[ {"id":"7d66c6fc-6aa4-52b4-a564-62227e6345d1","type":"article","starttime":"1484688600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T14:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484693376","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true","breaking":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Obama orders early release of Chelsea Manning, soldier who leaked Army records","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_7d66c6fc-6aa4-52b4-a564-62227e6345d1.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/obama-orders-early-release-of-chelsea-manning-soldier-who-leaked/article_7d66c6fc-6aa4-52b4-a564-62227e6345d1.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/obama-orders-early-release-of-chelsea-manning-soldier-who-leaked/article_3084a7dc-dcfc-11e6-8ad7-f3b346bb2e54.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Associated Press","prologue":"President Barack Obama is commuting the prison sentence of Chelsea Manning, the former Army intelligence analyst who leaked classified documents.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","national","chelsea manning","bradley manning","military","leaks","wikileaks"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"5b17ae61-8c48-5d5c-a14f-fa9ae4763f67","description":"Pfc. Chelsea Manning poses while wearing a wig and lipstick in this undated photo. On Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, President Barack Obama commuted the sentence of Manning, who is serving 35 years for leaking Army documents.","byline":"Associated Press","hireswidth":2000,"hiresheight":1504,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b17ae61-8c48-5d5c-a14f-fa9ae4763f67/587e987136e8b.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"466","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b17ae61-8c48-5d5c-a14f-fa9ae4763f67/587e987135d5a.image.jpg?resize=620%2C466"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b17ae61-8c48-5d5c-a14f-fa9ae4763f67/587e987135d5a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"226","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b17ae61-8c48-5d5c-a14f-fa9ae4763f67/587e987135d5a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C226"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"770","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b17ae61-8c48-5d5c-a14f-fa9ae4763f67/587e987135d5a.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C770"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"7d66c6fc-6aa4-52b4-a564-62227e6345d1","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 President Barack Obama commuted the prison sentence of Chelsea Manning on Tuesday, allowing the convicted Army leaker to go free nearly three decades early as part of a sweeping move to offer clemency in the final days of his administration.

Manning, who will leave prison in May, was one of 209 inmates whose sentences Obama was shortening, a list that includes Puerto Rican nationalist Oscar Lopez-Rivera. Obama also pardoned 64 people, including retired Gen. James Cartwright, who was charged with making false statements during a probe into disclosure of classified information.

\"These 273 individuals learned that our nation is a forgiving nation,\" said White House counsel Neil Eggleston, \"where hard work and a commitment to rehabilitation can lead to a second chance, and where wrongs from the past will not deprive an individual of the opportunity to move forward.\"

Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst, has been serving a 35-year sentence for leaking classified government and military documents to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. She asked Obama last November to commute her sentence to time served.

\n

Manning has spent more than six years behind bars. She was convicted in military court in 2013 of six violations of the Espionage Act and 14 other offenses for leaking more than 700,000 documents and some battlefield video to WikiLeaks.

She was known as Bradley Manning at the time of her 2010 arrest and is being held at the military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Manning was an intelligence analyst in Iraq and has acknowledged leaking the documents, but has said it was done to raise public awareness about the effects of war on civilians.

She attempted suicide twice last year, according to her lawyers, citing her treatment at Leavenworth.

Chase Strangio, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney representing Manning, said the president's action \"quite literally save Chelsea's life.\"

\"We are all better off knowing that Chelsea Manning will walk out of prison a free woman, dedicated to making the world a better place and fighting for justice for so many,\" Stangio said in a statement.

The U.S. Army declined to comment.

Cartwright, the former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, received a pardon, the White House said. He pleaded guilty in October to making false statements during an investigation into a leak of classified information about a covert cyberattack on Iran's nuclear facilities. Prosecutors said Cartwright falsely told investigators that he did not provide information contained in a news article and in a book by New York Times journalist David Sanger, and said he also misled prosecutors about classified information shared with another journalist, Daniel Klaidman.

The Justice Department sought a sentence of two years, saying employees of the U.S. government are entrusted each day with sensitive classified information.

\"They must understand that disclosing such information to persons not authorized to receive it has severe consequences,\" prosecutors wrote in a sentencing memorandum filed this month.

Commutations reduce sentences being served but don't erase convictions. Pardons generally restore civil rights, such as voting, often after a sentence has been served.

Most of the other people receiving commutations were serving sentences for nonviolent drug offenses.

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The Reid Park Zoo said two of its animals died this month \u2014 Nikita, a 20-year-old jaguar, and Lily, an 18-year-old white-handed gibbon.

Nikita, who was one of the oldest jaguars in captivity in the U.S., was euthanized Jan. 12 due to age-related health issues, according to a post on the zoo's blog.

Nikita had been treated for age-related issues for the past five years, and in addition to being a cancer survivor, the jaguar recently received three blood transfusions to treat chronic age-related concerns. In the days leading up to her death, staff noticed that she suddenly had trouble moving around and it was determined that her chronic spinal disease had gotten much worse, the blog said.

The median life expectancy for jaguars is 12 to 15 years.

Lily and her parents were transferred to the new gibbon habitat at the end of December, after which zoo staff noticed she was lethargic and wasn't eating much food.

She was returned to her old habitat for several days to see if she would improve before being moved into the zoo's health center for hands-on care. Lily died Jan. 14 in the company of veterinarians and curatorial staff, the blog post said.

Lily's parents,\u00a043-year-old male, Billy, and Moms, a 47-year -old female, are two of the oldest gibbons living in a North American zoo, and the only remaining gibbons at Reid Park.

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With a unanimous 5-0 vote, the Pima County Board of Supervisors approved a four-year extension for horse racing at Rillito Park.

The racing facility is recognized as \u201cthe birthplace of quarter-horse racing in the United States,\u201d and races have regularly been held at the site since the 1940s, though some dispute its historical significance.

On Tuesday, the board at least for now settled the question of whether racing would continue at the park, which also serves as the county's largest soccer facility with 11 full-size soccer fields.

The lease is with Rillito Racing Inc., which manages the sport and related business at the facility.

Rejecting the lease likely would have meant the end of horse racing at the park. County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry had recommended that if no extension was granted, the board should vote to tear down the grandstand \"to reduce the county's risk associated with its current condition.\"

A $1 million donation from the Bert W. Martin Foundation also was in the balance. Without an extension approval before the end of January, the offer, which would be used for a number of needed repairs to the grandstand, clubhouse and other facilities, will be rescinded.

Jaye Wells, president of the Rillito Park Foundation, of which Rillito Racing is a part, said recently that without a multiyear lease extension, getting donations from the Martin Foundation and other organizations would be extremely difficult. All improvements to the grandstand and other horse-racing infrastructure are the responsibility of the racing lessee, not the county.

Approval of the lease cements the park\u2019s status quo through June 2021, and that status quo has not been without tension. In addition to being the site of some of the country\u2019s earliest quarter-horse racing, Rillito, with 11 full-size soccer fields, is the county\u2019s largest soccer facility, and scheduling conflicts have arisen between the different users. Rillito is also used by the weekly Heirloom Farmers Market and special events like the annual Tucson Celtic Festival, held in early November.

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A Tucson woman involved in an adoption scam involving a Boston couple was sentenced Tuesday to 100 days in jail and four years probation.\u00a0

Pima County Superior Court Judge Casey McGinley told Karla Vargas that after reviewing the case Friday he was prepared to sentence her to prison for a financial crime he said was both unusual and emotionally harmful.\u00a0

However, McGinley told the 35-year-old woman he reconsidered because she has had a tragic life, and also because the victims in the case asked that she be spared prison.

He warned her to be careful going forward, to stop lying and \"using other people's good will against them.\"

If she ends up back in his courtroom, \"you will have used up all of everyone's good graces.\"

Cindy Cantrell, a journalist, and her husband, Jack McHugh, a contractor, first connected with Vargas in July 2015 through California-based Adoption Network Law Center.

Vargas, who has had 12 children and a long history of child-welfare issues, kept the births a secret and then tried to get money after the babies were born while pretending to still be pregnant. She admitted to a Tucson police detective that she didn\u2019t want to give up the twins she was carrying and kept it quiet to get money.

Vargas and her sister, Lucianna Lopez, set them up from the beginning, police records say, by telling them Lopez was Vargas\u2019 landlord and exaggerating by $100 per month the amount of the rent due.\u00a0

"}, {"id":"fd9a9940-06e5-5c1a-afd5-218a3ff74315","type":"article","starttime":"1484679600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T12:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484695810","priority":45,"sections":[{"tucson":"business/tucson"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Davis-Monthan passed over for new F-35, drone units","url":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/article_fd9a9940-06e5-5c1a-afd5-218a3ff74315.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/davis-monthan-passed-over-for-new-f--drone-units/article_fd9a9940-06e5-5c1a-afd5-218a3ff74315.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/davis-monthan-passed-over-for-new-f--drone-units/article_fd9a9940-06e5-5c1a-afd5-218a3ff74315.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By David Wichner\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"South Carolina is preferred site for drone unit; Texas gets F-35 nod.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["davis-monthan air force base","drones","mq-9 reaper","f-35","a-10"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5biz","#top5"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72683"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"b4fadba9-9e44-5386-86a1-1d1d2d81f7c4","description":"Maj. Douglas Rosenstock fires an AIM-120 AMRAAM from an F-35 Lightning II during a recent weapons test surge at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. By the end of the surge the F-35 Integrated Test Team released 30 weapons in 31 days, a first in flight testing. (Lockheed Martin photo/Darrin Russel)","byline":"Darin Russell / Lockheed Martin","hireswidth":1673,"hiresheight":982,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4f/b4fadba9-9e44-5386-86a1-1d1d2d81f7c4/587e9164de720.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"364","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4f/b4fadba9-9e44-5386-86a1-1d1d2d81f7c4/587e9164dcd0e.image.jpg?resize=620%2C364"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"59","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4f/b4fadba9-9e44-5386-86a1-1d1d2d81f7c4/587e9164dcd0e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C59"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"176","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4f/b4fadba9-9e44-5386-86a1-1d1d2d81f7c4/587e9164dcd0e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C176"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"601","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4f/b4fadba9-9e44-5386-86a1-1d1d2d81f7c4/587e9164dcd0e.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C601"}}},{"id":"2d986d9e-950f-5b43-909b-9f8f0b3832dc","description":"A MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial vehicle prepares to land after a mission in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. The Reaper has the ability to carry both precision-guided bombs and air-to-ground missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Brian Ferguson)","byline":"SSgt Brian Ferguson / USAF","hireswidth":1788,"hiresheight":1031,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d9/2d986d9e-950f-5b43-909b-9f8f0b3832dc/587e916573151.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"358","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d9/2d986d9e-950f-5b43-909b-9f8f0b3832dc/587e916572521.image.jpg?resize=620%2C358"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"58","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d9/2d986d9e-950f-5b43-909b-9f8f0b3832dc/587e916572521.image.jpg?resize=100%2C58"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"173","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d9/2d986d9e-950f-5b43-909b-9f8f0b3832dc/587e916572521.image.jpg?resize=300%2C173"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"590","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d9/2d986d9e-950f-5b43-909b-9f8f0b3832dc/587e916572521.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C590"}}}],"revision":19,"commentID":"fd9a9940-06e5-5c1a-afd5-218a3ff74315","body":"

Davis-Monthan Air Force Base has been passed over for now as a home to new drones or the F-35 Lightning II next-generation fighter jet.

After months of study and site visits, the Secretary of the Air Force announced that Shaw Air Force base in South Carolina is the preferred location to base a new MQ-9 Reaper remotely-piloted aircraft group.

Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, Texas, was named the preferred location for the first Air Force Reserve-led F-35 base.

D-M was a finalist for both missions and will be considered along with other finalists as reasonable alternatives during the environmental analysis process that must be completed before the Air Force makes a final basing decision.

Other F-35 site finalists were Homestead Air Reserve Base in Florida and Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri.

The Air Force Reserve unit in Fort Worth was selected for the F-35 because it met all of the training requirements at the lowest cost, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said in a news release.

The base\u2019s close proximity to Lockheed Martin\u2019s F-35 assembly line in Fort Worth also will provide \u201cmission synergy and access to an experienced workforce for recruiting,\u201d James added.

The other finalists for the drone site were Moody Air Force Base in Georgia; Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho; and Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska.

The need for additional locations for Reaper units was identified during surveys of officers and enlisted airmen, as part of an Air Combat Command initiative to address quality of life issues that have made it difficult to attract and keep drone pilots.

\u201cShaw AFB was selected because it was the best option to help us diversify assignment opportunities for personnel within the MQ-9 enterprise, provide increased opportunities for leadership from within the community, and provide flexibility to enhance integration with other organizations and capabilities,\u201d James said.

Once a final site is selected, the first airmen assigned to the new drone group are expected to begin arriving there in fiscal year 2018, the Air Force said. No drones will be based at the location at the selected location, which will be a \u201cmission control element\u201d consisting of remote piloting operations.

Though Davis-Monthan may be high on the list for subsequent basings, the news is a blow to efforts to attract new missions to the D-M, as its mainstay A-10 Thunderbolt II ground-attack jets are scheduled for retirement in phases by 2022.

Local officials have been lobbying for new missions for D-M and have hired a consultant to plot strategies to save the base from future budget cuts, citing D-M\u2019s estimated annual economic impact of about $990 million.

The head of a local business and community group that supports D-M and its airmen said the latest basing news was disappointing, but D-M still is under consideration for critical missions.

Bob Logan, president of the DM50, said although Shaw is now the presumed favorite for the new drone group, D-M will still get a look as part of the environmental assessment and may be in line for follow-on units.

\u201cWe all know the RPA (remotely piloted aircraft) mission is going to be expanding for many, many years,\u201d Logan said, noting that the Air Force is also looking at creating a new RPA wing, which is larger than a group.

The Air Force in announcing Shaw as a preferred location said is it considering another location to host an MQ-9 wing with up to 24 MQ-9s, launch and recovery elements, a mission-control element, a maintenance group and support personnel.

D-M is host to the Air National Guard 214th Reconnaissance Squadron, which remotely pilots unmanned aircraft in combat zones from its base at D-M.

D-M is not currently is not currently approved for drone launching and landing operations, though the 214th has such a capability at Libby Army Airfield in Sierra Vista.

Logan, a University of Arizona assistant dean, said F-35 basing has become very competitive, and Fort Worth had an obvious edge as F-35s roll off Lockheed\u2019s assembly line practically nest door to the joint air base.

F-35 basings will continue to widen as more enter service, Logan said, predicting that D-M eventually will gain an F-35 unit.

Logan said D-M remains an important training base with its weather and nearby training ranges and it\u2019s still under consideration to host more F-16 training.

Meanwhile, he noted, D-M\u2019s A-10s are being retrofitted with the latest communication system for search-and-rescue missions.

The upgraded system, known as the Lightweight Airborne Recovery System V-12, provides A-10 pilots with GPS coordinates of ground personnel and allows them to communicate via voice or text.

The systems are being installed by the 309th Aircraft Maintenance and Regeneration Group, a major tenant at D-M that operates the Air Force\u2019s biggest military maintenance and salvage operation.

"}, {"id":"58639a72-dce5-11e6-a2c6-afd0af400df3","type":"article","starttime":"1484678820","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T11:47:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484683721","priority":30,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Reid Park Zoo announces deaths of jaguar, gibbon","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_58639a72-dce5-11e6-a2c6-afd0af400df3.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/reid-park-zoo-announces-deaths-of-jaguar-gibbon/article_58639a72-dce5-11e6-a2c6-afd0af400df3.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/reid-park-zoo-announces-deaths-of-jaguar-gibbon/article_58639a72-dce5-11e6-a2c6-afd0af400df3.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":3,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":1,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Caitlin Schmidt\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Jaguar was euthanized; gibbon died of natural causes.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"b5bfbdd6-dce5-11e6-a827-abc8fa3f73bd","description":"Reid Park Zoo announced the deaths of Nikita, a\u00a020-year-old jaguar, and Lily, an 18-year-old gibbon, on Jan. 17.","byline":"Courtesy of Reid Park Zoo","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":1500,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/5b/b5bfbdd6-dce5-11e6-a827-abc8fa3f73bd/587e6786a4606.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"310","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/5b/b5bfbdd6-dce5-11e6-a827-abc8fa3f73bd/587e6786a2c7f.image.jpg?resize=620%2C310"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/5b/b5bfbdd6-dce5-11e6-a827-abc8fa3f73bd/587e6786a2c7f.image.jpg?crop=1809%2C1018%2C175%2C0&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/5b/b5bfbdd6-dce5-11e6-a827-abc8fa3f73bd/587e6786a2c7f.image.jpg?crop=1809%2C1018%2C175%2C0&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/5b/b5bfbdd6-dce5-11e6-a827-abc8fa3f73bd/587e6786a2c7f.image.jpg?crop=1809%2C1018%2C175%2C0&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"links":[{"id":"54d46412-d9e9-11e6-83e2-077492d7b8a8","type":"link","starttime":"1484355600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-13T18:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484690594","priority":45,"application":"editorial","title":"Nandi's Neighbors at the Reid Park Zoo","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/zoo/","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/zoo/","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/zoo/"}],"revision":11,"commentID":"58639a72-dce5-11e6-a2c6-afd0af400df3","body":"

The Reid Park Zoo said goodbye to two of its animals in January, with the losses of 20-year-old jaguar, Nikita, and Lily, an 18-year-old white-handed gibbon, officials said Tuesday.

