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[ {"id":"50772918-bd56-11e6-99bb-db70be03df9a","type":"article","starttime":"1481230800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-08T14:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481231784","priority":30,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Man seriously injured in Vail crash involving Sahuarita police officer","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_50772918-bd56-11e6-99bb-db70be03df9a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/man-seriously-injured-in-vail-crash-involving-sahuarita-police-officer/article_50772918-bd56-11e6-99bb-db70be03df9a.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/man-seriously-injured-in-vail-crash-involving-sahuarita-police-officer/article_50772918-bd56-11e6-99bb-db70be03df9a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":3,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":1},"byline":"Caitlin Schmidt\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Camino Loma Alta, near Old Spanish Trail, is closed in both directions.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"29162164-bd8b-11e6-8b94-f7d545c54b9f","description":"A 75-year-old man suffered serious injuries when his car drifted into oncoming traffic Thursday morning, crashing head-on with a Sahuarita Police Lieutenant's vehicle.","byline":"Courtesy of Pima County Sheriff's Department","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"504","height":"426","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/91/29162164-bd8b-11e6-8b94-f7d545c54b9f/5849cd9085d2c.image.jpg?resize=504%2C426"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"85","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/91/29162164-bd8b-11e6-8b94-f7d545c54b9f/5849cd9085d2c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C85"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"254","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/91/29162164-bd8b-11e6-8b94-f7d545c54b9f/5849cd9085d2c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C254"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"866","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/91/29162164-bd8b-11e6-8b94-f7d545c54b9f/5849cd9085d2c.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"50772918-bd56-11e6-99bb-db70be03df9a","body":"

A 75-year-old man seriously injured this morning, after his car crashed head-on into a Sahuarita police officer's vehicle, authorities said.

Pima County Sheriff's deputies received the call about the crash at about 6:30 a.m., in the area of East Old Spanish Trail and South Camino Loma Alta, said Deputy Cody Gress, a department spokesman.

When deputies arrived, they found two cars with extensive damage blocking traffic on Camino Loma Alta, Gress said.

Sahuarita Police Lieutenant Matthew McGlone was driving northbound on Camino Loma Alta in his marked vehicle, when a copper-colored Scion hatchback headed southbound drifted across the center lane and struck the officer's car.

McGlone was taken to the hospital with minor injuries and is expected to be fine, Gress said.

The condition of the other driver, identified as Anthony Zangara, is currently unknown.

Both men were wearing their seatbelts at the time of the crash, Gress said.

Sheriff's department traffic investigators are still looking into what caused Mr. Zangara to veer into oncoming traffic.

"}, {"id":"eca78ebc-f3d0-5e3d-aad8-c1ca0d0b17f0","type":"article","starttime":"1481222700","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-08T11:45:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481225836","priority":30,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"tucson":"business/tucson"},{"dining":"entertainment/dining"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"New foothills eatery serves Hawaiian, Pan-Asian food","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_eca78ebc-f3d0-5e3d-aad8-c1ca0d0b17f0.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/new-foothills-eatery-serves-hawaiian-pan-asian-food/article_eca78ebc-f3d0-5e3d-aad8-c1ca0d0b17f0.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/new-foothills-eatery-serves-hawaiian-pan-asian-food/article_eca78ebc-f3d0-5e3d-aad8-c1ca0d0b17f0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Kristen Cook Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Island Plate Lunch will holds its grand opening Saturday, Dec. 10","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["tucson dining","tucson restaurants","island plate lunch"],"internalKeywords":["#news","#dining","#latest","#top5biz"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"c26b9824-a431-52d5-afd4-b5dc22f10fb5","description":"Island Plate Lunch's poke bowl is not to be missed, says chef-owner Renee Eder.\u00a0","byline":"Courtesy of Island Plate Lunch","hireswidth":1666,"hiresheight":1244,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/26/c26b9824-a431-52d5-afd4-b5dc22f10fb5/58497fc5c3616.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"463","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/26/c26b9824-a431-52d5-afd4-b5dc22f10fb5/58497fc5c2789.image.jpg?resize=620%2C463"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/26/c26b9824-a431-52d5-afd4-b5dc22f10fb5/58497fc5c2789.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"224","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/26/c26b9824-a431-52d5-afd4-b5dc22f10fb5/58497fc5c2789.image.jpg?resize=300%2C224"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"765","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/26/c26b9824-a431-52d5-afd4-b5dc22f10fb5/58497fc5c2789.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C765"}}},{"id":"1cbc9589-15b4-5a77-95dc-129fb3bc446a","description":"The Teri Beef Plate is one of the Hawaiian-Pan Asian specialties served at Island Plate Lunch.\u00a0","byline":"Courtesy of Island Plate Lunch","hireswidth":1666,"hiresheight":1244,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cb/1cbc9589-15b4-5a77-95dc-129fb3bc446a/584980036c69e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"463","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cb/1cbc9589-15b4-5a77-95dc-129fb3bc446a/584980036b73e.image.jpg?resize=620%2C463"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cb/1cbc9589-15b4-5a77-95dc-129fb3bc446a/584980036b73e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"224","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cb/1cbc9589-15b4-5a77-95dc-129fb3bc446a/584980036b73e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C224"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"765","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cb/1cbc9589-15b4-5a77-95dc-129fb3bc446a/584980036b73e.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C765"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"eca78ebc-f3d0-5e3d-aad8-c1ca0d0b17f0","body":"

Every week day, Chef Renee Eder would go to school with her grandma who worked in the cafeteria. When her grandma took her home in the afternoon, Eder would climb onto a stool alongside her to help cook the family meal.

Eder doesn\u2019t need the stool any more, but she\u2019s still cooking. Her new venture \u2014 with her husband of 23 years, Justin \u2014 is Island Plate Lunch, which holds its grand opening Saturday, Dec. 10.

The casual eatery, at the intersection of River and Craycroft roads near Whole Foods, serves up Hawaiian and Pan-Asian specialties, the kind the Eders ate as kids.

Both grew up in Hawaii \u2014 Renee in downtown Honolulu and Justin on Kauai \u2014 and Renee studied at Le Cordon Bleu in Las Vegas, going on to work in different restaurants as well as Michel Richard\u2019s Central. The French-born chef took Renee under his wing, but when the Eders decided to open their own place it wasn\u2019t classical French cuisine they felt drawn to but that taste of home, the quintessential Hawaiian plate lunch.

The Eders \u2014 who relocated to Tucson two years ago to be near their kids studying at the University of Arizona\u2019s medical school \u2014 have created a small, casual, well-lit space that serves up breakfast, lunch and dinner. Diners can start off the day with taro pancakes or Spam with eggs and rice.

Many of the products \u2014 check out the sweet Maui onion-flavored Hawaiian Kettle style potato chips by the register \u2014 are imported from the islands, Renee said.

Of course you\u2019ll find Kalua pork and loco moco on the lunch and dinner menu, but Island Plate Lunch also offers a poke bowl, which \u2014 Renee said \u2014 is not to be missed, along with Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches, all built around pork belly.

\u201cI love pork belly,\u201d Renee said.

She\u2019s even got a PB and J pork belly banh mi on the menu.

\u201cIt\u2019s kind of unusual,\u201d she said, \u201cbut I\u2019m not normal.\u201d

One thing you must know if you\u2019re headed to Island Plate Lunch: Be ready to eat. The portions are mighty.

\u201cWe\u2019re from Hawaii,\u201d Justin said, smiling. \u201cWe like to eat.\u201d

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A former faculty senator at Pima Community College will receive nearly $150,000 in an out of court settlement after a federal judge found his civil rights were violated by the school's CEO.

David A. Katz will receive $100,000 in compensatory damages and $49,815 for lost pay in the wake of the finding that Chancellor Lee Lambert denied due process to the chemistry instructor who was let go in 2014.

Katz will not, however, get back his old job, which paid $65,000 a year and which he has said he hoped to resume.

Neither side would comment on the settlement, which includes a gag order on all parties and an agreement to not make \"disparaging, denigrating or defamatory comments,\" about each other.

The deal was signed Nov. 21 by Lambert and PCC Governing Board chairman Mark Hanna. The Arizona Daily Star received a copy in response to a public records request.

The defendants, including Lambert, two former subordinates and the college district as a whole, denied wrongdoing as part of the settlement.

But a pretrial ruling in July by U.S. District Court Judge Cindy K. Jorgenson found Lambert violated Katz's constitutional right to due process when the instructor was suspended, and later let go without being given an opportunity to defend himself.\u00a0

The Fourteenth Amendment provides extensive due-process protections to state employees, including the right to an impartial hearing, the right to details of alleged wrongdoing and the right to refute allegations before disciplinary action occurs.

PCC didn\u2019t follow any of those practices in the Katz case, said Jorgenson, who declined to rule out the possibility that Lambert could be held personally liable for damages if the matter went to trial.

Katz's lawsuit made several other claims the judge rejected, such as a claim that his free-speech rights were violated when he was disciplined after complaining about laboratory conditions at the college's west campus.

PCC portrayed Katz in court records as a problem employee prone to angry outbursts, a characterization disputed by some current and former college personnel.

The settlement agreement calls for the parties to bear their own court costs.

Katz's damage award will be covered by PCC's insurer, the Arizona School Risk Retention Trust.

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Anyone who lives here knows that there's no shortage of things to do in Tucson. Nonetheless, a national publication has narrowed it down to the 11 best, and some of the entries are no surprise.

U.S. News & World Report, an 80-year-old news and information magazine-turned-website that's known for its rankings of colleges, jobs, cars and other items requiring big decisions, also ranks travel and leisure these days.

How do they decide?

\"For any given destination, U.S. News' top things to do are selected based on our editors' analysis of what major travel publications recommend you do and see and a sampling of the opinions real travelers have expressed across the Web,\" according to the site.

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is at the top of the list and Gaslight Theatre is at the bottom (but that's still good, since it's such a short list.)

We won't give away that nine other entries are, but here's a hint: Most of them involve the great outdoors!

Check out the rankings here and tell us in the comments what you think. Are these really the best things to do?

"}, {"id":"1ad7af2c-bd50-11e6-abfa-5f9173218352","type":"article","starttime":"1481208300","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-08T07:45:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481209380","priority":30,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Man injured, two dogs saved from northside Tucson apartment fire","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_1ad7af2c-bd50-11e6-abfa-5f9173218352.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/man-injured-two-dogs-saved-from-northside-tucson-apartment-fire/article_1ad7af2c-bd50-11e6-abfa-5f9173218352.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/man-injured-two-dogs-saved-from-northside-tucson-apartment-fire/article_1ad7af2c-bd50-11e6-abfa-5f9173218352.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":2,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":1,"gallery":0},"byline":"Caitlin Schmidt\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Fire started after man turned on oven, igniting vapors from a leaking gasoline can.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"bb5c09b4-bd52-11e6-bbb5-ff606920ee88","description":"The staff at Southern Arizona Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center volunteered to care for two dogs rescued from fire at an apartment complex across the street.","byline":"Courtesy of Tucson Fire Department","hireswidth":960,"hiresheight":1210,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b5/bb5c09b4-bd52-11e6-bbb5-ff606920ee88/58496edc6a8b2.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"492","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b5/bb5c09b4-bd52-11e6-bbb5-ff606920ee88/58496edc689af.image.jpg?resize=492%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"126","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b5/bb5c09b4-bd52-11e6-bbb5-ff606920ee88/58496edc689af.image.jpg?resize=100%2C126"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"378","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b5/bb5c09b4-bd52-11e6-bbb5-ff606920ee88/58496edc689af.image.jpg?resize=300%2C378"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1291","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b5/bb5c09b4-bd52-11e6-bbb5-ff606920ee88/58496edc689af.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"154b3a6c-bd53-11e6-945a-df4879672115","description":"The kitchen of a north side apartment was destroyed in a fire, after gasoline vapors from a leaking can ignited when the resident turned on his oven.","byline":"Courtesy of Tucson Fire Department","hireswidth":1280,"hiresheight":960,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/54/154b3a6c-bd53-11e6-945a-df4879672115/58496f4c5adf7.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/54/154b3a6c-bd53-11e6-945a-df4879672115/58496f4c5960c.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/54/154b3a6c-bd53-11e6-945a-df4879672115/58496f4c5960c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/54/154b3a6c-bd53-11e6-945a-df4879672115/58496f4c5960c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/54/154b3a6c-bd53-11e6-945a-df4879672115/58496f4c5960c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}}],"youtube":[{"id":"1ecbb1b6-5cd4-5d77-bb78-bccaccf75b18","starttime":"1479480300","starttime_iso8601":"2016-11-18T07:45:00-07:00","title":"Watch: Aftermath of mobile home fire on Tucson's north side","description":"A 62-year old man and his dog are being assisted by the Red Cross, after their north side mobile home fire was completely destroyed in a Thursday night blaze. At about 11:45, Tucson fire crews responded to reports of heavy smoke and flames coming from a mobile home in the 4300 block of North Wegner Lane, near West Auto Mall Drive and West Wetmore Road, said Barret Baker, a Tucson Fire Department spokesman.","byline":"","video_id":"44EazXypD6o"}],"revision":2,"commentID":"1ad7af2c-bd50-11e6-abfa-5f9173218352","body":"

A man was sent to the hospital and his two dogs rescued, after a fire broke out in his apartment on Tucson's north side.

Fire crews arrived at the scene, in the 200 block of East Ft. Lowell Road, at about 4:45 p.m., after receiving a 911 call about a gasoline fire, said Capt. Barrett Baker, a Tucson Fire Department spokesman.

The resident, a man in his 60s, met firefighters at the front door, but told them that his dogs were still trapped inside. Several crews entered the apartment, and the dogs were quickly found and taken outside.

Southern Arizona Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center, which is located across the street from the apartment, volunteered to help the dogs, and the resident taken to the hospital with smoke inhalation and singeing of his facial hair, Baker said.

It took nine units and 23 firefighters 12 minutes to extinguish the fire, which consumed the apartment's entire kitchen.

Fire investigators have learned that the man was storing gasoline cans inside the apartment, one of which was leaking. When he turned on his stove for heating purposes, the gas vapors ignited, burning him and starting the kitchen fire, Baker said.

A damage estimate has yet to be determined.

