[ {"id":"f52322e7-4c93-5bd4-a4de-8e720be7d2eb","type":"article","starttime":"1485126000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-22T16:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1485135722","priority":42,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/local/govt-and-politics"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Proposal would allow electronic billboards in another part of Arizona","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_f52322e7-4c93-5bd4-a4de-8e720be7d2eb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/proposal-would-allow-electronic-billboards-in-another-part-of-arizona/article_f52322e7-4c93-5bd4-a4de-8e720be7d2eb.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/proposal-would-allow-electronic-billboards-in-another-part-of-arizona/article_f52322e7-4c93-5bd4-a4de-8e720be7d2eb.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"A Lake Havasu City Republican lawmaker wants to open his section of the state to electronic billboards.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72828"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"d462f17b-1f7b-5810-bfb3-2a89fd204c38","description":"Electronic billboards, such as this one in the Phoenix area, can contribute to light pollution, astronomers say.","byline":"Arizona Republic file photo","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"424","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/46/d462f17b-1f7b-5810-bfb3-2a89fd204c38/5882970f09c29.image.jpg?resize=424%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"146","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/46/d462f17b-1f7b-5810-bfb3-2a89fd204c38/56baa68c0e867.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/46/d462f17b-1f7b-5810-bfb3-2a89fd204c38/5882970f09c29.image.jpg?crop=700%2C393%2C0%2C98&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/46/d462f17b-1f7b-5810-bfb3-2a89fd204c38/5882970f09c29.image.jpg?crop=700%2C393%2C0%2C98"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"f52322e7-4c93-5bd4-a4de-8e720be7d2eb","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 A Lake Havasu City Republican lawmaker wants to open his section of the state to electronic billboards.

The proposal by Sen. Sonny Borrelli would create a 60-mile semicircle around the Tropicana Hotel in Laughlin, Nevada, where these signs could be erected by billboard companies. That area stretches from near the Hoover Dam on the north, out Interstate 40 past Kingman on the east, and south past Lake Havasu City.

What Borrelli is offering on behalf of Lamar Advertising would amend a 2012 law which limits electronic billboards with changing messages to a swath of central and southwest Arizona.

Those limits were crafted following negotiations between the sign industry and \u201cdark sky\u201d advocates, including astronomers who said they did not want a new source of light pollution.

The 2012 deal followed an appellate court ruling that internally illuminated billboards with changing messages were illegal along state highways.

A bid by lawmakers to simply override that ruling was vetoed by then-Gov. Jan Brewer, who was concerned about damaging the state\u2019s \u201cdark skies\u201d reputation. That resulted in the deal Brewer did approve: Allowing the signs in a wedge from the Phoenix area along I-8 and I-10 west to the state line.

\u201cThe issue is one of fair opportunity,\u201d said Lamar Advertising lobbyist Nick Simonetta. He said there\u2019s no reason billboard firms in other areas of the state should be denied the opportunity to put up new electronic signs.

Borrelli said he understands the concerns of the state\u2019s astronomers on the issue of light pollution.

The 2012 deal specifically made southern and southeastern Arizona, with its telescopes on sites including Kitt Peak and Mount Graham, off limits. The law also prohibits the signs north of the Phoenix area, from one end of the state to the other, in a special bid to protect Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff.

Borrelli said what he\u2019s offering should not affect Lowell. He said the observatory is at 7,500 feet elevation.

\u201cThere\u2019s a couple of mountain ranges that are between there and Kingman,\u201d Borrelli said. \u201cWe\u2019re not encroaching on their space.\u201d

He conceded that argument did not work last year when he introduced similar legislation. But Borrelli pointed out that measure would have allowed electronic billboards throughout Mohave County, versus the 60-mile radius from Laughlin in his latest bid.

And, like the law already in place for the balance of Arizona, the signs would have to go dark after 11 p.m.

Simonetta said he doesn\u2019t believe new signs would make a big difference in existing light pollution from Laughlin, \u201cthe big lit-up Roman candle\u201d on the Colorado River.

A spokesman for Lowell Observatory said officials there were studying the proposal and at this point had not yet taken a position.

The measure has not yet been scheduled for a hearing.

"}, {"id":"16a10d25-48a3-5d99-a136-b24dee212508","type":"article","starttime":"1485118980","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-22T14:03:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1485138364","sections":[{"state":"ap/state"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Bill would require blood, alcohol testing in serious crashes","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/article_16a10d25-48a3-5d99-a136-b24dee212508.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/bill-would-require-blood-alcohol-testing-in-serious-crashes/article_16a10d25-48a3-5d99-a136-b24dee212508.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/bill-would-require-blood-alcohol-testing-in-serious-crashes/article_16a10d25-48a3-5d99-a136-b24dee212508.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"PHOENIX \u2014 The parents of an 18-year-old who was killed in a crash want legislation passed that requires drug or alcohol testing for drivers involved in collisions where people are seriously injured or killed. Steve and Tana Smith say they hope other families can avoid the agony of not knowing what may have caused crashes that lead to serious injuries or death.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["general news","accidents","diagnostic tests","legislation","accidents and disasters","transportation","diagnosis and treatment","health","legislature","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":6,"commentID":"16a10d25-48a3-5d99-a136-b24dee212508","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The parents of an 18-year-old who was killed in a crash want legislation passed that requires drug or alcohol testing for drivers involved in collisions where people are seriously injured or killed.

Steve and Tana Smith say they hope other families can avoid the agony of not knowing what may have caused crashes that lead to serious injuries or death.

\u201cHad we known whether or not this driver was impaired, it would make this unbearable situation easier to cope with,\u201d Steve told KPHO-TV. \u201cThe not knowing, because no test was done in our case, is agonizing.\u201d

The Smiths are pushing for the bill in their son Joe\u2019s name.

\u201cIt\u2019s not going to change our situation, but if we can help someone else, if we can ease their pain just a little bit for what we are going through, that\u2019s our ultimate goal,\u201d Tana said.

Joe was killed when a semi-truck slammed into traffic on Interstate 10.

Joseph Garcia, 74, in another vehicle, was also killed in the crash.

After the collision the truck driver told a Department of Public Safety trooper that he was tired, records show.

No drug or alcohol tests were requested. The driver was not charged.

\u201cI assumed that that\u2019s what the law was, and since it\u2019s not, it needs to change,\u201d Tana told The Arizona Republic in October. \u201cI\u2019ll do whatever I can do to change this because this is something that can affect anybody at any time.\u201d

"}, {"id":"563353ce-1b47-5062-addf-586eadc30b09","type":"article","starttime":"1485054000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-21T20:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1485056886","priority":25,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Flights planned over Arizona, New Mexico for wolf survey","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_563353ce-1b47-5062-addf-586eadc30b09.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/flights-planned-over-arizona-new-mexico-for-wolf-survey/article_563353ce-1b47-5062-addf-586eadc30b09.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/flights-planned-over-arizona-new-mexico-for-wolf-survey/article_563353ce-1b47-5062-addf-586eadc30b09.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"Biologists plan daily flights over forested areas of eastern Arizona and western New Mexico \u00a0to conduct an annual survey of Mexican gray wolves.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wolf","survey"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"9834a37c-b07e-5089-8d6d-6b7f9d2a95d9","description":"New Mexico\u2019s Game and Fish director praised the ruling as a blow for the state\u2019s sovereignty.","byline":"The Associated Press / File","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"325","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/83/9834a37c-b07e-5089-8d6d-6b7f9d2a95d9/575b742ab7cf6.image.jpg?resize=512%2C325"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"63","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/83/9834a37c-b07e-5089-8d6d-6b7f9d2a95d9/56c69f3dace8f.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/83/9834a37c-b07e-5089-8d6d-6b7f9d2a95d9/575b742ab7cf6.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C18&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/83/9834a37c-b07e-5089-8d6d-6b7f9d2a95d9/575b742ab7cf6.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C18"}}},{"id":"e1892695-ad19-5249-8eeb-b0f10c7567a1","description":"This female Mexican gray wolf was in the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico, north of Socorro.","byline":"Susan Montoya Bryan / AP 2011","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":1975,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/18/e1892695-ad19-5249-8eeb-b0f10c7567a1/58842214f05cc.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"408","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/18/e1892695-ad19-5249-8eeb-b0f10c7567a1/58842214d9bc9.image.jpg?resize=620%2C408"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/18/e1892695-ad19-5249-8eeb-b0f10c7567a1/58842214e8b3c.preview-480.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"197","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/18/e1892695-ad19-5249-8eeb-b0f10c7567a1/58842214e7a6f.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"674","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/18/e1892695-ad19-5249-8eeb-b0f10c7567a1/58842214d9bc9.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"563353ce-1b47-5062-addf-586eadc30b09","body":"

ALBUQUERQUE \u2014 Biologists plan daily flights over forested areas of eastern Arizona and western New Mexico in late January and early February to conduct an annual survey of the region\u2019s population of endangered Mexican gray wolves.

Federal and state agencies say the flights may be visible to residents of Reserve, New Mexico, and the Arizona communities of Alpine and Springerville.

Biologists conduct the survey as part of a multi-agency effort to reintroduce wolves into their traditional habitat.

The operation includes capturing wild-born wolves to fit them with radio telemetry collars, replacing older collars and treating wolves that appear to be sick or injured.

Agencies say the operation is scheduled to run Jan. 23 to Feb. 4, weather permitting, with results released in February.

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Winter storm warning

in effect in high country

FLAGSTAFF \u2014 A winter storm warning remained in effect Saturday in Arizona\u2019s high country with hazardous driving conditions reported on Interstates 17 and 40 and other highways.

The National Weather Service said snow and rain showers continued through Saturday, making highways slippery with snow and reducing visibility.

Authorities reported hazardous conditions on I-17 south of Flagstaff and on I-40 east and west of the city.

The Arizona Department of Transportation recommended using chains or four-wheel drive vehicles on routes to Flagstaff.

Firefighter rescue two men trapped in wash

CAVE CREEK \u2014 Firefighters from several agencies used a helicopter to rescue two men trapped in a car in a Phoenix-area wash full of swift-running and frothy storm runoff.

A Phoenix Fire Department helicopter twice lowered a firefighter to the car\u2019s roof and a firefighter helped the men out of the car before each was lifted separately to the shore of the wash in the area of Cave Creek, an outlying suburb.

Rural Metro Fire Department spokesman Shawn Gilleland said the men rescued Saturday morning didn\u2019t require medical treatment.

Identities weren\u2019t released, but a Maricopa County Sheriff\u2019s Office spokesman said the men were a father and son.

Renovation begins

on \u2018Pluto\u2019 telescope

FLAGSTAFF \u2014 The telescope that first spotted Pluto nearly a century ago is undergoing a restoration that will take about a year to complete.

About $155,000 in grants and donations will fund the work on Lowell Observatory\u2019s Pluto Discovery Telescope, the Arizona Daily Sun reported.

Observatory spokesman Kevin Schindler said the decision to renovate was made in light of growing traffic, with a record 100,000 visitors in 2016.

He said NASA\u2019s New Horizons spacecraft also spiked interest in Pluto after it flew by the dwarf planet in 2015.

Mechanical engineer Ralph Nye, who is leading the renovation, said the telescope has been gathering dust since 1997 when it was last used for astronomical observation.

\u201cWe would like to make it knock people\u2019s socks off,\u201d Nye said. \u201cIt\u2019s a relic of the past that put us on the map because of the Pluto discovery, and it should be taken care of properly and preserved.\u201d

The leaky structure will be weatherproofed and telescope parts will be cleaned, among other improvements.

\u201cWhen it\u2019s raining you can hear it, drip drip drip,\u201d Nye said.

Once it\u2019s restored, Nye said he hopes the telescope can get back to taking color photos of the night sky.

\u201cThe telescope will be better taken care of if it\u2019s actually used,\u201d he said. \u201cYou\u2019d be surprised what old lenses can do.\u201d

The telescope will be removed while work is underway. Public tours will continue.

CHP arrests Arizona homicide suspect

TEMPE \u2014 Arizona authorities say a man sought in the shooting death of a 26-year-old Phoenix-area high school math teacher has been arrested in Northern California.

Tempe police say the California Highway Patrol arrested 27-year-old Caleb Bartels on Saturday after an off-duty officer spotted Bartels\u2019 vehicle parked along a highway near Doyle.

Police say several officers located Bartels and arrested him without incident.

Arizona authorities issued a warrant charging Bartels with homicide and other crimes in the Jan. 15 killing of Ryne Zahner. The teacher at a Mesa High School was shot in his Tempe home\u2019s backyard early that morning.

Bartels was booked into the Lassen County Jail in Susanville.

Tempe police had notified authorities in Oregon, Nevada and California that he might be headed to cities in those states.

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PHOENIX \u2014 An attorney for the state asked a federal judge Friday to throw out a lawsuit by some \u201cdeferred-action\u201d recipients who say they can\u2019t get a license to drive.

Douglas Northup said there is nothing in state policy specifically denying licenses to those who fall into a certain category of people who are technically in the country illegally but whom the federal government has decided can stay. In fact, he argued, the Motor Vehicle Division will license those who can show they are protected by the federal Violence Against Women Act.

But Judge David Campbell pointed out that the MVD is requiring these people to produce documents that Arizona does not require of other deferred-action recipients. That includes \u201cDreamers,\u201d whom he previously ruled are entitled to licenses.

He compared it to a city having two drinking fountains, one for Anglos and the other for Hispanics.

\u201cBoth can get water,\u201d Campbell said. \u201cBut they\u2019re being treated differently from everyone else.\u201d

Attorney Victor Viramontes of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund said the legal problem is even deeper than that.

He said the MVD, acting under an executive order issued by former Gov. Jan Brewer that remains in place under Doug Ducey, her successor, does in fact have a policy against issuing licenses to these deferred-action recipients.

Viramontes said only when they sue in federal court does the state agree to provide a license \u2014 and only for that person.

He said that might help the five people who are plaintiffs in the lawsuit. But Viramontes said that unless Campbell issues a blanket order voiding the policy, the state will continue to act illegally, with potentially more than 1,000 people being denied licenses he said they are entitled to have.

The case is rooted in the 2012 decision by the Obama administration to allow those who arrived in this country illegally as children to remain if they meet certain qualifications. Those admitted into the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program also were issued federal Employment Authorization Documents.

Brewer issued an executive order denying licenses to DACA recipients, saying they are not qualified under a 1996 state law that makes licenses available only to those in the country whose presence is \u201cauthorized by federal law.\u201d And she argued Obama\u2019s order does not qualify.

But it turned out that, even after Brewer\u2019s order, the MVD was still issuing licenses to those in other deferred-action programs who also had Employment Authorization Documents. That includes victims of domestic violence, those with pending visa applications and those allowed to stay for humanitarian reasons.

Challengers seized on that to say the state was violating constitutional prohibitions against unequal treatment. So the state, in an effort to undermine that argument, amended its policy to stop issuing licenses to some in other categories.

Campbell has since ruled that DACA recipients are in this country legally and the state is now issuing them licenses. This lawsuit deals with the others.

On Friday, Northup told Campbell the five plaintiffs have no case.

\u201cThey\u2019ve been offered driver\u2019s licenses,\u201d he told the judge.

He conceded that other deferred-action recipients need show only their employment authorization form to prove they are here legally. By contrast, those in the C-14 immigration category have to prove something else, such as they got deferred-action status because they are covered by the Violence Against Women Act or because they are cooperating with law enforcement on some case.

Northup said that\u2019s merely \u201can inconvenience.\u201d

That led to Campbell\u2019s questions about whether the state can legally make these people jump through the extra hoops.

But the judge also pointed out the state\u2019s forms and instructions say those with C-14 status are not entitled to a license.

\u201cWhere can I find online I can get a license?\u201d he asked Northup. And he got Northup to admit that he knows of no public statements made by the MVD that there is a way to get a license to drive.

Viramontes told Campbell that deferred-action recipients have actually gone to the MVD, only to be turned away.

\u201cIt is the policy,\u201d he said. \u201cIt\u2019s the only policy that\u2019s in the record.\u201d

And Viramontes said the MVD is trying to \u201cpick off\u201d\u2019 the five plaintiffs in this lawsuit by essentially violating its own policy and giving them a license \u2014 a move that would leave challengers with no one left in the case to pursue the lawsuit. But he said the illegal policy remains.

\u201cWe do know if you get a lawyer and threaten MVD, you will get a driver\u2019s license,\u201d he said.

"}, {"id":"3e211a92-d66c-54ee-a493-384ae4168c36","type":"article","starttime":"1484874000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-19T18:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484940174","priority":25,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Bill letting passers-by break into vehicle to rescue pets, kids advances","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_3e211a92-d66c-54ee-a493-384ae4168c36.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/bill-letting-passers-by-break-into-vehicle-to-rescue-pets/article_3e211a92-d66c-54ee-a493-384ae4168c36.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/bill-letting-passers-by-break-into-vehicle-to-rescue-pets/article_3e211a92-d66c-54ee-a493-384ae4168c36.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Currently, only public safety, animal control personnel can break vehicle's window for rescue.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72805"},"presentation":"","revision":6,"commentID":"3e211a92-d66c-54ee-a493-384ae4168c36","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 Responding to concerns by the Arizona Humane Society, state lawmakers agreed Thursday to effectively make it legal to break into a vehicle to rescue an animal \u2014 and even a child.

SB 1001 spells out that someone who uses \u201creasonable force\u201d to break into an unattended motor vehicle is not subject to civil damages if there\u2019s a \u201cgood faith belief\u201d the child or animal \u201cis in imminent danger of suffering physical injury or death.\u201d

There are some restrictions, including first having to notify a police officer, first responder or animal control enforcement agency. And once having broken into the vehicle, the rescuer must remain on site until that agency shows up.

Christopher West, field operations manager for the Humane Society, said the measure, which his organization helped to craft, stems from specific problems encountered by people in the field.

\u201cEvery year my dispatchers receive calls concerning dogs in hot cars,\u201d he told lawmakers.

\u201cWe are left helpless to do anything because under the current law only a law enforcement officer or an animal control officer can enter the vehicle to remove the animal,\u201d West continued. \u201cSo my emergency animal medical technicians are left standing beside the vehicle, waiting for a police officer or animal control officer to arrive, sometimes 30 to 60 minutes later.\u201d

With this change, West\u2019s technicians \u2014 and, in fact, anyone else \u2014 could make the call to law enforcement or the proper authority and then immediately break a window to retrieve the animal or child.

Sen. John Kavanagh, R-Fountain Hills, said while the measure was originally brought to him as one to protect animals, he made sure it was drafted to also include children. The senator conceded, however, he has no actual examples of anyone actually facing civil suit in this kind of situation.

The idea apparently got the attention of Gov. Doug Ducey who gave the concept, which had already been introduced by Kavanagh, a shout-out in his State of the State speech earlier this month

\u201cAll it takes is a good Samaritan to save a life, to be on the lookout, see movement, take action, and stop another death,\u201d the governor said. \u201cThe last thing we\u2019d want is any Arizonan worried about breaking into that car to save a life.\u201d

Ducey promised to sign the measure if it reaches his desk.

While the legislation got unanimous approval Thursday by the Senate Judiciary Committee, there were some concerns.

Sen. Bob Worsley, R-Mesa, said he can foresee situations where a pet owner has simply run into a store for a moment and the animal is not in real danger. Yet someone passes by, thinks there\u2019s a problem, breaks the window and causes several hundred dollars worth of damage.

\u201cWho\u2019s going to pay for that?\u201d he asked.

The legislation, which now needs approval of the full Senate, also spells out that the immunity from civil suit applies only if the person who breaks the window remains with the vehicle until law enforcement or animal control arrives.