Nikita, who was one of the oldest jaguars in the U.S., was euthanized Jan. 12 due to age-related health issues, according to a post on the zoo's blog.

Nikita had been treated for age-related issues for the past five years, and in addition to being a cancer survivor, the jaguar recently received three blood transfusions to treat chronic age-related concerns. In the days leading up to her death, staff noticed that she suddenly had trouble moving around and it was determined that her chronic spinal disease had gotten much worse, the blog said.

The median life expectancy for jaguars is 12 to 15 years.

Lily and her parents were transferred to the new gibbon habitat at the end of December, after which zoo staff noticed that she was lethargic and wasn't eating much food. She was returned to her old habitat for several days to see if she would improve before being moved into the zoo's health center for hands-on care. Lily passed away on Jan. 14,\u00a0in the company of veterinarians and curatorial staff, the blog post said.

Lily's parents,\u00a043-year-old male, Billy, and Moms, a 47-year -old female, are two of the oldest gibbons living in a North American zoo, and the only remaining gibbons at Reid Park.

"}, {"id":"a2fe3488-dcbe-11e6-9771-bfcc25545c86","type":"article","starttime":"1484665200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T08:00:00-07:00","priority":30,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tucson brewery gets big kudos from beer enthusiast website","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_a2fe3488-dcbe-11e6-9771-bfcc25545c86.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-brewery-gets-big-kudos-from-beer-enthusiast-website/article_a2fe3488-dcbe-11e6-9771-bfcc25545c86.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-brewery-gets-big-kudos-from-beer-enthusiast-website/article_a2fe3488-dcbe-11e6-9771-bfcc25545c86.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":3,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"One of 2016's most impressive beers comes out of Iron John's Brewing Co.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"cb6ff992-5e41-55c3-9276-847e483e519b","description":"John Adkisson opened Iron John\u2019s Brewing Co., 245 S. Plumer Ave., with John Markley in March of 2014. Adkisson has been brewing for more than 25 years, and is a founding member of the Tucson Homebrew Club.","byline":"Courtesy of John Adkisson.","hireswidth":1662,"hiresheight":1246,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/b6/cb6ff992-5e41-55c3-9276-847e483e519b/587e38f6c660e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/b6/cb6ff992-5e41-55c3-9276-847e483e519b/587e38f6c4acb.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"74","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/b6/cb6ff992-5e41-55c3-9276-847e483e519b/56e63b0facd84.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/b6/cb6ff992-5e41-55c3-9276-847e483e519b/587e38f6c4acb.image.jpg?crop=1662%2C934%2C0%2C94&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/b6/cb6ff992-5e41-55c3-9276-847e483e519b/587e38f6c4acb.image.jpg?crop=1662%2C934%2C0%2C94&resize=1024%2C575&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"a2fe3488-dcbe-11e6-9771-bfcc25545c86","body":"

A local brewery is getting some national attention on a website for beer enthusiasts, after it was singled out for having one of 2016's most impressive beers.

Iron John's Brewing Co., 245 S. Plumer Ave., got a very big mention on PorchDrinking.com, when Paste Magazine writer Jim Vorel called it a \"potentially world class brewery that few people have even heard of, much less sampled.\"

Vorel told PorchDrinking that he stopped at Iron John's while in Tucson for the weekend writing about the breweries.

\"It\u2019s so tiny that it\u2019s almost 'professional homebrewing' in scope, but the guy there is insanely talented and dedicated to his craft,\" Vorel wrote in the post. \u00a0\"I had a stone fruit sour there that, if it had been released by Wicked Weed or Jester King, would have had people trading whales or shelling out $100 online to acquire.\"

Vorel says in the post that Iron John's is being overlooked in Tucson, but after this mention, that might not be the case for much longer.

Check out the whole article here\u00a0or visit Iron John's website.

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A few light showers are possible today, especially east of town, but weather conditions should be mild and mostly dry through Thursday.

A storm system moving into town late Thursday through early Friday will bring valley rain and mountain snow. That's not the end of it though, because a stronger storm will come in on its heels Friday night and be accompanied by below normal temperatures.

High: 63

Low: 41

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Currently

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Clear, 40
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Wind 0 MPH East, 95% humidity
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UV index 0, visibility 10.0 miles
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No precipitation today
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No lightning strikes today
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Today

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8 am: Clear, 40
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 7% chance precip.
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97% humidity, UV index 0
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9 am: Clear, 43
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 4% chance precip.
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87% humidity, UV index 1
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10 am: Clear, 49
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Wind 2 MPH ESE, 1% chance precip.
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73% humidity, UV index 2
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11 am: Clear, 53
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Wind 2 MPH NE, 0% chance precip.
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64% humidity, UV index 3
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12 pm: Clear, 56
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Wind 2 MPH N, 0% chance precip.
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55% humidity, UV index 4
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1 pm: Clear, 59
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Wind 2 MPH NNW, 0% chance precip.
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51% humidity, UV index 4
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2 pm: Partly Cloudy, 60
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Wind 5 MPH NNW, 15% chance precip.
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48% humidity, UV index 3
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3 pm: Partly Cloudy, 61
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Wind 6 MPH NNW, 15% chance precip.
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46% humidity, UV index 2
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4 pm: Clear, 60
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Wind 7 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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48% humidity, UV index 1
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5 pm: Clear, 59
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Wind 7 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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51% humidity, UV index 0
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6 pm: Partly Cloudy, 56
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Wind 6 MPH NW, 1% chance precip.
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60% humidity, UV index 0
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7 pm: Partly Cloudy, 53
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Wind 5 MPH WNW, 1% chance precip.
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68% humidity, UV index 0
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8 pm: Partly Cloudy, 51
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Wind 3 MPH WNW, 2% chance precip.
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75% humidity, UV index 0
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9 pm: Partly Cloudy, 50
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Wind 2 MPH W, 3% chance precip.
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79% humidity, UV index 0
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10 pm: Clear, 48
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Wind 2 MPH S, 3% chance precip.
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83% humidity, UV index 0
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11 pm: Clear, 47
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Wind 3 MPH ESE, 4% chance precip.
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85% humidity, UV index 0
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\n
\n\n

Wednesday

\n\n
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12 am: Clear, 46
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Wind 3 MPH ESE, 4% chance precip.
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87% humidity, UV index 0
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1 am: Clear, 45
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Wind 4 MPH ESE, 5% chance precip.
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89% humidity, UV index 0
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2 am: Clear, 44
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 5% chance precip.
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90% humidity, UV index 0
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3 am: Clear, 44
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 5% chance precip.
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90% humidity, UV index 0
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4 am: Clear, 43
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 5% chance precip.
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91% humidity, UV index 0
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5 am: Clear, 43
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 6% chance precip.
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91% humidity, UV index 0
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6 am: Clear, 42
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Wind 3 MPH SE, 6% chance precip.
\n
90% humidity, UV index 0
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7 am: Clear, 41
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Wind 4 MPH SE, 6% chance precip.
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91% humidity, UV index 0
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8 am: Clear, 42
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Wind 4 MPH SE, 5% chance precip.
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89% humidity, UV index 0
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9 am: Clear, 46
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Wind 4 MPH SSE, 3% chance precip.
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80% humidity, UV index 1
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10 am: Clear, 50
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Wind 3 MPH SSE, 1% chance precip.
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69% humidity, UV index 2
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11 am: Clear, 54
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Wind 2 MPH SE, 0% chance precip.
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62% humidity, UV index 3
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12 pm: Clear, 57
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Wind 2 MPH SSW, 0% chance precip.
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54% humidity, UV index 4
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1 pm: Clear, 59
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Wind 3 MPH W, 0% chance precip.
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51% humidity, UV index 4
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2 pm: Clear, 60
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Wind 5 MPH WNW, 0% chance precip.
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46% humidity, UV index 3
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3 pm: Clear, 61
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Wind 5 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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42% humidity, UV index 2
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4 pm: Clear, 61
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Wind 6 MPH NW, 0% chance precip.
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42% humidity, UV index 1
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5 pm: Clear, 59
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Wind 5 MPH NNW, 0% chance precip.
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45% humidity, UV index 0
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6 pm: Clear, 56
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Wind 4 MPH NNW, 0% chance precip.
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51% humidity, UV index 0
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7 pm: Clear, 53
\n
Wind 3 MPH NNW, 0% chance precip.
\n
59% humidity, UV index 0
\n
\n
"}, {"id":"66172780-dcbb-11e6-b308-9faccc4b4846","type":"article","starttime":"1484660820","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T06:47:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484661272","priority":40,"sections":[{"crime":"news/local/crime"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Man accused of shooting Sierra Vista woman in the face","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/article_66172780-dcbb-11e6-b308-9faccc4b4846.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/man-accused-of-shooting-sierra-vista-woman-in-the-face/article_66172780-dcbb-11e6-b308-9faccc4b4846.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/crime/man-accused-of-shooting-sierra-vista-woman-in-the-face/article_66172780-dcbb-11e6-b308-9faccc4b4846.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"A man has been arrested in the case of a woman who was shot in the face early Monday in Sierra Vista, officials say. Eric Douglas Bryan was arrested Monday afternoon and booked into the Cochise County jail on suspicion of multiple charges, including attempted murder, aggravated assault and burglary.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":["cochise county","crime","eric douglas bryan","jail","sierra vista","attempted murder","aggravated assault","burglary"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"e773b258-dcbb-11e6-8182-d7f32fa3e27d","description":"Eric Douglas Bryan","byline":"Cochise County Sheriff's Department","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"496","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/77/e773b258-dcbb-11e6-8182-d7f32fa3e27d/587e21638480c.image.jpg?resize=496%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/77/e773b258-dcbb-11e6-8182-d7f32fa3e27d/587e21638480c.image.jpg?crop=600%2C337%2C0%2C263&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/77/e773b258-dcbb-11e6-8182-d7f32fa3e27d/587e21638480c.image.jpg?crop=600%2C337%2C0%2C263&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/77/e773b258-dcbb-11e6-8182-d7f32fa3e27d/587e21638480c.image.jpg?crop=600%2C337%2C0%2C263"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"66172780-dcbb-11e6-b308-9faccc4b4846","body":"

A man has been arrested in the case of a woman who was shot in the face early Monday in Sierra Vista, officials say.

Eric Douglas Bryan was arrested Monday afternoon and booked into the Cochise County jail on suspicion of multiple charges, including attempted murder, aggravated assault and burglary.

Bryan, 46, was set for an initial court appearance today.

A 30-year-old woman was found shot in the face in the 200 block of North Third Street, north of East Fry Blvd, in Sierra Vista Monday morning.

Cochise County Sheriff\u2019s deputies discovered the woman after responding to a call of a shooting in the area about 2 a.m., according to a news release.

No further information in the case has been released.

"}, {"id":"4d1d0230-dcb7-11e6-a671-9fa4287a7cf6","type":"article","starttime":"1484659020","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T06:17:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484673552","priority":40,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tucson Fire: 6 displaced in overnight midtown blaze","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_4d1d0230-dcb7-11e6-a671-9fa4287a7cf6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-fire-displaced-in-overnight-midtown-blaze/article_4d1d0230-dcb7-11e6-a671-9fa4287a7cf6.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-fire-displaced-in-overnight-midtown-blaze/article_4d1d0230-dcb7-11e6-a671-9fa4287a7cf6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":1,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Six people were displaced by an early morning fire in midtown, Tucson Fire officials say. The fire started about 1:30 a.m. Tuesday and mostly affected the patio area of the home in the 2800 block of North Tyndall Avenue, near East Glenn Street and North First Avenue. Six people in the home got out safely before fire crews arrived, Capt. Barrett Baker said in a news release.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":["midtown","fire","patio","barrett baker","tucson"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"903e9b00-dcb7-11e6-b37e-1f7fc47f5950","description":"Six people were displaced in an early morning fire Tuesday in midtown, officials said. No one was injured.","byline":"Tucson Fire Department","hireswidth":1200,"hiresheight":900,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/03/903e9b00-dcb7-11e6-b37e-1f7fc47f5950/587e1a5820f85.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/03/903e9b00-dcb7-11e6-b37e-1f7fc47f5950/587e1a581f9c0.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/03/903e9b00-dcb7-11e6-b37e-1f7fc47f5950/587e1a581f9c0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/03/903e9b00-dcb7-11e6-b37e-1f7fc47f5950/587e1a581f9c0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/03/903e9b00-dcb7-11e6-b37e-1f7fc47f5950/587e1a581f9c0.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}},{"id":"e9c9107e-dcb7-11e6-bd6e-630913356a63","description":"Six people were displaced in an early morning fire Tuesday in midtown, officials said. No one was injured.","byline":"Tucson Fire Department","hireswidth":1224,"hiresheight":1632,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/9c/e9c9107e-dcb7-11e6-bd6e-630913356a63/587e1acfcd838.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"465","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/9c/e9c9107e-dcb7-11e6-bd6e-630913356a63/587e1acfcc779.image.jpg?resize=465%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/9c/e9c9107e-dcb7-11e6-bd6e-630913356a63/587e1acfcc779.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/9c/e9c9107e-dcb7-11e6-bd6e-630913356a63/587e1acfcc779.image.jpg?resize=300%2C400"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1365","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/9c/e9c9107e-dcb7-11e6-bd6e-630913356a63/587e1acfcc779.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1365"}}}],"youtube":[{"id":"0d9e2026-4dc4-54f8-a3dc-e68df98cb5a1","starttime":"1484673275","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T10:14:35-07:00","title":"Tucson Fire: 6 displaced in overnight midtown blaze","description":"The cause of the blaze was being investigated. Video courtesy of Tucson Fire Department.","byline":"","video_id":"Ael2WBzXCaA"}],"revision":6,"commentID":"4d1d0230-dcb7-11e6-a671-9fa4287a7cf6","body":"

Six people were displaced by an early morning fire in midtown, Tucson Fire officials say.

The fire started about 1:30 a.m. Tuesday and mostly affected the patio area of the home in the 2800 block of North Tyndall Avenue, near East Glenn Street and North First Avenue. Six people in the home got out safely before fire crews arrived, Capt. Barrett Baker said in a news release.

The cause of the blaze was being investigated.

"}, {"id":"53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78","type":"article","starttime":"1484620980","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T19:43:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484626863","priority":41,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Western Women: Mary Colton dedicated life's work to indigenous arts","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/western-women-mary-colton-dedicated-life-s-work-to-indigenous/article_53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/western-women-mary-colton-dedicated-life-s-work-to-indigenous/article_53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Jan Cleere\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Renowned artist herself, she help expand Museum of Northern Arizona into prominent role preserving Native American culture.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72475"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b","description":"Mary Russell Ferrall Colton","byline":"Wikimedia Commons","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"83","height":"116","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/04/e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b/587969c8435b9.image.jpg?resize=83%2C116"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"140","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/04/e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b/587969c8435b9.image.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"419","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/04/e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b/587969c8435b9.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1431","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/04/e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b/587969c8435b9.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":15,"commentID":"53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78","body":"

Not only was Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton a renowned artist in her own right, but she took on the mission of fostering the redevelopment and popularity of Native American artisans. Through her efforts, and those of her husband, Harold Sellers Colton, Flagstaff\u2019s Museum of Northern Arizona became one of the pre-eminent facilities encouraging indigenous arts and crafts.