"}, {"id":"efdfd07a-bd4e-11e6-9cd6-3fc4775153ae","type":"article","starttime":"1481206500","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-08T07:15:00-07:00","priority":30,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tucson weather: Warmer temps arrive for the weekend","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_efdfd07a-bd4e-11e6-9cd6-3fc4775153ae.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-weather-warmer-temps-arrive-for-the-weekend/article_efdfd07a-bd4e-11e6-9cd6-3fc4775153ae.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-weather-warmer-temps-arrive-for-the-weekend/article_efdfd07a-bd4e-11e6-9cd6-3fc4775153ae.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":1,"gallery":1},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"\u00a0Clear, sunny skies and warmer temps expected to run into next week.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#weather","#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"b559f6f7-2fd0-5199-9a46-50561647b29c","description":"Colorful fairy duster blooms brighten the desert in Tucson Mountain Park west of the city. Photo taken February 14, 2014, by Doug Kreutz, Arizona Daily Star. -- Credit: Doug Kreutz","byline":"Doug Kreutz","hireswidth":3648,"hiresheight":2736,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/55/b559f6f7-2fd0-5199-9a46-50561647b29c/53015ab4d7849.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/55/b559f6f7-2fd0-5199-9a46-50561647b29c/53015ab4d9044.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/55/b559f6f7-2fd0-5199-9a46-50561647b29c/53015ab5481d3.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/55/b559f6f7-2fd0-5199-9a46-50561647b29c/53015ab548ca2.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/55/b559f6f7-2fd0-5199-9a46-50561647b29c/53015ab521367.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"youtube":[{"id":"c3abdee2-1342-5b46-93cc-1729285845df","starttime":"1464821100","starttime_iso8601":"2016-06-01T15:45:00-07:00","title":"Saguarohenge: Only in Tucson","description":"The Brits have Stonehenge and we have, well, Saguarohenge. Find the unusual planting at Pima Prickly Park, 3500 W. River Road. Video by Doug Kreutz, Arizona Daily Star.","byline":"","video_id":"8FIlwp8orpk"}],"revision":2,"commentID":"efdfd07a-bd4e-11e6-9cd6-3fc4775153ae","body":"

Sunny skies return to town, with high temperatures running right about normal today.

That won't last, as temps climb back up to warmer than average this weekend into next week.

High: 70

Low: 44

\n\n\n\n

Currently

\n\n
\n\n\n
\n
Clear, 41.9
\n
Wind 0 MPH East, 82% humidity
\n
UV index 0, visibility 10.0 miles
\n
No precipitation today
\n
No lightning strikes today
\n
\n
"}, {"id":"e4402a67-1c75-571c-bc7c-a09f6b59e1c6","type":"article","starttime":"1481165880","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T19:58:00-07:00","sections":[{"deaths":"news/local/obituaries/deaths"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Deaths in Southern Arizona","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/obituaries/deaths/article_e4402a67-1c75-571c-bc7c-a09f6b59e1c6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/obituaries/deaths/deaths-in-southern-arizona/article_e4402a67-1c75-571c-bc7c-a09f6b59e1c6.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/obituaries/deaths/deaths-in-southern-arizona/article_e4402a67-1c75-571c-bc7c-a09f6b59e1c6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Barbara Poole Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"The deceased are from Tucson unless otherwise noted.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"516","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/5e/f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95/57f2fdff9031d.image.jpg?resize=620%2C516"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"83","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/5e/f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95/53d6b4c71b224.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"250","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/5e/f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95/53d6b4c71b9c8.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"852","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/5e/f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95/53d6b4c6efdb1.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"e4402a67-1c75-571c-bc7c-a09f6b59e1c6","body":"

The deceased are from Tucson unless otherwise noted.

Baeverlen, Monica, 49, general laborer, Nov. 15, Adair Dodge.

Cannon, Billy, 84, minister, Oracle, Dec. 5, Adair Avalon.

Capin, Stanley L., 82, salesman, Dec. 1, Adair Dodge.

Clark, Elliot M., 33, manager, Nov. 24, Adair Dodge.

Coins, Sarah B., 86, management, Dec. 4, Adair Dodge.

Downey, Barbara E., 86, secretary, Canon City, CO, Nov. 22, Adair Dodge.

Fauntleroy, Diane, 71, clerk, Dec. 4, Desert Rose Heather.

Fugitt, Honorine E., 91, secretary, Dec. 2, Adair Dodge.

Goetz, Rita, 89, nurse, Dec. 5, Adair Avalon.

Goyer, Judith J., 72, journalist, Dec. 2, Adair Dodge.

Johnson Jr., Frank R., 60, auto dealer, Nov. 19, Adair Dodge.

Lynn, Robert E., 84, supervisor, Dec. 3, Desert Rose Heather.

Martin, Robert C., 54, electrician, Nov. 23, Angel Valley.

Moreno, Hector, 81, radiology, Dec. 2, Adair Dodge.

Roberts, Garland, 86, machinist, Dec. 2, Adair Dodge.

Shaw, Jennifer, 75, business owner, Nov. 28, Adair Dodge.

Sweet, David R., 77, manager, Dec. 2, Adair Dodge.

Thompson, Sarah M., 27, housekeeper, Nov. 14, Adair Dodge.

"}, {"id":"53c50cf8-9664-5dcd-b276-1b50c77b8787","type":"article","starttime":"1481163780","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T19:23:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481172604","priority":44,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"environment":"news/science/environment"}],"application":"editorial","title":"New jaguar roams Southern Arizona, photo indicates","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_53c50cf8-9664-5dcd-b276-1b50c77b8787.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/new-jaguar-roams-southern-arizona-photo-indicates/article_53c50cf8-9664-5dcd-b276-1b50c77b8787.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/new-jaguar-roams-southern-arizona-photo-indicates/article_53c50cf8-9664-5dcd-b276-1b50c77b8787.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Tony Davis\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"It's the first confirmed jaguar sighting ever at Fort Huachuca.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#top5","#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"1e8537e2-859a-505c-8a94-bb97827f3a63","description":"A photo of a jaguar in the Huachuca Mountains apparently went public first on a Boy Scouts Facebook page.","byline":"Courtesy of Arizona Game and Fish Department","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"264","height":"187","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/e8/1e8537e2-859a-505c-8a94-bb97827f3a63/5848bb9896509.image.jpg?resize=264%2C187"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/e8/1e8537e2-859a-505c-8a94-bb97827f3a63/5848bb9896509.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"213","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/e8/1e8537e2-859a-505c-8a94-bb97827f3a63/5848bb9896509.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"725","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/e8/1e8537e2-859a-505c-8a94-bb97827f3a63/5848bb9896509.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"53c50cf8-9664-5dcd-b276-1b50c77b8787","body":"

A male jaguar \u2014 likely the sixth documented in the Southwest since 1996 \u2014 was photographed last week on Fort Huachuca, authorities said Wednesday.

The jaguar is believed to be separate from the male jaguar known as \u201cEl Jefe,\u201d who was photographed from 2012 to 2015 in the Santa Rita Mountains, authorities said. It was the first confirmed jaguar sighting ever at Fort Huachuca, said Angie Camara, a Fort Huachuca spokeswoman.

This jaguar, photographed in the evening on Dec. 1, appeared to weigh about 150 to 200 pounds, compared to more than 200 pounds for more mature adults, said Mark Hart, an Arizona Game and Fish Department spokesman. The jaguar that roamed the Santa Ritas weighed about 210 pounds, he said.

The discovery adds fuel to the longstanding dispute between environmentalists and state game officials over whether Arizona has a viable jaguar population worth protecting, or whether the jaguars seen represent only a fringe population with little or no biological significance.

The latest sighting shows \u201cthat these cats will continue returning to the United States and will survive here as long as we protect the habitat they need,\u201d said Randy Serraglio, a conservation advocate for the Center for Biological Diversity.

This jaguar\u2019s presence in Arizona shows that males are starting to re-establish themselves here, since only one confirmed jaguar sighting occurred from 1976 to 1996, said Rob Peters, Defenders of Wildlife\u2019s senior Southwest representative.

\u201cI\u2019m convinced after looking at data and talking to different jaguar experts that there was originally a population that straddled the border and clearly included reproduction in the U.S.,\u201d Peters said.

But Game and Fish spokesman Hart said, \u201cWe continue to hold that we are on the northern periphery of their range, and that the primary reason is that there have been no credible sightings of females here since the 1940s.\u201d

Jim deVos, an assistant Game and Fish director, has said that the number of jaguars documented here in the past century is too small for Arizona to be an important factor in regional jaguar conservation. Jaguars are much more common in Mexico, although the species is also listed as endangered there.

\u201cThe jaguars are a unique component of Arizona\u2019s wildlife, but when you look at the species as a whole, I\u2019m hard-pressed to say we play a significant role given the lack of animals in the past 50 years or 100 years,\u201d deVos told the Star last spring.

The new photo was taken by a trail camera managed by fort officials. Both they and Game and Fish declined to be specific about where on the 73,000-acre Army fort the photo was taken. Fort spokeswoman Camara would say only that it was found \u201cin the heart of the Huachuca Mountains,\u201d amidst the steep, rocky, heavily forested terrain that is characteristic of that Southern Arizona range near Sierra Vista.

The photo apparently was first made public Tuesday afternoon by the Cochise County District of the Boy Scouts of America, on its Facebook page.

Cochise Boy Scout officials didn\u2019t respond to questions about how they got the photo. One referred a reporter to Fort Huachuca\u2019s Facebook page for details on the jaguar. Camara said she doesn\u2019t know how the scouts got it. Game and Fish and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which manages endangered species, then put out a news release on the jaguar mid-morning Wednesday.

Hart said the game department got its first look at a jaguar photo from the Huachucas on Monday. It issued the news release shortly after the Star contacted the agency about the photo Wednesday morning. Hart said the agency had been working on an announcement since the previous day.

Environmentalists, fort officials and game and wildlife officials were all thrilled by the discovery. The last confirmed jaguar sighting in Arizona occurred in September 2015, when the final round of photos and video footage of \u201cEl Jefe\u201d was taken by remote cameras in the Santa Ritas. That jaguar was first photographed in November 2011 in Southern Arizona\u2019s Whetstone Mountains before moving to the Santa Ritas, southeast of Tucson.

\u201cIt\u2019s exciting, but right now our first priority is making sure the jaguar is safe and our folks here are safe as well,\u201d Camara said. \u201cWe want to make sure we are not doing anything that would put the animal or our personnel at risk.\u201d

Hart said Game and Fish wants to ensure the welfare of the jaguar and the general public. The agency doesn\u2019t want people to go up into the mountains to look for the jaguar and wants to avoid illegal \u201ctake\u201d of an endangered species. Under federal law, take means killing, harming or harassment of an endangered animal, and Hart said pursuing or stalking the animal would also be illegal.

\u201cWe don\u2019t want people going up there other than those who routinely use that area,\u201d he said. \u201cWe don\u2019t want to disturb the natural movement of the jaguar. It\u2019s a dangerous cat, larger than a mountain lion.\u201d

The jaguar photo on the Boy Scouts\u2019 Facebook page drew more than 100 comments, most expressing happiness and concern for the animal\u2019s welfare. It was shared by 2,200 people.

Jennifer Setzler, whose Facebook page didn\u2019t say where she lives, posted, \u201cBeautiful. Please don\u2019t go looking for it and get it shot.\u201d

Chris Evans of Toronto posted, \u201cHopefully there is a breeding pair, repopulating the Southwest.\u201d

Ruth Cullen Hall of Bozeman, Montana, posted, \u201cLet it be. Too many people would like to shoot one.\u201d

But Jennifer Jones, a Sierra Vista resident, was less thrilled about the discovery, making an apparent reference to Endangered Species Act restrictions when she posted, \u201cJust so you all know, if another one shows up that\u2019s the end of Ft. Huachuca and everyone\u2019s job.\u201d

"}, {"id":"2cd0ad14-7b23-5cbe-b3d5-d748820e849a","type":"article","starttime":"1481163780","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T19:23:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481210085","priority":30,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"environment":"news/science/environment"},{"tucson":"business/tucson"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Assess Vigneto comprehensively, wildlife service tells Army Corps","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_2cd0ad14-7b23-5cbe-b3d5-d748820e849a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/assess-vigneto-comprehensively-wildlife-service-tells-army-corps/article_2cd0ad14-7b23-5cbe-b3d5-d748820e849a.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/assess-vigneto-comprehensively-wildlife-service-tells-army-corps/article_2cd0ad14-7b23-5cbe-b3d5-d748820e849a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Emily Bregel Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Environmentalists say the wildlife service's letter is a victory for threatened wildlife in the San Pedro Valley.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["villages at vigneto","benson","u.s. fish and wildlife service","tucson audubon society","earthjustice","army corps of engineers","el dorado holdings inc."],"internalKeywords":["#toptwo","#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"f8b41c38-5fc7-5d97-b479-d2e3cea4e71a","description":"The proposed future home of the 28,000-home Villages at Vigneto, along Arizona 90 south of Interstate 10.","byline":"Ron Medvescek / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1861,"hiresheight":1114,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/8b/f8b41c38-5fc7-5d97-b479-d2e3cea4e71a/5848a77950e0e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"371","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/8b/f8b41c38-5fc7-5d97-b479-d2e3cea4e71a/5848a7794feaf.image.jpg?resize=620%2C371"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"60","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/8b/f8b41c38-5fc7-5d97-b479-d2e3cea4e71a/5848a7794feaf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C60"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"180","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/8b/f8b41c38-5fc7-5d97-b479-d2e3cea4e71a/5848a7794feaf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C180"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"613","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/8b/f8b41c38-5fc7-5d97-b479-d2e3cea4e71a/5848a7794feaf.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C613"}}}],"revision":12,"commentID":"2cd0ad14-7b23-5cbe-b3d5-d748820e849a","body":"

Federal wildlife officials are pushing back against the Army Corps of Engineers\u2019 determination that restoration work related to a 28,000-home development in Benson is unlikely to affect protected species.

In an Oct. 14 letter to the Corps, obtained by the Star this week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service disagreed with the Corps\u2019 conclusion about unlikely environmental impacts, which was based on a biological evaluation of a \u201cmitigation parcel\u201d outside the bounds of the Villages at Vigneto development.

But the wildlife service also emphasized that it would not move forward in consulting with the Corps about the mitigation parcel unless the entire 12,300-acre Vigneto development was included in the discussion.

The mitigation parcel is part of developers\u2019 plan to offset unavoidable impacts at the Vigneto site. The off-site 144-acre parcel will undergo restoration such as weed removal, planting of native species and erosion control.

In its letter, the wildlife service said the mitigation parcel and the development itself are \u201cinterrelated actions\u201d that must be evaluated together.

That\u2019s a crucial point for environmentalists who have long argued the Corps should evaluate the proposed master planned community as a whole, rather than in a piecemeal way that could understate the project\u2019s effects on critical habitats and protected species that rely on them in the San Pedro Valley.

\u201cThe Corps really chooses to define their purview as narrowly as they possibly can,\u201d said Karen Fogas, executive director of the Tucson Audubon Society. The wildlife service is pushing the Corps to recognize that, for threatened species, survival depends on looking at the environment holistically, she said.

\u201cWe\u2019re really delighted the Fish and Wildlife Service landed on the same conclusions that we were putting forth, and they have done that in a very comprehensive way,\u201d Fogas said. \u201cThis is a win for wildlife.\u201d

A spokesman for Vigneto developer El Dorado Holdings Inc. in Phoenix did not respond to requests for comment Wednesday.