"}, {"id":"4401cae6-d5b1-5261-b9a9-aa2e0bfeb2b1","type":"article","starttime":"1484865000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-19T15:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484873526","priority":42,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Senate panel OKs making US flag theft more serious offense","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_4401cae6-d5b1-5261-b9a9-aa2e0bfeb2b1.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/senate-panel-oks-making-us-flag-theft-more-serious-offense/article_4401cae6-d5b1-5261-b9a9-aa2e0bfeb2b1.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/senate-panel-oks-making-us-flag-theft-more-serious-offense/article_4401cae6-d5b1-5261-b9a9-aa2e0bfeb2b1.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":3,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"The Judiciary Committee voted 4-3 to make it a Class 6 felony to steal an American flag on display.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#top5","#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72790"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"8061600b-caf6-58be-be73-5765e05dae07","description":"The Star Spangled Banner flies in the morning breeze after being raised in a ceremony at Benjamin Plumbing Supply. It was the first official flag distributed by Flags for the Flagless and coincided with Flag Day.","byline":"Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":5046,"hiresheight":3088,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/06/8061600b-caf6-58be-be73-5765e05dae07/58813e2c83d2c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"379","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/06/8061600b-caf6-58be-be73-5765e05dae07/58813e2c86ef2.image.jpg?resize=620%2C379"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"61","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/06/8061600b-caf6-58be-be73-5765e05dae07/58813e2c86ef2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C61"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"183","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/06/8061600b-caf6-58be-be73-5765e05dae07/58813e2c92828.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"626","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/06/8061600b-caf6-58be-be73-5765e05dae07/58813e2c86ef2.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"4401cae6-d5b1-5261-b9a9-aa2e0bfeb2b1","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 A flag is a flag.

But a Senate panel agreed Thursday to make it so you\u2019ll spend more time behind bars for stealing the Stars and Stripes.

The Judiciary Committee voted 4-3 to make it a Class 6 felony to steal an American flag that is on display by a resident or business. That translates to a year in state prison and a fine of up to $150,000.

SB 1009 is a major departure from existing laws which set the penalty for theft based on the value of the item stolen. So someone who takes property worth less than $1,000 faces up to six months in the county jail and a $2,500 fine.

The vote followed testimony of Charles Foley, a Tucson police officer who runs a program called \u201cFlags for the Flagless.\u201d Foley, who said he has provided 90 U.S. flags in Pima County, said some of those have been to replace flags that were stolen.

\u201cI don\u2019t know who is stealing them,\u201d he told lawmakers. Foley said he hopes that an enhanced penalty will provide a new deterrent.

Among the flags that Foley has replaced is one at Tucson\u2019s First Southern Baptist Church. Actually, he had to replace that flag twice after back-to-back thefts, the second involving someone who used bolt cutters to steal not only the flag but also the rope.

\u201cWe see this as an attack on our ministry,\u201d testified Edward Eddinfield, the church\u2019s senior pastor. \u201cTo not have our flag out there changes us from boldly looking like we\u2019re in business to like we\u2019ve just closed our doors.\u201d

And he said that the flag represents the freedom of people to worship as they want.

That testimony drew criticism from Sen. Martin Quezada, D-Phoenix.

\u201cI\u2019m a little bit troubled that we would seek to celebrate freedom by subjecting more people to possible imprisonment as felons for stealing this flag,\u201d he said. \u201cIt\u2019s a little bit contradictory, especially when we should be preaching forgiveness.\u201d

But it wasn\u2019t just the felony that bothered foes. It also is the fact that the enhanced penalty is reserved for only those who steal the U.S. flag.

Sen. John Kavanagh, R-Fountain Hills, the sponsor of SB 1009, said that special treatment is justified.

He said his legislation imposes the felony penalty not on the theft of any American flag but only on one that is on display, versus one in a package in a store.

\u201cMy reasoning is that when you steal a flag that somebody is flying, not only are you stealing the object but you\u2019re stealing that person\u2019s First Amendment right to express themselves,\u201d Kavanagh explained.

\u201cThey may be flying the flag in mourning for somebody who died,\u201d he said. \u201cIt may be a patriotic statement. It may be a statement of protest.\u201d

Quezada said if what\u2019s being stolen is not just a flag but a constitutional right of expression, then Kavanagh\u2019s bill is flawed.

\u201cIs it not also stealing somebody\u2019s First Amendment right to steal an LGBT pride flag, or a flag of another nation who that individual is supporting because we are at war with them and they want to make a political statement?\u201d he asked. Quezada said even the \u201cDon\u2019t Tread on Me\u201d flag that has become the symbol of \u201ctea party\u201d activists also would be denied the same protection.

Kavanagh agreed with Quezada \u2014 up to a point.

He said the First Amendment does protect expression of all viewpoints, much in the same way that he believes it is more than the simple crime of assault to hit someone if the purpose is to stop that person from giving a political speech. But Kavanagh said he\u2019s not willing to expand his legislation to take in all flags.

\u201cSometimes you\u2019ve got to draw a line in the sand,\u201d he said. \u201cAnd I drew it at the most venerated flag in this country, which is our American flag.\u201d

Sen. Bob Worsley, R-Mesa, voted for the measure. But he had his own concerns with the wording of the bill.

He said that, as crafted, it includes anything that is an actual flag. And what that means, said Worsley, is someone could face prison time for taking a tiny flag stuck into a cupcake with a toothpick.

Kavanagh did not dispute that\u2019s what the legislation said. But he told colleagues not to worry.

\u201cI don\u2019t know that any police officer would even be involved in arresting somebody that did something so inconsequential,\u201d he said. \u201cWe have to trust our law enforcement to have some restraint in what they do.\u201d

Kavanagh also noted that under Arizona law prosecutors and judges are free to convert any Class 6 felony to a misdemeanor if they believe the facts warrant it.

The measure now needs approval of the full Senate.

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PHOENIX \u2014 Law enforcement officers in Utah and Nevada separately stopped and released an Arizona homicide suspect before he was declared a wanted man.

Caleb Bartels, 27, was stopped on Sunday night in northern Arizona and again by Utah officials. On Monday, he was stopped by Nevada law enforcement.

All three incidents took place before a nationwide warrant was issued for his arrest, authorities say.

The warrant says Bartels is wanted for the killing early Sunday morning of Ryne Zahner, a teacher a Mesa High School who was shot in his home's backyard.

Police believe Bartels and Zahner were friends and former roommates who had a falling out.

Before that warrant was issued, the Arizona Department of Public Safety stopped Bartels around 5:30 p.m. in northern Arizona, just 13 hours after the shooting.

The Utah Highway Patrol stopped him again around 10 p.m., where a trooper found an AR-15, a pistol and fully-loaded magazine in the vehicle. There was no warrant issued for Bartels' arrest and the trooper had no indication he was prohibited from possessing a firearm. He was let go.

The next day, about an hour before a warrant was sent to law enforcement nationwide, the Nevada Highway Patrol stopped Bartels in West Wendover, Nevada, for a headlight violation. Records indicate no action was taken and Bartels was allowed to proceed.

Law enforcement officials are still searching for Bartels, who they believe may have fled to Sacramento, California; Reno, Nevada, or Beaverton, Oregon. He is considered armed and dangerous.

"}, {"id":"bf80fd95-b169-5764-9b1a-8bc3006d1b0a","type":"article","starttime":"1484769600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T13:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484864045","priority":30,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Bill would prevent cities from blocking nearby incorporations","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_bf80fd95-b169-5764-9b1a-8bc3006d1b0a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/bill-would-prevent-cities-from-blocking-nearby-incorporations/article_bf80fd95-b169-5764-9b1a-8bc3006d1b0a.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/bill-would-prevent-cities-from-blocking-nearby-incorporations/article_bf80fd95-b169-5764-9b1a-8bc3006d1b0a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Law now allows cities the power to veto any new nearby townships.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["city incorporations","arizona incorporations"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72731"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"15570d9d-ea93-5185-bf96-74b3027dea5a","description":"Rep. Eddie Farnsworth, R-Gilbert","byline":"Capitol Media Services","hireswidth":1362,"hiresheight":1520,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/55/15570d9d-ea93-5185-bf96-74b3027dea5a/587fbe068e9c2.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"556","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/55/15570d9d-ea93-5185-bf96-74b3027dea5a/587fbe068cce1.image.jpg?resize=556%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/55/15570d9d-ea93-5185-bf96-74b3027dea5a/587fbe068cce1.image.jpg?crop=1362%2C766%2C0%2C108&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/55/15570d9d-ea93-5185-bf96-74b3027dea5a/587fbe068cce1.image.jpg?crop=1362%2C766%2C0%2C108&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/55/15570d9d-ea93-5185-bf96-74b3027dea5a/587fbe068cce1.image.jpg?crop=1362%2C766%2C0%2C108&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":17,"commentID":"bf80fd95-b169-5764-9b1a-8bc3006d1b0a","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 A House panel agreed to ease the rules for when new cities and towns can be formed, a change in law that foes insist will harm the ability of existing communities to grow.

HB 2088 would create an exemption from laws that give cities the power to veto any new nearby incorporations. That power extends out six miles for cities of at least 5,000 and three miles for smaller towns.

Rep. Eddie Farnsworth, R-Gilbert, is pushing the measure specifically to give the opportunity for residents of San Tan Valley in northeast Pinal County to decide if they want to incorporate. That effort has so far been blocked by Florence.

Alex Vidal, lobbyist for the League of Arizona Cities and Towns, defended that veto power, saying the buffer zone provides room to grow through annexation. He said what San Tan wants to do is incorporate right up to the border of Florence, effectively stopping its growth there.

But Vidal said this isn\u2019t a strictly local fight. He said this change, if it gets signed into law, sets the stage for similar incorporations \u2014 and similar limits on expansion of existing cities and towns \u2014 throughout the state.

Vidal\u2019s objections were not enough to keep the Committee from Local and International Affairs from approving it by a vote of 4-3.

It now goes to the full House, which approved a virtually identical measure last year. But since that time, more than 20 members of the 60-member chamber have been replaced.

San Tan resident Tisha Castillo said the approximately 100,000 residents of the area have a \u201cright to decide our future.\u201d

Farnsworth, who does not represent the area, agreed. He said it\u2019s unfair to give Florence, with a population of about 26,000, veto power over what would be a much larger community.