Born in Louisville, Kentucky, on March 25, 1889, Mary began her studies at the Philadelphia School of Design at the age of 15. She opened an art studio in downtown Philadelphia with two of her classmates, preferring to work in oils but also experimenting with pencil, ink, charcoal, watercolor and sculpture.

In 1910, she met University of Pennsylvania zoology professor Harold Colton. The couple wed on May 23, 1912.

Spending their honeymoon traveling and camping throughout the west, they arrived in Flagstaff that June and hiked the San Francisco Peaks.

Making their home in Ardmore, Pennsylvania, the couple traveled west whenever possible. They collected old Indian potsherds and discovered ancient sites around Flagstaff that had never been documented including Elden Pueblo, one of the most important pueblos in the Flagstaff area. Recording the location of many ruins they discovered, they initiated some of the first archaeological surveys of the Colorado Plateau.

They visited the Hopi mesas and watched snake dances at Hotevilla and Oraibi. After an extensive trip through the Painted Desert and Hotevilla, Harold wrote his mother that Mary \u201chad discarded her skirt and taken to bloomers quite unblushingly, and on the whole trip wore her hair in pigtails.\u201d

On Aug. 30, 1914, Mary gave birth to Joseph Ferrell Colton, and on Sept. 4, 1917, Sabin Woolworth Colton IV arrived. On a trip to Tucson in 1923, 6-year-old Sabin came down with valley fever and died the following year.

The Coltons moved to Flagstaff in 1925, purchasing 400 acres of land during the ensuing years.

At this time, a small gallery housed in the town\u2019s Women\u2019s Club contained a handful of native blankets, basketry, and pottery. Mary urged the community to expand its native holdings into a facility of science and art. She proposed building a museum from native rock, \u201croofed with stout spruce timbers, somewhat after the pueblo style of architecture, and placed high upon a mesa top overlooking the city and facing the great Peaks.\u201d

With the backing of the community, the Museum of Northern Arizona began to grow. Harold was elected director and president, a position he held for 30 years, while Mary took on the job as curator of art and later accepted the additional position of curator of ethnology, serving until 1948.

Mary was deeply concerned about the decline in Hopi craftsmanship. She was determined to re-establish these ancient arts, skills that had deteriorated with the onset of modern machinery and cheaply made imitations.

She hunted for a better breed of sheep that would produce quality wool and provide weavers with long staple cotton to construct handwoven fabrics that would flourish with the strength and beauty of ancient cloths.

She sought a source for indigo that would re-create the brilliant blue dyes once used in Hopi weavings. She studied native plants searching for traditional stains that would improve the color quality in textiles and basketry.

She experimented with firing methods and paints to restore Hopi pottery to its former beauty and skill while researching natural soils and rocks trying to replicate authentic clay colors.

Mary initiated the Arizona Artists Exhibitions in 1929, providing local artists with a venue for promoting their work. She put together a traveling exhibit, \u201cCraftsmen of the Painted Desert,\u201d displaying Hopi and Navajo art to schools and museums across the country. Her trunk show or \u201ctreasure chest,\u201d in which she compiled lesson plans consisting of collections of art objects and techniques, received national acclaim for its innovative teaching methods.

On July 2, 1930, Mary held the first Hopi craftsman exhibition to promote and preserve native art. \u201cIndians swarmed in from the Reservation,\u201d said Harold, \u201cthen the dry season broke with a gentle rain, which was interpreted to mean that the benevolent Kachinas that dwell in the towering Peaks above the town, were pleased. It was, therefore, a huge success.\u201d

By 1931, she had established the junior art show, presenting the artistic talents of grade-school children. \u201cArt education must begin with children,\u201d she wrote. We must grow our own artists. The material is here awaiting encouragement and cultivation.\u201d

In 1934, she published \u201cArt for the Schools of the Southwest: An Outline for the Public and Indian Schools.\u201d

\u201cIt does not matter what career he, or she, may adopt in later life,\u201d she wrote, \u201ctraining in art appreciation means an increased ability to see beauty in the world about you and a facility for creating things with your hands; these things are a great asset and add immensely to our joy in life.\u201d

She initiated the Hopi Silver Project in 1938, encouraging silversmiths to utilize ancient designs and adopt an overlay technique she proposed would generate better quality and a saleable product.

As the Museum of Northern Arizona expanded, the Coltons donated over 100 acres of land to help it grow and thrive. Mary, however, was not flourishing as well.

She became a recluse, rarely leaving her home. She went back to painting for a while, completing \u201cBell Rock\u201d and \u201cCourthouse Rock,\u201d a Sedona landscape, in 1951, her last work. And although she was not well, she participated in the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the museum in 1953, and an exhibition of her art in 1958.

Harold completed the work she had started to restore ancient Hopi colors, publishing her recipes and findings in \u201cHopi Dyes\u201d in 1965.

Mary, 82, died July 16, 1971. She is buried in a family plot outside Philadelphia.

"}, {"id":"08b21d56-141b-5ead-addd-67f50809ad8c","type":"article","starttime":"1484614800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T18:00:00-07:00","priority":10,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Woman recognized for keeping roadside litter free","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_08b21d56-141b-5ead-addd-67f50809ad8c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/woman-recognized-for-keeping-roadside-litter-free/article_08b21d56-141b-5ead-addd-67f50809ad8c.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/woman-recognized-for-keeping-roadside-litter-free/article_08b21d56-141b-5ead-addd-67f50809ad8c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":1,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Weekly award for good deeds in the community.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72569"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"eb4f86fb-cbd0-58a8-afdf-9fc793b895c3","description":"Alice Gordon, with bell in center, regularly picks up litter along North First Avenue.","byline":"Ben\u2019s Bells","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/b4/eb4f86fb-cbd0-58a8-afdf-9fc793b895c3/5879170c95056.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/b4/eb4f86fb-cbd0-58a8-afdf-9fc793b895c3/5879170c95056.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/b4/eb4f86fb-cbd0-58a8-afdf-9fc793b895c3/5879170c95056.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/b4/eb4f86fb-cbd0-58a8-afdf-9fc793b895c3/5879170c95056.image.jpg"}}}],"links":[{"id":"f7f793ed-baa0-5302-91a3-50a192d69418","type":"link","starttime":"1482454800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-22T18:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484330763","application":"editorial","title":"Favorite baby names in Arizona over the past 55 years","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/families/favorite-names-in-arizona-over-the-past-years/collection_9a7e5110-1b91-11e6-a603-77e324cbd9da.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/families/favorite-names-in-arizona-over-the-past-years/collection_9a7e5110-1b91-11e6-a603-77e324cbd9da.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Using Social Security Administration data, we show the most popular boys' and girls' names in Arizona from 1960 to 2015.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/families/favorite-names-in-arizona-over-the-past-years/collection_9a7e5110-1b91-11e6-a603-77e324cbd9da.html"}],"revision":8,"commentID":"08b21d56-141b-5ead-addd-67f50809ad8c","body":"

\u2022 What: Ben\u2019s Bells promote kindness and community involvement. Each week a person who makes Tucson better is \u201cbelled.\u201d

\u2022 Last week\u2019s recipient: Alice Gordon.

\u2022 Nominated by: Bill Burrus.

\u2022 Why: Gordon has for several years picked up litter along North First Avenue from Orange Grove to River roads. Every Saturday morning, Gordon is out picking up trash, Burrus wrote in his nomination letter. She has recruited help from a neighbor, Loretta Weber, but does this all on her own volition, Burrus wrote. \u201cShe makes sure she recycles all the trash she can,\u201d Burrus added. \u201cShe never asks or hopes for any recognition and is always cheerful, even during the hot summer months.\u201d

\u2022 More info and to nominate someone: Go to bensbells.org/BellingForm to submit a name. Go to bensbells.org or call 622-1379 for more information.

"}, {"id":"3664afcd-ae7a-5d1d-8ac7-91ee333476d6","type":"article","starttime":"1484614800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T18:00:00-07:00","priority":25,"sections":[{"tucsongiving":"news/local/tucsongiving"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Catholic Community Services to honor local families at gala","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucsongiving/article_3664afcd-ae7a-5d1d-8ac7-91ee333476d6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucsongiving/catholic-community-services-to-honor-local-families-at-gala/article_3664afcd-ae7a-5d1d-8ac7-91ee333476d6.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucsongiving/catholic-community-services-to-honor-local-families-at-gala/article_3664afcd-ae7a-5d1d-8ac7-91ee333476d6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Loni Nannini\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"The event will raise funds for more than 40 CCS programs for families throughout Southern Arizona.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72568"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"bb8c52d2-476d-5b71-b85a-12711512b046","description":"Cards hang on the walls of Casa Alitas, a program of Catholic Community Services. CCS will honor several Tucson families while raising funds for 40 of its programs at its gala Jan. 28.","byline":"Mike Christy / Arizona Daily Star 2016","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":2194,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b8/bb8c52d2-476d-5b71-b85a-12711512b046/587d3419606a8.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"453","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b8/bb8c52d2-476d-5b71-b85a-12711512b046/587d3418dbe35.image.jpg?resize=620%2C453"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b8/bb8c52d2-476d-5b71-b85a-12711512b046/587d3418dbe35.image.jpg?resize=100%2C73"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"219","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b8/bb8c52d2-476d-5b71-b85a-12711512b046/587d3418dbe35.image.jpg?resize=300%2C219"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"748","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/b8/bb8c52d2-476d-5b71-b85a-12711512b046/587d3418dbe35.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C748"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"3664afcd-ae7a-5d1d-8ac7-91ee333476d6","body":"

Pat Torrington and other volunteers with Catholic Community Services understand that families \u2014 whether they are comprised of one or 100 \u2014 matter.

The organization will celebrate that philosophy at Family Matters In The Great Southwest on Jan. 28 at the Hilton El Conquistador Golf & Tennis Resort, 10000 N. Oracle Road.

\u201cI think this is an opportunity to educate people about the many wonderful programs that Catholic Community Services offer for families of all sizes and configurations. It is important for people to realize that these programs don\u2019t just serve Catholics. They are open to everyone, no matter what religion, culture or ethnic background,\u201d said Torrington, president of the organization\u2019s corporate board of directors and chair of the upcoming fundraiser.

The annual gala will raise funds for more than 40 CCS programs that provide services for families in nine counties throughout Southern Arizona. In the process, it will highlight the diversity of the group\u2019s programs and celebrate three unique local families: Pat and Marilou Lopez and their family; Pedro and Rosario Morales; and Moriah Mu\u00f1oz.

Each family, while very different, sets a heroic example in the community, according to the charity\u2019s Chief Executive Officer Peg Harmon.

\u201cWe are honoring the Lopez family who are heroes in their own right by supporting the community through active involvement and spearheading philanthropy to many different organizations including CCS. Our two other families \u2014 Pedro and Rosario Morales and Moriah Mu\u00f1oz \u2014 have been heroic in their lives as well. They have met challenging situations and responded in ways that have helped them as individuals and allowed them to succeed in supporting their children and improving their lives,\u2019 Harmon said.

Pat and Marilou, both graduates of Salpointe Catholic High School and the University of Arizona, have carried on a legacy of giving rooted in their parents and grandparents.

The Lopez family, which dates back to Tucson in the 1880s, boasts volunteers for organizations ranging from Boys & Girls Clubs of Tucson, Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts to the Pima County Merit System; Marilou\u2019s family, the Tornquists, were active in Knights of Columbus, Rotary and many other community organizations.

Marilou\u2019s mother was a founding member of CCS Merilac Lodge, a residential program for pregnant teens and young mothers and their babies that promotes infant bonding and parenting skills along with personal development and education.

Pat and Marilou and their daughters \u2014 Katie, Melissa and Elise \u2014 have championed organizations such as Arts For All, Reachout Women\u2019s Center, Tu Nidito, Catholic Tuition Support Organization, Catholic Foundation for the Diocese of Tucson, Salpointe Catholic High School Board and its foundation and many other nonprofits.

Harmon said the Morales family offers its own inspiration. Pedro and Rosario, who were both born deaf in Mexico, have overcome obstacles ranging from poverty, language barriers and lack of education to loss of family. After many years of hard work, Pedro became a U.S. citizen in 1996; Rosario was naturalized a few years later.

The couple and their four children, who continue to work to better their lives, make their home in Tucson and utilize the CCS Community Outreach Program for the Deaf to help interpret spoken and written English (reading bills, children\u2019s school records, medical reports, etc.). The program also assists with obtaining and maintaining employment, supporting housing needs and connecting with community resources.

Another CCS program participant that shines brightly is Mu\u00f1oz. Taken into foster care at age 13 due to her mother\u2019s substance abuse, Mu\u00f1oz was shuffled through group homes for four years. She ran away to rejoin her mother, became addicted to meth and was in jeopardy of losing her infant daughter, Karina, when she was given the option of going to Merilac Lodge. It was a turning point for Mu\u00f1oz, who overcame her addiction and learned about parenting and conflict resolution along with money management and other life skills. After two years at Merilac Lodge, Mu\u00f1oz was granted full custody of Karina and moved into her own apartment. She encourages other young mothers to seek CCS support to change their lives with the understanding that \u201csometimes you have to fall in order to get back up.\u201d

Torrington believes that the stories of the Family Matters honorees will resonate with a broad audience and hopes they will help promote awareness about the unique programs offered by CCS, which often partners with government or social service organizations to maximize services to those in need.

\u201cCCS does everything from providing child care and youth development to caring for seniors and housing for the elderly. Most people don\u2019t realize how expansive their programs are. Wherever they see a need, they try to develop a program to meet that need. For example, they are currently working to develop a residential program for homeless people when they are discharged from the hospital. Other unique programs like COPD help to maximize independence and prevent isolation for people with hearing loss and other disabilities,\u201d Torrington said.

The common thread through the various services is the emphasis of support for the family unit, no matter its size or shape, according to Harmon.

\u201cThe family unit is where we all learn how to be people. We all begin in the context of a family of some sort and all families need support and assistance. Sometimes they get that support from other members of the families and sometimes people need to reach out and get support from others. If we make our families strong, then children are strong and we will have a strong future for them and our community,\u201d Harmon said.

"}, {"id":"d7b0cff5-b53d-51f3-888f-edbc4c777014","type":"article","starttime":"1484611200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T17:00:00-07:00","priority":10,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tucson area residents can get free tax preparation help","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_d7b0cff5-b53d-51f3-888f-edbc4c777014.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-area-residents-can-get-free-tax-preparation-help/article_d7b0cff5-b53d-51f3-888f-edbc4c777014.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/tucson-area-residents-can-get-free-tax-preparation-help/article_d7b0cff5-b53d-51f3-888f-edbc4c777014.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Volunteers available to do basic individual tax returns.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"906893a8-a767-59e8-960e-58a258bba16f","description":"","byline":"Carolyn Kaster","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"396","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/06/906893a8-a767-59e8-960e-58a258bba16f/58793db7c6a2b.image.jpg?resize=620%2C396"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/06/906893a8-a767-59e8-960e-58a258bba16f/58793db7c6a2b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/06/906893a8-a767-59e8-960e-58a258bba16f/58793db7c6a2b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C192"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"654","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/06/906893a8-a767-59e8-960e-58a258bba16f/58793db7c6a2b.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C654"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"d7b0cff5-b53d-51f3-888f-edbc4c777014","body":"

Catholic Community Services, the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance and the IRS are offering free tax preparation services to residents in the Tucson area for both state and federal returns.

Free tax help is available to those who have low to moderate income ($54,000 or less), seniors, disabled individuals or those who English is a second language.

Local tax volunteers have been certified through the IRS\u2019 VITA program to prepare basic tax returns, and to provide information on credits, deductions and allowable expenses that taxpayers may be eligible for. The volunteers can electronically file both federal and state returns at no charge, according to an IRS news release.

These sites are not able to provide help with business tax returns or complex individual tax returns.

Residents who would like to get their returns prepared should bring a photo ID of themselves and their spouse; valid Social Security numbers or Individual Tax Identification Numbers for each person on the return; all wage and earnings statements, other pertinent financial documents (mortgage, day care expenses, etc.); Health Insurance Marketplace Statement; proof of health insurance; any other documents concerning income and expenses; and a copy of last year\u2019s tax return (if available).

If filing jointly both spouses must be present to sign the required forms.

"}, {"id":"c3dc5044-dc29-11e6-9e31-8bdd5579672a","type":"article","starttime":"1484600400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T14:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484663791","priority":30,"sections":[{"dining":"entertainment/dining"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"These four breweries are slated to launch in 2017","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/dining/article_c3dc5044-dc29-11e6-9e31-8bdd5579672a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/dining/these-four-breweries-are-slated-to-launch-in/article_c3dc5044-dc29-11e6-9e31-8bdd5579672a.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/dining/these-four-breweries-are-slated-to-launch-in/article_c3dc5044-dc29-11e6-9e31-8bdd5579672a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Gerald M. Gay\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Three have been working toward opening for several years.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"0a18ccac-dc2c-11e6-984e-6bcf10f3daa9","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":1426,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a1/0a18ccac-dc2c-11e6-984e-6bcf10f3daa9/587d2fe687ce9.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"295","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a1/0a18ccac-dc2c-11e6-984e-6bcf10f3daa9/587d2fe68594f.image.jpg?resize=620%2C295"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a1/0a18ccac-dc2c-11e6-984e-6bcf10f3daa9/587d2fe68594f.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C992%2C162%2C0&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a1/0a18ccac-dc2c-11e6-984e-6bcf10f3daa9/587d2fe68594f.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C992%2C162%2C0&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a1/0a18ccac-dc2c-11e6-984e-6bcf10f3daa9/587d2fe68594f.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C992%2C162%2C0&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"c3dc5044-dc29-11e6-9e31-8bdd5579672a","body":"

Craft beer continues to expand its already sizable footprint in Tucson with four breweries slated to open in 2017.

While one, Copper Mine Brewing Co. at 3455 S. Palo Verde Road, is new to the scene, the other three have been working toward launching for several years now.

BlackRock Brewers, Button Brew House and Harbottle Brewing all signed leases on locations at the tail end of 2016, taking the next big step on the way to production.

Here\u2019s what we know:

BlackRock Brewers

1664 S. Research Loop

When the owners of BlackRock Brewers finish the build-out on their 3,700 square feet of space at 1664 S. Research Loop, they will have the distinction of being the only brewery on Tucson\u2019s east side, where proper zoning is difficult to find and even harder to secure.

Tony Williams and Chuck Boyer started their journey to open a brewery nearly five years ago, taking on Gene Sandoval as brewmaster and as a third partner along the way.

Tucson\u2019s craft beer boom was just getting started at that point. Now the city is slated to have more than 20 by the end of 2017.

Williams shows no fear as BlackRock aims for a March opening date.

\u201cTucson still has plenty of room,\u201d Williams said. \u201cThey have like, 45 in San Diego and they are doing fine there.\u201d

Williams said they chose the bigger space because they will be \u201cthe only game\u201d on the east side, where locals generally flock to BZ\u2019s Pizza on Broadway or Arizona Beer House on North Kolb to get their fix.

BlackRock will run on a 3-barrel system. The taproom will feature six taps, sporting four flagships, one seasonal and a \u201cforeign exchange\u201d beer imported from Dragoon, 1912 or any one of the other breweries in town, Williams said.

\u201cThat is the fun thing about craft beer,\u201d he said. \u201cWe collaborate, work together. At the end of the day, if one of us succeeds, we all succeed.\u201d

Button Brew House\u00a0

6800 N. Camino Martin

After three years on the hunt, Todd and Erika Button have finally found a forever home for their aptly named Button Brew House.

The couple signed a lease for a space at 6800 N. Camino Martin in December. It is right around the corner from Catalina Brewing Company, sparking the potential for a brand new brewing district on Tucson\u2019s northwest side.

For Todd, who left a 20-year career in the printing business to enter into the brewing industry, this next step is a big deal.

\u201cTo me it feels like a dream,\u201d Todd said. The space is a little more than 3,000 square feet.

He added \u201cIt is one of the scariest things that I\u2019ve ever done in my life. I am really excited about it, but the other side of me is just terrified.\u201d

The Buttons have already put a down-payment on a 10-barrel system. Todd Button said the quality of the beer will be his primary focus.

\u201cWe want to make good, world-class beers,\u201d he said. \u201cI want to make sure we do it the right way. Quality is important. We don\u2019t want off-flavors.\u201d

The Buttons hope to be brewing my mid-May.

\u201cWe are putting everything on the line to do this, but we also believe in it,\u201d Todd said.

Harbottle Brewing Company\u00a0

3820 S. Palo Verde Road

When the owners of Harbottle started their journey to open a brewery in Tucson, they were known by a completely different moniker: Flux Brewing.

Then came the roadblocks in the trademark process. A brewery in Maine had a product with a similar name, as did a winery in California.

Owners Michael Figueira, Andy Shlicker and Sam Kroack came to agreements with both businesses, but \u201cwe eventually made the decision that if we couldn\u2019t trademark it, we would have no potential for growth outside the market.\u201d

Thus Flux became Harbottle, named for Figueira\u2019s distant relative, John Harbottle, a British naval captain who, as the story goes, helped King Kamehameha assert his claim to the thrown.

The brewery is moving into the old home of Mexico in Season, a vegan Mexican restaurant that was open for a short time at 3820 S. Palo Verde Road.

\u201cOnce we looked at it, we knew it was the right fit,\u201d Figueira said. The location is just shy of 4,000 square feet, with good visibility from the street in a high traffic area.

\u201cIt was perfect,\u201d he added.

Harbottle, which will run a 7-barrel system purchased from McFate Brewing in Scottsdale, opens down the street from several breweries, including Green Feet Brewing, 1055 Brewing and Nimbus, all of which are on East 44th Street. Copper Mine Brewing, mentioned earlier in the story, can be found between 44th and Harbottle.

\u201cWe are now able to be part of that local community,\u201d Kroack said. \u201cIt is a perfect fit for what we are trying to accomplish.\"

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The ways of wildflowers are never certain, but experts say deserts around Tucson could burst into beautiful bloom in late winter and spring \u2014 especially with a boost from additional rains.

Some areas \u201chad a good soaker in late December and the ground is turning green with seedlings,\u201d said Mark Dimmitt, a wildflower expert and retired director of natural history at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

\u201cNormally December is too late to start a good wildflower bloom, but it has happened if the winter was very warm,\u201d Dimmitt said. \u201cSo far that\u2019s been the case, so if it holds and we get another couple of good rains, we could have a good flowering of spring annuals. I think that most of the perennials have had enough rain to ensure a good bloom in the Tucson Mountains.\u201d

Meg Quinn, author of \u201cWildflowers of the Desert Southwest,\u201d predicted that the bloom could be \u201caverage or good in some areas.\u201d

\u201cI\u2019ve seen a surprising number of annuals germinating on the Sweetwater Preserve trails on the east side of the Tucson Mountains,\u201d Quinn said.

Others, including Erik Rakestraw, a horticulturist at the Desert Museum, noted that the wildflower bloom is \u201cpretty unpredictable\u201d and that it\u2019s \u201ca little early to tell.\u201d

\u201cHowever, that being said, the herbaceous perennials and small shrubs will probably bloom,\u201d Rakestraw said. \u201cIt will probably be a good year for brittlebush and fairy dusters.\u201d

FIND SOME BLOOMS

Don\u2019t expect to see more than a few scattered wildflowers until February and March.

Once the bloom takes shape in late winter and spring, here are some spots where you\u2019re likely to find some displays of gold poppies, lupines, penstemons, phacelias, fairy dusters and other species.

"}, {"id":"ff3b358c-dc25-11e6-87e8-1ff13697689c","type":"article","starttime":"1484596620","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T12:57:00-07:00","sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Woman shot in the face in Sierra Vista","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_ff3b358c-dc25-11e6-87e8-1ff13697689c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/woman-shot-in-the-face-in-sierra-vista/article_ff3b358c-dc25-11e6-87e8-1ff13697689c.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/woman-shot-in-the-face-in-sierra-vista/article_ff3b358c-dc25-11e6-87e8-1ff13697689c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"A 30-year-old woman was shot in the face in the 200 block of North Third Street, north of East Fry Blvd, in Sierra Vista Monday morning. Cochise County Sheriff\u2019s deputies discovered the woman after responding to a call of a shooting in the area at around 2 a.m., according to a news release. Detectives are interviewing leads. No other details about the victim\u2019s condition or about the shooting have been released.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/55d4b997012b6.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C54&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C54"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"ff3b358c-dc25-11e6-87e8-1ff13697689c","body":"

A 30-year-old woman was shot in the face in the 200 block of North Third Street, north of East Fry Blvd, in Sierra Vista Monday morning.

Cochise County Sheriff\u2019s deputies discovered the woman after responding to a call of a shooting in the area at around 2 a.m., according to a news release.

Detectives are interviewing leads. No other details about the victim\u2019s condition or about the shooting have been released.

"}, {"id":"d1c2c4d5-ccd8-5de1-aea5-3d8b3821466a","type":"article","starttime":"1484589600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T11:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484693957","priority":44,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/local/govt-and-politics"},{"environment":"news/science/environment"},{"tucson":"business/tucson"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Hudbay may challenge Army Corps' authority over mine site","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_d1c2c4d5-ccd8-5de1-aea5-3d8b3821466a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/hudbay-may-challenge-army-corps-authority-over-mine-site/article_d1c2c4d5-ccd8-5de1-aea5-3d8b3821466a.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/hudbay-may-challenge-army-corps-authority-over-mine-site/article_d1c2c4d5-ccd8-5de1-aea5-3d8b3821466a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Tony Davis\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Jurisdictional issues \"will be a key element\" of an appeal if the Corps denies its Clean Water Act permit, says the company proposing the Rosemont Mine.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72606"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"f78ff1e2-9117-50da-b2df-50a47ffcb2e4","description":"The site of the proposed Rosemont Mine, seen above, has washes that fall under the authority of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Hudbay Minerals Inc. may challenge that.","byline":"Mike Christy / Arizona Daily Star file","hireswidth":1024,"hiresheight":591,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/78/f78ff1e2-9117-50da-b2df-50a47ffcb2e4/53d32a2dcce24.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"357","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/78/f78ff1e2-9117-50da-b2df-50a47ffcb2e4/5835dd66b7289.image.jpg?resize=620%2C357"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"57","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/78/f78ff1e2-9117-50da-b2df-50a47ffcb2e4/53d32a2e398ca.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"173","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/78/f78ff1e2-9117-50da-b2df-50a47ffcb2e4/53d32a2e3a0a6.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"589","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/78/f78ff1e2-9117-50da-b2df-50a47ffcb2e4/53d32a2e0e7af.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":14,"commentID":"d1c2c4d5-ccd8-5de1-aea5-3d8b3821466a","body":"

The company proposing to build the Rosemont Mine is raising the possibility of challenging the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers\u2019 authority to regulate washes on the site if the Corps denies a permit to build the project.

Federal jurisdiction over those washes hasn\u2019t been questioned since Rosemont Copper first announced its plans to build the $1.5 billion project a decade ago. The company, now owned by Toronto-based Hudbay Minerals Inc., applied for a Clean Water Act permit for the project back in 2011 and announced its intention to apply in 2008.

A Rosemont consultant, in fact, developed a preliminary version of a formal determination document showing which washes on the mine site would be covered by Clean Water Act oversight years ago.

But the broader issue of federal control over development along mostly dry washes such as these has been subject of national legal disputes for years. Experts say Rosemont\u2019s fate could be affected by how those disputes play out in the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump.

In a Nov. 17 letter to the Corps, Patrick Merrin, a top Hudbay official, wrote, \u201cIn our view, there is significant uncertainty as to whether the Corps has jurisdiction over the onsite drainages. In the event of an adverse final decision on our application, we anticipate that jurisdictional arguments will be a key element of our appeal ... .\u201d

The Corps\u2019 lower-level Los Angeles-based office has recommended denial of Rosemont\u2019s permit. A decision will be made by the agency\u2019s San Francisco-based South Pacific Division, which oversees the Los Angeles office. If that decision goes against Rosemont, the mining company legally can appeal to higher-level Corps officials who would make a final decision.

The Star obtained Merrin\u2019s letter last week under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, along with a letter from South Pacific Division Commander Col. Pete Helmlinger laying out some of the reason for the L.A. office\u2019s recommendation. Hudbay didn\u2019t respond to questions about this issue from the Star.

The Rosemont permit application seeks permission to dredge and put fill material such as mine waste rock and tailings in several ephemeral washes, which carry water only during storms.

The feds\u2019 authority over many desert washes in the Tucson area has been clear since 2008, when the U.S. government declared the Santa Cruz River a legally navigable river even though most of it also runs only during storms. Under the Corps\u2019 and EPA\u2019s interpretation of court rulings, dry washes that are significant tributaries to a navigable river are legally covered by Clean Water Act rules. That means permits are needed for anyone wishing to significantly alter or otherwise impact the washes.

A highly controversial 2015 federal rule known as the \u201cWaters of the U.S.\u201d rule would have formally inscribed that practice onto the books. The phrase \u201cwaters of the U.S.\u201d is used legally to describe rivers and washes that are covered by federal regulation.

But shortly after the EPA and Corps adopted the rule, many states including Arizona successfully stalled it in court until full-blown arguments can be heard over whether it\u2019s legally authorized by the Clean Water Act.

Trump himself argued strongly against the \u201cWaters of the U.S.\u201d rule in his campaign as an example of federal overreach. He has called it extreme and unconstitutional and vows on his transition website to eliminate it.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, Trump\u2019s pick to run the EPA, is one of 30 attorneys general who has filed suit against the rule. He and other critics say it violates private property rights and expands federal authority.

The EPA and environmentalists say the rule gives needed protection to clean water and washes that serve important biological functions and feed major rivers.

"}, {"id":"fc79b00c-27b7-5f05-bf01-38d73e572690","type":"article","starttime":"1484541000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T21:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484686129","priority":41,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Learn to make the most of gem show at Star discussion","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_fc79b00c-27b7-5f05-bf01-38d73e572690.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/learn-to-make-the-most-of-gem-show-at-star/article_fc79b00c-27b7-5f05-bf01-38d73e572690.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/learn-to-make-the-most-of-gem-show-at-star/article_fc79b00c-27b7-5f05-bf01-38d73e572690.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Ann Brown\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"The tents of the annual Tucson Gem, Mineral and Fossil Showcase will soon be dotting the city as the dealing and bargain-hunting of the multishow event begin Jan. 28 and continue through Feb. 12. The showcase can be confusing and overwhelming. To make participating in the event less overwhelming, the Star is offering a free panel discussion, \u201cHow to Make the Most of the Gem, Mineral and Fossil Showcase\u201d (and not get ripped off), at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31 at Casas Adobes Church, 6801 N. Oracle Road.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["tucson gem and mineral show","tucson gem","mineral and fossil showcase","casas adobes church"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72567"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"f7e2264a-77ef-5257-bc46-888d05ccad6a","description":"The tents, booths and bins of the Tucson Gem, Mineral and Fossil Showcase can be overwhelming to the nonexpert. The Star is offering a panel on navigating and understanding the showcase.","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star 2015","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":1861,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/7e/f7e2264a-77ef-5257-bc46-888d05ccad6a/58796e047071b.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/7e/f7e2264a-77ef-5257-bc46-888d05ccad6a/58796e0476374.image.jpg?resize=620%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/7e/f7e2264a-77ef-5257-bc46-888d05ccad6a/58796e0476374.image.jpg?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C1&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"186","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/7e/f7e2264a-77ef-5257-bc46-888d05ccad6a/58796e0497cf7.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/7e/f7e2264a-77ef-5257-bc46-888d05ccad6a/58796e0476374.image.jpg?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C1"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"fc79b00c-27b7-5f05-bf01-38d73e572690","body":"

The tents of the annual Tucson Gem, Mineral and Fossil Showcase will soon be dotting the city as the dealing and bargain-hunting of the multishow event begin Jan. 28 and continue through Feb. 12.

The showcase can be confusing and overwhelming.

To make participating in the event less overwhelming, the Star is offering a free panel discussion, \u201cHow to Make the Most of the Gem, Mineral and Fossil Showcase\u201d (and not get ripped off), at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31 at Casas Adobes Church, 6801 N. Oracle Road.

Four experts on the multishow event will share tips, ideas and insights. They are:

Some of the topics to be discussed include:

There will be time for questions, too.

The Star\u2019s goal is for readers to walk away with solid ideas about how they can navigate, participate in and enjoy the shows.

The discussion is free, but you\u2019re asked to register at tucson.com/workshop

"}, {"id":"49944178-d9c9-11e6-91cc-e79d947a8b86","type":"article","starttime":"1484521200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T16:00:00-07:00","priority":15,"sections":[{"education":"news/local/education"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Two open house events at Tucson-area private schools","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/article_49944178-d9c9-11e6-91cc-e79d947a8b86.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/two-open-house-events-at-tucson-area-private-schools/article_49944178-d9c9-11e6-91cc-e79d947a8b86.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/two-open-house-events-at-tucson-area-private-schools/article_49944178-d9c9-11e6-91cc-e79d947a8b86.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Saint Ambrose School and St. Michael's School are hosting events.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["saint ambrose school","st. michael's school","open house","k-8 school"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"df2b1848-3928-5594-ba1a-b1ad081b8260","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df2b1848-3928-5594-ba1a-b1ad081b8260/572fb273ab083.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df2b1848-3928-5594-ba1a-b1ad081b8260/55d4bb77c048a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df2b1848-3928-5594-ba1a-b1ad081b8260/572fb273ab083.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C41&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df2b1848-3928-5594-ba1a-b1ad081b8260/572fb273ab083.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C41"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"49944178-d9c9-11e6-91cc-e79d947a8b86","body":"

Two private schools in the Tucson area are hosting open house events in the coming weeks.

Saint Ambrose Catholic School, 300 S. Tucson Blvd., will host its event on Jan. 29 from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Attendees will have a chance to meet with the school's teachers and learn about the program. The school serves students from kindergarten through eighth grade.

St. Michael's School, at 602 N. Wilmot Road, will invite prospective families to its campus on Jan. 21 from 9 to 11 a.m. and again on Jan. 25 from 4 to 6 p.m. These events will be focused on students in kindergarten and first grade but anyone is welcome. St. Michael's is also a K-8 school.

"}, {"id":"34ae6e3f-ebdd-5b29-80a8-7b87db26efe9","type":"article","starttime":"1484517600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T15:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484622730","priority":45,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/local/govt-and-politics"}],"application":"editorial","title":"County answers neighborhood's petition to get its roads paved: No","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_34ae6e3f-ebdd-5b29-80a8-7b87db26efe9.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/county-answers-neighborhood-s-petition-to-get-its-roads-paved/article_34ae6e3f-ebdd-5b29-80a8-7b87db26efe9.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/county-answers-neighborhood-s-petition-to-get-its-roads-paved/article_34ae6e3f-ebdd-5b29-80a8-7b87db26efe9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Murphy Woodhouse\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"County officials say tax hikes are needed to provide adequate transportation funding.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["ally miller","chuck huckelberry","orangewood estates","transportation funding","road runner","potholes"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72552"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"74b4f093-7bed-5ce2-9a98-4a5db1588f28","description":"Anna Maldonado, a resident in the Orangeview Estates neighborhood, submitted a petition with more than 200 signatures from neighbors to Pima County in early November to have them fix the roads in their community. The county said no.","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":2054,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4b/74b4f093-7bed-5ce2-9a98-4a5db1588f28/58796cd90be2e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"424","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4b/74b4f093-7bed-5ce2-9a98-4a5db1588f28/58796cd8a77f4.image.jpg?resize=620%2C424"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4b/74b4f093-7bed-5ce2-9a98-4a5db1588f28/58796cd8a77f4.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"205","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4b/74b4f093-7bed-5ce2-9a98-4a5db1588f28/58796cd8a77f4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C205"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"701","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4b/74b4f093-7bed-5ce2-9a98-4a5db1588f28/58796cd8a77f4.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C701"}}},{"id":"a1c7bb6f-b614-5d96-963c-da70723ae6e6","description":"Lives in the Orangeview Estates neighborhood","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1185,"hiresheight":1749,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/1c/a1c7bb6f-b614-5d96-963c-da70723ae6e6/58796cd931176.hires.jpg","presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"420","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/1c/a1c7bb6f-b614-5d96-963c-da70723ae6e6/58796cd93037e.image.jpg?resize=420%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"148","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/1c/a1c7bb6f-b614-5d96-963c-da70723ae6e6/58796cd93037e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C148"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"443","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/1c/a1c7bb6f-b614-5d96-963c-da70723ae6e6/58796cd93037e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C443"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1511","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/1c/a1c7bb6f-b614-5d96-963c-da70723ae6e6/58796cd93037e.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1511"}}}],"revision":20,"commentID":"34ae6e3f-ebdd-5b29-80a8-7b87db26efe9","body":"

When Anna Maldonado and her family moved into the northwest side\u2019s Orangewood Estates development in the early 1980s, the roads were almost as new as their recently constructed home.

Things have changed since then.

Now, according to county data previously provided to the Road Runner, many of the roads that crisscross the neighborhood near West Magee and North Oldfather roads are deemed to be in \u201cpoor\u201d or \u201cfailed\u201d condition. Photos Maldonado provided show sections of street that could only nominally be described as paved.

There is, of course, absolutely nothing unique about the situation. Countywide, more than 65 percent of local streets \u2014 as opposed to collector or arterial streets \u2014 are in either failed or poor condition. That figure is much lower \u2014 about 29 percent \u2014 for much more heavily used arterials.

Maldonado, like many county residents, grumbled for years about the state of her roads. Last October, however, she heard about a collision in which someone hit one of the neighborhood\u2019s numerous potholes and drove into a fire hydrant, after which she says county crews finally came to repair the pothole. She called county officials asking for more patchwork, an approach her son felt was a fool\u2019s errand.

\u201cThat\u2019s not how you\u2019re going to get it done,\u201d he suggested. \u201cYou need to do a petition.\u201d

Hoping to get it finished before the Oct. 18 board of supervisors meeting, Anna and a neighbor quickly went door to door asking people to sign in support of getting their roads \u201cremilled and resurfaced.\u201d Within a few days, 240 people had signed, which likely represents more than half of the neighborhood\u2019s households.

Supervisor Ally Miller, whose district includes Orangewood, passed the petition along to county administration with the following request: \u201cDue to a lack of maintenance and repair by the county over the past 20 years, this road is now in dire need of being re-milled and resurfaced before someone is seriously injured. I am requesting immediate action.\u201d

Anna and her husband, Ray Maldonado, came the supervisors meeting to plead their case, and now \u2014 a few months later \u2014 they have their answer: No.

County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry asked the transportation department to provide a cost estimate for the requested work, which worked out to about $1.1 million for the neighborhood\u2019s 3.74 miles of road.

\u201cFunds for such are unavailable,\u201d he wrote in a memo earlier this month.

He also asked Priscilla Cornelio, the county\u2019s transportation director, to provide a summary of how this fiscal year\u2019s $4.5 million budget for pavement preservation, which is where money for projects like Orangewood would come from, was being spent. All of them were major arterials or collector roads.

Money for pavement preservation is a fairly small part of the county\u2019s transportation budget, accounting for 8 percent of the fiscal year 2015 budget. Combined, more than half that year\u2019s transportation budget went to servicing debt for past roadway projects and roadway maintenance, which includes crack sealing and pothole repair.

In her memo to Huckelberry, Cornelio noted that there are about 1,000 miles of county roads that \u201crequire attention,\u201d work estimated to cost $250 million.

Maldonado appreciates her neighborhood is not alone in having bad streets. That being said, she doesn\u2019t think hers \u201cwill last another five years.\u201d

\u201cThey have to find the money,\u201d she added.

To do that, Huckelberry has another simple answer.

\u201cThere has to be a recognition on everybody\u2019s part that it\u2019s going to take taxes,\u201d he said.

Huckelberry and other county officials have long argued that Pima County does not get its fair share of the Highway User Revenue Fund, or HURF, which is made up largely of state gas-tax revenues; that the state and federal gas taxes, which have not been increased since the early 1990s, are in need of revision; and that an additional half-cent countywide sales tax dedicated to road repair would go a long way toward giving roads like Orangewood\u2019s the attention they need.

Miller has been a vocal critic of blaming the state for the county\u2019s road woes. However, she did not return requests for comment on Orangewood Estates specifically and transportation funding generally.

For her part, Maldonado splits the blame for her neighborhood\u2019s situation evenly between Miller, whom she accuses of being big on talk and light on action, and Huckelberry, whom she doesn\u2019t trust to spend road dollars \u201cproperly.\u201d

Huckelberry\u2019s proposals have gotten some recent backing from a state task force created by the Legislature to look into ways to improve transportation funding. The dryly named Surface Transportation Funding Task Force released its equally dry final report Dec. 31, and raising the gas tax was one its most repeated recommendations. It also suggests the Legislature should allow counties and regional transportation authorities to pursue \u201clocal options\u201d \u2014 like the additional half-cent sales tax Huckelberry talks about \u2014 \u201cas appropriate.\u201d

What the Legislature chooses do with its creation\u2019s recommendations is, of course, another matter altogether. For Maldonado, the key word in all the proposals is tax.

\u201cEvery time you turn around, they\u2019re asking for more money,\u201d she said. \u201cHow much more can you drain these people?\u201d

DOWN THE ROAD

Visitors to Saguaro National Park West will have some roadwork to contend with this week. Starting Tuesday, Jan. 17, crews will intermittently reduce traffic to one lane on North Sandario Road at its intersection with North Kinney Road between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to install traffic counting sensors. The work will continue through Jan. 24.

Overnight utility work on West Ajo Way at its intersection with South 16th Avenue will reduce the highway to one lane from 9 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17, to 5 a.m. Wednesday.

"}, {"id":"de9b2274-d9c8-11e6-b4c2-2346b0e4f6e4","type":"article","starttime":"1484515800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T14:30:00-07:00","priority":15,"sections":[{"education":"news/local/education"}],"application":"editorial","title":"AAA Arizona seeks Crossing Guard of the Year nominations","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/article_de9b2274-d9c8-11e6-b4c2-2346b0e4f6e4.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/aaa-arizona-seeks-crossing-guard-of-the-year-nominations/article_de9b2274-d9c8-11e6-b4c2-2346b0e4f6e4.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/aaa-arizona-seeks-crossing-guard-of-the-year-nominations/article_de9b2274-d9c8-11e6-b4c2-2346b0e4f6e4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Winner will receive $500.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["aaa arizona","crossing guard of the year"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":1,"commentID":"de9b2274-d9c8-11e6-b4c2-2346b0e4f6e4","body":"

AAA Arizona is calling for Pima County's nominations for its 10th annual Crossing Guard of the Year.

The organization invites students, parents, school staff and community members to nominate someone who they believe deserves to be named the Crossing Guard of the Year. AAA Arizona will also accept self nominations.

The winner and the winner's school will each receive $500.

To nominate, visit https://www.az.aaa.com/files/crossing-guard-year-nom-2017

Deadline for nominations is March 10.

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A winter storm dumped about 3 inches of snow on Mount Lemmon by early Sunday morning, according to the National Weather Service.

In Tucson, the soggy conditions, more than a half-inch of rain fell at the Tucson International Airport, led to the cancellation of the Tucson Association of Realtors Shootout, a soccer competition that brings in over 330 teams from throughout the Southwest. (See story, Page B8.)

There is a 10 percent chance that scattered showers will continue Monday in Tucson, according to the weather service. The expected high temperature is 59 degrees.

On Mount Lemmon, the weather service is calling for a 30 percent chance of snow showers for most of Monday, with a high near 36.

Tucson residents hoping to visit Mt. Lemmon should call the Pima County Sheriff\u2019s Department road condition line at 520-547-7510.

Sunny skies should return Tuesday, but will only last a couple of days until the rain returns Thursday night. Shower chances are expected to increase through Saturday.

Arizona State University meteorology professor Randall Cerveny recently said in a KTAR-FM radio interview in Phoenix that the rain and snowfall in Arizona is helping to ease the state\u2019s 17-year drought.

The U.S. Drought Monitor showed that approximately 25 percent of Arizona was in moderate or severe drought, an improvement from 45 percent three months ago.

No area of Arizona is in the exceptional or extreme-drought category.

"}, {"id":"d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace","type":"article","starttime":"1484514000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T14:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484622400","priority":31,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Lawmaker is seeking 10-cent hike in Arizona's gas tax","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/lawmaker-is-seeking--cent-hike-in-arizona-s-gas/article_d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/lawmaker-is-seeking--cent-hike-in-arizona-s-gas/article_d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Last time Arizona hiked its gas tax was in 1991.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["arizona gas tax","arizons taxes","tax hikes","arizona roads","hurf","gov. doug ducey"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72611"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff","description":"State Rep. Noel Campbell wants a gas-tax hike on the 2018 ballot.","byline":"Capitol Media Services","hireswidth":1443,"hiresheight":1436,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/58798481091cf.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"617","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/587984810739e.image.jpg?resize=620%2C617"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/587984810739e.image.jpg?crop=1443%2C811%2C0%2C97&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/587984810739e.image.jpg?crop=1443%2C811%2C0%2C97&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/587984810739e.image.jpg?crop=1443%2C811%2C0%2C97&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":20,"commentID":"d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The new head of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure wants a dime-a-gallon increase in the state gasoline tax.

But he\u2019s not sure voters are willing to go along.

Rep. Noel Campbell, R-Prescott, pointed out that the last time Arizona hiked its gas tax was in 1991. Since then it has remained at 18 cents a gallon.

\u201cAnd a dollar of tax revenue then is worth about 47 cents today,\u201d he said. \u201cSo we\u2019re not even collecting enough tax to maintain our roads.\u201d

So Campbell figures it\u2019s time to revisit the issue.

He has no illusion his colleagues would approve such a sharp hike in gasoline taxes. And it\u2019s not just a matter of politics: It takes a two-thirds vote of the House and Senate to hike tax rates.

But Campbell needs just a simple majority to put the issue on the 2018 ballot. And he figures he\u2019d better start selling the issue now to get even that margin.

\u201cThe question is, do we have enough willpower to tax ourselves a reasonable amount \u2014 reasonable \u2014 to help us with our road conditions,\u201d he said.

It\u2019s not just a question of a flat tax rate.

Campbell noted there are an increasing number of vehicles on the road that use no gasoline or diesel fuel. And all vehicles are getting much better gas mileage.

Consider: The Arizona Department of Transportation reports that in 2005 motorists logged more than 163 million miles a day on Arizona roads. A decade later, it topped 178 million miles. Yet the amount of gasoline sold in 2015 is virtually identical to what it was in 2005.

\u201cWe have got to get revenue into our transportation system to start dealing with these highway needs that we have,\u201d Campbell said.

And there are a lot.

In a report released last month, a special task force set up by the Legislature pegged Arizona\u2019s near-term funding needs at $20 billion. And that\u2019s just for building, widening and maintaining freeways. An additional $40 billion is needed for other road projects.

Meanwhile, ADOT predicts the Highway User Revenue Fund will add just $1.4 billion this year. And that includes not only fuel taxes but also vehicle license fees and registration charges.

Hiking the gas tax by a dime could bring in an additional $285 million.

But Campbell has another idea he is crafting beyond the gas-tax hike in HCR 2011: a $30 annual fee that motorists would pay every time they buy vehicle insurance.

At the very least, he said, that could raise about $115 million a year. It would eliminate what has become a practice of funding the Department of Public Safety by raiding HURF dollars that would otherwise be spent on road construction and maintenance.

Gov. Doug Ducey proposes just such a shift from HURF to balance this coming year\u2019s budget.

And it would do something else. Campbell figures it would impose at least some financial burden for using state roads on all vehicles, regardless of how much \u2014 or how little \u2014 gasoline they use.

But in proposing to take the issue to the statewide ballot, Campbell faces a different hurdle.

Residents of Maricopa and Pima counties already have voted to hike sales taxes to take care of their own road-construction needs. That raises the question of whether urban voters, who make up three-fourths of voters in the state, would see any advantage in hiking gasoline taxes, too.

\u201cI don\u2019t really have an answer for you politically,\u201d Campbell said. But he said he at least needs to start the discussion.

Campbell also expressed some frustration at having to fight this battle without help from the state\u2019s top elected official.

\u201cThe governor has got to show leadership here,\u201d he complained.

But Campbell should not count on any backing from Ducey in his quest. Gubernatorial press aide Daniel Scarpinato said his boss remains opposed to any new or increased taxes in any form.