The Audubon Society is among six environmental groups that filed a lawsuit in May arguing the Corps would be violating the Endangered Species Act if it failed to consult with the wildlife service about a project that could harm threatened species.

The ball is now in the Army Corps\u2019 court, said Chris Eaton, attorney with Earthjustice, the environmental law firm that filed the suit.

The wildlife service cannot force the Army Corps to comply with its request to consult on the entire Vigneto project but if the Corps doesn\u2019t comply, environmentalists can use the Corps\u2019 decision to bolster their argument that the Corps is in violation of the Endangered Species Act, he said.

Corps spokesman Dave Palmer did not respond to requests for comment on Wednesday.

Benson City Councilman Jeff Cook said he \u201ccompletely agrees\u201d with the wildlife service\u2019s request for a more comprehensive review. Wells around the region are already starting to dry up, and Cook said he wants a realistic picture of how Vigneto will affect the underground aquifer that feeds Benson\u2019s wells.

\u201cI feel that the city rushed through the development agreement and the approval of the final master plan (for Vigneto) without taking into consideration the impacts it\u2019s going to have on our entire community,\u201d he said. \u201cI think the Army Corps and Fish and Wildlife are looking into it in-depth, the way we should have.\u201d

In July, the Benson City Council voted unanimously to approve the final plan for Vigneto, which includes retail and office space, parks, community trails, schools, medical facilities, vineyards and a golf course.

PERMIT REVOKED

Days after the City Council\u2019s approval, the Corps revoked a crucial permit for Vigneto, in a victory for environmentalists who had argued that the decade-old Clean Water Act permit was no longer relevant. The permit was originally approved for a smaller, canceled project called Whetstone Ranch. In 2014, Whetstone\u2019s developers transferred their permit to Vigneto\u2019s developers, El Dorado Holdings.

But the 12,300-acre Vigneto footprint is 4,000 acres bigger than Whetstone\u2019s. Developers had argued the additional acreage could obtain permits separately.

Critics of Vigneto said the permit suspension was an important step toward initiating consultation between the Army Corps and the Fish and Wildlife Service \u2014 but the scope of that consultation remains to be seen. Consultation could take just a few months or much longer if the scope is extensive.

Developers said in July they hoped to break ground by next summer.

In its recent letter, the wildlife service said it would not initiate consultation until the Corps did a full biological assessment of the entire development \u2014 not just the originally permitted 8,200 acres \u2014 and the mitigation parcel, including analysis of direct and indirect effects.

That includes considering the impact of Vigneto\u2019s groundwater pumping, the letter said.

\u201cSuch a displacement of groundwater from the aquifer is likely to reduce flow in the San Pedro River, in reaches designated as critical habitat for the Southwestern willow flycatcher and proposed as critical habitat for the yellow-billed cuckoo and Mexican gartersnake,\u201d the letter said.

Environmental groups suing the Corps also want consultation to include the jaguar, ocelot and lesser long-nosed bat.

\u201cWe hope the Corps is paying attention, and we hope for a response from them sooner rather than later,\u201d Fogas said.

"}, {"id":"55d78ec7-b583-5ffb-9c0e-f9a6514cf19a","type":"article","starttime":"1481162880","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T19:08:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481172783","priority":42,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Shooting closure along Redington Road is extended, modified","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_55d78ec7-b583-5ffb-9c0e-f9a6514cf19a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/shooting-closure-along-redington-road-is-extended-modified/article_55d78ec7-b583-5ffb-9c0e-f9a6514cf19a.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/shooting-closure-along-redington-road-is-extended-modified/article_55d78ec7-b583-5ffb-9c0e-f9a6514cf19a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Doug Kreutz Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Target practice is now permitted east of the 6.3-mile point.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["recreational shooting","redington road","coronado national forest","shooting debris","forest service"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"f01971bf-8c24-531d-8c01-77df38093f7c","description":"Hundreds of spent shotgun shells littered the ground at one of the wildcat shooting sites in January 2013.","byline":"Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star 2013","hireswidth":1200,"hiresheight":804,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/01/f01971bf-8c24-531d-8c01-77df38093f7c/58487f243aef4.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"415","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/01/f01971bf-8c24-531d-8c01-77df38093f7c/58487f243a0db.image.jpg?resize=620%2C415"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/01/f01971bf-8c24-531d-8c01-77df38093f7c/58487f243a0db.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/01/f01971bf-8c24-531d-8c01-77df38093f7c/58487f243a0db.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"686","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/01/f01971bf-8c24-531d-8c01-77df38093f7c/58487f243a0db.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C686"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"55d78ec7-b583-5ffb-9c0e-f9a6514cf19a","body":"

A recreational shooting closure on some of the Coronado National Forest land along Redington Road east of Tucson has been extended \u2014 but shooting now will be permitted in a previously closed area east of the 6.3-mile point on the road.

The original closure, which prohibited shooting between the 5- and 7-mile points on the road, was put in place in January 2013 because shooters had trashed the area with shooting debris and bullet-riddled targets. Removal of shooting debris and a risk assessment pertaining to lead concentrations in the soil were carried out during the closure.

\u201cExtending the closure will allow the area to continue to recover \u2014 improving vegetative growth, forage and cover for wildlife,\u201d said Heidi Schewel, spokeswoman for the Coronado National Forest.

The closure extension will remain in effect until Sept. 30, 2018, or until rescinded. It prohibits shooting within 0.6 of a mile on either side of the road from the western boundary of the national forest along Redington Road to the 6.3-mile point on the road.

\u201cResponsible recreational shooting is allowed above mile marker 6.3 to move some of the shooting activity occurring farther up into Redington Pass to a more manageable location, and to provide a more accessible location for recreational shooters,\u201d Schewel said.

Violation of the closure is punishable by a fine of not more than $5,000 for individuals and $10,000 for organizations, imprisonment for not more than six months, or both.

Exemptions to the closure include persons with a Forest Service permit specifically authorizing the otherwise prohibited act, or any person possessing a valid Arizona hunting license lawfully involved in hunting and harvesting game. Also exempt are federal, state and local officers or members of an organized rescue or firefighting force performing an official duty.

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When Cassandra Yates was gunned down on Nov. 20, her husband, who\u2019s been charged with her killing, was freshly out of jail on a prohibited firearms charge.

A convicted felon with a history of domestic violence, 22-year-old King Yates had been arrested on Nov. 7, after police discovered him with a gun, court records show.

King was subsequently released from the Pima County Jail with no bond, pending a Jan. 3 hearing, according to Tucson City and Pima County Superior Court records.

Less than three weeks after his release, 24-year-old Cassandra died when her husband allegedly shot and killed her at a neighbor\u2019s apartment.

Before police arrived, King walked away from the apartment, police said.

Paramedic crews tried to save Cassandra, but she died shortly after.

The next morning, police located King while responding to a suspicious activity call after neighbors heard breaking glass at a residence only miles away from the scene of his wife\u2019s murder, according to police.

King was found asleep inside a bedroom and arrested without incident.

On Dec. 1, he was indicted on charges of second-degree murder, criminal trespass and prohibited possession of a firearm, court documents show.

But these court cases aren\u2019t Yates\u2019 first.

In 2012, a woman who Yates had a relationship with filed a restraining order with Pima County Superior Court.

That same year, he was convicted on a felony drug charge and ended up violating his probation, which landed him in prison from June to November 2013. While in custody, he had a number of disciplinary infractions, including disorderly conduct and harassment, according to Arizona Department of Corrections records.

In January 2014, Yates was arrested on a misdemeanor domestic violence assault charge and pleaded guilty, paying a $378 fine, according to city court records.

He and Cassandra married in September 2014 and two months later, Yates was charged with nine felonies related to drug possession and sales, weapons violations and prohibited possession, but was never convicted. The court ended up dismissing five of the charges and he was acquitted on the other four, records show.

In March 2015, Yates was arrested again on domestic violence assault charges. City court records show that the case is still ongoing.

After his Nov. 7 arrest , the court\u2019s Pretrial Services recommended he stay in jail. The court overruled the decision, releasing him on his own recognizance.

Court records show that the presiding judge in both of Yates' cases is Sean E. Brearcliffe.

Yates is now being held on a $1 million bond pending a hearing Friday.

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A pedestrian who was seriously injured in an October car crash succumbed to his injuries and died last Friday, authorities said.

At 8 p.m. on Oct. 14, police responded to the a serious injury collision involving two pedestrians at the intersection of North Alvernon Way and East Flower Street, according to a Tucson Police Department news release.

The two male pedestrians were transported to Banner-University Medical Center with serious injuries, but the driver of the car that hit them wasn't hurt in the crash, the release said.

Through their investigation, police learned that the driver was traveling northbound on Alvernon in the curb lane, having just passed East Grant Road. As he drove north, he hit the pedestrians while they were crossing the road.

The two men weren't walking in or near the crosswalk, and speed and impairment aren't believed to be factors in the crash. The driver wasn't cited, the release said.

The pedestrian who died has been identified as 77-year-old Arthur Valenzuela Lopez. The other man has since been released from the hospital.

"}, {"id":"e4071112-9513-531d-87b4-d54165363cd7","type":"article","starttime":"1481145300","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T14:15:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481169427","priority":30,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/local/govt-and-politics"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Ray Carroll's going-out-of-office sale raises money for charity","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_e4071112-9513-531d-87b4-d54165363cd7.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/ray-carroll-s-going-out-of-office-sale-raises-money/article_e4071112-9513-531d-87b4-d54165363cd7.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/ray-carroll-s-going-out-of-office-sale-raises-money/article_e4071112-9513-531d-87b4-d54165363cd7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Murphy Woodhouse Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"The outgoing supervisor hoped to raise $3,000 for Casa de los Ni\u00f1os.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["casa de los ninos","ray carroll"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"8b377aeb-2fb2-5f22-acd5-36b0180ecdf8","description":"Outgoing Supervisor Ray Carroll holds up a preserved bug head that he found in Costa Rica years ago.","byline":"Murphy Woodhouse /Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1662,"hiresheight":1246,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b3/8b377aeb-2fb2-5f22-acd5-36b0180ecdf8/584864355897c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b3/8b377aeb-2fb2-5f22-acd5-36b0180ecdf8/5848643557c97.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b3/8b377aeb-2fb2-5f22-acd5-36b0180ecdf8/5848643557c97.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b3/8b377aeb-2fb2-5f22-acd5-36b0180ecdf8/5848643557c97.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b3/8b377aeb-2fb2-5f22-acd5-36b0180ecdf8/5848643557c97.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}},{"id":"277be9da-971e-5745-b315-f6ca5c828d4c","description":"Supervisor Ray Carroll\u2019s ties were going cheap, at just $2.","byline":"Murphy Woodhouse/Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1247,"hiresheight":1662,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/277be9da-971e-5745-b315-f6ca5c828d4c/58486434f0082.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"465","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/277be9da-971e-5745-b315-f6ca5c828d4c/58486434ef0c5.image.jpg?resize=465%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/277be9da-971e-5745-b315-f6ca5c828d4c/58486434ef0c5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/277be9da-971e-5745-b315-f6ca5c828d4c/58486434ef0c5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C400"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1365","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/277be9da-971e-5745-b315-f6ca5c828d4c/58486434ef0c5.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1365"}}},{"id":"ce511a15-99fd-5eba-86d4-473a4afe9e34","description":"Supervisor Ray Carroll holds a baseball signed by Ozzie Guillen, a former Chicago White Sox shortstop and manager. It and the other signed baseballs were $5.","byline":"Murphy Woodhouse/Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1662,"hiresheight":1246,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e5/ce511a15-99fd-5eba-86d4-473a4afe9e34/58486435ae95f.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e5/ce511a15-99fd-5eba-86d4-473a4afe9e34/58486435add49.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e5/ce511a15-99fd-5eba-86d4-473a4afe9e34/58486435add49.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e5/ce511a15-99fd-5eba-86d4-473a4afe9e34/58486435add49.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e5/ce511a15-99fd-5eba-86d4-473a4afe9e34/58486435add49.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}}],"revision":16,"commentID":"e4071112-9513-531d-87b4-d54165363cd7","body":"

At the top of the county Administration Building on Wednesday, people were picking through piles of old paintings, neckties, dog bowls, signed baseballs and countless other souvenirs accumulated over outgoing Ray Carroll\u2019s nearly 20 years on the board of supervisors.

There was even a preserved head from a bug Carroll found in Costa Rica years ago that, like everything else in the room, was priced to sell.

The one-day office sale, dubbed Pearl Harbor Wednesday by Carroll as a play on Black Friday, raised just more than $2,600 for Casa de Los Ni\u00f1os, which runs a local children\u2019s crisis shelter. Carroll worked for the organization in the late 1980s and said the sale was a \u201ctribute to the people who got me into public service.\u201d

Nicholas McLain, manager of the nonprofit\u2019s Tucson thrift store, said he appreciated the unique fundraiser, adding that it was \u201cthe first time I\u2019ve heard of an office sale.\u201d

One entire table was covered in dog products, which Carroll joked had been donated by his adopted Schnauzer Simon, who he added was \u201cmore popular.\u201d Among the water bowls and collars was a hot dog costume Simon had worn a time or two too many.

\u201cHe can\u2019t wear the same thing every year,\u201d Carroll said.

Among the many other knickknacks and curiosities was a signed poster of Sen. John McCain, a bust of George Washington, a leather vest that Carroll sported gamely, a copy of \u201cLake Wobegon Days\u201d signed by author Garrison Keillor and a jigsaw puzzle featuring St. Francis of Assisi preaching to a pack of dogs.

With their children out of the home, Carroll said he and his wife, Ann, simply didn\u2019t have room for the stuff in their home after \u201cdownsizing.\u201d

\u201cWe\u2019re empty-nesters,\u201d he added.

"}, {"id":"faf2ecf5-1f76-5c10-8189-78960af335f6","type":"article","starttime":"1481142600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T13:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481167225","priority":41,"sections":[{"education":"news/local/education"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Above-average class time unlikely to change for Amphi high schoolers","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/article_faf2ecf5-1f76-5c10-8189-78960af335f6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/above-average-class-time-unlikely-to-change-for-amphi-high/article_faf2ecf5-1f76-5c10-8189-78960af335f6.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/above-average-class-time-unlikely-to-change-for-amphi-high/article_faf2ecf5-1f76-5c10-8189-78960af335f6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Yoohyun Jung Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Amphitheater's three high schools spend more time in classrooms than their peers in the Tucson area.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["amphitheater school district","canyon del oro high school","amphitheater high school","instructional hours","ironwood ridge high school"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"76e5a268-ae6f-5bdc-a280-956f89985fe7","description":"Ironwood Ridge High School students, like these pictured on the first day of classes Aug. 11, could have full-time status changed from four to five classes if their principal approves the change.","byline":"Ron Medvescek / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1745,"hiresheight":1188,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/6e/76e5a268-ae6f-5bdc-a280-956f89985fe7/584866fec56f7.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"422","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/6e/76e5a268-ae6f-5bdc-a280-956f89985fe7/584866fec4541.image.jpg?resize=620%2C422"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/6e/76e5a268-ae6f-5bdc-a280-956f89985fe7/584866fec4541.image.jpg?crop=1745%2C981%2C0%2C0&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/6e/76e5a268-ae6f-5bdc-a280-956f89985fe7/584866fec4541.image.jpg?crop=1745%2C981%2C0%2C0&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/6e/76e5a268-ae6f-5bdc-a280-956f89985fe7/584866fec4541.image.jpg?crop=1745%2C981%2C0%2C0&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":25,"commentID":"faf2ecf5-1f76-5c10-8189-78960af335f6","body":"

Canyon del Oro and Ironwood Ridge high school students may face changes in their school hours, but only if their principals choose to.