Vidal argued that nothing in current law stops San Tan from incorporating \u2014 as a smaller town. He said all proponents have to do is draw lines that are at least six miles from Florence.

Farnsworth said the opposition from Vidal\u2019s group, which represents the existing 90 cities and towns in the state, goes beyond their right to annexation.

He pointed out that Arizona provides a certain amount of revenue-sharing each year, divided up among cities and towns based on their population. Farnsworth said if there is suddenly a new city with 100,000 people, that means less money for everyone else.

The measure now needs approval of the full House.

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PHOENIX \u2014 Voter registration in Arizona has increased by nearly 58,000 since the November general election even though the next full election cycle is nearly two years away.

Some off-year elections are coming up, including city elections in Holbrook and Goodyear in March plus a runoff city council election in Phoenix.

The secretary of state released the new figures Tuesday. They show total registration is now more than 3.6 million voters.

Republicans continue to hold a registration advantage with nearly 1.26 million voters. Independents are just behind at 1.24 million and there are 1.1 million registered Democrats in the state.

The increase is about 1.6 percent, well below the 5 \u00bd percent surge between last August's primary and the November general election.

"}, {"id":"5c5b36dc-dcfc-11e6-96be-83ddb86550c6","type":"article","starttime":"1484688660","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T14:31:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484713320","priority":40,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Former Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano hospitalized","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_5c5b36dc-dcfc-11e6-96be-83ddb86550c6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/former-arizona-gov-janet-napolitano-hospitalized/article_5c5b36dc-dcfc-11e6-96be-83ddb86550c6.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/former-arizona-gov-janet-napolitano-hospitalized/article_5c5b36dc-dcfc-11e6-96be-83ddb86550c6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Kristin J. Bender\nThe Associated Press","prologue":"SAN FRANCISCO \u2014 Former Arizona governor Janet Napolitano has been hospitalized with complications from her cancer treatment. Napolitano is a former U.S. Homeland Security secretary and currently president of the University of California. On Tuesday, the school system revealed her hospitalization and that she has been undergoing cancer treatment for five months.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["janet napolitano","department of homeland security","arizona","cancer","medicine","treatment"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"6d52725e-8c63-58e6-aff2-1bf7fb201754","description":"Former Homeland Security Director Janet Napolitano is 59.\u00a0","byline":"AP","hireswidth":2981,"hiresheight":2109,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d5/6d52725e-8c63-58e6-aff2-1bf7fb201754/583c87148ea4d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"439","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d5/6d52725e-8c63-58e6-aff2-1bf7fb201754/583c87148d362.image.jpg?resize=620%2C439"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d5/6d52725e-8c63-58e6-aff2-1bf7fb201754/583c87148d362.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"212","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d5/6d52725e-8c63-58e6-aff2-1bf7fb201754/583c87148d362.image.jpg?resize=300%2C212"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"724","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d5/6d52725e-8c63-58e6-aff2-1bf7fb201754/583c87148d362.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C724"}}}],"revision":9,"commentID":"5c5b36dc-dcfc-11e6-96be-83ddb86550c6","body":"

SAN FRANCISCO \u2014 Former Arizona governor Janet Napolitano has been hospitalized with complications from her cancer treatment.

Napolitano is a former U.S. Homeland Security secretary and currently president of the University of California. On Tuesday, the school system revealed her hospitalization and that she has been undergoing cancer treatment for five months.

The UC Office of the President said Napolitano, 59, was diagnosed last August but did not say what type of cancer she has or respond to inquiries seeking further details. Her condition was never made public and emerged only after a side effect from her medication sent her to the hospital Monday.

Her office said Napolitano has performed her duties at full capacity and is expected to be discharged in the next day or so. The president of the 10-campus system has kept the chairwoman of the UC Board of Regents informed throughout her treatment, which is nearly complete, the university said.

Napolitano, who previously was treated successfully for breast cancer, was a two-term Democratic governor of Arizona before joining President Barack Obama's Cabinet.

She served as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security from 2009 to 2013, as governor of Arizona from 2003 to 2009, as Arizona's attorney general from 1998 to 2003, and as U.S. attorney for Arizona from 1993 to 1997.

Napolitano now oversees the 10 UC campuses, five medical centers, three affiliated national laboratories, and a statewide agriculture and natural resources program.

In November 2004, Napolitano had surgery to remove her right ovary and an ovarian cyst, which was benign. She resumed a normal work schedule three days later.

Napolitano had her right breast removed in 2000 after being diagnosed with cancer.

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PHOENIX \u2014 The man who shot and severely beat an Arizona state trooper last week was a former member of the Mexican federal police who was in the country illegally, authorities said.

He had rolled his car on Interstate 10 before he inexplicably attacked the officer who had stopped to help.

Leonard Pennelas-Escobar opened fire on Trooper Edward Andersson early Thursday after the officer had stopped on the interstate and set up flares in a bid to get motorists to slow down. Pennelas-Escobar said something unrecognizable in Spanish before shooting the trooper, and then he started landing blows with his fists and beating the trooper's head on the ground, Department of Public Safety Director Frank Milstead said Monday.

A passing motorist who witnessed the attack retrieved a handgun from his vehicle and fired two shots at Pennelas-Escobar after he refused an order to stop attacking Andersson. With Pennelas-Escobar incapacitated, the motorist tended to the wounded trooper but was later drawn back into the dispute when Pennelas-Escobar got up and resumed his assault on Andersson. The motorist then fired a fatal shot at Pennelas-Escobar.

\"He definitely kept him (Andersson) from having much more serious neurological injuries from this beating,\" Milstead said.

Milstead called a news conference Monday to offer more detail on the chaotic scene, but he was unable to provide an explanation on why Pennelas-Escobar attacked the officer.

The 37-year-old Pennelas-Escobar was in the country illegally, a drug user and was believed to have once worked as a Mexican police officer, Milstead said. Still, Pennelas-Escobar had no known criminal history.

Andersson arrived at the rollover scene about 55 miles west of downtown Phoenix to find Pennelas-Escobar holding his injured girlfriend, 23-year-old Vanessa Monique Lopez-Ruiz, on the edge of the roadway.

She had been ejected in the high-speed rollover and was later pronounced dead. The cause of the collision hasn't yet been determined. Pennelas-Escobar was believed to have been the vehicle's driver.

Andersson, a 27-year department veteran, suffered gunshot wounds to the right shoulder and chest. He underwent surgery and has since been released from the hospital.

The motorist who shot Pennelas-Escobar hasn't spoken out publicly about the shooting.

Milstead said the motorist didn't serve in the military or work as a law enforcement officer, but he still had experience in using firearms. The DPS director described the motorist as a humble man with a strong religious faith.

\"He knows he did the right thing,\" Milstead said. \"He is trying to reconcile that in his mind, which is difficult to take a life even when you know it's the right thing to do.\"

Arizona has a \"defense of third person\" law that allows someone to use deadly force against another who is threatening or injuring a third person. It was not unusual that the passing driver was armed in this gun-friendly state with loose regulation.

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Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey is heading to Washington to attend the inauguration of president-elect Donald Trump.

Ducey's office says he will fly to Washington, D.C. on Wednesday and attend Friday's ceremony.

The Republican governor didn't outright support Trump until he locked up the GOP nomination in advance of last summer's Republican convention. He did say that no matter what he would support the Republican nominee over Democrat Hillary Clinton in the election.

Ducey returns to the state on Saturday.

"}, {"id":"64dc16d8-dc6a-11e6-a29d-df904e0e6bfa","type":"link","starttime":"1484624700","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T20:45:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484628061","sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Zebra skinned; principal reassigned over email; dad, toddler swept out to sea","permalink":"http://tucson.com/zebra-skinned-principal-reassigned-over-email-dad-toddler-swept-out/collection_3a0de601-299c-5406-8ef6-db50f82600f1.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/zebra-skinned-principal-reassigned-over-email-dad-toddler-swept-out/collection_3a0de601-299c-5406-8ef6-db50f82600f1.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":1},"prologue":"Odd and interesting news from around the West.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"url":"http://tucson.com/zebra-skinned-principal-reassigned-over-email-dad-toddler-swept-out/collection_3a0de601-299c-5406-8ef6-db50f82600f1.html"}, {"id":"53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78","type":"article","starttime":"1484620980","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T19:43:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484626863","priority":41,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Western Women: Mary Colton dedicated life's work to indigenous arts","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/western-women-mary-colton-dedicated-life-s-work-to-indigenous/article_53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/western-women-mary-colton-dedicated-life-s-work-to-indigenous/article_53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Jan Cleere\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Renowned artist herself, she help expand Museum of Northern Arizona into prominent role preserving Native American culture.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72475"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b","description":"Mary Russell Ferrall Colton","byline":"Wikimedia Commons","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"83","height":"116","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/04/e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b/587969c8435b9.image.jpg?resize=83%2C116"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"140","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/04/e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b/587969c8435b9.image.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"419","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/04/e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b/587969c8435b9.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1431","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/04/e0453746-7d1f-57d7-97bd-076d3a455c3b/587969c8435b9.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":15,"commentID":"53e5fcb8-cb19-5feb-a65a-48bde2f4bd78","body":"

Not only was Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton a renowned artist in her own right, but she took on the mission of fostering the redevelopment and popularity of Native American artisans. Through her efforts, and those of her husband, Harold Sellers Colton, Flagstaff\u2019s Museum of Northern Arizona became one of the pre-eminent facilities encouraging indigenous arts and crafts.

Born in Louisville, Kentucky, on March 25, 1889, Mary began her studies at the Philadelphia School of Design at the age of 15. She opened an art studio in downtown Philadelphia with two of her classmates, preferring to work in oils but also experimenting with pencil, ink, charcoal, watercolor and sculpture.

In 1910, she met University of Pennsylvania zoology professor Harold Colton. The couple wed on May 23, 1912.

Spending their honeymoon traveling and camping throughout the west, they arrived in Flagstaff that June and hiked the San Francisco Peaks.