"}, {"id":"d2e272f0-db5f-11e6-beb2-c71340252eed","type":"article","starttime":"1484511480","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T13:18:00-07:00","sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Chance of rain in Tucson, snow on Mount Lemmon for MLK day","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_d2e272f0-db5f-11e6-beb2-c71340252eed.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/chance-of-rain-in-tucson-snow-on-mount-lemmon-for/article_d2e272f0-db5f-11e6-beb2-c71340252eed.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/chance-of-rain-in-tucson-snow-on-mount-lemmon-for/article_d2e272f0-db5f-11e6-beb2-c71340252eed.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Staff and wire reports","prologue":"On Mount Lemmon, a winter storm resulted in around 3 inches of snowfall by early Sunday morning, according to the National Weather Service, with more snow expected throughout the day. The road to Mount Lemmon was still open as of 11:50 a.m., according to the Pima County Sheriff\u2019s Department. In Tucson, the soggy conditions on Sunday led to the cancellation of the popular Tucson Association of Realtors Shootout, a soccer competition that brings in over 330 teams from throughout the Southwest.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/55d4b997012b6.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C54&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C54"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"d2e272f0-db5f-11e6-beb2-c71340252eed","body":"

On Mount Lemmon, a winter storm resulted in around 3 inches of snowfall by early Sunday morning, according to the National Weather Service, with more snow expected throughout the day.

The road to Mount Lemmon was still open as of 11:50 a.m., according to the Pima County Sheriff\u2019s Department.

In Tucson, the soggy conditions on Sunday led to the cancellation of the popular Tucson Association of Realtors Shootout, a soccer competition that brings in over 330 teams from throughout the Southwest.

There is a 20 percent chance that scattered showers will continue on Monday, Martin Luther King Day, in Tucson, according to the National Weather Service, with an expected high temperature of 61 degrees.

On Mount Lemmon, the NWS is calling for a 30 percent chance of snow showers for most of Monday, with a high near 37.

Sunny skies return Tuesday, but will only last a couple of days until the rain returns Thursday. Shower chances are expected to increase throughout the weekend.

Arizona State University meteorology professor Randy Cerveny recently said in a KTAR-FM radio interview in Phoenix, that the rain and snowfall in Arizona is helping to ease the state\u2019s 17-year drought.

The U.S. Drought Monitor showed approximately 25 percent of Arizona was in moderate or severe drought, an improvement from 45 percent three months ago.

No area of Arizona is in the exceptional or extreme drought category.

Tucson residents hoping to visit Mt. Lemmon on Monday should call the Pima County Sheriff's Department road condition line at 547-7510.

"}, {"id":"32ce219e-d9c8-11e6-a38c-c31746f78c3b","type":"article","starttime":"1484510400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T13:00:00-07:00","priority":15,"sections":[{"education":"news/local/education"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Saguaro National Park to host youth camps","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/article_32ce219e-d9c8-11e6-a38c-c31746f78c3b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/saguaro-national-park-to-host-youth-camps/article_32ce219e-d9c8-11e6-a38c-c31746f78c3b.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/saguaro-national-park-to-host-youth-camps/article_32ce219e-d9c8-11e6-a38c-c31746f78c3b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"The camps will teach youths about wilderness.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["saguaro national park","tucson mountain district","youth camp"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":1,"commentID":"32ce219e-d9c8-11e6-a38c-c31746f78c3b","body":"

Saguaro National Park's Tucson Mountain District will host two outdoor camps for youths in February.

Participating youths will have a chance to explore the wilderness through a guided experience and learn how to set up tents, string up tarps and use a backpack stove. They will also be taught how to explore the outdoors safely.

Some of the other activities include exploring the desert after dark and storytelling around the campfire.

The two events are:

Explore Camp costs $15 and Wilderness, $45. Fees must be received days by Feb. 1 for Explore and Feb. 17 for Wilderness.

For more information, contact Chip Littlefield at 733-5157 or chip_littlefield@nps.gov. To register, visit http://www.nps.gov/sagu/planyourvisit/wilderness-exploration-camp.htm

"}, {"id":"7b66f670-db57-11e6-8d40-eb1250158c1e","type":"article","starttime":"1484507940","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T12:19:00-07:00","sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Alzheimer's Association to host program for caregivers","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_7b66f670-db57-11e6-8d40-eb1250158c1e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/alzheimer-s-association-to-host-program-for-caregivers/article_7b66f670-db57-11e6-8d40-eb1250158c1e.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/alzheimer-s-association-to-host-program-for-caregivers/article_7b66f670-db57-11e6-8d40-eb1250158c1e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"The Alzheimer\u2019s Association Desert Southwest Chapter will host a three-part interactive program dubbed \u201cLiving with Alzheimer\u2019s: For Caregivers\u201d at its regional office, 1159 N. Craycroft Road, starting Tuesday. The program covers a range of topics related to caring for someone with Alzheimer\u2019s disease, including partnering with your medical team, daily strategies and safety issues and opportunities for supporting research.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/55d4b997012b6.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C54&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/aa/5aa76f12-b77a-52b1-94a1-71e4ba848233/572eb5139a9d4.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C54"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"7b66f670-db57-11e6-8d40-eb1250158c1e","body":"

The Alzheimer\u2019s Association Desert Southwest Chapter will host a three-part interactive program dubbed \u201cLiving with Alzheimer\u2019s: For Caregivers\u201d at its regional office, 1159 N. Craycroft Road, starting Tuesday.

The program covers a range of topics related to caring for someone with Alzheimer\u2019s disease, including partnering with your medical team, daily strategies and safety issues and opportunities for supporting research.

The sessions run from 11 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, on Jan. 24, and Jan. 31.

For more information, contact the Alzheimer\u2019s Association at mhartford@alz.org or 1-800-272-3900.

"}, {"id":"57c070f6-d9c3-11e6-9997-6f4a2ef3bb52","type":"article","starttime":"1484505000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T11:30:00-07:00","priority":15,"sections":[{"education":"news/local/education"}],"application":"editorial","title":"McSally recognizes Southern AZ young women leaders","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/article_57c070f6-d9c3-11e6-9997-6f4a2ef3bb52.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/mcsally-recognizes-southern-az-young-women-leaders/article_57c070f6-d9c3-11e6-9997-6f4a2ef3bb52.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/mcsally-recognizes-southern-az-young-women-leaders/article_57c070f6-d9c3-11e6-9997-6f4a2ef3bb52.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"She recognized the students on the U.S. House floor.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["martha mcsally","buena high school","pusch ridge christian academy","girls rule foundation"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"352b4a58-56f6-529e-b78e-c13f543f1be5","description":"Rep. Martha McSally","byline":"Ron Medvescek / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1763,"hiresheight":1175,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/52/352b4a58-56f6-529e-b78e-c13f543f1be5/582e2e4229a8c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"413","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/52/352b4a58-56f6-529e-b78e-c13f543f1be5/582e2e4228dea.image.jpg?resize=620%2C413"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/52/352b4a58-56f6-529e-b78e-c13f543f1be5/582e2e4228dea.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/52/352b4a58-56f6-529e-b78e-c13f543f1be5/582e2e4228dea.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/52/352b4a58-56f6-529e-b78e-c13f543f1be5/582e2e4228dea.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"57c070f6-d9c3-11e6-9997-6f4a2ef3bb52","body":"

U.S. Rep. Martha McSally recognized two young Southern Arizona women on the U.S. House floor last week.

She recognized Macy Maine of Buena High School in Sierra Vista and Hannah Mason from Pusch Ridge Christian Academy. Those two women were out of four students who received the 2016 Brilliant, Beautiful and Bold Role Model Award from the Girls Rule Foundation.

The award recognizes young women leaders who are making a difference.

Maine was given the award for engaging in the community. She is an All-American Cheerleader and a frequent volunteer in her community, McSally said. Mason is a selfless leader who cared for her family after her father passed in a car accident.

"}, {"id":"d17384f2-d9c2-11e6-afcd-c3f83b280e82","type":"article","starttime":"1484499600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T10:00:00-07:00","priority":15,"sections":[{"education":"news/local/education"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Amphi schools to host forum seeking input on superintendent search","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/article_d17384f2-d9c2-11e6-afcd-c3f83b280e82.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/amphi-schools-to-host-forum-seeking-input-on-superintendent-search/article_d17384f2-d9c2-11e6-afcd-c3f83b280e82.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/amphi-schools-to-host-forum-seeking-input-on-superintendent-search/article_d17384f2-d9c2-11e6-afcd-c3f83b280e82.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Current superintendent is retiring at the end of school year.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["amphitheater school district","amphi schools","amphitheater","patrick nelson","school superintendent"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"4e0c8ba3-df76-5496-ad5f-67b80d47afdf","description":"Amphitheater Superintendent Patrick Nelson, who has overseen the Tucson district since 2012, says he wants to retire while things are running smoothly. \u201cI want to leave things for the next person working as well as possible,\u201d he says.","byline":"Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1793,"hiresheight":1155,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0c8ba3-df76-5496-ad5f-67b80d47afdf/5876632d4f187.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"399","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0c8ba3-df76-5496-ad5f-67b80d47afdf/5876632d4e45a.image.jpg?resize=620%2C399"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0c8ba3-df76-5496-ad5f-67b80d47afdf/5876632d4e45a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"193","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0c8ba3-df76-5496-ad5f-67b80d47afdf/5876632d4e45a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C193"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"660","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e0/4e0c8ba3-df76-5496-ad5f-67b80d47afdf/5876632d4e45a.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C660"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"d17384f2-d9c2-11e6-afcd-c3f83b280e82","body":"

Amphitheater School District is hosting community forums to hear from community members about the qualities they're looking for in a new superintendent.

The district is working with the Arizona School Boards Association to search for a new superintendent. Current Superintendent Patrick Nelson will retire at the end of the school year.

Two forums will be held Tuesday at 6 p.m. One will be at the multi-purpose room at Canyon del Oro High School, 25 W. Calle Concordia, and the other, at the Amphitheater High School Library, 125 W. Yavapai Road.

"}, {"id":"cb14595d-fc04-57ae-9fdf-4d3700da4b89","type":"article","starttime":"1484440237","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-14T17:30:37-07:00","lastupdated":"1484454966","priority":0,"sections":[{"news":"news"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Arizona lottery drawings for Saturday, Jan. 14","url":"http://tucson.com/news/article_cb14595d-fc04-57ae-9fdf-4d3700da4b89.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/arizona-lottery-drawings-for-saturday-jan/article_cb14595d-fc04-57ae-9fdf-4d3700da4b89.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/arizona-lottery-drawings-for-saturday-jan/article_cb14595d-fc04-57ae-9fdf-4d3700da4b89.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"LOTTERY Arizona lottery drawings for Saturday, Jan. 14: 5 Card Cash 4C-6D-8H-3S-8S (4C, 6D, 8H, 3S, 8S) All or Nothing Evening 01-03-07-08-09-11-13-17-18-20 (one, three, seven, eight, nine, eleven, thirteen, seventeen, eighteen, twenty) All or Nothing Midday 02-03-04-08-11-12-16-17-19-20 (two, three, four, eight, eleven, twelve, sixteen, seventeen, nineteen, twenty)","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["lottery"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"cb14595d-fc04-57ae-9fdf-4d3700da4b89","body":"

LOTTERY

Arizona lottery drawings for Saturday, Jan. 14:

5 Card Cash

4C-6D-8H-3S-8S

(4C, 6D, 8H, 3S, 8S)

All or Nothing Evening

01-03-07-08-09-11-13-17-18-20

(one, three, seven, eight, nine, eleven, thirteen, seventeen, eighteen, twenty)

All or Nothing Midday

02-03-04-08-11-12-16-17-19-20

(two, three, four, eight, eleven, twelve, sixteen, seventeen, nineteen, twenty)

Pick 3

6-4-9

(six, four, nine)

Fantasy 5

02-08-10-22-32

(two, eight, ten, twenty-two, thirty-two)

The Pick

09-19-26-30-40-41

(nine, nineteen, twenty-six, thirty, forty, forty-one)

Mega Millions

Estimated jackpot: $150 million

Powerball

23-55-59-64-69, Powerball: 13, Power Play: 5

(twenty-three, fifty-five, fifty-nine, sixty-four, sixty-nine; Powerball: thirteen; Power Play: five)

Lottery information: 325-9141

Online: arizonalottery.com

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The familiar pink exterior of the Old Pima County Courthouse is being replaced by a more authentic hue.

A restoration team has discovered the original color of the historic 1929 building was an earthy adobe shade.

The courthouse\u2019s pink facade likely emerged as the original paint\u2019s yellow and red undertones faded in the sun, said Corky Poster, architect and principal with Poster Frost Mirto, which specializes in historic preservation. The county hired the firm to oversee the restoration of the iconic courthouse.

As subsequent painters sought to match the faded color each time it was repainted, the courthouse grew pinker over time, he said.

The original color was discovered in the building\u2019s interior, on part of a door jamb that had been protected from sunlight for almost a century, Poster said.

\u201cIt was a time capsule,\u201d he said. \u201cIt\u2019s like they put the paint color in a box and buried it. It gave us a very good notion of the color.\u201d

The update to the paint color will be the most noticeable change to the courthouse\u2019s exterior resulting from its restoration, said Linda Mayro, director of the Pima County Office of Sustainability and Restoration.

The restoration project will return the Spanish Revival-style courthouse to the architect\u2019s original vision, while adhering to the U.S. secretary of the interior\u2019s standards for restoration, she said.

\u201cWe\u2019re trying to restore the integrity of the architect\u2019s and county\u2019s intent back in 1929,\u201d she said.

Mayro presented the plans for the color change to the Tucson-Pima County Historical Commission on Jan. 11, and all members supported the new paint, she said.

The new color was developed by Dunn-Edwards Paints, which for years had manufactured paint to match the courthouse\u2019s existing rosy tone, with a color called \u201cOld Pima Pink.\u201d

The updated color, which harks back to the original, will be known as \u201cNew Pima Pink,\u201d because it still has rosy undertones, said Sam Samaniego, architectural service representative for Dunn-Edwards.

\u201cCROWNING ACHIEVEMENT\u201d

Designed by architect Roy Place, the old county courthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 1977 nomination form submitted to the register describes it as the \u201cmost outstanding Spanish Colonial Revival building in Arizona,\u201d a departure from the primarily European-style county courthouses throughout the country.

The nomination describes its red-tiled roofs, the \u201celegant\u201d tiled dome topped with a copper lantern, balconies with carved ornamentation and archways lining a covered walkway overlooking the courtyard.

\u201cIt\u2019s kind of the crowning achievement of Roy Place \u2014 probably Tucson\u2019s best architect that most folks never heard of,\u201d Poster said.

Place\u2019s heyday was between 1920 and 1940, and he\u2019s responsible for nearly all the public works buildings constructed in those years, as well as dozens of University of Arizona buildings, Poster said. Place also designed the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Health Care System on South Sixth Avenue and the Pioneer Hotel downtown.

On Friday afternoon, many visitors passing through El Presidio Park behind the courthouse were enthused about the new paint, which is already applied on a west-facing section of the courthouse.

\u201cIt\u2019s fantastic they were able to find the original color,\u201d said Robert Mu\u00f1oz, who works for Pima County financial services. \u201cIt adds to the history of the building.\u201d

But some were disappointed to see the hallmark pink go away. Sharon Rhoy, who worked in the courthouse\u2019s Justice Court offices before her retirement, said the new shade is \u201cboring.\u201d

\u201cIt\u2019s not going to stand out. I loved the charm of the building the way it was,\u201d she said. \u201cI was attached to the pink because I think it complemented the architecture.\u201d

For Rob McCright, who works in the TransAmerica building downtown, the courthouse\u2019s new hue is an aesthetic improvement.

Currently, \u201cthere\u2019s so much pink,\u201d he said. \u201cI actually think it\u2019ll look better.\u201d The only downside is he\u2019ll have to change how he gives directions, he said.

\u201cYou won\u2019t be able to say, \u2018Go to the pink building and turn left,\u2019\u201d he said.

RENOVATION PLANS

Pima County officials are taking advantage of the vacant state of the courthouse to embark on the renovation project, Mayro said. The courthouse emptied in 2015 after the Justice Courts, treasurer, assessor and recorder\u2019s offices moved out.

Plans are in the works to convert it to a regional visitors center, she said.

Repairs planned for the courthouse include replacing the electrical, air-conditioning and plumbing systems; fixing broken tiles and repairing leaks on the building\u2019s turquoise dome; and redoing the roof using the historic red tiles.

The estimated cost of the exterior rehabilitation and systems upgrades is about $11 million, and additional costs of building out tenant spaces is still unknown since the designs aren\u2019t finished, said Lisa Josker, Pima County director of facilities management.

Contractors recently discovered the courthouse\u2019s Dillinger Courtroom \u2014 where infamous bank robber John Dillinger and his accomplices were arraigned in 1934 \u2014 was originally bigger than its current size, Josker said. Removing ceiling tiles in an adjacent jury room revealed the original wood trim extends from the courtroom into the jury room. The courtroom will be restored to its original size, Josker said.

The exterior renovation of the courthouse should wrap up in April or May, but completion of the more extensive interior renovations will take another 18 months or so, Poster said.

The restoration team\u2019s initial assessment of the courthouse revealed it\u2019s in good condition.

\u201cIt has by no means been neglected. The county has been a very good steward of the building,\u201d he said.

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HSL Properties is back at it.

They\u2019re asking for a taxpayer subsidy for a downtown Tucson development. Again.

In case you\u2019re new in town, you should know this is a tradition. Under Humberto S. Lopez, the company\u2019s founder, HSL has been asking for public help to develop its downtown properties since the 1980s. Most recently, the company asked the city to buy his closed Hotel Arizona, at 181 W. Broadway, and lease it back to him, while also selling tax-free bonds to upgrade it.

The city said no, as recently as 2010.

Now Lopez\u2019s nephew, Omar Mireles, is in charge of HSL, and he puts a less confrontational face on the company, which mostly owns and operates apartment complexes.

But in its downtown holdings, the M.O. remains the same. HSL asked last week for an eight-year property-tax abatement to build 246 apartments at the site of La Placita Village, the colorful office complex at the southwest corner of Broadway and Church.

This is not that surprising. Most of the recent downtown projects are getting the so called Government Property Lease Excise Tax, or GPLET, break.

What\u2019s different about the La Placita project is the history with HSL \u2014 and the fact that the project is right next door to the hotel that Lopez closed in 2012, in apparent frustration with the city for not underwriting his development.

\u201cEverybody thinks about all this tumultuous history,\u201d Councilman Paul Cunningham said during a City Council study session Tuesday. \u201cThat\u2019s the elephant in the room. But it doesn\u2019t really matter, if everybody\u2019s acting in good faith and their intentions are just. This is the kind of thing you go forward with.\u201d

Maybe he\u2019s right. Or maybe this is the opportunity the city has been looking for, to start weaning developers from incentives and maybe to force progress on the hotel.

After years of expensive nurturing, downtown may be at a place where good projects don\u2019t actually need tax breaks in order to succeed. HSL has already scheduled demolition of all but three historically significant structures in La Placita Village for May, which suggests the project is ready to go ahead. Mireles said construction could begin as early as June.

It is also a market-rate project, so big money will be coming in once the apartments are built and rented. Asked at the study session what the rents will be, Mireles said current projections are about $900 for a studio apartment, $1,200 for a one-bedroom and on up to $3,000 for a four-bedroom.

Those are pretty expensive places for Tucson, but Mireles said that\u2019s what the market dictates now.

\u201cI\u2019m surprised that this isn\u2019t a viable project without a GPLET,\u201d Councilwoman Karin Uhlich said Tuesday. \u201cThat\u2019s one of the things that is part of the analysis, that this place would not happen in the same time place and manner \u2014 which is very general language \u2014 without a GPLET.\u201d

Councilman Steve Kozachik asked, \u201cDo you walk away from your plans if the analysis says it doesn\u2019t merit an eight-year abatement?\u201d

That\u2019s the city\u2019s first challenge: Should it call HSL\u2019s bluff and start easing out of the incentive business? After all, as Uhlich pointed out, the streetcar has already raised property values along the line, which runs right in front of both La Placita and the hotel next door.

Contrasting it with the hotel, Mireles said of the apartment project: \u201cThe reality that we see is that right now the market is right for this project. The demand is there, and the demand going forward will improve.\u201d

The city is under no obligation to approve the GPLET, the city\u2019s economic development manager, Camila Bekat, explained to me.

\u201cA GPLET is a discretionary incentive,\u201d she said. \u201cYou might meet the criteria, but the council has the discretion.\u201d

HSL\u2019s request for the incentive represents something the city hasn\u2019t had with this company for a long time: leverage. HSL has used its vacant hotel in the middle of downtown as leverage to try to persuade the city to put big money into a renovation. So far it hasn\u2019t worked.

Now the city has the leverage of this request by HSL for a tax abatement. Maybe the city could make the granting of the GPLET conditional on some sort of movement by HSL toward renovating and reopening the embarrassing hotel.

It\u2019s a topic that council members and Mireles danced around during the council meeting. When I asked Mireles on Friday if the two projects could be brought together as part of a bigger deal, he said no.

\u201cThese are two very separate and different projects at the end of the day,\u201d he said.

He noted that while both are HSL-owned properties now, different investor groups will own the completed projects.

The city has been in negotiations with HSL and the Rio Nuevo Multifacilities District for more than a year on the hotel. It has not progressed much, and there hasn\u2019t even been a new informal proposal for more than a year.

\u201cWe\u2019re still trying to figure out how to make the numbers work,\u201d Mireles told me. \u201cIf we could make it pencil out, believe me, we\u2019d want that sore topic out of the way.\u201d

I understand a renovated downtown hotel is not necessarily a winning prospect right now. But I can\u2019t be the only one who noticed that HSL has bought the Hilton El Conquistador and the Ritz-Carlton Dove Mountain in the last couple of years. Mireles said they\u2019re different businesses with different prospects. Fine.

But it shows that this is a company, HSL, that by all appearances is doing well financially, yet has left the eyesore in the center of downtown vacant, without progress, for almost five years. Perhaps what HSL needs is a little incentive to start moving on the hotel \u2014 you know what I mean? Like a GPLET on a neighboring project HSL is also pursuing.

"}, {"id":"41e216cd-fdcf-5c13-9ee3-66613a6c4980","type":"article","starttime":"1484434500","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-14T15:55:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484689332","priority":45,"sections":[{"news":"news"},{"crime":"news/local/crime"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tucson mother could face prison time in adoption scam","url":"http://tucson.com/news/article_41e216cd-fdcf-5c13-9ee3-66613a6c4980.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/tucson-mother-could-face-prison-time-in-adoption-scam/article_41e216cd-fdcf-5c13-9ee3-66613a6c4980.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/tucson-mother-could-face-prison-time-in-adoption-scam/article_41e216cd-fdcf-5c13-9ee3-66613a6c4980.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Patty Machelor\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Victims credit Tucson police detective with building a tough case.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["adoption fraud","boston","tucson","tucson police department"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#watchdog","#top5","#topread"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72229"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"139e30a1-bbde-5a4a-b4cf-25c4a802b3a6","description":"From left, Karla Vargas, who pleaded guilty to one count of attempted fraud, with Cindy Cantrell and Lucianna Lopez.","byline":"Courtesy of Cindy Cantrell","hireswidth":1874,"hiresheight":1105,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/39/139e30a1-bbde-5a4a-b4cf-25c4a802b3a6/587958b5baa2a.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"366","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/39/139e30a1-bbde-5a4a-b4cf-25c4a802b3a6/587958b5b8ce1.image.jpg?resize=620%2C366"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/39/139e30a1-bbde-5a4a-b4cf-25c4a802b3a6/587958b5b8ce1.image.jpg?crop=1874%2C1054%2C0%2C50&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/39/139e30a1-bbde-5a4a-b4cf-25c4a802b3a6/587958b5b8ce1.image.jpg?crop=1874%2C1054%2C0%2C50&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/39/139e30a1-bbde-5a4a-b4cf-25c4a802b3a6/587958b5b8ce1.image.jpg?crop=1874%2C1054%2C0%2C50&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}},{"id":"1f3e5e98-1abc-51eb-aad6-f4463d557297","description":"Tucson Police Department Detective Jennifer Burns investigated a fraud case in which a Boston couple were led to believe they could adopt twins from a pregnant Tucson woman.","byline":"A.E. Araiza / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1715,"hiresheight":1209,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f3/1f3e5e98-1abc-51eb-aad6-f4463d557297/587958b74a8bb.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"437","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f3/1f3e5e98-1abc-51eb-aad6-f4463d557297/587958b749a7a.image.jpg?resize=620%2C437"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f3/1f3e5e98-1abc-51eb-aad6-f4463d557297/587958b749a7a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"211","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f3/1f3e5e98-1abc-51eb-aad6-f4463d557297/587958b749a7a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C211"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"722","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f3/1f3e5e98-1abc-51eb-aad6-f4463d557297/587958b749a7a.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C722"}}}],"revision":24,"commentID":"41e216cd-fdcf-5c13-9ee3-66613a6c4980","body":"

A Boston couple longing to be parents were thrilled when a Tucson woman, pregnant with twins, saw their adoption request online and chose them.

\u201cIt seemed like a fairy tale to us that she was due at Christmas,\u201d Cindy Cantrell said.

Cantrell, a journalist, and her husband, Jack McHugh, a contractor, first connected with Karla Vargas in July 2015 through California-based Adoption Network Law Center.

The idea of raising twins made them pause only a moment before they became enamored with the idea. They\u2019d been through disappointments and had their hopes for adoption dashed before.

\u201cI thanked her again and again and again for choosing us,\u201d Cantrell said. \u201cWe felt so fortunate.\u201d

They signed the contract that month and agreed to provide monthly support to Vargas through the law center. They also paid Tucson-based Oasis Adoption Services Inc. for its services for the birth mother.

In addition to rent, the couple also paid her monthly food bills, bought her maternity clothing, set aside money for counseling she might want, and paid for her phone and bus passes.

\u2022\u2022\u2022

Looking back, Cantrell sees the warning signs.

The first: Vargas did not contact the couple as promised after she learned the babies\u2019 genders.

She also told them her cellphone was going to be turned off, which was perplexing because Cantrell and her husband were paying the bill. And a couple of times she asked them to pay rent early because her landlord was \u201cgoing on vacation.\u201d

\u201cIt was always something,\u201d Cantrell said. \u201cI knew she\u2019d had a tough life and it made me uncomfortable and sad, but I kept giving her the benefit of the doubt.\u201d

Vargas also didn\u2019t seem interested in meeting the couple \u2014 which Cantrell said they respected as her choice \u2014 but then suddenly changed her mind and had them come the weekend there was a pro football game in Phoenix.

Vargas and her sister, both Dallas fans, kept suggesting they all go see the game and were so focused on getting there that, to Cantrell, it seemed that was the reason they\u2019d invited the couple out.

But there was also a tender moment that September weekend, when Vargas invited Cantrell along to an ultrasound appointment. Cantrell said when she saw the twins, she felt overcome with love and excitement.

\u201cI thought, \u2018This is real. This is happening,\u2019\u201d she said.

\u2022\u2022\u2022

Communication after the Tucson visit became increasingly sporadic.

On Nov. 10, Cantrell\u2019s mother-in-law died unexpectedly, leaving the couple grieving and busy handling details.

Vargas was out of touch, too, so on Nov. 29, Cantrell sent a text to her. \u201cIs everything OK between us?\u201d she asked.

Vargas responded, \u201cYes. Why?\u201d

McHugh, Cantrell\u2019s husband, exchanged text messages the next day with Vargas\u2019 twin sister, whom they knew as Lucy, explaining they\u2019d been unable to get much feedback from Vargas and wondered when they should fly out to Tucson. The text exchange shows Lucy told them her sister\u2019s doctors thought the twins would arrive Dec. 14.

Meanwhile, Oasis Adoption was trying to contact Vargas, who was so evasive the owner made some calls trying to figure out why, Cantrell said.

Soon, the couple received a conference call from the agency and the California law center: Vargas, they were told, had secretly given birth on Nov. 15, two weeks before the reassuring texts.

The twins were in a local hospital\u2019s neonatal intensive-care unit for a couple of weeks before Vargas took them home Nov. 30. Only she and her sister knew that, records show.

Then, on Dec. 1, a text from Vargas\u2019 phone came through to the law center, which had withheld payment when Vargas couldn\u2019t be reached: Rent was due and funds were needed for the supposedly expectant mother.

\u2022\u2022\u2022

A month later, in January 2016, Cantrell contacted the Tucson Police Department. She said she hoped an investigation would prevent other couples from being victimized.

Vargas, a 35-year-old who has had 12 children and a long history of child-welfare issues, had gone through with at least one adoption before. \u201cThat\u2019s where we gained our hope from, and that\u2019s where she learned the system,\u201d Cantrell said.

Detective Jennifer Burns said it was the first time she\u2019d heard of adoption fraud allegations in her 16 years with Tucson police, including a decade working financial crimes.

\u201cThe case started up quite a discussion,\u201d Burns said of her unit. \u201cWe were not familiar with the laws of adoption.\u201d

Burns and her supervisor were motivated to try to build a case by two things Cantrell reported: Vargas kept the births a secret and then tried to get money after the babies were born while pretending to still be pregnant.

Burns said that during her investigation, Vargas admitted she didn\u2019t want to give up the twins she was carrying and kept it quiet to get money.

Vargas and her sister, Lucianna Lopez, set them up from the beginning, Burns said, by telling them Lopez was Vargas\u2019 landlord and exaggerating by $100 per month the amount of the rent due. The couple did not know the sister \u201cLucy\u201d they would later meet was the same person posing as Vargas\u2019 landlord, police records show.

The total in rent and other living expenses paid by the couple to Vargas over the four to five months amounted to $6,014.

Vargas admitted in a December plea hearing only that she lied about the amount of rent due, said her attorney, Michelle Bowen. Vargas turned down an interview request by the Arizona Daily Star.

Vargas pleaded guilty to a Class 3 felony for attempted fraud scheme and artifice, said Benjamin Mendola, a deputy Pima County attorney. She is being held at the Pima County jail; bond is set at $11,000.

She could be ordered to spend up to 8.7 years in prison or up to five years on probation at her sentencing Tuesday before Pima County Superior Court Judge Casey McGinley.

Lopez also was indicted on charges of fraud and forgery, and her case is still pending. Her attorney, Richard Kingston, would not talk to the Star.

\u2022\u2022\u2022

Catherine Braman, executive director of Oasis Adoption Services, would not comment on Vargas\u2019 case specifically but said she has heard of only one other Arizona case in which a birth mother was prosecuted for fraud.

\u201cThere\u2019s a lot of safeguards in place,\u201d said Braman, who has operated her agency since 2000 and worked in adoption since 1996. \u201cWe work really hard to not let that happen.\u201d

Kristin Yellin, chief legal counsel with the Adoption Network Law Center, said her organization provides legal oversight in adoption cases and financial protection if a birth mother changes her mind.

Yellin\u2019s organization has reimbursed the Boston couple for the money they spent supporting Vargas.

\u201cWe have to let our clients know we may never know the whole truth about any particular individual,\u201d Yellin said. They do records checks on any birth mother seeking adoption for her child. \u201cIf there are things like fraud or bad checks or drug issues in the past, yes, we will let them know.\u201d

\u2022\u2022\u2022

The twins \u2014 a boy and a girl \u2014 are now 14 months old, their well-being and current caregivers not a matter of public record.

Cantrell and McHugh started training to be foster parents last fall, a final attempt to adopt the twins, who were removed from Vargas\u2019 care by Arizona\u2019s Department of Child Safety in May.

But a short time after completing the initial steps, the couple realized how complicated and prolonged that process would be and have since entered into an adoption agreement for another baby.

While they are overjoyed to have another chance to become parents, Cantrell said it has taken a long time to recover from an experience she describes as \u201cpsychologically violent.\u201d

Cantrell said having Detective Burns invest so much time in investigating their case \u201chas gone a long way toward helping me heal from trauma that is still difficult to describe.\u201d

\u201cShe listened to me, she asked how I was doing,\u201d Cantrell said. \u201cI expected our interactions to be very businesslike, but she reached out from a place of compassion and empathy.\u201d

Usually, Burns said, the crimes she investigates are property crimes related to businesses or banks, situations where people are disappointed but not brokenhearted. But this case resonated with her, from one mother to another.

When she learned Cantrell and her husband were advancing toward adopting another child, she sent them gifts, all things her own children had enjoyed when they were young: a rattle, a special blanket and a Baby Einstein music player.

\u201cIt felt like a victory for them,\u201d Burns said. \u201cI wanted a happy ending for her. I didn\u2019t want her to give up.\u201d

The gifts from the detective were among the first presents they received for the adoption that\u2019s now underway.

\u201cWe looked at her note,\u201d Cantrell said, \u201cand we both cried.\u201d

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Eager to see what mischief is being cooked up by your lawmakers?

But are regular trips to the Capitol out of the question?