For now, the principals don\u2019t appear to have immediate plans, though an advisory committee spent the past several months exploring possible changes after it was found that Amphitheater\u2019s three high schools were spending more time in classrooms than their peers in the Tucson area.

The amount of extra time varied for each high school, with Amphitheater High being closer to the state-required minimum, which is 720 hours a year. Canyon del Oro was spending what amounted to six to seven additional weeks in instructional time.

The district\u2019s Governing Board, with the exception of Scott Leska, who wanted the issue further explored, and Julie Cozad, who wasn\u2019t there, voted Tuesday night to essentially keep things the way they are, which is to allow each school\u2019s leaders to decide what is best.

It\u2019s not all wasted effort though, says Kent Barrabee, Governing Board member, who repeatedly said during the meeting that the board is not in a place to make administrative decisions that require expertise, and that\u2019s best left to the school leaders.

The \u201cbenefit of this exercise,\u201d meaning the time spent by 20 committee members who explored the issue over the past several months, was heightened \u201cawareness\u201d of instructional hours, he said.

Tina Mehren, the parent who brought the issue to the surface and served on the committee, disagreed. \u201cIt\u2019s a shame,\u201d she said. \u201cI think it\u2019s an act of cowardice from the board.\u201d

Mehren, whose daughter attended CDO, argued that the district is not choosing what is best for students because changing would involve moving around too many pieces, including transportation and programming. \u201cMore is not always better. There is a point of diminishing returns to time in the seat.\u201d

The committee drafted recommendations, which included:

All of those came with a caveat: \u201cEach high school continues to have autonomy to develop their site schedule,\u201d the recommendation presentation said, meaning the committee could not come to a consensus about a single recommendation for all of the schools.

Mehren and others who spoke during public comment said while the committee was made up of competent educators and a variety of members, including students and teachers, there were issues with how the committee operated.

For example, a $200,000 figure was being cited as a downside to changing instructional hours, but the breakdown of that money was not fully explained, they said.

An August presentation to the committee by Scott Little, the district\u2019s chief financial officer, said that should CDO and Ironwood Ridge change full-time status to five classes instead of four, the 195 students currently taking four or fewer classes would lose full-time status, which would result in an annual loss of $221,454.

Also, a survey was supposed to take place to get feedback from teachers on what they thought, but that never happened, Mehren and others, including board members, said. Patrick Nelson, the district\u2019s superintendent, argued that the survey was to be conducted should the recommendations actually take place.

Amphitheater Principal Jon Lansa told the Star in May when the committee formed that he thought the hours at his school were appropriate. The school\u2019s schedule, he told the board Tuesday, was carefully crafted three years ago with more professional development for teachers as one of the key goals.

Four Ironwood Ridge teachers took part in the advisory committee, said Natalie Burnett, that school\u2019s principal. Those four people don\u2019t necessarily represent all of the school\u2019s teaching staff, which is more than 80 people.

CDO Principal Paul DeWeerdt told the Amphi board that while he is certain there is a \u201csweet spot\u201d in terms of how much time is optimal for learning, the committee hasn\u2019t found it. He added that it\u2019s \u201ccounterintuitive\u201d to think that less time in classrooms would somehow translate to better learning.

"}, {"id":"1a1daf14-b4f8-5f44-81ec-d30254d2257f","type":"article","starttime":"1481140800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T13:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481215623","sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Countdown to Winterhaven Festival of Lights","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/article_1a1daf14-b4f8-5f44-81ec-d30254d2257f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/countdown-to-winterhaven-festival-of-lights/article_1a1daf14-b4f8-5f44-81ec-d30254d2257f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/countdown-to-winterhaven-festival-of-lights/article_1a1daf14-b4f8-5f44-81ec-d30254d2257f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":2,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":1},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Winterhaven runs 6 to 10 p.m. everyday, Dec. 10 through Dec. 26.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["winterhaven","tucson christmas lights"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"dbe31bcd-198d-537d-8538-19a4d70eeace","description":"Alex Parrs strings up a length of artificial garland to mark a spot for a specific animal, one of a dozen or more plotted in his front yard as part of his Christmas Zoo theme for the upcoming Winterhaven Festival of Lights, Tuesday, December 6, 2016, Tucson, Ariz. Parrs, who has been decking the yard for six years, estimated he would be stringing up approximately 100,000 lights for his contribution to this year\u2019s festival.","byline":"Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1910,"hiresheight":1084,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/be/dbe31bcd-198d-537d-8538-19a4d70eeace/58485f7eb8d6b.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"352","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/be/dbe31bcd-198d-537d-8538-19a4d70eeace/58485f7eb7af8.image.jpg?resize=620%2C352"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"57","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/be/dbe31bcd-198d-537d-8538-19a4d70eeace/58485f7eb7af8.image.jpg?resize=100%2C57"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"170","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/be/dbe31bcd-198d-537d-8538-19a4d70eeace/58485f7eb7af8.image.jpg?resize=300%2C170"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"581","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/be/dbe31bcd-198d-537d-8538-19a4d70eeace/58485f7eb7af8.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C581"}}}],"links":[{"id":"5b214142-c9ce-5ab9-a08e-e246974204dc","type":"link","starttime":"1481132280","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T10:38:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481215567","application":"editorial","title":"Photos: Shopping on Tucson in years past","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/retrotucson/photos-tucson-shopping-in-years-past/collection_327aa4f2-9945-11e5-8b84-3fe53785b125.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/retrotucson/photos-tucson-shopping-in-years-past/collection_327aa4f2-9945-11e5-8b84-3fe53785b125.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Shopping in Tucson through the years.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["winterhaven","tucson christmas lights"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"url":"http://tucson.com/news/retrotucson/photos-tucson-shopping-in-years-past/collection_327aa4f2-9945-11e5-8b84-3fe53785b125.html"}],"revision":11,"commentID":"1a1daf14-b4f8-5f44-81ec-d30254d2257f","body":"

Alex Parrs strings up artificial garland to mark a spot for a specific animal, one of a dozen or more plotted in his front yard as part of his Christmas Zoo theme, for the upcoming Winterhaven Festival of Lights. Parrs, who has been decorating the yard for six years, estimated he would be stringing up approximately 100,000 lights for his contribution to this year\u2019s festival.

The festival, in its 67th year, runs 6 to 10 p.m. every day from Saturday, Dec. 10, through Monday, Dec. 26, in the Winterhaven neighborhood on Fort Lowell Road, west of North Country Club Road. Visitors can tour the lights on foot, on a hayride wagon, a bus trolley or a pedal-powered group bike. There is no designated parking lot. The only drive-through night is Dec. 26. Visitors are asked to bring a donation for the Community Food Bank. For more information, go to winterhavenfestival.org.

"}, {"id":"487a2a04-7cd8-5f63-946b-b6e1b6c4700e","type":"article","starttime":"1481139900","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T12:45:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481166845","priority":43,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Saguaro Park entrance fees will increase in January","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_487a2a04-7cd8-5f63-946b-b6e1b6c4700e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/saguaro-park-entrance-fees-will-increase-in-january/article_487a2a04-7cd8-5f63-946b-b6e1b6c4700e.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/saguaro-park-entrance-fees-will-increase-in-january/article_487a2a04-7cd8-5f63-946b-b6e1b6c4700e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":1,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":1},"byline":"By Doug Kreutz Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Entrance fees at Saguaro National Park will increase from $10 to $15.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["saguaro national park","trails"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"4081944e-398d-5de0-b195-c18f20bec775","description":"The private-vehicle fee increase from $10 to $15 will help Saguaro National Park address maintenance issues and improve other facets.","byline":"Ron Medvescek / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1763,"hiresheight":1175,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/08/4081944e-398d-5de0-b195-c18f20bec775/5848592c2ff7a.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"413","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/08/4081944e-398d-5de0-b195-c18f20bec775/5848592c2ee0c.image.jpg?resize=620%2C413"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/08/4081944e-398d-5de0-b195-c18f20bec775/5848592c2ee0c.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C183&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/08/4081944e-398d-5de0-b195-c18f20bec775/5848592c2ee0c.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C183&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/08/4081944e-398d-5de0-b195-c18f20bec775/5848592c2ee0c.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C183&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"links":[{"id":"0f56204a-c708-588a-9959-ea0e72be75b2","type":"link","starttime":"1477674000","starttime_iso8601":"2016-10-28T10:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481136428","priority":51,"sections":[{"photo":"photo"},{"parks":"entertainment/outdoors/parks"},{"gallery":"gallery"},{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Visual tribute to National Parks in Arizona","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/parks/","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/parks/","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"To honor the 100th anniversary of the U.S. National Park Service, we have assembled photos of NPS properties in Arizona, including national monuments, memorials and historic sites.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["saguaro national park","trails"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":11,"url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/parks/"}],"revision":5,"commentID":"487a2a04-7cd8-5f63-946b-b6e1b6c4700e","body":"

Entrance fees at Saguaro National Park will increase from $10 to $15 per private vehicle beginning Jan. 3, park officials announced.

After proposing the fee increase in August, the park solicited public comments regarding the appropriateness of the increase. Twenty-one people responded during a 30-day comment period and 80 percent of the respondents were in favor of the increase, according to the officials.

\u201cThis fee increase will help us to continue addressing our deferred maintenance needs, because 100 percent of the fees collected stay in Saguaro National Park.\u201d said Leah McGinnis, acting superintendent of the park.

Entrance fees for private vehicles at the park haven\u2019t increased since 2005. Since then, the park\u2019s deferred maintenance costs have increased to $16 million, officials noted.

Projects planned for 2017 include repairing the Cactus Forest, Douglas Springs and Heartbreak Ridge trails, as well as improving the auditorium of the Red Hills Visitor Center in the park\u2019s west district.

The fee increase applies only to private vehicles.

Annual passes, commercial permits, wilderness camping permits, walk-in, and bicycle permit fees won\u2019t change. Motorcycle permits will remain at $10.

"}, {"id":"ac9c80ea-bcab-11e6-a6af-3b6c57b8e686","type":"article","starttime":"1481135580","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T11:33:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481150932","priority":30,"sections":[{"crime":"news/local/crime"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Man injured in stabbing on Tucson's east side","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/article_ac9c80ea-bcab-11e6-a6af-3b6c57b8e686.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/man-injured-in-stabbing-on-tucson-s-east-side/article_ac9c80ea-bcab-11e6-a6af-3b6c57b8e686.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/man-injured-in-stabbing-on-tucson-s-east-side/article_ac9c80ea-bcab-11e6-a6af-3b6c57b8e686.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":2,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":1,"gallery":1},"byline":"Caitlin Schmidt\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Police are talking with the other man involved; no suspects are outstanding.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"a8e59eb3-a3de-5a50-a839-449608e07744","description":"","byline":"Courtesy of Tucson Police Department","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"349","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8e/a8e59eb3-a3de-5a50-a839-449608e07744/582e4b19ae8e1.image.jpg?resize=620%2C349"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8e/a8e59eb3-a3de-5a50-a839-449608e07744/582e4b19ae8e1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C56"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8e/a8e59eb3-a3de-5a50-a839-449608e07744/582e4b19ae8e1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C169"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8e/a8e59eb3-a3de-5a50-a839-449608e07744/582e4b19ae8e1.image.jpg"}}}],"youtube":[{"id":"3d388b38-28c6-5a20-ac09-db83ba03ea95","starttime":"1480618860","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-01T12:01:00-07:00","title":"Watch: Tucson Police Chief discusses officer-involved shooting","description":"Tucson Police Chief Chris Magnus spoke to reporters Dec. 1 about an officer-involved shooting during which two officers were injured and the suspect killed. Video by Caitlin Schmidt.","byline":"","video_id":"dUkR9tXDXNA"}],"revision":2,"commentID":"ac9c80ea-bcab-11e6-a6af-3b6c57b8e686","body":"

A man was taken to the hospital after a Wednesday morning stabbing on Tucson's east side, authorities said.

The victim, who suffered \"some sort of knife wound,\" was transported with non-life threatening injuries, said Sgt. Kimberly Bay, a Tucson Police Department spokeswoman.

The altercation between the two men took place at an apartment complex in the 4400 block of East 29th Street, near South Columbus Boulevard, shortly after 10 a.m., Bay said.

Police are talking with the other man involved, and no suspects are outstanding.

The details leading up to the stabbing are currently under investigation, Bay said.

"}, {"id":"db5b877a-bca4-11e6-974e-5f36395b69fe","type":"article","starttime":"1481135400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T11:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481137739","priority":50,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Does photo show new jaguar roaming Southern Arizona mountains?","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_db5b877a-bca4-11e6-974e-5f36395b69fe.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/does-photo-show-new-jaguar-roaming-southern-arizona-mountains/article_db5b877a-bca4-11e6-974e-5f36395b69fe.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/does-photo-show-new-jaguar-roaming-southern-arizona-mountains/article_db5b877a-bca4-11e6-974e-5f36395b69fe.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":4,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"A new photograph taken in the Huachuca Mountains shows a jaguar, possibly one not previously seen in Arizona.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["jaguar","arizona","wildlife management","photo","u.s. fish and wildlife service","cochise county","macho b"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#topstory"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"008b0700-bca5-11e6-8663-3fa57cb7b755","description":"A photograph of a jaguar taken by a Fort Huachuca trail camera in the Huachuca Mountains recently might show a jaguar not previously seen in Arizona, state Game and Fish Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said today.","byline":"Arizona Game and Fish","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"264","height":"187","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/08/008b0700-bca5-11e6-8663-3fa57cb7b755/58484eaecb8ba.image.jpg?resize=264%2C187"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/08/008b0700-bca5-11e6-8663-3fa57cb7b755/58484eaecb8ba.image.jpg?crop=264%2C148%2C0%2C19&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/08/008b0700-bca5-11e6-8663-3fa57cb7b755/58484eaecb8ba.image.jpg?crop=264%2C148%2C0%2C19"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"574","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/08/008b0700-bca5-11e6-8663-3fa57cb7b755/58484eaecb8ba.image.jpg?crop=264%2C148%2C0%2C19"}}}],"revision":18,"commentID":"db5b877a-bca4-11e6-974e-5f36395b69fe","body":"

A photograph of a jaguar taken by a Fort Huachuca trail camera in the Huachuca Mountains might show a jaguar not previously seen in Arizona, state and federal wildlife officials said today.

\u201cPreliminary indications are that the cat is a male jaguar and, potentially, an individual not previously seen in Arizona,\u201d Benjamin Tuggle, regional director for the Southwest Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said in a news release. \u201cWe are working with the Arizona Game and Fish Department to determine if this sighting represents a new individual jaguar.\u201d

\u201cWhile this is exciting news, we are examining photographic evidence to determine if we\u2019re seeing a new cat here, or if this is an animal that has been seen in Arizona before,\u201d said Jim DeVos, assistant director of the Arizona department\u2019s Wildlife Management Division. \u201cWe look forward to partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and thoroughly vetting the evidence.\u201d

The date stamped on the photo is Dec. 1.

The new image might not be the Santa Rita Mountains jaguar nicknamed \"El Jefe\" who has been spotted in film and video before.

El Jefe was was first photographed in 2011 in the Whetstone Mountains south of the community of Dragoon and then is believed to have moved over to the Santa Ritas southeast of Tucson, officials have said.

Two remote camera sites in the Santa Ritas have been the only places in the U.S. and Canada where four wild cat species including jaguars and ocelots have been photographed.

In 2009 the capture and euthanization of a 15-year-old jaguar known as Macho B sparked massive controversy and a prolonged criminal investigation.

Like El Jefe today, Macho B at the time was the nation's only known wild jaguar. This new photo could change that status for El Jefe.

"}, {"id":"3f199672-bc9f-11e6-a2c9-47f2a8bbe381","type":"article","starttime":"1481130240","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T10:04:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481130725","sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tucson native serves in Pearl Harbor 75 years after attack","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_3f199672-bc9f-11e6-a2c9-47f2a8bbe381.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-native-serves-in-pearl-harbor-years-after-attack/article_3f199672-bc9f-11e6-a2c9-47f2a8bbe381.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-native-serves-in-pearl-harbor-years-after-attack/article_3f199672-bc9f-11e6-a2c9-47f2a8bbe381.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":1,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":3},"byline":"Dusty Good, Navy Office of Community Outreach","prologue":"PEARL HARBOR \u2014 As the nation pauses to remember the attack on Pearl Harbor, which occurred 75 years ago on Dec. 7, 1941, the occasion has special meaning for a Tucson, Arizona native who is serving in the U.S. Navy in the very location that drew the United States into World War II. Petty Officer 3rd Class Kanin Wadsworth is assigned to the Navy\u2019s U.S. Pacific Fleet Headquarters. According to Navy officials, the U.S. Pacific Fleet is the world\u2019s largest fleet command, encompassing 100 million square miles, nearly half the Earth\u2019s surface, from Antarctica to the Arctic circle and from the West Coast of the United States into the Indian Ocean. The U.S. Pacific Fleet consists of approximately 200 ships/submarines, nearly 1,100 aircraft, and more than 140,000 Sailors and civilians.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"6000fb00-bc9f-11e6-81bd-0bb9653d9862","description":"Petty Officer 3rd Class Kanin Wadsworth","byline":"Courtesy Navy Office of Community Outreach","hireswidth":1600,"hiresheight":1142,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/6000fb00-bc9f-11e6-81bd-0bb9653d9862/5848425209b76.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"443","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/6000fb00-bc9f-11e6-81bd-0bb9653d9862/584842520867d.image.jpg?resize=620%2C443"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/6000fb00-bc9f-11e6-81bd-0bb9653d9862/584842520867d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"214","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/6000fb00-bc9f-11e6-81bd-0bb9653d9862/584842520867d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C214"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"731","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/6000fb00-bc9f-11e6-81bd-0bb9653d9862/584842520867d.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C731"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"3f199672-bc9f-11e6-a2c9-47f2a8bbe381","body":"

PEARL HARBOR \u2014 As the nation pauses to remember the attack on Pearl Harbor, which occurred 75 years ago on Dec. 7, 1941, the occasion has special meaning for a Tucson, Arizona native who is serving in the U.S. Navy in the very location that drew the United States into World War II.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Kanin Wadsworth is assigned to the Navy\u2019s U.S. Pacific Fleet Headquarters. According to Navy officials, the U.S. Pacific Fleet is the world\u2019s largest fleet command, encompassing 100 million square miles, nearly half the Earth\u2019s surface, from Antarctica to the Arctic circle and from the West Coast of the United States into the Indian Ocean. The U.S. Pacific Fleet consists of approximately 200 ships/submarines, nearly 1,100 aircraft, and more than 140,000 Sailors and civilians.

Wadsworth is responsible for electronics systems on the P-3 aircraft.

\u201cI like that my job gives me a sense of accomplishment,\u201d said Wadsworth. \"When I fix something and get to see the planes fly it makes me feel great.\"

Being stationed in Pearl Harbor, often referred to as the gateway to the Pacific in defense circles, means that Wadsworth is serving in a part of the world \u2013 the Pacific -- that is taking on new importance in America\u2019s national defense strategy.

Pearl Harbor itself is home to more than 19,000 U.S. Navy Sailors 11 surface ships, 19 nuclear-powered submarines and 19 aircraft.

Although the world has changed greatly in the past 75 years, the Navy has been pivotal in helping maintain peace and stability in the Pacific region for decades, and for good reason, Navy officials say. The Pacific is home to more than 50 percent of the world's population, many of the world's largest and smallest economies, several of the world's largest militaries, and many U.S. allies.

Accordingly, the Navy is basing approximately 60 percent of its ships and aircraft in the region. Officials say the Navy will also provide its most advanced warfighting platforms to the region, including missile defense-capable ships; submarines; reconnaissance aircraft; and its newest surface warfare ships.

\u201cI feel honored to be at a place where young sailors and Marines who were here long ago,\u201d said Wadsworth. \"Even though it was a tragedy, they demonstrated courage and integrity that I use for inspiration today.\"

While much as changed in 75 years, American Sailors\u2019 core attributes of toughness, initiative, accountability and integrity remain today. The last legacy of the heroism and determination exhibited on Dec. 7th, 1941 is the heritage Wadsworth and other service members remain committed to live up to in the 21st Century.

\u201cIt\u2019s important for those of us serving in Pearl Harbor today to remember the sacrifice of those who served before us,\u201d said Admiral Scott Swift, Commander, U.S. Pacific fleet. \"The important work we do everyday honors those who were here 75 years ago and is a testament to the enduring value of our Navy's mission.\"

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Monta\u00f1o","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"414","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/56/c56169f8-bc40-11e6-85c3-e76f90a39d7e/5847a33ce2f86.image.jpg?resize=620%2C414"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/56/c56169f8-bc40-11e6-85c3-e76f90a39d7e/5847a33ce2f86.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": 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When Jennifer Spoelma decided to write a book last September, she took the plunge and told the world.\u00a0

She figured that was the best way to make sure it got done.\u00a0

\"I had no idea how to write a book and didn't know what I was getting myself into...\" says Spoelma, 24. \"At the start I told people, and I said, 'Now I have to live up to it.'\"\u00a0

It worked.\u00a0

For a year, Spoelma waded the waters of book writing\u00a0\u2014 researching, marketing, asking for feedback and staring at a blank screen. She squeezed her writing into the weekend hours and the moments before and after her full-time job as a product education strategist at Simpleview, Inc.\u00a0

But she got it done.\u00a0

In her first book \"Tell It Well: How to Discover, Own and Share Your Story Well,\" Spoelma wants to empower people to share personal stories of faith and life.\u00a0

Her book becomes available on Amazon Thursday, Dec. 15 with a launch party following on Saturday, Dec. 17\u00a0in the Creative Tribe Workshop studio, 236 S. Scott Ave.\u00a0

A fitting place, since it took a tribe.\u00a0

\"Tell

Jennifer Spoelma's book will be available on Amazon Thursday, Dec. 15.\u00a0

Around the same time Spoelma started writing the book, she also started the Tuesdays Together meetup for creative entrepreneurs\u00a0\u2014 a local chapter of the international organization the Rising Tide Society.\u00a0

Not that she actually considered herself much of an entrepreneur at that time. She was a blogger with an idea for a book. That was all. Or so she thought. \u00a0

Finding a genuine life

Spoelma moved to Tucson from Grand Rapids, Michigan the summer of 2014, newly married to husband Trevor Spoelma, a doctoral student at the University of Arizona's Eller College of Management.

\u00a0

A photo posted by Jennifer Spoelma (@jenniferspoelma) on Nov 29, 2016 at 2:18pm PST

In Grand Rapids, she worked as a program director for a church youth group and organized a weekend retreat to empower students to share their stories and their faith.\u00a0

She was also working on her blog, the Jenuine Life, a place to celebrate the beauty she saw in other women and give them a forum through which to tell their stories.\u00a0

\"That was kind of a similar thread,\" she says. \"I didn't realize how everything was tying together at the time.\"\u00a0

It was a year of job hunting and transition, a year without many people to meet.\u00a0

The summer of 2015, her blog work compelled her to attend the Yellow Conference in Los Angeles\u00a0\u2014 a place \"for the creative, entrepreneurial-minded lady who wants to change the world,\" so the tagline reads.\u00a0

Game changer.\u00a0

\"I went there and was very inspired and just very moved and realized that these are my people...\" Spoelma says of the three-day conference. \"I get these people and feel excited for for them. I can be intense sometimes pursuing things. I kind of go hard after things which sometimes makes me feel like I'm too much.\"\u00a0

But not here. Not with these women.\u00a0

She came back to Tucson thinking, \"There have to be people like this in Tucson, too. How do you find them? How do you do this?\"\u00a0

When the tide rises

Spoelma found the answer to her desire for creative community in the Rising Tide Society, launched in May 2015 to provide community for entrepreneurs.\u00a0

Too bad there was no Tucson chapter.\u00a0

The organization encouraged Spoelma to apply to lead it in Tucson.\u00a0

\"I felt they better not choose me because I have a blog but I don't run a business. I don't have anything to show for it,\" she says. \"They accepted me in September 2015, and I was like, 'OK. I guess I have to find people to join my group.'\"\u00a0

On the second Tuesday of September, she hosted the first Tuesdays Together in Tucson. Twelve people showed up. Now the Facebook group boasts more than 200.\u00a0

\"The whole point is to just get started,\" says Emily Powell, a consistent Tuesdays Together attendee. She is in the beginning stages of launching her own toy business. \"Due to the support from fellow Tuesdays Together members, both creatively and just having key insights into the growth process, I could embrace the idea of just starting instead of waiting for something to be perfect.\"\u00a0

Tuesdays Together helped her to refine her ideas and held her accountable: She wanted something new to share at each meeting.

\"One of the things I have been proud to see happen, not because of me specifically, but as a facet of the group, is a lot of people have gotten to know each other and realize each other's services,\" Spoelma says. \"As needs are growing and services expand, they are able to use each other and build their portfolios, and as everyone is growing, it's lifting up everybody else, too.\"\u00a0

The Creative Tribe Workshop, a similar organization, started around the same time as Tuesdays Together and gives people a chance to exercise that creative streak. Now, the two organizations collaborate.\u00a0

For 24-year-old Theresa Delaney, founder of the Creative Tribe Workshop and small business owner, Tuesdays Together offers a monthly chance to talk business \u2014 a way to stave off isolation.\u00a0

\"It makes people feel like they're more welcome to try new things and get out there and start their own business, because they will have a network of support to turn to...\" Delaney says. \"It creates a feeling of support for people and I really think this is the motto of the Rising Tide group \u2014 by helping each other, we're helping ourselves in the long run. The rising tide lifts all boats and creating that spirit helps everyone individually as well.\"\u00a0

\"Jenny

Jennifer Spoelma squeezed her writing into weekends and before and after work while her husband worked on a doctorate degree.\u00a0

And while Spoelma's heart beats to infuse others with the confidence to tell their stories aloud and in life, she needed a boost of her own.\u00a0

\"I think at first I felt pretty insecure leading the group thinking, 'I don't make a living doing this. It's technically at hobby level...'\" Spoelma says. \"I saw that there are no qualifiers for meaningful work. You don't need to make a living, you don't need to make a certain amount of money. You don't need to make money at all for what you're doing to be important. It's also saying there are a lot of exciting and worthy things that come from building an audience and having people like your work, but that doesn't validate your work either. Seeing that other people were doing what they loved and maybe were more content than I was to be doing it on the side was an important lesson.\"\u00a0

Tell it well\u00a0

This fall, 148 backers pledged $14,305 to Spoelma's book through Kickstarter, surpassing her goal of $14,000.

She self-published through the copyrighting company\u00a0Words Move People\u00a0she runs with her sisters Erica Male and Kellie Voss. The\u00a0organization also helps Christian churches with branding and communication.\u00a0

Spoelma never saw herself writing a book, but after she moved to Tucson, she found her passion for encouraging storytellers was going unused.\u00a0

\"That was when it clicked,\" she says. \"Oh, I don't have a platform or a youth ministry or anything like that to touch people with at this stage of life, but a book is something someone can pick up and own the journey for themselves.\"\u00a0

During interviews for her blog, women she admired would often thank her for challenging them to reflect on aspects of their life.\u00a0

\"I didn't know I knew that,\" they would tell her. \"I didn't know I had that story.\"\u00a0

The book challenges Christians in particular to think about their life story and the movement of God in it, Spoelma says. Most people think they don't have a story, don't know how to share it or felt insecure doing so.\u00a0

\"Tell

Jennifer Spoelma wants others to have the confidence to tell their stories of faith.\u00a0

But everybody has a story, Spoelma says. And everybody has a chance to make, build, dream and do.\u00a0

She did.\u00a0

\"It's really easy to rule yourself out and think, 'I have this struggle or I don't have time because of this and this and this,' so surrounding myself with other people who were realizing their dreams and working toward them and pursuing them despite whatever struggles they had or hindrances they had was really inspiring,\" she says. \"You keep putting one foot in front of the other, because you realize nobody has it made for them.\"\u00a0

"}, {"id":"9200cbe4-bc8b-11e6-883b-7ba38941994f","type":"article","starttime":"1481125500","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T08:45:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481129076","priority":30,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"tucson":"business/tucson"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Blue Bell Creameries to reopen Tucson distribution center in March","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_9200cbe4-bc8b-11e6-883b-7ba38941994f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/blue-bell-creameries-to-reopen-tucson-distribution-center-in-march/article_9200cbe4-bc8b-11e6-883b-7ba38941994f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/blue-bell-creameries-to-reopen-tucson-distribution-center-in-march/article_9200cbe4-bc8b-11e6-883b-7ba38941994f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":3,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Caitlin Schmidt\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Ice cream products will also be returning to store shelves.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5biz"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"0ffbee7d-d36a-5f1b-a111-6dbdac2ef9bb","description":"Shipping manager Earnie Palmer, right, inspects cases of ice cream as he and a crew get the trucks loaded for deliveries from the Blue Bell Creameries distribution center, 3219 E. 45th St.","byline":"KELLY PRESNELL / ARIZONA DAILY STAR","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"379","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/ff/0ffbee7d-d36a-5f1b-a111-6dbdac2ef9bb/514669e290d9a.image.jpg?resize=620%2C379"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"61","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/ff/0ffbee7d-d36a-5f1b-a111-6dbdac2ef9bb/514669e29249c.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"183","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/ff/0ffbee7d-d36a-5f1b-a111-6dbdac2ef9bb/514669e2a4840.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/ff/0ffbee7d-d36a-5f1b-a111-6dbdac2ef9bb/514669e290d9a.image.jpg?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C15"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"9200cbe4-bc8b-11e6-883b-7ba38941994f","body":"

More than a year after its closing, Blue Bell Creameries will be reopening its Tucson distribution center and returning the frozen treat to store shelves beginning March 6, the company announced Wednesday.