Making their home in Ardmore, Pennsylvania, the couple traveled west whenever possible. They collected old Indian potsherds and discovered ancient sites around Flagstaff that had never been documented including Elden Pueblo, one of the most important pueblos in the Flagstaff area. Recording the location of many ruins they discovered, they initiated some of the first archaeological surveys of the Colorado Plateau.

They visited the Hopi mesas and watched snake dances at Hotevilla and Oraibi. After an extensive trip through the Painted Desert and Hotevilla, Harold wrote his mother that Mary \u201chad discarded her skirt and taken to bloomers quite unblushingly, and on the whole trip wore her hair in pigtails.\u201d

On Aug. 30, 1914, Mary gave birth to Joseph Ferrell Colton, and on Sept. 4, 1917, Sabin Woolworth Colton IV arrived. On a trip to Tucson in 1923, 6-year-old Sabin came down with valley fever and died the following year.

The Coltons moved to Flagstaff in 1925, purchasing 400 acres of land during the ensuing years.

At this time, a small gallery housed in the town\u2019s Women\u2019s Club contained a handful of native blankets, basketry, and pottery. Mary urged the community to expand its native holdings into a facility of science and art. She proposed building a museum from native rock, \u201croofed with stout spruce timbers, somewhat after the pueblo style of architecture, and placed high upon a mesa top overlooking the city and facing the great Peaks.\u201d

With the backing of the community, the Museum of Northern Arizona began to grow. Harold was elected director and president, a position he held for 30 years, while Mary took on the job as curator of art and later accepted the additional position of curator of ethnology, serving until 1948.

Mary was deeply concerned about the decline in Hopi craftsmanship. She was determined to re-establish these ancient arts, skills that had deteriorated with the onset of modern machinery and cheaply made imitations.

She hunted for a better breed of sheep that would produce quality wool and provide weavers with long staple cotton to construct handwoven fabrics that would flourish with the strength and beauty of ancient cloths.

She sought a source for indigo that would re-create the brilliant blue dyes once used in Hopi weavings. She studied native plants searching for traditional stains that would improve the color quality in textiles and basketry.

She experimented with firing methods and paints to restore Hopi pottery to its former beauty and skill while researching natural soils and rocks trying to replicate authentic clay colors.

Mary initiated the Arizona Artists Exhibitions in 1929, providing local artists with a venue for promoting their work. She put together a traveling exhibit, \u201cCraftsmen of the Painted Desert,\u201d displaying Hopi and Navajo art to schools and museums across the country. Her trunk show or \u201ctreasure chest,\u201d in which she compiled lesson plans consisting of collections of art objects and techniques, received national acclaim for its innovative teaching methods.

On July 2, 1930, Mary held the first Hopi craftsman exhibition to promote and preserve native art. \u201cIndians swarmed in from the Reservation,\u201d said Harold, \u201cthen the dry season broke with a gentle rain, which was interpreted to mean that the benevolent Kachinas that dwell in the towering Peaks above the town, were pleased. It was, therefore, a huge success.\u201d

By 1931, she had established the junior art show, presenting the artistic talents of grade-school children. \u201cArt education must begin with children,\u201d she wrote. We must grow our own artists. The material is here awaiting encouragement and cultivation.\u201d

In 1934, she published \u201cArt for the Schools of the Southwest: An Outline for the Public and Indian Schools.\u201d

\u201cIt does not matter what career he, or she, may adopt in later life,\u201d she wrote, \u201ctraining in art appreciation means an increased ability to see beauty in the world about you and a facility for creating things with your hands; these things are a great asset and add immensely to our joy in life.\u201d

She initiated the Hopi Silver Project in 1938, encouraging silversmiths to utilize ancient designs and adopt an overlay technique she proposed would generate better quality and a saleable product.

As the Museum of Northern Arizona expanded, the Coltons donated over 100 acres of land to help it grow and thrive. Mary, however, was not flourishing as well.

She became a recluse, rarely leaving her home. She went back to painting for a while, completing \u201cBell Rock\u201d and \u201cCourthouse Rock,\u201d a Sedona landscape, in 1951, her last work. And although she was not well, she participated in the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the museum in 1953, and an exhibition of her art in 1958.

Harold completed the work she had started to restore ancient Hopi colors, publishing her recipes and findings in \u201cHopi Dyes\u201d in 1965.

Mary, 82, died July 16, 1971. She is buried in a family plot outside Philadelphia.

"}, {"id":"aeb0ec66-b64f-52a8-959c-200484a68b72","type":"article","starttime":"1484607960","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T16:06:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484618953","sections":[{"national":"ap/national"},{"state":"ap/state"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Shooter of Arizona trooper was in US illegally, Department of Public Safety says","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/national/article_aeb0ec66-b64f-52a8-959c-200484a68b72.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/national/shooter-of-arizona-trooper-was-in-us-illegally-department-of/article_aeb0ec66-b64f-52a8-959c-200484a68b72.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/national/shooter-of-arizona-trooper-was-in-us-illegally-department-of/article_aeb0ec66-b64f-52a8-959c-200484a68b72.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Jacques Billeaud\nThe Associated Press","prologue":"PHOENIX \u2014 An Arizona state trooper who was beaten and shot while responding to a traffic collision on Interstate 10 was attacked by a Mexican man who was responsible for the one-vehicle rollover, authorities said. Leonard Pennelas-Escobar opened fire on Trooper Edward Andersson early Thursday after the officer had stopped on the interstate and set up flares in a bid to get motorists to slow down. Pennelas-Escobar said something unrecognizable in Spanish before shooting the trooper, and then he started landing blows with his fists and beating the trooper\u2019s head on the ground, Department of Public Safety Director Frank Milstead said Monday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["general news","traffic","gun politics","police","violent crime","crime","accidents","accidents and disasters","transportation","political issues","government and politics","human rights and civil liberties","social issues","social affairs","law enforcement agencies"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":7,"commentID":"aeb0ec66-b64f-52a8-959c-200484a68b72","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 An Arizona state trooper who was beaten and shot while responding to a traffic collision on Interstate 10 was attacked by a Mexican man who was responsible for the one-vehicle rollover, authorities said.

Leonard Pennelas-Escobar opened fire on Trooper Edward Andersson early Thursday after the officer had stopped on the interstate and set up flares in a bid to get motorists to slow down. Pennelas-Escobar said something unrecognizable in Spanish before shooting the trooper, and then he started landing blows with his fists and beating the trooper\u2019s head on the ground, Department of Public Safety Director Frank Milstead said Monday.

A passing motorist who witnessed the attack retrieved a handgun from his vehicle and fired two shots at Pennelas-Escobar after he refused an order to stop attacking Andersson. With Pennelas-Escobar incapacitated, the motorist tended to the wounded trooper but was later drawn back into the dispute when Pennelas-Escobar got up and resumed his assault on Andersson. The motorist then fired a fatal shot at Pennelas-Escobar.

\u201cHe definitely kept him (Andersson) from having much more serious neurological injuries from this beating,\u201d Milstead said.

Milstead called a news conference Monday to offer more detail on the chaotic scene, but he was unable to provide an explanation on why Pennelas-Escobar attacked the officer.

The 37-year-old Pennelas-Escobar was in the country illegally, a drug user and was believed to have once worked as a Mexican police officer, Milstead said. Still, Pennelas-Escobar had no known criminal history.

Andersson arrived at the rollover scene about 55 miles west of downtown Phoenix to find Pennelas-Escobar holding his injured girlfriend, 23-year-old Vanessa Monique Lopez-Ruiz, on the edge of the roadway.

She had been ejected in the high-speed rollover and was later pronounced dead. The cause of the collision hasn\u2019t yet been determined. Pennelas-Escobar was believed to have been the vehicle\u2019s driver.

Andersson, a 27-year department veteran, suffered gunshot wounds to the right shoulder and chest. He underwent surgery and has since been released from the hospital.

The motorist who shot Pennelas-Escobar hasn\u2019t spoken out publicly about the shooting.

Milstead said the motorist didn\u2019t serve in the military or work as a law enforcement officer, but he still had experience in using firearms. The DPS director described the motorist as a humble man with a strong religious faith.

\u201cHe knows he did the right thing,\u201d Milstead said. \u201cHe is trying to reconcile that in his mind, which is difficult, to take a life even when you know it\u2019s the right thing to do.\u201d

Arizona has a \u201cdefense of third person\u201d law that allows someone to use deadly force against another who is threatening or injuring a third person. It was not unusual that the passing driver was armed in this gun-friendly state with loose regulation.

"}, {"id":"81cb011b-e422-59f7-a700-7c38ccb2ae05","type":"article","starttime":"1484594880","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T12:28:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484610726","sections":[{"state":"ap/state"},{"business":"ap/business"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Arizona pushing private expansion of state mental hospital","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/article_81cb011b-e422-59f7-a700-7c38ccb2ae05.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/arizona-pushing-private-expansion-of-state-mental-hospital/article_81cb011b-e422-59f7-a700-7c38ccb2ae05.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/arizona-pushing-private-expansion-of-state-mental-hospital/article_81cb011b-e422-59f7-a700-7c38ccb2ae05.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Bob Christie\nThe Associated Press","prologue":"PHOENIX \u2014 The state health department is asking the Arizona Legislature to pass a law allowing it to lease parts of the state mental hospital and its 93-acre grounds to private providers. Department of Health Services Director Cara Christ told the House health committee at a hearing last week that her department wants to build a Center for Psychiatric Excellence on the grounds.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["business","general news","health","state legislature","government and politics","legislature","health care services","health care industry","state governments","industry regulation","government business and finance","government regulations"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":7,"commentID":"81cb011b-e422-59f7-a700-7c38ccb2ae05","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The state health department is asking the Arizona Legislature to pass a law allowing it to lease parts of the state mental hospital and its 93-acre grounds to private providers.

Department of Health Services Director Cara Christ told the House health committee at a hearing last week that her department wants to build a Center for Psychiatric Excellence on the grounds.

The hospital and grounds about a mile north of Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport is held in a charitable trust for the benefit of mental health patients in the state. The law change would allow Christ to sign short- and long-term leases and development agreements with private providers.

