WASHINGTON (AP) — It was barely three weeks ago that Donald Trump opened the first presidential debate by asking, with faux deference, if it was OK to refer to his opponent as "Secretary Clinton."

By Round 2 he was back to calling Hillary Clinton "the devil." Since then, the Republican candidate's scorched-earth campaign tactics have left all sides wondering just how low things will go in the third and final presidential debate, coming up Wednesday night.

For her part, Clinton steps up as a flood of hacked emails provides an unprecedented real-time look into the machinations of a presidential campaign — hers. In the disclosed material, Clinton is shown taking positions in paid, private speeches at odds with some of her public pronouncements. And she is revealed as resistant to advice by aides to apologize for her email practices and clear the air. That's all fodder for the debate.

Trump, never known for self-censorship, has pronounced himself "unshackled" at last in the final weeks of the campaign. That has people wondering what Trump possibly has left to unleash.

Moderator Chris Wallace of Fox News will have new information about both candidates to delve into during this debate. For Trump, there is the drip-drip drama of women who have come forward to allege that he went after them with unwanted sexual advances. For Clinton, there is the drip-drip of WikiLeaks.

Some things to watch for in Wednesday's 90-minute faceoff at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas: