[ {"id":"ee5d0d7e-fb71-11e6-92ee-db3cd61daf86","type":"article","starttime":"1488045600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-25T11:00:00-07:00","priority":30,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Arizona House wants cities to help in immigration crackdowns","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_ee5d0d7e-fb71-11e6-92ee-db3cd61daf86.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/arizona-house-wants-cities-to-help-in-immigration-crackdowns/article_ee5d0d7e-fb71-11e6-92ee-db3cd61daf86.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/arizona-house-wants-cities-to-help-in-immigration-crackdowns/article_ee5d0d7e-fb71-11e6-92ee-db3cd61daf86.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Clarice Silber\nAssociated Press","prologue":"HB 2121 would bar local officials from refusing to comply with federal immigration agents.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf","description":"Rep. Bob Thorpe","byline":"Capitol Media Services photo by Howard Fischer","hireswidth":1280,"hiresheight":1618,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58af9c5d7b258.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"490","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58782d9f0d939.image.jpg?resize=490%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58782d9f0d939.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C719%2C0%2C250&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58782d9f0d939.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C719%2C0%2C250&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58782d9f0d939.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C719%2C0%2C250&resize=1024%2C575&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"ee5d0d7e-fb71-11e6-92ee-db3cd61daf86","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 A debate in the Arizona Legislature over a proposal that would require local governments to cooperate with federal immigration agents laid bare the stark divide over the issue.

On one side of the debate late Thursday was a lawmaker smuggled into the U.S. as a young child who called for immigration reform and an end to splitting up families. On the other was a legislator who just as passionately called for the return of the \"rule of law\" that has drawn immigrants to the country for more than a hundred years.

House Bill 2121 would bar local officials from refusing to comply with federal immigration agents as they pursue immigrants living illegally in the U.S. The measure sponsored by Republican state Rep. Bob Thorpe, of Flagstaff, would require counties and municipalities to allow immigration officers to interview inmates in jail, receive detainees' incarceration status and their proposed release dates.

The legislation would also make local governments liable for any person who is injured by someone who is released when there is a request for their confinement. It passed the House late Thursday on a voice vote and awaits a formal vote before heading to the Senate.

Democratic state Rep. Isela Blanc, of Tempe, who came to the U.S. from Mexico at age 10 and later become a citizen, spoke fervently against the proposal and repeatedly described it as an \"incredibly divisive bill.\" Blanc said when she was living in the U.S. illegally as a young child, she felt safe and unafraid, but that's not true for young people now.

\"This for me is a bill that really separates our Arizona,\" Blanc said. \"This is seriously hurting families, and it's hurting our communities.\"

The debate unfolded just days after Maricopa County Sheriff Paul Penzone said his department will end a policy former Sheriff Joe Arpaio put in place that allowed access. The policy routinely kept immigrants locked up a few extra days after their release date to give federal authorities a chance to check their immigration status and launch deportation proceedings.

Republican state Rep. Kelly Townsend, of Mesa, said the bill would help restore the law and order she thinks the country has not had over the past eight years in regard to immigration.

\"It's not that we are trying to break up families,\" Townsend said. \"It's not that we are cold-hearted, it's that there are consequences to illegal actions. Bringing your children into a country, (if) you've done that illegally, that's going to create consequences. And yes, it's uncomfortable, it's emotional.\"

The measure is one of the few forays the Arizona Legislature has made since SB 1070, a 2010 Arizona law that requires police to check the immigration status of people they have reasonable suspicion of living illegally in the country.

Its passage drew widespread protests and a boycott of Arizona and sparked a national debate over the law and its legality. The backlash and the recall of its key sponsor, then-Senate President Russell Pearce, chilled the GOP-controlled Legislature from proposing strict immigration measures after SB 1070 became law.

However, their efforts have returned amid the Trump administration's demand for a tougher stance on immigration, and a directive for a nationwide crackdown on an estimated 11 million immigrants living illegally in the U.S.

"}, {"id":"1a4be837-a79e-5568-a4a5-a918bc01211e","type":"article","starttime":"1488045600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-25T11:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1488050929","priority":45,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"books":"entertainment/books"},{"events":"events"},{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"editors_pick":"true","top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Student makes 12-hour commute for Noam Chomsky class at University of Arizona \u2014 twice a week","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/article_1a4be837-a79e-5568-a4a5-a918bc01211e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/student-makes--hour-commute-for-noam-chomsky-class-at/article_1a4be837-a79e-5568-a4a5-a918bc01211e.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/student-makes--hour-commute-for-noam-chomsky-class-at/article_1a4be837-a79e-5568-a4a5-a918bc01211e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Kristen Cook\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Like many UA students, Joe Coughlin calls California home. But the restaurateur gives new meaning to \"long-distance learner.\"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["joe coughlin","marv waterstone","politics","education","class","noam chomsky","university of arizona","tucson","campus"],"internalKeywords":["#editorspick","#latest","#bestof"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"73706"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"13b42eb4-355b-5e11-be62-05a127716ff4","description":"To get to the University of Arizona, Joe Coughlin hops a bus to Los Angeles, then takes a 9\u0192-hour Amtrak ride to Tucson.","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":1969,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/3b/13b42eb4-355b-5e11-be62-05a127716ff4/58ab6ae9ba215.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"407","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/3b/13b42eb4-355b-5e11-be62-05a127716ff4/58ab6ae9583d1.image.jpg?resize=620%2C407"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/3b/13b42eb4-355b-5e11-be62-05a127716ff4/58ab6ae9583d1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"197","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/3b/13b42eb4-355b-5e11-be62-05a127716ff4/58ab6ae9583d1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C197"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"672","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/3b/13b42eb4-355b-5e11-be62-05a127716ff4/58ab6ae9583d1.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C672"}}},{"id":"9186124b-06bd-5dcc-9840-fcf082d1baa8","description":"Joe Coughlin, center, who commutes from Bakersfield, California, figures the $225 UA course is costing him around $4,000.","byline":"Ron Medvescek / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1684,"hiresheight":1231,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/18/9186124b-06bd-5dcc-9840-fcf082d1baa8/58ab69f2600b6.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"453","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/18/9186124b-06bd-5dcc-9840-fcf082d1baa8/58ab69f25f123.image.jpg?resize=620%2C453"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/18/9186124b-06bd-5dcc-9840-fcf082d1baa8/58ab69f25f123.image.jpg?resize=100%2C73"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"219","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/18/9186124b-06bd-5dcc-9840-fcf082d1baa8/58ab69f25f123.image.jpg?resize=300%2C219"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"749","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/18/9186124b-06bd-5dcc-9840-fcf082d1baa8/58ab69f25f123.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C749"}}}],"revision":24,"commentID":"1a4be837-a79e-5568-a4a5-a918bc01211e","body":"

Joe Coughlin is a front-row kind of guy.

In fact, that\u2019s one of his big rules when it comes to school.

\u201cStudies show there\u2019s a one-letter grade difference between the front and back,\u201d he says. \u201cIn front, there are no distractions. You\u2019re right in front of the teacher.\u201d

He\u2019s also always the first to queue up for POL 150C2: \u201cWhat is Politics?\u201d (Yes, there\u2019s a line to get into class.) This is even more impressive when you know about Coughlin\u2019s complicated commute to take the University of Arizona\u2019s general education course: He hops a bus and then rides a train from \u2026 Bakersfield, California.

That\u2019s 2\u00bd hours on the bus, 9\u00bd hours on Amtrak\u2019s Sunset Limited. Total travel time: 12 hours.

Twice a week.

\u201cIt\u2019s kind of an adventure to me,\u201d says Coughlin, 63, the married father of three who owns Coconut Joe\u2019s, a beach-themed restaurant that\u2019s been a Bakersfield landmark for nearly 30 years. It\u2019s the kind of place where servers have the regulars\u2019 orders into the kitchen as soon as they walk in the door.

Coughlin knew he had to take the course after his son \u2014 a recent UA Eller College of Management grad \u2014 told him renowned linguist and political activist Noam Chomsky was teaching a seven-week politics course that started Jan. 12. The Tuesday/Thursday lecture class, co-taught with Professor Emeritus Marv Waterstone, explores climate change, nuclear weapons, militarism, globalization and capitalism\u2019s impact on social inequality.

\u201cI immediately got on the phone,\u201d says Coughlin, who\u2019s read many of Chomsky\u2019s books and considers the man his hero. \u201cI didn\u2019t know if outsiders could get into the class. I was going to talk my way in.\u201d

Turns out, community members \u2014 even if they\u2019re from a community 598.4 miles away \u2014 are more than welcome and account for 278 of those enrolled in the class, according to the UA. Another 232 are matriculated students. People start lining up at 4 p.m. for the 5 p.m. lecture. No one waltzes in late.