The hospital itself will not be privatized and its staff will remain state employees, said Colby Bower, an assistant director at the department.

The hospital currently has 311 patients divided between three units \u2014 one for sex offenders, one for patients who have been convicted of serious crimes and determined to be insane, and one for people ordered by the courts to be hospitalized because of mental illness.

The idea is to have private mental health providers develop facilities that would create a behavioral health campus. They could include outpatient behavioral health services, urgent psychiatric services, 24-hour holds for observation and stabilization, short stays for adult inpatient acute psychiatric services and a psychiatric emergency room.

Private providers could use empty hospital wards, renovate and use vacant buildings or build new facilities.

\u201cWe are looking to build a campus of psychiatric excellence to help build the workforce to increase the behavioral health services that are provided in the community and to be able to provide our patients with the entire continuum of psychiatric care,\u201d Christ told the committee.

Christ needs legislative approval to enter into the leases, and has the approval of the chairwoman of the House health committee. Rep. Heather Carter, R-Cave Creek. She called it a good way to combine providers on one campus and leverage state assets.

\u201cI think the idea is really forward-thinking,\u201d Carter said in an interview Friday. \u201cAnd I applaud our agencies for thinking entrepreneurial about how to make highest and best use of the land. That\u2019s prime real estate and it has a clearly articulated purpose to serve our Arizona citizens.\u201d

The committee advanced House Bill 2043 on an 8-0 vote with one abstention on Thursday. It now heads to floor debate after a routine constitutional review.

The hospital has plenty of unused space. It currently has about 80 unoccupied beds in four wards in the secured civil hospital that could be leased out; a building with a 28-bed capacity now used as administrative space that could become an urgent care center; and 23 available beds in a building adjacent to the criminal commitment unit.

The hospital also has a vacant building that could house offices or patient beds, an abandoned complex of 10 single-story buildings that could be razed or renovated and an empty 2-acre plot that could be a building site.

About a dozen private providers from large hospitals to small groups expressed interest after the health department asked for feedback, Bower said.

\u201cWe feel like there\u2019s enough interest out there to move forward,\u201d he said.

"}, {"id":"d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace","type":"article","starttime":"1484514000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-15T14:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484855474","priority":31,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Lawmaker is seeking 10-cent hike in Arizona's gas tax","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/lawmaker-is-seeking--cent-hike-in-arizona-s-gas/article_d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/lawmaker-is-seeking--cent-hike-in-arizona-s-gas/article_d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Last time Arizona hiked its gas tax was in 1991.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["arizona gas tax","arizons taxes","tax hikes","arizona roads","hurf","gov. doug ducey"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"72611"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff","description":"State Rep. Noel Campbell wants a gas-tax hike on the 2018 ballot.","byline":"Capitol Media Services","hireswidth":1443,"hiresheight":1436,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/58798481091cf.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"617","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/587984810739e.image.jpg?resize=620%2C617"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/587984810739e.image.jpg?crop=1443%2C811%2C0%2C97&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/587984810739e.image.jpg?crop=1443%2C811%2C0%2C97&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/4f/44fb0b54-3e43-5a00-b99b-1280c68375ff/587984810739e.image.jpg?crop=1443%2C811%2C0%2C97&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":21,"commentID":"d0745c84-d084-5000-a4eb-b3d043e7eace","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The new head of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure wants a dime-a-gallon increase in the state gasoline tax.

But he\u2019s not sure voters are willing to go along.

Rep. Noel Campbell, R-Prescott, pointed out that the last time Arizona hiked its gas tax was in 1991. Since then it has remained at 18 cents a gallon.

\u201cAnd a dollar of tax revenue then is worth about 47 cents today,\u201d he said. \u201cSo we\u2019re not even collecting enough tax to maintain our roads.\u201d

So Campbell figures it\u2019s time to revisit the issue.

He has no illusion his colleagues would approve such a sharp hike in gasoline taxes. And it\u2019s not just a matter of politics: It takes a two-thirds vote of the House and Senate to hike tax rates.

But Campbell needs just a simple majority to put the issue on the 2018 ballot. And he figures he\u2019d better start selling the issue now to get even that margin.

\u201cThe question is, do we have enough willpower to tax ourselves a reasonable amount \u2014 reasonable \u2014 to help us with our road conditions,\u201d he said.

It\u2019s not just a question of a flat tax rate.

Campbell noted there are an increasing number of vehicles on the road that use no gasoline or diesel fuel. And all vehicles are getting much better gas mileage.

Consider: The Arizona Department of Transportation reports that in 2005 motorists logged more than 163 million miles a day on Arizona roads. A decade later, it topped 178 million miles. Yet the amount of gasoline sold in 2015 is virtually identical to what it was in 2005.

\u201cWe have got to get revenue into our transportation system to start dealing with these highway needs that we have,\u201d Campbell said.

And there are a lot.

In a report released last month, a special task force set up by the Legislature pegged Arizona\u2019s near-term funding needs at $20 billion. And that\u2019s just for building, widening and maintaining freeways. An additional $40 billion is needed for other road projects.

Meanwhile, ADOT predicts the Highway User Revenue Fund will add just $1.4 billion this year. And that includes not only fuel taxes but also vehicle license fees and registration charges.

Hiking the gas tax by a dime could bring in an additional $285 million.

But Campbell has another idea he is crafting beyond the gas-tax hike in HCR 2011: a $30 annual fee that motorists would pay every time they buy vehicle insurance.

At the very least, he said, that could raise about $115 million a year. It would eliminate what has become a practice of funding the Department of Public Safety by raiding HURF dollars that would otherwise be spent on road construction and maintenance.

Gov. Doug Ducey proposes just such a shift from HURF to balance this coming year\u2019s budget.

And it would do something else. Campbell figures it would impose at least some financial burden for using state roads on all vehicles, regardless of how much \u2014 or how little \u2014 gasoline they use.

But in proposing to take the issue to the statewide ballot, Campbell faces a different hurdle.

Residents of Maricopa and Pima counties already have voted to hike sales taxes to take care of their own road-construction needs. That raises the question of whether urban voters, who make up three-fourths of voters in the state, would see any advantage in hiking gasoline taxes, too.

\u201cI don\u2019t really have an answer for you politically,\u201d Campbell said. But he said he at least needs to start the discussion.

Campbell also expressed some frustration at having to fight this battle without help from the state\u2019s top elected official.

\u201cThe governor has got to show leadership here,\u201d he complained.

But Campbell should not count on any backing from Ducey in his quest. Gubernatorial press aide Daniel Scarpinato said his boss remains opposed to any new or increased taxes in any form.

"}, {"id":"bb79e2e0-da76-11e6-93ae-075f6d11c223","type":"article","starttime":"1484413800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-14T10:10:00-07:00","priority":30,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Ex-Goodyear cop sentenced in tanning salon voyeurism case","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_bb79e2e0-da76-11e6-93ae-075f6d11c223.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/ex-goodyear-cop-sentenced-in-tanning-salon-voyeurism-case/article_bb79e2e0-da76-11e6-93ae-075f6d11c223.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/ex-goodyear-cop-sentenced-in-tanning-salon-voyeurism-case/article_bb79e2e0-da76-11e6-93ae-075f6d11c223.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"Man pleaded guilty, admitted to secretly\u00a0filming naked women.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"e7f135b2-da76-11e6-96d9-f714de0b4960","description":"Jeffrey Streeter","byline":"Courtesy of Maricopa County Sheriff's Office","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"465","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/7f/e7f135b2-da76-11e6-96d9-f714de0b4960/587a529612981.image.jpg?resize=465%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/7f/e7f135b2-da76-11e6-96d9-f714de0b4960/587a529612981.image.jpg?crop=534%2C300%2C0%2C216&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/7f/e7f135b2-da76-11e6-96d9-f714de0b4960/587a529612981.image.jpg?crop=534%2C300%2C0%2C216&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/7f/e7f135b2-da76-11e6-96d9-f714de0b4960/587a529612981.image.jpg?crop=534%2C300%2C0%2C216"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"bb79e2e0-da76-11e6-93ae-075f6d11c223","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 A judge in Phoenix has sentenced a former Goodyear police officer who pleaded guilty to surreptitiously filming naked women at a tanning salon to three years in prison.

Jeffrey Streeter was sentenced on Friday after pleading guilty in November to six counts of voyeurism. He will also have to register as a sex offender and be on probation for life.

Police say Streeter recorded women at the salon without their knowledge. Streeter was arrested in November 2014 and at the time faced 22 counts of voyeurism.

Police say the found 23 videos on his phone in relation to the investigation.

Goodyear police say Streeter resigned after his arrest.

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PHOENIX \u2014 Gov. Doug Ducey is offering the average Arizona teacher a $900-a-year raise \u2014 by 2022.

The governor Friday unveiled his plan to put $114 million in new funds into K-12 education for the coming fiscal year. That is on top of $76 million that schools will get automatically because of increases in enrollment as well as inflation.

But the governor\u2019s big promise during his State of the State speech earlier this week of \u201crecognizing and rewarding the work of our teachers\u201d would produce $13.6 million this coming year.

The National Education Association puts the average teacher salary in Arizona at $45,477 a year, the lowest in the nation. With close to 60,000 teachers in the state, that first-year funding comes out to just $225 per teacher.

Joe Thomas, president of the Arizona Education Association, said he appreciates the governor putting more than $100 million in new funding into public schools. But he said the amount Ducey has earmarked for teacher salaries won\u2019t achieve the governor\u2019s goal of recruiting and retaining teachers.

\u201cI don\u2019t know that a dollar a day is going to be the difference between someone staying and someone leaving,\u201d he said.

Sen. Steve Farley, D-Tucson, pointed out that about $89 million of what the governor is calling new spending is coming from shifting gasoline taxes and vehicle registration fees from the account that otherwise would fund road construction and repair.

Gubernatorial press aide Daniel Scarpinato said the teacher salary plan is the best his boss can do given the state\u2019s revenue situation.