In April 2015, the company issued a nationwide recall of all products, after two batches of ice cream tested positive for Listeria. A month later, Blue Bell shuttered its Arizona, Texas, Oklahoma and Alabama distribution centers after tests revealed that the contamination went back two years.\u00a0

Blue Bell products returned to stores in Texas and Alabama by September 2015, and the Oklahoma distribution facility was also reopened.

\u201cIt has always been our goal to return to Arizona, and we believe that we are in a great position to expand our sales territory next year,\u201d Ricky Dickson, vice president of sales and marketing for Blue Bell, wrote in a news release.

The company has already started hiring for all three Arizona centers, the other two located in Phoenix and Apache Junction, and will continue to add more employees as needed, Dickson said.

The store locations that will be stocking the products haven't been released yet, but the company said that fans can expect to find it in most major supermarkets and drug stores.

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Famous foodie Alton Brown is talking up Tucson again, but this time it's to People Magazine.

Brown, who has become something of a Tucson expert over the years, has selected the Tucson Tamale Holiday Pack as one of his 10 best Christmas gifts for foodies.

His logic is simple: \"Because they're probably the best Western-style tamales I've had\u2014and they ship!\"

It's no secret that Brown loves Tucson Tamale. In June 2015, he picked the restaurant as one of 10 great spots to hit during a July Fourth holiday weekend.\u00a0

To read the rest of his gift list on People Magazine's website, \u00a0click\u00a0here.

"}, {"id":"23e4bef8-bc87-11e6-8439-976f269a5efa","type":"article","starttime":"1481121900","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-07T07:45:00-07:00","priority":30,"sections":[{"crime":"news/local/crime"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tucson woman gets 7 \u00bd-year prison term in daughter's death","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/article_23e4bef8-bc87-11e6-8439-976f269a5efa.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/tucson-woman-gets--year-prison-term-in-daughter-s/article_23e4bef8-bc87-11e6-8439-976f269a5efa.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/tucson-woman-gets--year-prison-term-in-daughter-s/article_23e4bef8-bc87-11e6-8439-976f269a5efa.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":2,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":1},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"Woman was charged with first-degree murder, but pleaded guilty to manslaughter.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"937763ba-bc87-11e6-82ac-a7fe140ba0a6","description":"The parents of 18-month-old twins were arrested March 13, 2013 on suspicion of child abuse. Monique Gaxiola, 30 (pictured), and Kristepher Benavidez, 25, were booked into Pima County jail. Each is facing two counts of child abuse. The twins, who were repeatedly abused, were hospitalized. Another child, age 7, was placed in the custody of Child Protective Services.","byline":"Photo courtesy of the Tucson Police Department","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"480","height":"600","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/37/937763ba-bc87-11e6-82ac-a7fe140ba0a6/514249d697b3d.image.jpg?resize=480%2C600"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"125","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/37/937763ba-bc87-11e6-82ac-a7fe140ba0a6/514249d73ca4d.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"375","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/37/937763ba-bc87-11e6-82ac-a7fe140ba0a6/514249d74729e.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/37/937763ba-bc87-11e6-82ac-a7fe140ba0a6/514249d697b3d.image.jpg?crop=480%2C270%2C0%2C168"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"23e4bef8-bc87-11e6-8439-976f269a5efa","body":"

TUCSON, Ariz. \u2014 A Tucson woman has been sentenced to 7 \u00bd years in prison in the death of her 18-month-old daughter in 2013.

Pima County prosecutors say Monique Gaxiola was sentenced after previously pleading guilty to manslaughter.

Goxiola and the father of the child, Kristepher Benavidez, originally were charged with first-degree murder and child abuse.

Benavidez told authorities that he was trying to brush the toddler's teeth when she began thrashing around and hit her head on the sink.

She stopped breathing so he took the girl and her twin sister to the hospital.

Doctors discovered multiple signs of abuse on both toddlers.

Authorities say the girl who hit her head died.

Benavidez was sentenced to 22 1/2 years in prison last month.

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Cloudy skies with a very slight chance of showers today, mainly in the mountains outside of Tucson.

Today's high temperature will be a few degrees cooler than yesterday, but don't worry! Dry conditions and much warmer temperatures are expected through the middle of next week.

High: 67

Low: 41

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Currently

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Clear, 48.8
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Wind 0 MPH NNW, 71% humidity
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UV index 0, visibility 10.0 miles
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No precipitation today
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No lightning strikes today
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Today

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8 am: Partly Cloudy, 45
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Wind 2 MPH ESE, 3% chance precip.
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79% humidity, UV index 0
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9 am: Clear, 49
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Wind 3 MPH ESE, 1% chance precip.
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70% humidity, UV index 1
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10 am: Partly Cloudy, 54
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Wind 2 MPH ESE, 0% chance precip.
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60% humidity, UV index 2
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11 am: Partly Cloudy, 58
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Wind 3 MPH SSW, 0% chance precip.
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49% humidity, UV index 3
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12 pm: Partly Cloudy, 60
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Wind 3 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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44% humidity, UV index 3
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1 pm: Partly Cloudy, 62
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Wind 4 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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40% humidity, UV index 3
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2 pm: Partly Cloudy, 63
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Wind 5 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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37% humidity, UV index 2
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3 pm: Partly Cloudy, 64
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Wind 7 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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36% humidity, UV index 1
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4 pm: Partly Cloudy, 64
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Wind 7 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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36% humidity, UV index 0
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5 pm: Partly Cloudy, 63
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Wind 7 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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38% humidity, UV index 0
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6 pm: Partly Cloudy, 59
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Wind 6 MPH NNW, 0% chance precip.
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46% humidity, UV index 0
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7 pm: Partly Cloudy, 56
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Wind 5 MPH NW, 1% chance precip.
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51% humidity, UV index 0
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8 pm: Partly Cloudy, 54
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Wind 4 MPH NW, 1% chance precip.
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55% humidity, UV index 0
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9 pm: Partly Cloudy, 52
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Wind 4 MPH WNW, 0% chance precip.
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60% humidity, UV index 0
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10 pm: Clear, 50
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Wind 3 MPH W, 1% chance precip.
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66% humidity, UV index 0
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11 pm: Clear, 48
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Wind 3 MPH SSW, 1% chance precip.
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70% humidity, UV index 0
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Thursday

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12 am: Clear, 48
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Wind 2 MPH SSE, 1% chance precip.
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71% humidity, UV index 0
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1 am: Clear, 47
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Wind 2 MPH SE, 1% chance precip.
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73% humidity, UV index 0
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2 am: Clear, 46
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Wind 2 MPH SSE, 2% chance precip.
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75% humidity, UV index 0
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3 am: Clear, 45
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Wind 3 MPH ESE, 2% chance precip.
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76% humidity, UV index 0
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4 am: Clear, 45
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 2% chance precip.
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77% humidity, UV index 0
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5 am: Clear, 44
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Wind 4 MPH SE, 2% chance precip.
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78% humidity, UV index 0
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6 am: Clear, 44
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Wind 4 MPH SE, 3% chance precip.
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77% humidity, UV index 0
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7 am: Clear, 43
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Wind 4 MPH SE, 3% chance precip.
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78% humidity, UV index 0
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8 am: Clear, 45
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Wind 4 MPH SE, 2% chance precip.
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73% humidity, UV index 0
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9 am: Clear, 50
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Wind 4 MPH SE, 1% chance precip.
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61% humidity, UV index 1
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10 am: Clear, 55
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Wind 3 MPH ESE, 0% chance precip.
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50% humidity, UV index 2
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11 am: Clear, 59
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 0% chance precip.
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43% humidity, UV index 3
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12 pm: Clear, 63
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Wind 4 MPH WNW, 0% chance precip.
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37% humidity, UV index 3
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1 pm: Clear, 66
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Wind 4 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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32% humidity, UV index 3
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2 pm: Clear, 68
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Wind 5 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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29% humidity, UV index 2
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3 pm: Clear, 68
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Wind 6 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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28% humidity, UV index 1
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4 pm: Clear, 68
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Wind 8 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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28% humidity, UV index 0
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5 pm: Clear, 66
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Wind 7 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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30% humidity, UV index 0
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6 pm: Clear, 61
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Wind 6 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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36% humidity, UV index 0
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7 pm: Clear, 59
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Wind 6 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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40% humidity, UV index 0
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"}, {"id":"403247b0-8b02-525a-b823-6b5bed2425ac","type":"article","starttime":"1481078820","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-06T19:47:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481108625","priority":35,"sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"faith-and-values":"lifestyles/faith-and-values"},{"families":"lifestyles/families"},{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"},{"local":"news/local"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Visiting USS Arizona memorial a fitting way to pay respect to WWII vets","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_403247b0-8b02-525a-b823-6b5bed2425ac.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/visiting-uss-arizona-memorial-a-fitting-way-to-pay-respect/article_403247b0-8b02-525a-b823-6b5bed2425ac.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/visiting-uss-arizona-memorial-a-fitting-way-to-pay-respect/article_403247b0-8b02-525a-b823-6b5bed2425ac.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"The battleship was destroyed Dec. 7, 1941.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"a94984d9-8f08-5422-a4b6-fd4b5b7b3f25","description":"A rose rests on medallions at the USS Arizona Mall Memorial on the UA campus. Each medallion represents one of 1,177 sailors and Marines who died when the ship was attacked Dec. 7, 1941.","byline":"Jordan Glenn / for the Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1194,"hiresheight":1735,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/94/a94984d9-8f08-5422-a4b6-fd4b5b7b3f25/584753ae01c5e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"427","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/94/a94984d9-8f08-5422-a4b6-fd4b5b7b3f25/584753ae00dfb.image.jpg?resize=427%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/94/a94984d9-8f08-5422-a4b6-fd4b5b7b3f25/584753ae00dfb.image.jpg?crop=1194%2C671%2C0%2C994&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/94/a94984d9-8f08-5422-a4b6-fd4b5b7b3f25/584753ae00dfb.image.jpg?crop=1194%2C671%2C0%2C994&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/94/a94984d9-8f08-5422-a4b6-fd4b5b7b3f25/584753ae00dfb.image.jpg?crop=1194%2C671%2C0%2C994&resize=1024%2C575&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":16,"commentID":"403247b0-8b02-525a-b823-6b5bed2425ac","body":"

On Sunday, the new USS Arizona Mall Memorial was unveiled on the University of Arizona Mall.

Hundreds of visitors viewed the brass medallions inscribed with the name, home state, rank or rating, and ship\u2019s duties of the 1,177 sailors and Marines who died on board the battleship that was destroyed Dec. 7, 1941 \u2014 75 years ago today \u2014 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and launched the U.S. into World War II.

The memorial includes a full-scale outline of the deck of the ship that is below the ship\u2019s bell in the Student Union tower.

Veterans and students, among others, continued to make their way to the new memorial this week. A few have left flowers.

Don Emrick, who served in the Navy during the Vietnam War and turned 70 last weekend, brought his son to campus Tuesday morning, noting many of the medallions carried the names of young men in their late teens and early 20s.

Eight medallions carry the names of Arizonans.

James William Horrocks was from Patagonia, and his Purple Heart is part of \u201cThe Life and Legacy of the USS Arizona\u201d exhibit, which continues through Dec. 23 at the UA Libraries\u2019 Special Collections, open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

George Hollowell was from Phoenix and died at the age of 21. His portrait is part of the UA\u2019s Special Collections.

"}, {"id":"1713cd92-280b-5a0b-9045-920665273c3f","type":"article","starttime":"1481078220","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-06T19:37:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481108627","priority":45,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Tucsonan recalls Pearl Harbor attack through the eyes of a child","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_1713cd92-280b-5a0b-9045-920665273c3f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucsonan-recalls-pearl-harbor-attack-through-the-eyes-of-a/article_1713cd92-280b-5a0b-9045-920665273c3f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucsonan-recalls-pearl-harbor-attack-through-the-eyes-of-a/article_1713cd92-280b-5a0b-9045-920665273c3f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Curt Prendergast\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"\u201cI could see the pilots in their cockpits,\u201d says east-sider Bob Lans, now 80.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["pearl harbor"],"internalKeywords":["#top5","#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"b3b4165a-5891-590b-a7cc-7489af81ef74","description":"Bob Lans, 80, says the Japanese planes were flying so low at Pearl Harbor that he \u201ccould see the pilots in their cockpits.\u201d He remembers dodging the shell casings that littered the sidewalk while he rode his tricycle.","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1125,"hiresheight":1842,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/3b/b3b4165a-5891-590b-a7cc-7489af81ef74/584764f36e211.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"379","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/3b/b3b4165a-5891-590b-a7cc-7489af81ef74/58475919134ab.image.jpg?resize=379%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"164","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/3b/b3b4165a-5891-590b-a7cc-7489af81ef74/58475919134ab.image.jpg?resize=100%2C164"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"491","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/3b/b3b4165a-5891-590b-a7cc-7489af81ef74/58475919134ab.image.jpg?resize=300%2C491"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1677","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/3b/b3b4165a-5891-590b-a7cc-7489af81ef74/58475919134ab.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1677"}}},{"id":"8d9b37d3-2fb0-5936-9e58-31489666efb3","description":"Bob Lans was 5 when he witnessed the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. A year later an article was written about him that appeared in a New Jersey newspaper.","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1277,"hiresheight":1623,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d9/8d9b37d3-2fb0-5936-9e58-31489666efb3/5847591a2e040.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"488","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d9/8d9b37d3-2fb0-5936-9e58-31489666efb3/5847591a2d09b.image.jpg?resize=488%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"127","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d9/8d9b37d3-2fb0-5936-9e58-31489666efb3/5847591a2d09b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C127"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"381","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d9/8d9b37d3-2fb0-5936-9e58-31489666efb3/5847591a2d09b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C381"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1301","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d9/8d9b37d3-2fb0-5936-9e58-31489666efb3/5847591a2d09b.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1301"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"1713cd92-280b-5a0b-9045-920665273c3f","body":"

Always an early riser, 5-year-old Bob Lans woke up on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941 and headed to the second-floor bathroom.