\u201cIt\u2019s an honor to be in the class,\u201d says Coughlin, who has two daughters in college. \u201cWe treat it as such.\u201d

Coughlin, who has always preferred road and rails to planes, has pretty much the same weekly travel itinerary. He leaves Sunday night to drive from his home on a bamboo-studded acre in Bakersfield for Los Angeles\u2019 Union Station. He folds his 6-foot-1 frame into a sleeping car \u2014 which costs more, $200-ish versus $47 to spend the night upright in a seat \u2014 and snoozes his way across state lines.

Then, he hightails it over to Prince of Tucson RV Park. Yeah, one day he skipped the bus and train and drove his RV over after finding out the hard way that February is high season here.

\u201cThe gem show ate up every hotel room in town,\u201d Coughlin says, forcing him to once take refuge all the way in Casa Grande and another time at a motel so skeevy that check-in and check-out happened pretty much simultaneously.

\u201cI\u2019ve had umpty-umpteen problems, but it\u2019s been fun,\u201d he insists. \u201cThis experience has taught me to not have to be in control of everything. I tend to plan things out. I\u2019ve become more easygoing.\u201d

Like, not flinching when his RV engine blew up on Grant Road. Or, the time he trekked all the way to Bakersfield, only to turn around and then drive 10 hours round trip to San Francisco. As part of his treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia, he must head up there to get his blood drawn once a month. Now that, he says, was a commute.

Coughlin, who regularly speaks at schools and in seminars about life lessons through what he calls \u201cCoconut College,\u201d figures the $225 course is probably costing him around $4,000. He hasn\u2019t yet tired of the grind because he gets so much out of the class. \u201cIt\u2019s just eye-opening,\u201d he says. \u201cIt\u2019s so mentally stimulating.\u201d

This is a dude who really values education.

Not that you\u2019d guess from his high school transcripts. A solid C-minus student, college wasn\u2019t in the cards. His parents didn\u2019t encourage their three kids to go. The youngest, Coughlin says he \u201ccrashed and burned\u201d as a young adult. He was stocking green-bean cans in a grocery store in Virginia without much of a future when he joined the Navy Reserve at 24.

Two years later, armed with a top-recruit award, Coughlin talked his way into a meeting with the dean of Virginia Commonwealth University, promising if he didn\u2019t earn straight A\u2019s, the dean could kick him out. Coughlin had a 3.9 GPA when he transferred to Arizona State University the following year. Don\u2019t hold his Sun Devilness against him, though. Coughlin \u2014 who met his wife, Leah, there \u2014 says he often thought about transferring to the University of Arizona. He much prefers the campus and vibe in Tucson.

Between lectures, Coughlin bides his time doing homework, shopping Urban Outfitters\u2019 book section and dining at La Cocina or Frog & Firkin. You\u2019ll spot him on campus toting a black backpack and Takamine guitar, which he taught himself to play by watching YouTube videos.

Because of Coughlin\u2019s always-hunker-down-in-the-front-row rule, he\u2019s actually sat next to Chomsky, who joins the students in the audience for Waterstone\u2019s Tuesday lectures.

\u201cI don\u2019t know of anybody I more respect,\u201d Coughlin says. \u201cHe has no agenda, no ideology he\u2019s pushing. He\u2019s coming from the perspective of making the world a better place.\u201d

While he\u2019s talked to Waterstone, Coughlin has yet to chat up Chomsky.

\u201cWhat I\u2019d really like,\u201d Coughlin grins sheepishly, \u201cis to get a picture with him.\u201d

Spoken like someone who\u2019s a card-carrying member of the Noam Chomsky Fan Club, which, he is. In a way. Coughlin has a blue plastic card with his name printed on it in white letters that must be scanned to prevent crashers from sneaking into the popular class.