The good news is that a website maintained by the Arizona Legislature lets you keep track of new bills, amendments and roll-call votes.

You can even watch hearings and testify for or against measures from the comfort of your home. And no one will care if you\u2019re in your pajamas.

It starts at the main legislative web page: www.azleg.gov

On the main page is a calendar of events. But the real detail starts under the \u201cbills\u201d menu. Here the new bills are listed by number, in batches of 50, divided between House and Senate.

Want more information on any of them? Clicking on the specific bill presents several options, including an overview, the status of where it is in the process, and a documents button where you can see the introduced version and, as the session goes on, added amendments and changes.

There\u2019s also a section called RTS current bill positions. That\u2019s a list of who has signed in for or against the measure, a feature that does not usually get filled until a bill is scheduled for a hearing. More about that in a minute.

Not sure of the bill number? Enter a keyword in the search.

So, for example, if you were to put in the word \u201cflag\u201d SB 1009 would pop up. That bill would make the theft of an American flag a felony. You can view the measure in PDF or HTML format and can also seek more information.

Also on that main page are links to the agendas of upcoming standing committees. That enables you to poke through what hearings are coming up and what bills are on that day\u2019s agenda.

And what if you have something to say?

One option is to drive to the Capitol, sign in to speak and have your say. How long you might get depends on the whims of who is chairing the committee.

But there\u2019s a less-direct \u2014 and less-cumbersome \u2014 method of putting in your two cents. And it goes to that RTS system, short for \u201crequest to speak.\u201d

On the main legislative page is a pull-down menu for legislative information, with the first option being a request to speak.

Clicking on that will result in a page asking you to sign in.

Don\u2019t worry if you don\u2019t have a username or password. They\u2019re easy to create. But you might consider doing that now, before you suddenly need it.

That leads to a different page, where there\u2019s a menu on the left side to create a new request to speak, see what you\u2019re already signed in for or against, and search for upcoming agendas on that issue.

You will need to know the bill number or, at the very least, the name of the committee where it is scheduled to be heard.

But you can register in support or opposition to a specific bill. And you can even explain why.

There is, however, no requirement that you actually come to the Capitol to testify. And whether you do or not, there is an option to simply sign in with a position but not request to speak.

In any case, your name and position are shared with the legislators on the committee and become part of the record.

Sometimes having a bunch of people signed in remotely supporting or opposing a bill can have some influence.

But those with strong feelings might consider personal testimony, where lawmakers can ask you questions, which is generally much more effective.

And, understand what lobbyists already know: It\u2019s helpful to contact lawmakers ahead of any vote, whether in person, by mail or phone.

Very often, by the time the committee actually meets, most legislators already have made up their minds.

You also can watch committee meetings and floor actions as they unfold.

The link is under the House button on the main page, where you can click on \u201clive proceedings.\u201d

You will, however, need to know in which room the hearing is taking place, information that can come from the agenda.

On the prospect of contacting lawmakers directly, the main legislative page has office phone numbers and links to email under both the House and Senate member lists.

One more thing: Legislators are likely to be far more responsive to inquiries and messages that come from their own constituents.

But if you\u2019re not sure who represents you, there\u2019s also a \u201cfind my legislator\u201d button on both the House and Senate membership pages.

If that\u2019s not an option, there\u2019s one more ultimate fallback: The Legislature maintains a toll-free number, (800) 352-8404. You can either dial a lawmaker or reach the House or Senate operator, who can help figure out who represents you.

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Lindy Elkins-Tanton took the helm of Arizona State University\u2019s School of Earth and Space Exploration in 2014 and put in a bid for the school to lead a NASA mission.

This month, NASA chose ASU to lead that $450-million Discovery mission to the metallic asteroid Psyche. ASU will also build a critical instrument for the robotic spacecraft and has a role in a second NASA mission announced last week.

It\u2019s big news for ASU and the 10-year-old school, which is leading its first NASA mission. It\u2019s also a rarity in space-science circles, where the odds of landing a NASA mission on the first try are, well, astronomical.

\u201cIt\u2019s kind of outrageous,\u201d Elkins-Tanton said in a telephone interview, then quickly noted she has been personally working on the science behind the mission for more than five years and she now heads a school that already serves as mission control for two NASA space-based instruments.

But, as she wrote on the Psyche Facebook page the day the selection was announced: \u201cWe worked a paltry five and a half years. Other teams have gone through this process twice, three times.\u201d

The Psyche mission, combined with the University of Arizona-led OSIRIS-REx sample-return mission, makes Arizona a hub for asteroid exploration, she said.

She also envisions the two universities, along with NAU and Lowell Observatory transforming the state into \u201cthe aerospace capital of the world.\u201d

The Discovery program is a competition for \u201csmall\u201d missions, capped at $450 million. Finalists for the current round of awards included two missions to Venus and a bid to launch an infrared space telescope to look for near-Earth objects.

The telescope, called NEOCam, was not selected, but NASA continued funding for its further development.

At a NASA Small Bodies Assessment Group meeting in Tucson last week, a NASA official congratulated the group of asteroid and comet researchers from across the country for \u201crunning the table\u201d in the latest announcement of NASA Discovery program awards.

In addition to Psyche, NASA selected the Lucy mission, which will provide the first close look at six \u201cTrojan\u201d asteroids that are caught in Jupiter\u2019s orbit, leading or following the giant planet in its long orbit around the sun.

That mission, led by Hal Levison of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, will visit six \u201cunique\u201d bodies, \u2014 \u201cunique, in that we know nothing about them,\u201d Levinson told the small-bodies group on Thursday.

In addition, said Levinson, each one of the six asteroids has a different size, shape and composition.

Psyche, meanwhile, is not just unique, but \u201chighly improbable\u201d \u2014 the only one found by astronomers that is almost totally metallic in content. \u201cIt is a new type of world, not rock or ice, but metal,\u201d said Elkins-Tanton, who reported to the group Thursday via video-conference call.

She said the team\u2019s \u201cstrong, testable hypothesis\u201d is that Psyche is the metal core of a forming planet whose rocky crust was stripped away in a series of cataclysmic collisions with other bodies. It would have taken six or seven such collisions to reveal the core, she said, something that is a rarity in models of planet formation.

She said the asteroid\u2019s composition answers criticisms she\u2019s heard of visiting yet another small body: \u201cWhy are we going to see more asteroids? Aren\u2019t we just stamp collecting? We\u2019re not just stamp-collecting. This is is the only way we\u2019re ever going to see a core.\u201d

\u201cYou guys can kind of feel you\u2019ve cleared the table on Discovery missions, but don\u2019t gloat around your Venus colleagues.\u201d NASA Planetary Defense Officer Lindley Johnson told the small-bodies group on Thursday. Johnson heads the NASA effort to discover and mitigate the threat composed by near-Earth objects.

Jim Green, director of NASA\u2019s Planetary Science Division, said NASA has not shifted its emphasis in its competed programs from planets to asteroids and comets. Lucy and Psyche were simply the two best proposals in the current round, he said. \u201cIt\u2019s a competition. It\u2019s a real shoot-out and it\u2019s incredibly difficult,\u201d he said.

Green said the growth of small-bodies research is part of an evolution in thinking about solar system formation that actually began in Arizona with geologist Eugene Shoemaker\u2019s investigations of Barrington meteor crater in Northern Arizona in the 1960s.

It wasn\u2019t that long ago that astronomers thought the rims and craters on Earth, its moon and elsewhere in the solar system resulted from volcanic activity, he said. Now planetary scientists know those craters resulted form impacts that built moons and planets or blasted them apart.

Arizona began the research into how small bodies created our solar system, Green said.

The Psyche mission, scheduled to launch in 2023 and possibly a year earlier than that, will reach its target by 2030. Psyche, about 130 miles in diameter, resides in the main asteroid belt, about three times Earth\u2019s distance from the sun.

The Psyche spacecraft will orbit its target for a year, using an array of instruments, including a multi-spectral imager being built by an ASU team, to determine the composition of Psyche, believed to be the iron-nickel core of a once-forming planet.

ASU is also building an instrument for the Lucy mission to Jupiter\u2019s trojans. It is a version of a thermal-emission spectrometer that was built by ASU Regent\u2019s Professor Phil Christensen for the OSIRIS-REx mission.

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On Tuesday, the Pima County Board of Supervisors will face a simple question about the complicated, long-simmering and divisive issue of horse racing at Rillito Park: should it stay, or should it go?

The specific matter will be a four-year extension of the current lease with Rillito Racing Inc., which manages the sport and related business at the facility.

However, without that extension, County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry recommends \u201cfunding the demolition of the grandstand to reduce the county\u2019s risk associated with its current condition.\u201d That would cost an estimated $400,000.

\u201cIf we don\u2019t extend the lease, I think it\u2019s the end of horse racing at Rillito,\u201d said Supervisor Sharon Bronson, whose district includes the park.

A $1 million donation from the Bert W. Martin Foundation also hangs in the balance. Without an extension approval before the end of January, the offer, which would be used for a number of needed repairs to the grandstand, clubhouse and other facilities, will be rescinded. A list of over $2 million in repairs is included in the contract amendment the supervisors will consider Tuesday morning.

The racing facility is recognized as \u201cthe birthplace of quarter-horse racing in the United States,\u201d and races have regularly been held at the site since the 1940s, though some dispute its historical significance.

Jaye Wells, president of the Rillito Park Foundation, of which Rillito Racing is a part, said that without a multiyear lease extension, getting donations from the Martin Foundation and other organizations would be extremely difficult. All improvements to the grandstand and other horse-racing infrastructure are the responsibility of the racing lessee, not the county.

Approval of the lease would essentially cement the park\u2019s status quo through June 2021, and that status quo has not been without tension. In addition to being the site of some of the country\u2019s earliest quarter-horse racing, Rillito, with 11 full-size soccer fields, is the county\u2019s largest soccer facility, and scheduling conflicts have arisen between the different users. Rillito is also used by the weekly Heirloom Farmers Market and special events like the annual Tucson Celtic Festival, held in early November.

Some in the youth soccer community would like to see Rillito\u2019s space be used to fit as many soccer fields as possible, which would require the costly relocation of horse racing facilities, and they point to county\u2019s growing population and rising scarcity of sports fields.

Ted Schmidt, president of the Pima County Junior Soccer League, the umbrella organization for regional youth soccer, argues that was also the Board of Supervisors\u2019 unanimous preference in 2006.

The soccer league holds many of its weekend games at Rillito and the Tucson Soccer Academy, of which Schmidt is also president, and is the primary user of the facility for weekday practices.

In August 2006, the Board of Supervisors approved a resolution calling for horse racing to be moved to another location and a complex with 18 soccer fields to be built, according to a recently completed 14-page county report on the park, which, with supporting documentation, stretches past 700 pages.

However, the Great Recession hit county finances hard shortly after and delayed a proposed 2008 bond package, which could have provided funds for the costly recommendations, until 2015. Voters that year overwhelmingly shot the proposal down.

\u201cI think it\u2019s unfortunate that both for economic and political reasons we didn\u2019t move forward in 2006 with the plan that we had,\u201d Schmidt said, adding later that he \u201cunderstands the reality of the economics right now, that we can\u2019t move the racetrack.\u201d

Nanette Slusser, an assistant county administrator, told most parties with a stake in Rillito at a Dec. 22 meeting that clearing the park and putting in up to four additional fields \u2014 the most she and other officials say could fit without compromising parking capacity \u2014 would cost about $8 million.

\u201cWe don\u2019t have $8 million,\u201d she said, adding that another bond package would be the only way to get that kind of cash for park expansion.

\u201cThe likelihood of doing a bond package in the next three years \u2026 is slim to none,\u201d Bronson, who helped facilitate the sometimes tense meeting, said, adding that roads would be the most likely priority of any conceivable bond program.

That\u2019s part of why Schmidt isn\u2019t necessarily opposed to the supervisors approving the four-year lease extension. But what he\u2019s hoping to get from them is acknowledgment \u201cthat the long- term plan for Rillito needs to be the conversion of that property into a sports complex\u201d and eventually moving horse racing to \u201ca suitable location.\u201d

County officials, including Slusser, say there aren\u2019t any clear alternative sites, and two promising prospects fell through since 2006. Schmidt, however, disagrees, and said someplace like the Desert Diamond Casino could work.

Schmidt believes that with sufficient investment, Rillito could become a major interstate and regional soccer tournament site, which could have multimillion-dollar economic impacts for the county. Data cited in the county report shows that an 18-field facility in Phoenix, Reach 11, has an annual economic impact of $152 million. A 2015 study commissioned by the only other Arizona racetrack operator Turf Paradise found the sport\u2019s statewide annual economic impact is around $91 million.

Officials have a dimmer view of Rillito\u2019s soccer tournament prospects, and the report concludes that the park, even with more fields, \u201cis inadequate to support soccer tournament activity beyond local and smaller regional events.\u201d

The county hopes to develop 162 acres south of the Kino Sports Complex, on Tucson\u2019s southeast side, into a major tournament site with 20 fields. Slusser said that project is estimated to cost $55 million, some funding for which was included in the failed 2015 bond package.

Beyond renewed commitment by the supervisors to the 2006 resolution, Schmidt said he\u2019d like some \u201caccommodations\u201d from the county in exchange for support for the lease extension of the racetrack.

Those include new lights for two unlit fields, affordable access to Kino Sports Complex fields when there are conflicts between racing and soccer, and a passage between the four fields on the inside of the track to the park\u2019s seven other fields. Slusser estimated the costs for some of those improvements would be around $325,000.

Bronson said she supports some of those measures, saying there are \u201csome small things we can do.\u201d

But if things go according to plan, Wells sees the future of racing extending well beyond the end of the next lease. He said the business of horse racing \u201chas been growing like crazy,\u201d and recent attendance figures show there\u2019s still interest in the sport.

There were nearly 39,000 paid attendees for the 2015 racing season, and over 27,000 the next year, but because there were fewer racing days 2016 actually had a higher average daily attendance. Daily average betting rose from $71,000 to $103,000 between 2014 and 2016. The racing season typically is held from late winter to early spring, with around 20 days of racing.

If the lease is extended, Slusser said it would provide horse racing with a \u201cdo or die\u201d opportunity.

\u201cAt five years, they should be self-sufficient, or they will be gone,\u201d she added.

Schmidt disputes the significance of local horse racing, and says interest in the sport is waning and that its business model, which relies heavily on alcohol sales and betting, is not appropriate at a park like Rillito. Youth sports and their numerous health benefits, on the other hand, are, he said.

Huckelberry said the county has an obligation to preserve the history and culture of Southern Arizona, adding later: \u201cYes, people can serve value judgments, but (horse racing) is still part of the culture and history.\u201d

Racing also accounted for just over 40 percent of the $116,000 in revenues taken in by the county from facility users, according to the report. Youth sports, which includes soccer but also lacrosse, football and other sports, paid nearly $20,000 for using the facility\u2019s lights. The county parks and recreation department spends about $300,000 annually on Rillito in maintenance and other costs, according to recent county budgets.

Providing recreation opportunities to local youth shouldn\u2019t be about generating revenue, Schmidt said, echoing Slusser\u2019s point that it is a \u201cpublic service.\u201d

Bronson told the Star she is likely to support a lease extension, though she conceded she is \u201cconflicted\u201d about the matter. Representatives from the farmers market and Celtic Festival, along with a number of students from the University of Arizona\u2019s Race Track Industry Program also submitted letters in support of extending the lease.

\u201cI think at this point the status quo is the best we can do,\u201d Bronson said, referencing the financial obstacles to expanding the park or moving the racetrack.

\u201cOver the next five years, I think horse racing has a place in this community, as does soccer\u201d she added. \u201cI think they need to coexist.\u201d

While Schmidt sees horse racing as an obstacle to his vision for the park, he said farmers markets and other special events are not.

In his memo about the lease extension, Huckelberry suggested some ways to promote coexistence: better coordination between the park\u2019s users, and centralization of horse-race and tournament scheduling with the county parks and recreation department, whose \u201cmaster-use calendar\u201d is a good way to \u201cminimize conflicting use dates.\u201d

His other suggestion, that the number of annual race days be capped at 16 unless the supervisors approve additional days, didn\u2019t go over so with Wells, who said such a measure would \u201cbottle up our potential.\u201d

But whatever arrangement the supervisors approve on Tuesday \u2014 if they approve one at all \u2014 Wells said that if horse racing is \u201cgiven a chance to succeed \u2026 it puts the odds in our favor.\u201d

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