He often stood on top of the toilet lid and cranked open the window, hoping for a glimpse of ships as they pulled into Pearl Harbor. But that morning he was met with a different sight: Japanese warplanes coming in from the ocean.

To his left, he heard a \u201chumongous explosion\u201d from a fuel tank the bombers hit on their way to attack the U.S. Navy ships moored in the harbor.

\u201cThe next thing, the planes were coming through,\u201d he said. \u201cAnd they were coming through lower than my window was.\u201d

The house was perched on a hill near the harbor and the planes were flying low to better target their torpedoes, Lans, now 80, said Tuesday from his kitchen on Tucson\u2019s east side.

\u201cI could see the pilots in their cockpits, they were that close to where I was,\u201d Lans recalled.

As the bombs began to fall, his father, who was a captain in the Army, hustled him and his mother downstairs and put them under the dining room table.

\u201cThat\u2019s where I spent most of the attack,\u201d he said.

A bomb fell on the nearby parade grounds of Hickam Field as his father opened the door to rush to the Army headquarters building. Lans described the powerful explosion as \u201clike a Fourth of July thing, this huge colored mass from the bomb drop\u201d that is seared into his memory.

The surprise attack on Pearl Harbor killed more than 2,400 Americans, including 1,177 aboard the USS Arizona. On Dec. 8, President Franklin Roosevelt said the day of the attack \u201cwill live in infamy\u201d and Congress declared war on Japan.

Back in Pearl Harbor, civilians didn\u2019t know what was coming next.

\u201cEverybody thought there was going to be an invasion,\u201d Lans said.

He and his family moved into the hills and lived with a Hawaiian family for a time. They moved back to their house when the invasion never materialized.

Although only one house in the neighborhood had been hit by a bomb, Lans remembers dodging the shell casings that littered the sidewalk while he rode his tricycle.

Not long after, he was aboard a cargo ship headed for San Francisco with his mother. The tense ride \u2014 always in fear of Japanese submarines lurking below the water\u2019s surface \u2014 was broken up by daily drills involving a machine gun mounted on the ship\u2019s deck.

Within days of arriving in San Francisco, he was on a train to New Jersey to live with relatives. His family lived in Palo Alto, California, for several years before moving to Tucson in 1951 to help with his father\u2019s arthritis.

Lans has been a Tucsonan since then, except for two years in the early 1960s when he was drafted into the Army and was stationed at bases throughout the United States. He went to Tucson High and the University of Arizona before teaching and coaching gymnastics at Palo Verde High School until 1991.

The trauma of the attack on Pearl Harbor stayed with him, he said, recalling a day from his boyhood when a plane was flying low over his aunt\u2019s house near Chesapeake Bay and he instinctively scurried under the porch.

\u201cAnybody that is in war is traumatized,\u201d he said, whether you are a soldier or a child bystander. \u201cI can\u2019t even imagine what\u2019s happening with these kids in Syria.\u201d

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After the Tucson City Council refused Tuesday to permanently stop the practice of destroying confiscated firearms, Attorney General Mark Brnovich asked the Arizona Supreme Court to cut off the city\u2019s state aid.

Potentially at stake in the showdown over local control is $115 million a year that Tucson receives in state-shared revenue.

The City Council voted 7-0 to reject Brnovich\u2019s demand that it repeal its 2005 ordinance requiring the destruction of most handguns and semi-automatic weapons seized by police.

Tuesday\u2019s action is the first test of a new state law giving Brnovich the power to pressure cities to change policies he believes contradict the wishes of Arizona lawmakers. The law, known as SB 1486, allows the state to withhold state-shared revenues if Tucson refuses to repeal its legislation.

On Tuesday, city officials revised downward the dollar amount they believe is in jeopardy if Tucson loses in court, saying only two types of state revenue are applicable. The city received a total of $115 million from both last year.

These funds are used to pay for law enforcement, city courts, public transportation and the parks and recreation department, said Joyce Garland, the city\u2019s chief financial officer.

The City Council said it will temporarily stop the practice of destroying guns until the legal issue has been resolved, but it ordered City Attorney Mike Rankin to take all legal action to defend the city\u2019s rights under its voter-approved city charter.

The first action will be to file a separate legal challenge of a requirement under SB 1486 that the city post a $57 million bond in order to challenge the attorney general in court, said Mayor Jonathan Rothschild.

The 2016 law mandates that any community that wants to fight the attorney general in court must first post a bond equal to half of its annual state aid.

That requires an unprecedented and unconstitutional multimillion-dollar filing fee just to access the court system, Rothschild said.

If the Supreme Court rejects the city\u2019s appeal, he said the city will pursue other legal options.

\u201cIn my practice of law, in which I did for a little while, what I learned was you take it one day at a time,\u201d Rothschild said. \u201cI am confident in our position, but if a court gives us guidance else-wise we will find the tools to deal with it.\u201d

Councilman Steve Kozachik was less sure about the city\u2019s options if a judge throws out the city\u2019s appeal to waive the bond.

\u201cWe don\u2019t have that kind of cash,\u201d he said.

Councilwoman Regina Romero said the state targeted Tucson with SB 1487 and a lawsuit was inevitable. \u201cWe were waiting on this,\u201d she said.

The motion approved by the council says the destruction of seized firearms serves the protection of public safety and the safety of police officers.

Exceptions in the city\u2019s ordinance say weapons won\u2019t be destroyed if needed as evidence, or if the police department wants to keep a gun for its own purposes, to transfer it to another law enforcement agency, or lend or transfer it to a museum.

Brnovich said it still runs afoul of several state laws.

The first, enacted in 2000, explicitly prohibits local governments from enacting any ordinances dealing with the acquisition, licensing, registration or use of firearms.

More specifically, a 2013 state law bars law enforcement agencies from destroying firearms. A companion measure says the only proper way to dispose of a seized weapon is to sell it.

Tucson city records show 4,820 guns have been destroyed since the beginning of 2013.

Brnovich rejected arguments by the Tucson City Council that cities have a right to make their own decisions.

He told the justices that SB 1486 specifically gives him the right to intercede and ask the high court to punish offenders.

Officially, the lawsuit asks the high court to give Tucson a deadline by which it has to repeal the ordinance.

Brnovich said there\u2019s a public interest in keeping cities from destroying weapons because requiring them to sell off what they seize not only increases the supply but also lowers the costs to buyers.

He also argues that allowing otherwise usable weapons to be destroyed runs afoul of the Legislature\u2019s position \u201cthat increasing the supply of legal firearms is in the interest of public safety\u201d because it helps fight crime.

Brnovich\u2019s lawsuit is built on legislation crafted by Senate President Andy Biggs, who complained during hearings earlier this year that there is a \u201cgrowing disrespect for state law\u201d by local governments.

The law allows any lawmaker who thinks a local regulation is contrary to state to require the attorney general to investigate. In this case, it was Rep. Mark Finchem, R-Oro Valley, who filed the complaint.

While the court fight technically involves weapons, it will require the justices to determine exactly how much authority charter cities have to write their own laws.

Tucson is among 18 cities that have taken advantage of a constitutional provision allowing them to write their own charters. And even Brnovich conceded that such charters \u201csupersede all laws of the state in conflict ... as such laws relate to purely municipal affairs.\u201d

It was that provision which allowed Tucson to successfully challenge a 2012 state law that sought to dictate when cities can have local elections.

\u201cBut firearms regulation, including regulating the destruction of firearms, implicates statewide interests and therefore is not of purely local concern,\u201d Brnovich is arguing.

One issue for the justices to decide is whether guns are different than other property.

Brnovich acknowledged there are two court decisions that ruled the sale or disposition of property by charter cities \u201cis a matter of solely local concern in which the state legislature may not interfere.\u201d But he said those cases involve land and not personal property.

"}, {"id":"6d793eea-6401-56d9-9a21-06cb7badd371","type":"article","starttime":"1481076720","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-06T19:12:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481108626","sections":[{"deaths":"news/local/obituaries/deaths"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Deaths in Southern Arizona","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/obituaries/deaths/article_6d793eea-6401-56d9-9a21-06cb7badd371.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/obituaries/deaths/deaths-in-southern-arizona/article_6d793eea-6401-56d9-9a21-06cb7badd371.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/obituaries/deaths/deaths-in-southern-arizona/article_6d793eea-6401-56d9-9a21-06cb7badd371.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Barbara Poole Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"The deceased are from Tucson unless otherwise noted.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"516","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/5e/f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95/57f2fdff9031d.image.jpg?resize=620%2C516"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"83","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/5e/f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95/53d6b4c71b224.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"250","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/5e/f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95/53d6b4c71b9c8.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"852","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/5e/f5e8e3c4-db33-599a-94ce-5813becf1d95/53d6b4c6efdb1.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"6d793eea-6401-56d9-9a21-06cb7badd371","body":"

The deceased are from Tucson unless otherwise noted.

Albright, Albert, 83, senior master sergeant, Nov. 19, East Lawn Palms.

Bellis, Charles, 58, Nov. 22, East Lawn Palms.

DeLara Jr., Joseph, 80, mechanic, Nov. 23, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Dyke Sr., John, 96, salesman, Nov. 25, East Lawn Palms.

Freeman, Robert, 99, draftsman, Nov. 28, East Lawn Palms.

Gilberto, Gene, 81, safe technician, Nov. 24, East Lawn Palms.

Godfrey, Jane, 84, secretary, Nov. 21, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Goodpasture, Leo, 86, hairdresser, Nov. 2, East Lawn Palms.

Harwood, Jerry, 87, homemaker, Oct. 30, East Lawn Palms.

Ice, Peggy, 83, operator, Nov. 15, East Lawn Palms.

Johnson, Gladys, 98, bookkeeper, Nov. 23, East Lawn Palms.

Johnson, Ronalee, 77, homemaker, Nov. 29, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Kehm, Walter, 95, manager, Nov. 24, East Lawn Palms.

Kontowicz, Frank, 54, manager, Nov. 22, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Lee, Karen, 40, ceramic artist, Nov. 30, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Lerch, William, 83, Air Force, Nov. 29, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Mathas, Hope, 93, homemaker, Nov. 27, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Mesta, Maria, 79, homemaker, Nov. 23, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Neillo, Theresa, 91, accountant, Nov. 24, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Orban, Anna, 88, secretary, Nov. 24, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Oser Jr., Lee, 81, executive officer, Nov. 26, East Lawn Palms.

Owens, Charles, 95, engineer, Nov. 21, East Lawn Palms.

Parsons, Mary, 98, clerk, Nov. 22, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Phillips, Steven, 70, attorney, Nov. 25, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Pierson, Lyle, 84, school counselor, Nov. 25, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Porter, Effie, 74, bookkeeper, Nov. 25, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Powers, Norman, 79, engineer, Nov. 12, East Lawn Palms.

Reedy, Anna S., 91, stockbroker, Nov. 28, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Schriner, Aleya, 18, student, Nov. 15, East Lawn Palms.

Shaylor-Yates, Cassandra, 24, college student, Nov. 20, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Strosser, Alice, 92, homemaker, Nov. 26, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Tran, Xuyen, 80, teacher, Nov. 8, East Lawn Palms.

Underwood, William, 95, Air Force, Dec. 2, Bring\u2019s Broadway.

Willer, Elmer, 87, business owner, Nov. 18, East Lawn Palms.

Yeakle, Kathy, 60, pharmacy technician, Nov. 10, East Lawn Palms.

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{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/ab/4abce5f4-1f18-57da-8ee9-20368f491331/57620d114a945.image.jpg?resize=300%2C342"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1166","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/ab/4abce5f4-1f18-57da-8ee9-20368f491331/57620d114a945.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1166"}}}],"youtube":[{"id":"de2bf77c-9d82-5055-8c08-ca5ec25a8804","starttime":"1466803560","starttime_iso8601":"2016-06-24T14:26:00-07:00","title":"Highlights of the House Democrats' 24-hour sit-in","description":"Democratic representatives found a novel way to bring awareness to their push for gun control votes on the House floor.","byline":"","video_id":"QID_xKTx1r8"}],"revision":7,"commentID":"94642869-d659-543e-b516-ff0be676bb68","body":"

You\u2019ve noticed the shortage of guns in Tucson since 2005, haven\u2019t you?

You know, nobody can buy a shotgun or a rifle or a pistol around here. Nobody.

Right?

Of course not.

It has not been any harder to buy a gun in Tucson since the City Council passed the ordinance requiring that firearms seized by police be destroyed in most cases. That\u2019s why the ordinance is absurd. Destroying 4,820 seized or forfeited firearms since January 2013 has done nothing to curb access to firearms or to stem gun violence.

So it\u2019s no wonder that someone got upset that we were essentially throwing away money by destroying the usable guns rather than selling them to a licensed dealer and getting some money out of them.

It\u2019s just too bad that somebody was a state legislator from Oro Valley making the complaint to the attorney general instead of a Tucson resident making the case to the City Council.

The ordinance is pointless and seems to directly contradict a 2013 state law, aimed at Tucson, which prohibits cities from destroying seized guns. But it is our right to have pointless ordinances and hash out the arguments ourselves, without putting $115 million per year in jeopardy.

That\u2019s why it\u2019s a good thing the City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to fight a state law that threatens the city\u2019s financial viability if a single legislator thinks it may be violating state law. The council\u2019s underlying ordinance is wrong, but the state law is even wronger.

You may remember when the Legislature passed SB 1487 this year \u2014 it was one of 14 so-called \u201cpre-emption\u201d bills introduced last session that attempted to undermine local control. Messing with cities had been a hobby for the Legislature in the past but became an animating force among Republicans last session.

SB 1487 was the climax of the effort. It allows any individual legislator to report to the attorney general any city action that seems to violate state law or the Constitution.

This is one of the absurdities of the law: Here we have Rep. Mark Finchem, who believes Hezbollah has camps in northern Mexico and is allying with drug cartels to attack the United States, singlehandedly commanding that Tucson spend money to defend itself. That\u2019s more power than one hostile legislator ought to have.

Under the new law, the attorney general must investigate the apparent violation within 30 days and tell the city whether he believes it is violating, may be violating or is not violating state law or the Constitution. If he finds the city is violating state law, the city must change within 30 days or have its state-shared revenue withheld \u2014 $115 million per year in Tucson\u2019s case.

This is another problem with the law. It makes the state attorney general judge and jury over what constitutes a violation of state law.

Even if the attorney general finds that the city might be violating state law, the city must post a bond equal to six months worth of state-shared revenue \u2014 in Tucson\u2019s case, about $57 million \u2014 while the state Supreme Court decides who\u2019s right.

\u201cThe state can pre-empt us on matters that are truly of a statewide concern. The state can\u2019t pre-empt us on matters of local concern,\u201d city attorney Mike Rankin told me before Tuesday\u2019s council vote.

That\u2019s especially true of charter cities like Tucson, Rankin said.