\u201cWe don\u2019t think we can ever do enough to reward our teachers,\u201d he said. \u201cAnd so we\u2019re doing what we can this year with available dollars.\u201d

Thomas, however, said the claim of limited dollars is self-inflicted, citing a series of tax breaks approved during the recession. The result is that corporate income tax collections, which were $571 million last year, will be less than half that much by 2020.

House Speaker J.D. Mesnard, however, defended those tax cuts, saying they \u201chelp grow the economy.\u201d

But after accounting for one-time expenditures, Ducey\u2019s $9.8 billion budget for the new fiscal year is a 1.8 percent increase. That\u2019s less than what would be normal spending growth just to keep pace with inflation and population growth.

The governor also is proposing a small tax cut, about $2.8 million, by indexing the amount of the standard deduction on Arizona\u2019s personal income tax form.

There is some new money for universities, but nowhere near close to the $99 million Ducey cut in his first term. Instead, there is a one-time $15 million no-strings-attached appropriation the schools can use for whatever they believe are priorities.

That\u2019s being divided up based on student enrollment, with slightly more than half going to Arizona State University, $3.2 million to Northern Arizona University and nearly $4.2 million for the University of Arizona.

The governor also proposes to let the universities keep about $37 million they generate in sales taxes from commercial enterprises on campus. That would provide enough cash flow to borrow $1 billion for 30 years to fund maintenance, which has been put off, as well as new research and development projects.

Gubernatorial staff said that\u2019s new money for universities, freeing up what they would otherwise spend on borrowing. But it also comes at a $7 million loss in state sales tax revenue for the three cities where the universities are located.

Other goals

In defending the teacher-pay plan, Scarpinato said Ducey\u2019s long-term goal is to increase teacher salaries by 2 percent over five years. While that is less than inflation, Scarpinato said school districts are free to use other funds to supplement teacher pay.

He also said the budget has other education funding including:

The governor, also, has directed the universities to provide scholarships to those who are willing to teach for at least four years. Ducey\u2019s budget includes no new money for what that would cost the schools.

Ducey is putting $17 million in funding for construction of new schools statewide and repairs to existing ones.

Lawmakers assumed that responsibility after the Supreme Court ruled more than two decades ago that leaving that to local taxpayers resulted in gross inequities. Scarpinato said it comes down to priorities.

\u201cWhat we really tried to do with building this budget is look at where are the dollars we invest that we have going to make the most difference,\u201d he said.

But Mesnard said he is \u201cconcerned for legal and structural reasons.\u201d

Education issues aside, Ducey\u2019s budget includes about $20 million in additional funds for state agencies to reimburse private contractors who, in the wake of approval of Proposition 206, now have to pay their workers who care for the disabled and others at least $10 an hour.

It does not have an across-the-board pay hike for what the governor in his State of the State speech called Arizona\u2019s \u201ctalented state employees.\u201d The last general raise was in 2008, though employees who agreed to surrender merit protections got a 5 percent boost in 2014.

"}, {"id":"6a6e9404-d9cc-11e6-8eba-e3d1f7ff17ba","type":"article","starttime":"1484341320","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-13T14:02:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484341354","priority":35,"sections":[{"government-and-politics":"news/government-and-politics"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Ducey's budget includes raises for teachers, new money for universities","url":"http://tucson.com/news/government-and-politics/article_6a6e9404-d9cc-11e6-8eba-e3d1f7ff17ba.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/government-and-politics/ducey-s-budget-includes-raises-for-teachers-new-money-for/article_6a6e9404-d9cc-11e6-8eba-e3d1f7ff17ba.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/government-and-politics/ducey-s-budget-includes-raises-for-teachers-new-money-for/article_6a6e9404-d9cc-11e6-8eba-e3d1f7ff17ba.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services","prologue":"New spending plan's additional education funding comes out to just $225 per teacher.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["arizona budget","arizona legislature","arizona spending","gov. doug ducey","arizona education spending"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"2bbd194e-6f6c-5ab6-b890-d23eeb57d2c6","description":"During Monday\u2019s State of the State speech, Gov. Doug Ducey said he wanted to recognize and reward the work of teachers.","byline":"Ross D. Franklin / The Associated Press","hireswidth":3500,"hiresheight":2466,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/bb/2bbd194e-6f6c-5ab6-b890-d23eeb57d2c6/587587d1bef4a.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"437","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/bb/2bbd194e-6f6c-5ab6-b890-d23eeb57d2c6/587587d1813b8.image.jpg?resize=620%2C437"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/bb/2bbd194e-6f6c-5ab6-b890-d23eeb57d2c6/587587d1813b8.image.jpg?crop=1715%2C964%2C0%2C51&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/bb/2bbd194e-6f6c-5ab6-b890-d23eeb57d2c6/587587d1813b8.image.jpg?crop=1715%2C964%2C0%2C51&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/bb/2bbd194e-6f6c-5ab6-b890-d23eeb57d2c6/587587d1813b8.image.jpg?crop=1715%2C964%2C0%2C51&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":21,"commentID":"6a6e9404-d9cc-11e6-8eba-e3d1f7ff17ba","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 Gov. Doug Ducey is offering the average Arizona teacher a $900 a year raise \u2014 by 2022.

The governor today unveiled his plan to put $114 million in new funds into K-12 education for the coming fiscal year. That is on top of $76 million that schools will get automatically due to both increases in enrollment as well as inflation.

But the governor's big promise during his State of the State speech earlier this week of \"recognizing and rewarding the work of our teachers'' would produce just $13.6 million this coming year.

The National Education Association puts the average teacher salary in Arizona at $45,477 a year, the lowest in the nation. With close to 60,000 teachers in the state, that first-year funding comes out to just $225 per teacher.

Gubernatorial press aide Daniel Scarpinato said it's the best his boss can do given the state's revenue situation.

\"We don't think we can ever do enough to reward our teachers,'' he said. \"And so we're doing what we can this year with available dollars.

And Scarpinato said when the raise is fully implemented in five years it will \"move the needle for teachers.''

After accounting for one-time expenditures, Ducey's $9.78 billion budget for the new fiscal year is just a 1.8 percent increase. That's less than what would be normal spending growth just to keep pace with inflation and population growth.

It does include some new money for the state's university system.

There is nothing in the plan to restore some of the basic state aid that has been cut since the recession, including $99 million taken directly from schools in Ducey's first term. Instead, there is a one-time $15 million no-strings-attached appropriation that the schools can use for whatever they believe are priorities.

That's being divided up based on student enrollment, with slightly more than half going to Arizona State University, $3.2 million to Northern Arizona University and nearly $4.2 million for the University of Arizona.

But what the governor also proposes is to let the universities keep about $37 they generate in sales taxes and use that as a financing mechanism to make payments to borrow up to $1 billion for the next 30 years. Those bonds would go both for both maintenance that has been put off as well as new research and development projects.

Gubernatorial staffers said having those revenues that will free up the money the universities would otherwise spend on borrowing. But this isn't just state dollars: The cities where the universities are located will lose close to $7 million that they would otherwise get.

In defending the amount of money Ducey is making available for teacher pay, Scarpinato said that is just one piece of what is going into K-12 education.

The plan also includes providing $10 million this coming year that can be used in schools in the poorest neighborhoods for full-day kindergarten.

Arizona at one time had $240 million for such programs statewide, a program that was repealed during the recession. The limited funds will be targeting schools about 80 schools in which at least 90 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunches, a figure that equals about $37,000 a year for a family of three.

\"These are schools that really, really need our help,'' said Dawn Wallace, the governor's education adviser.

She said the aim is to have as many students reading as possible by the third grade. Wallace said, though, that eligible schools are free to use the dollars in any program they want that, including preschool and counselors.

The governor's budget also includes a $1,000 bonus for new teachers who agree to go to work at schools in which at least 60 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunches. Up to about 900 schools statewide fit the definition.

And there's a plan to make another $250,000 available in an existing program that forgives the loans taken out by those who agree to teach math, science and special education. There is currently about $170,000 available.

\"You think it's hard getting a math teacher in central Phoenix?'' Wallace asked. \"Try getting a math teacher in Winslow.''

Separately, the governor has directed the universities to come up with a plan to both provide scholarships to those who are willing to go into education for at least four years, guaranteeing a job waiting after graduation. But Ducey's budget includes no new money for what that would cost the schools.

And Ducey's proposal includes $38 million for bonuses for schools whose students, on average, score in the top 10 percent statewide in the AzMERIT test, with high-poverty schools getting a $400-per-student bump and $225 for schools with more affluent students.

One area not getting a lot of new dollars is the account for the state to provide dollars for the construction of new schools and repairs to existing ones.

Lawmakers agreed to assume that responsibility after a Supreme Court ruling more than two decades ago which found that leaving that to local taxpayers resulted in gross inequities. But total funding for the coming year in Ducey's budget is just $17 million.

Scarpinato said it comes down to priorities.

\"What we really tried to do with building this budget is look at where are the dollars we invest that we have going to make the most difference,'' he said.

\"If you talk to parents out there, if you talk to teachers, they're going to tell you that it's the teacher in front of the classroom, that it's the early literacy programs, it connectivity to new programs, to new technology, that those are the things that are going to make the most difference,'' Scarpinato continued. \"So that's really where we're pushing the dollars the most because we actually want these dollars to result in improving education in the state.''

But Ducey may not get the last word. The Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest, which got that historic 1994 ruling voiding the state's method of financing schools, is weighing whether to again ask the courts whether the system has again gotten so out of balance to be unconstitutional.

The governor's budget includes $5 billion to expand broadband Internet access into rural schools. And there also is $20 million available to schools who help districts who have have have signed contracts with teachers for the coming school year but enrollment is less than forecast.

Ducey's budget includes about $20 million in additional funds for state agencies reimburse private contractors who, in the wake of approval of Proposition 206, now have to pay their workers who care for the disabled and others at least $10 an hour.

It also does not include any across-the-board pay hike for what the governor in his State of the State speech called Arizona's \"talented state employees.'' The last general raise was in 2008, though employees who agreed to surrender merit protections got a 5 percent boost in 2014.