\u201cThe Arizona constitutional framers specifically decided they did not want charter cities to be subordinate to the state,\u201d he noted. \u201cThey were giving us true home-rule powers. They embedded that in the Constitution.\u201d

Now, of course the Attorney General\u2019s Office is aware that Tucson is a charter city. But in its filings the office argues the city does not have the right to supersede state laws related to firearms, over which the Legislature has asserted authority. And Attorney General Mark Brnovich calls it a Second Amendment issue. It is not.

The arguments actually veer into the realm of the absurd. One point: The city interferes with the right to keep and bear arms by destroying seized guns. Another point: \u201cThe State believes that increasing the supply of firearms is in the interest of public safety.\u201d

Both of these arguments rest on the same fallacy that the city\u2019s gun-destruction ordinance does: That Tucson\u2019s ordinance makes a whit of difference when it comes to the supply of guns.

Here\u2019s a quick data point: Last month the FBI conducted 39,722 background checks for gun purchases in Arizona. That\u2019s nearly 40,000 possible purchases statewide in one month. In the real-world context, Tucson\u2019s 105-or-so destroyed guns per month make no significant difference in the right to bear arms or the supply of guns.

It\u2019s still a dumb ordinance. Better to make some money off those guns than to destroy the ones that have value.

But it\u2019s our dumb ordinance to fight over and none of the state\u2019s business.

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A small puppy died at a local vet Monday morning, after a Tucson police officer found it buried alive the night before on the east side of town.

In a post on a local rescue book's Facebook page, The Sanctuary Group reported that the puppy was discovered buried alive in the area of South Pantano and East Escalante Road late Sunday night.

A person walking by heard the dog's cries and called the police who responded to the area quickly, the post said.

A sergeant with the Tucson Police Department contacted the group who established a plan with a local vet to try to save the dog's life, with the sergeant offering to pay for the first 24 hours of the dog's care.

When the puppy arrived at the vet, his mouth was filled with rocks and dirt and he was unresponsive with an extremely low body temperature, the post said.

At 5 a.m., the vet made the decision to euthanize the dog, who was showing signs of neurological symptoms and suffered a seizure.

Tucson police is investigating the incident and anyone with information is asked to call 911 or 88-CRIME.

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The Tucson City Council voted 7-0 Tuesday to fight a new state law that dilutes local control.

The council will go to court to fight for its right to continue destroying confiscated handguns and semi-automatic weapons, rather than selling them as required by the state.

The Arizona Attorney General's Office had issued an ultimatum that the city stop destroying guns that police seize, or be taken to court.

In a motion following more than two-hour long executive session, the council authorized City Attorney Mike Rankin to \"take all legal action necessary and appropriate to defend the City's rights, including its constitutional authority under its voter-approved Charter; and to challenge the constitutionality of SB1487 in all respects.\"

SB 1487, which was signed earlier this year by the governor, bars cities from passing laws that conflict with state legislation. \u00a0

The Council directed Tucson City Manager Mike Rankin and Chief of Police Chris Magnus to suspend the destruction of firearms until the legal fight has been resolved.\u00a0

\"The Mayor and Council hereby reaffirm that the destruction of firearms acquired by TPD through its law enforcement activities serves important and compelling local interests, including the protection of public safety and the safety of Tucson's police officers, and that the City is exercising its constitutional authority under its Charter through TC 2-142, which was adopted in 2005,\" Councilman Steve Kozachik said as part of his motion.

"}, {"id":"9a710acf-7810-5edf-abca-d3374bc259d1","type":"article","starttime":"1481058900","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-06T14:15:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1481108627","priority":30,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/local/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Transit fare hikes, cost-saving measures, coming online Jan. 1","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_9a710acf-7810-5edf-abca-d3374bc259d1.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/transit-fare-hikes-cost-saving-measures-coming-online-jan/article_9a710acf-7810-5edf-abca-d3374bc259d1.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/transit-fare-hikes-cost-saving-measures-coming-online-jan/article_9a710acf-7810-5edf-abca-d3374bc259d1.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Murphy Woodhouse Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Plan approved by council calls for additional increases in 2018.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["sun van","sun tran","sun shuttle","sun link","fare increase","tucson city council","sungo card","tucson bus fare","tucson public transportation","tucson bus system"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"e8e3d1fe-5b1d-5d99-8039-4e9636874819","description":"Tucson residents wait at Ronstadt Transit Center.","byline":"Sydney Richardson / For The Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1763,"hiresheight":1175,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/8e/e8e3d1fe-5b1d-5d99-8039-4e9636874819/57e1ab9551514.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"413","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/8e/e8e3d1fe-5b1d-5d99-8039-4e9636874819/57e1ab1714e76.image.jpg?resize=620%2C413"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/8e/e8e3d1fe-5b1d-5d99-8039-4e9636874819/57e1ab1714e76.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C91&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/8e/e8e3d1fe-5b1d-5d99-8039-4e9636874819/57e1ab1714e76.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C91&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/8e/e8e3d1fe-5b1d-5d99-8039-4e9636874819/57e1ab1714e76.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C91&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"9a710acf-7810-5edf-abca-d3374bc259d1","body":"

Sun Tran, Sun Link and Sun Shuttle fare increases are set to go into effect in less than a month on Jan. 1.

The fares, which were approved by the city council in September, will be accompanied by a handful of cost-saving measures to take the sting out of the hike.

Cash prices will jump to $1.75 from $1.50 for full-fare riders, to 75 cents from 50 cents for economy customers and to $2.25 from $2 for express bus riders. However, riders who use their SunGO Card will pay a discounted rate \u2014 $1.50 for full fare and 60 cents for economy.

Every fare includes two hours of unlimited usage of all three services, though a card is necessary to enjoy that benefit, according to a city press release.

Additionally, when card holders load $20 and use it within 45 days, they will be credited with another $5. Those who register new cards will get a $2 bonus.

Beyond fare changes, the city council also authorized improvements to bus stop infrastructure and service.

\u201cOur goal is to make transit easier to use, more comfortable and affordable for everyone,\u201d said Sun Tran general manager Kate Riley of those additional changes.

Fares for full-price Sun Van passengers will remain the same in 2017, though low-income riders will see a jump of 50 cents to $1.50. Both rates will rise more substantially in areas more than three-quarters of a mile from fixed bus routes, where so-called optional service is provided. There, full-fare prices will rise to $5 and economy rates will rise to $3.50, increases of $2 and $2.50 respectively.

For more information on the changes, go to tinyurl.com/jqjyxcq or call 792-9222.

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Professors at the University of Arizona may soon be asking students about their preferred gender pronouns and crafting a syllabus that includes warnings for possibly traumatizing content.

The University of Arizona\u2019s faculty senate on Monday explored establishing guidelines for professors to be more sensitive to marginalized students, including LGBTQ students and those who have experienced trauma.

The recommendations come as a result of discussions facilitated by the diversity task force, which UA President Ann Weaver Hart created last year as a response to student activism.

Groups of marginalized students and their supporters reported racism and homophobia on campus, and they subsequently released a demand letter asking for a range of changes, including diversifying the UA\u2019s faculty and staff and providing cultural competency training.

\u201cIt\u2019s about creating a more welcome climate in the classroom,\u201d said Jes\u00fas Trevi\u00f1o, the UA\u2019s senior diversity officer and vice provost for inclusive excellence, who was hired in May to address diversity on campus.

The task force has eight subcommittees, including the classroom experience subcommittee that produced the two recommendations on gender pronouns and content warnings. Each subcommittee is intended to tackle issues raised in the students\u2019 demand letter.

The general consensus from the faculty senate was to pursue fine-tuning the language for the pronoun and content warning recommendations for campuswide guidelines. The faculty group will re-evaluate in the future whether or not those guidelines should be elevated to mandated policy.

Some faculty senators voiced concerns mostly about the guidelines\u2019 impact on academic freedom. Roy Spece, a law professor, said at the meeting that while he\u2019s sympathetic to students\u2019 concerns, there doesn\u2019t need to be restrictions on professors\u2019 speech when the issue is a moral one.

It could start the university down a \u201cslippery slope,\u201d he said. \u201cWe need to respect people\u2019s rights to say things we don\u2019t like.\u201d

Trevi\u00f1o, the senior diversity officer, said in an interview that the message is not \u201cdo not present the information in the classroom.\u201d Instead, faculty should simply let students know, through syllabus or other means, what would be discussed throughout the semester.

But where does the university draw the line? \u201cCommon sense,\u201d he said. The boundaries are something the university and its members would have to continue to discuss, but the best gauge right now is to consider what is an obvious trigger for trauma, such as sexual violence.

Some discomfort is part of the learning process, he said. \u201cBut we don\u2019t want to push them over the learning edge.\u201d

In the end, the guidelines to ask students about their preferred gender pronouns and giving advanced notice on possibly triggering content are \u201cnot unlike a whole bunch of things that already exist in your contracts,\u201d faculty senate Chair Lynn Nadel told his fellow senators at the meeting.

\u201cIf you look at the university handbook, you will find a variety of things you\u2019re required to do,\u201d he said. \u201cThat\u2019s not news. This is appropriate behavior. It\u2019s simply adding things to an already long list of things faculty members are expected to do as part of their employment.\u201d

Shevonda Joyner, a UA junior and an intern for the diversity task force, said she would like to see the guidelines implemented as quickly as possible. When the professors show \u201can actual understanding of students,\u201d they feel comfortable and safe in the classroom, which is the state of mind they need to be in to learn.

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Ventana Medical Systems/Roche Tissue Diagnostics has laid off 84 employees at its Oro Valley operation to address a \u201cchallenging business environment,\u201d the company said.

A variety of positions were affected across departments including research and development, marketing and human resources, Ventana spokesowman Jacquie Bucher said.

Ventana/Roche is one of Southern Arizona\u2019s biggest employers, reporting 1,286 full-time equivalent workers at the start of 2016 in the Star 200 survey of the region\u2019s major employers.\u00a0

The affected employees will have the opportunity to apply for open positions at Ventana, or the broader Roche organization, she said.

\u201cThrough the course of normal business, we constantly review our performance, resources and spends,\u201d Bucher said in an email. \u201cThis action was taken to address the challenging business environment and to rebalance our headcount to meet the needs of our current projects.\u201d

The recent job moves are unrelated to a plan Roche announced in November 2015 to restructure its small-molecule drug manufacturing network, she said.

Roche recently agreed to sell a drug manufacturing plant in Florence, South Carolina, to another drug company after announcing it would close the plant along with three plants in Europe in a cost-saving move.

Ventana develops and makes diagnostic instruments and tissue tests for cancer and other infectious diseases, including so-called companion tests to match patients to Roche drugs for breast, lung and skin cancer.

In October, Swiss-based Roche reported strong sales growth in the third quarter, with a 7 sales at its diagnostics division rising 7 percent to $8.3 million.

Roche, based in Basel, Switzerland, has expanded its facilities and workforce at Ventana since it acquired the University of Arizona technology spinoff for $3.4 billion in 2008. The company had about 800 local workers at the end of 2008.

Ventana was founded in 1985 by UA pathologist Dr. Thomas Grogan based on his invention of an automated slide-staining device for tissue pathology.

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Arizona college students are increasingly choosing business and health-related majors, but not so much education, history or architecture.

A new report by the Arizona Board of Regents showed that in the 2015-2016 school year, there was an overall growth in the number of degrees awarded by the state\u2019s three public universities, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Among the findings were:

At the University of Arizona, the majors that awarded the most degrees were business, health-related, biological or biomedical sciences, social sciences and engineering.

\u201cStudents are making choices and looking at where there are job opportunities and choosing those majors,\u201d said Dan Anderson, director of institutional analysis for the regents board. The largest increases in the number of degrees awarded follow job market trends.

On the other hand, education saw steep declines statewide in the number of degrees awarded both at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

While it still remains one of the largest majors at each of the three state universities, statewide there were 587 fewer education bachelor\u2019s degrees awarded in 2015-2016 school year compared with the 2007-2008 school year.

But there are teacher jobs all around the state. Scores of research conducted by the Arizona Department of Education and education-advocacy organizations around the state point out a growing teacher shortage in Arizona. Tucson-area school districts started out the 2016-2017 school year with hundreds of teacher vacancies.

One important distinction is that most of the decreases in education degrees come from degree tracks that lead to becoming a teacher, said Ronald Marx, professor of education psychology and dean of education at the UA. In other words, students aspire to be in education; they just don\u2019t want to become teachers.

In fact, program areas in the College of Education other than teacher certification tend to be very robust, he said. Aside from the obvious low-wage issues \u2014 starting Arizona teachers tend to make about $30,000 to $35,000, though the amount varies across the state \u2014 Marx said the reputation of teaching as a profession has taken a beating.

Teachers are increasingly depicted in mass media as being not particularly smart, effective nor caring, he said. Teaching has come to be considered a low-status profession in the past several years.

\u201cLow social status and low amounts of money compounds into fewer people making decisions to be teachers,\u201d Marx said.

Then there is the issue of low return on investment, he said.

Tuition at public universities across the country is skyrocketing, but teacher wages in the state are so low that many students, even those with passion, can\u2019t justify graduating with a degree loaded with debt just to get a job that doesn\u2019t provide them the ability to pay that debt off.

In contrast to education, business majors often see a high return of investment, said Pam Perry, associate dean of undergraduate studies at the Eller College of Management at the UA. Eller\u2019s Masters in Business Administration program was ranked sixth in the country recently for return on investment by U.S. News & World Report.

\u201cBusiness has always been one of the most-popular majors at almost every major university,\u201d she said. The Board of Regents report noted the high growth of business-management and marketing degrees, but that growth isn\u2019t necessarily a surprise to the associate dean.

Perhaps a more noteworthy finding from the report would be that health-related degrees have also seen a big hike, Perry said.

Francisco Moreno, assistant vice president for diversity and inclusion at UA Health Sciences, said health-related professions have also always enjoyed a high level of interest from students, but added that the interest has increased significantly in the last several years.

Statewide, nearly 1,200 more health-related undergraduate degrees were awarded in 2015-2016 school year than eight years ago. At the graduate level, the number of degrees awarded went from 551 to 1,251.

The UA\u2019s health-sciences programs serve more than 9,000 undergraduate students, Moreno said. The health industry has steadily been a reliable source of employment for graduates. \u201cThe spectrum of healthcare services is pretty much under-resourced in terms of human capital,\u201d he said.

What aids in UA health programs\u2019 growth is the industry\u2019s growth in the community, he said. It\u2019s a mutually beneficial relationship, with the university supporting the establishment and development of medical and biotechnology firms in the area and those firms looking for employees at the university.

An example of that relationship is Ventana Medical Systems, which makes medical diagnostic instruments. It\u2019s a homegrown firm, still manufacturing in Tucson and distributing worldwide. Ventana was born with the help of the UA and former UA President Henry Koffler.

The Health Science Center also collaborates with local school districts and nonprofit organizations to develop outreach and education programs. Those connections are \u201cgood forms of recruitment,\u201d Moreno said.

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