"}, {"id":"a12d5e7e-d9a1-11e6-9d5b-979a2ef0d616","type":"article","starttime":"1484322300","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-13T08:45:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484322384","priority":30,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"US attorney for Arizona departing as administrations change","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_a12d5e7e-d9a1-11e6-9d5b-979a2ef0d616.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/us-attorney-for-arizona-departing-as-administrations-change/article_a12d5e7e-d9a1-11e6-9d5b-979a2ef0d616.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/us-attorney-for-arizona-departing-as-administrations-change/article_a12d5e7e-d9a1-11e6-9d5b-979a2ef0d616.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"During his tenure, the office successfully prosecuted Jared Lee Loughner.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"7769a3fd-f0f1-5f4f-97a3-f1e6f2d541c8","description":"John Leonardo","byline":"Ross D. Franklin","hireswidth":1700,"hiresheight":2208,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/76/7769a3fd-f0f1-5f4f-97a3-f1e6f2d541c8/50397ff485aa3.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"477","height":"619","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/76/7769a3fd-f0f1-5f4f-97a3-f1e6f2d541c8/50397ff17a959.image.jpg?resize=477%2C619"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"129","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/76/7769a3fd-f0f1-5f4f-97a3-f1e6f2d541c8/50397ff17bcf7.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"389","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/76/7769a3fd-f0f1-5f4f-97a3-f1e6f2d541c8/50397ff1df68d.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/76/7769a3fd-f0f1-5f4f-97a3-f1e6f2d541c8/50397ff17a959.image.jpg?crop=477%2C268%2C0%2C211"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"a12d5e7e-d9a1-11e6-9d5b-979a2ef0d616","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The top federal prosecutor for Arizona is stepping down with the change of administrations in Washington.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch on Friday announced the departure of U.S. Attorney John Leonardo, whom she said has served with integrity and distinction while working tirelessly to uphold the law and defend the nation's values.

Leonardo is a former Pima County Superior Court judge who has served as Arizona's U.S. attorney since 2012.

U.S. attorneys are presidential appointees.

During Leonardo's tenure, the office successfully prosecuted Jared Lee Loughner.

He's the man who carried out the Tucson shooting rampage in which six people were killed and then-Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and 12 others were wounded.

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PHOENIX \u2014 Taking aim largely at state universities, state Rep. Bob Thorpe is proposing to withhold state aid because they offer lower in-state tuition to \u201cDreamers.\u201d

The proposal by the Flagstaff Republican empowers the attorney general to determine, on his or her own, that an educational institution that receives state funds \u201cis in violation of state law or the constitution of Arizona.\u201d If the school doesn\u2019t back down in 60 days, it loses 10 percent of its state funding.

HB 2119 does not specifically mention tuition. But Thorpe told Capitol Media Services he crafted the measure following decisions by community colleges in several counties, including Maricopa and Pima, to conclude that those in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program are entitled to pay in-state tuition if they meet other residency requirements.

A 1998 voter-approved law reserves resident tuition for only those with \u201clawful immigration status.\u201d The same measure also denies scholarships of public money to those who do not qualify.

Maricopa community colleges, however, decided to extend in-state tuition to DACA recipients who are given permission under policies of the Obama administration not only to remain but also to work. Their attorneys have argued that makes their presence legal.

The Attorney General\u2019s Office disagreed and filed suit. But in 2015 a trial judge said as long as the Department of Homeland Security considers DACA recipients to be here legally, the state cannot establish a different standard.

Since then, the Arizona Board of Regents extended that same tuition basis to DACA recipients at the three state universities.

On Tuesday, Assistant Attorney General Rusty Crandell urged the Court of Appeals to overturn that trial court ruling.

Thorpe said despite court rulings so far, not only on tuition but driver\u2019s licenses, he does not accept the premise that President Obama has the authority by executive order to determine who can remain here legally.

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PHOENIX \u2014 Saying students are being taught hatred at public expenses, a Republican lawmaker from Flagstaff is proposing new limits on what and how schools, colleges and universities can teach.

Rep. Bob Thorpe said a 2010 law that targeted \u201cethnic studies\u201d courses at some public schools, including those at Tucson Unified School District, does not go far enough with its prohibition against teaching anything that promotes resentment toward another race. He wants to expand that list to include gender, religion, political affiliation and social class.

And Thorpe wants a ban on not just classes but any events or activities that \u201cnegatively target specific nationalities or countries.\u201d

But it does not stop there.

HB 2120 would extend the new restrictions to community colleges and universities, not just in terms of what\u2019s taught in the classroom but also any event or activity. And it gives the attorney general the unilateral power to withhold up to 10 percent of state aid if he or she determines a college or university is in violation.

Thorpe said Thursday his bill is aimed specifically at things like a \u201cprivilege walk\u201d exercise sponsored by the University of Arizona and a course entitled \u201cWhiteness and Race Theory\u201d at Arizona State University.

The former is described in UA literature as helping participants \u201crecognized the privileges that they have been granted and to learn about the backgrounds of their peers.\u201d

Among the exercises is telling students to step forward if they meet certain criteria, like having more than 50 books in a home, going to a private school or having inherited money. Conversely, those who were raised in a single-parent household, had to rely on public transportation or were ashamed of their clothes while growing up take a step back for each.

Participants are supposed to notice where they are in relation to others.

The ASU class is described online as teaching \u201cpostcolonialist, psychoanalytic, deconstructionist, feminist, new historicist\u201d schools of thought.

Among the required books is \u201cThe Everyday Language of White Racism,\u201d described on Google\u2019s website as providing \u201can incisive analysis of everyday language to reveal the underlying racist stereotypes that continue to circulate in American culture.\u201d

Thorpe said he sees those and similar classes as a step backward.

\u201cThe gains that were made in the 1960s are now being eroded,\u201d he said. \u201cWe\u2019re now finding ways to divide people and put wedges between people.\u201d

Take that privilege walk exercise.

\u201cSomebody is being classified as being less of an individual based upon their social classification, a classification being placed upon them, the ZIP code they grew up in, whether their parents were successful in business or not,\u201d Thorpe said.

\u201cI\u2019m not saying in my bill these classes cannot occur,\u201d he continued. \u201cWhat I\u2019m saying is taxpayers should not have to pay for them.\u201d

His legislation, however, has no such distinction: State aid would be at risk whether or not public dollars are involved.

Thorpe insisted he\u2019s not trying to block classes that discuss differences. So, for example, he said it would be fair to teach the different political philosophies of political parties and their adherents.

\u201cThe conversation is perfectly acceptable,\u201d Thorpe said. \u201cWhat I don\u2019t want is somebody to be treated negatively and poorly because, for example, they are a Green Party member or they\u2019re a Democrat or they\u2019re a Republican.\u201d

And he said this does not mean ignoring historical facts, like slavery, genocide and discrimination, that could make those who were \u2014 or are \u2014 affected angry at those who were the oppressors.

\u201cLet\u2019s just ensure they\u2019re accurately discussed,\u201d Thorpe said. He said it comes down to limiting the discussion to the historic facts.

\u201cIf you then look at an individual whose ancestors, because of their race, for example, they are linked to people that did something 100 or 200 years ago, that person who\u2019s living today has little or no association with what happened 200 years ago,\u201d he said. \u201cSo let\u2019s not have a wedge issue and cause that person to be vilified when they absolutely had nothing to do with some event that happened in the past.\u201d

But Thorpe was less clear about what would be acceptable in teaching about more current instances of discrimination, such as the fact that studies have shown minority motorists are more likely to be stopped than Anglos.

\u201cThis is Draft No. 1,\u201d he said, saying he is sure there will be revisions.

The provisions about disparaging specific countries is a direct result of what Thorpe said are campus movements specifically targeting Israel. He said, though, that is not meant to prohibit a discussion of specific policies like decisions by the Israeli government to build housing for Jewish settlers on land that had previously been owned and occupied for centuries by Palestinians.

The original 2010 law is in legal limbo following a lawsuit challenging it by supporters of the Mexican American Studies program at TUSD.

That case is awaiting trial after the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in 2015 there is evidence the statute was enacted for discriminatory reasons. Judge Jed Rakoff, writing for the majority, said it appears the law improperly and illegally interferes with the rights of students to get information.

Heidi Vega, spokeswoman for the Arizona School Boards Association, said her organization believes these standards should be set not by the Legislature but locally elected school boards. But Thorpe said he crafted the measure because local school boards and the Board of Regents are not addressing the issue.

UA spokesman Chris Sigurdson said the \u201cprivilege walk\u201d is an optional activity, saying the optional materials have been in use for more than 20 years. He said it is \u201cnot part of any formal curriculum\u201d at the school.

He referred questions about the legislation to the regents. Spokeswoman Sarah Harper said her board has not had a chance to review what Thorpe has proposed.

A spokesman for Arizona State University would not comment.

Lee Bebout, the ASU associate professor who offers the course Thorpe finds offensive, defended it as a way of addressing aspects of social conflict.

\u201cCollege is exactly the place where students and teachers must work together to confront difficult ideas,\u201d he told Capitol Media Services. And Bebout said college curricula \u201cshould be designed by experts in the field rather than by politicians.\u201d

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PHOENIX \u2014 The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office has released video of a naked Mesa woman who stole a deputy's vehicle and led authorities on a 70-mile pursuit that ended near Eloy.

The video released Thursday blurs the body of 31-year-old Lisa Ann Luna from her neck to her feet.

Lisa Luna is accused of stealing an MCSO pick-up truck and leading multiple agencies on a high-speed chase that covered over 70 miles pic.twitter.com/NZhvVJ99kO

— @SgtJEnriquez (@SgtJEnriquez) January 12, 2017
\n

Luna told authorities she was on drugs and took off her clothes while walking along a road in Gila Bend on Jan. 5.

The video shows the deputy taking a blanket out of the truck and trying to give it to Luna to cover herself up.

By then, she is behind the wheel and has apparently locked the driver's side door.

Luna is shown driving off with the deputy being thrown to the pavement.

She remains jailed on suspicion of several felony charges.

"} ]