Coughlin smiles. \u201cIt would be easier to get into Fort Knox.\u201d

"}, {"id":"98402b42-fb7b-11e6-a16f-633e80dee058","type":"article","starttime":"1488041880","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-25T09:58:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1488042864","priority":20,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"3 arrested in connection with child abuse at Phoenix day care center","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_98402b42-fb7b-11e6-a16f-633e80dee058.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/arrested-in-connection-with-child-abuse-at-phoenix-day-care/article_98402b42-fb7b-11e6-a16f-633e80dee058.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/arrested-in-connection-with-child-abuse-at-phoenix-day-care/article_98402b42-fb7b-11e6-a16f-633e80dee058.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"PHOENIX \u2014 Phoenix police say three people have been arrested in an alleged child abuse case, in which a day care worker is accused of striking a 21-month-old boy with a broom handle. Police said officers arrested 37-year-old Lillie Adams on Thursday on one count of child abuse after investigating a Feb. 17 incident in which the boy was taken to a hospital for treatment of an unspecified injury.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"3909437e-fb7c-11e6-a982-8b0f5641649c","description":"Lillie Adams,\u00a0Ruben Sandoval and Perla Denise Sierra Duarte","byline":"Courtesy of Maricopa County jail","hireswidth":2000,"hiresheight":667,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/90/3909437e-fb7c-11e6-a982-8b0f5641649c/58b1b971a164c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"207","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/90/3909437e-fb7c-11e6-a982-8b0f5641649c/58b1b9719f8fb.image.jpg?resize=620%2C207"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"33","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/90/3909437e-fb7c-11e6-a982-8b0f5641649c/58b1b9719f8fb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C33"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"100","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/90/3909437e-fb7c-11e6-a982-8b0f5641649c/58b1b971e7848.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/90/3909437e-fb7c-11e6-a982-8b0f5641649c/58b1b9719f8fb.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C342"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"98402b42-fb7b-11e6-a16f-633e80dee058","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 Phoenix police say three people have been arrested in an alleged child abuse case, in which a day care worker is accused of striking a 21-month-old boy with a broom handle.

Police said officers arrested 37-year-old Lillie Adams on Thursday on one count of child abuse after investigating a Feb. 17 incident in which the boy was taken to a hospital for treatment of an unspecified injury.

The owner of Brighter Angeles Learning Center and a director for the center were arrested the following day, and are accused of hindering prosecution and failing to accurately report an injury to law enforcement as required by law.

Police identified the owner as 51-year-old Ruben Sandoval and the director as 26-year-old Perla Denise Sierra Duarte.

Efforts to reach Sandoval and Duarte for comment on the allegations were not immediately successful Saturday.

The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office indicates Adams remained jailed Friday pending an initial court appearance, and a court website doesn't indicate whether she has an attorney who could comment on the allegation.

"}, {"id":"1fb2cd37-45df-589c-b47c-3fed1782ce55","type":"article","starttime":"1487988720","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T19:12:00-07:00","priority":20,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"news/science/health-med-fit"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"California lawmaker seeks research funding for valley fever vaccine","url":"http://tucson.com/news/science/health-med-fit/article_1fb2cd37-45df-589c-b47c-3fed1782ce55.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/science/health-med-fit/california-lawmaker-seeks-research-funding-for-valley-fever-vaccine/article_1fb2cd37-45df-589c-b47c-3fed1782ce55.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/science/health-med-fit/california-lawmaker-seeks-research-funding-for-valley-fever-vaccine/article_1fb2cd37-45df-589c-b47c-3fed1782ce55.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Harold Pierce\nCenter for Health Journalism Collaborative","prologue":"The bill\u2019s introduction comes in response to the Center for Health Journalism Collaborative's years-long reporting series \u201cJust One Breath.\u201d","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"74121"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"0035ddb6-106f-5abd-af5c-a25a647dd764","description":"A technician labels valley fever test trays at the Kern County, California, health department.","byline":"Casey Christie / The Californian 2016","hireswidth":1662,"hiresheight":984,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/03/0035ddb6-106f-5abd-af5c-a25a647dd764/5838b89bde4e7.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"367","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/03/0035ddb6-106f-5abd-af5c-a25a647dd764/5838b89bdcc6a.image.jpg?resize=620%2C367"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"59","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/03/0035ddb6-106f-5abd-af5c-a25a647dd764/5838b89bdcc6a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C59"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"178","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/03/0035ddb6-106f-5abd-af5c-a25a647dd764/5838b89bdcc6a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C178"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"606","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/03/0035ddb6-106f-5abd-af5c-a25a647dd764/5838b89bdcc6a.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C606"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"1fb2cd37-45df-589c-b47c-3fed1782ce55","body":"

Responding to a surge in cases and inconsistent reporting practices, a California assemblyman introduced legislation last week that would allocate millions of dollars to valley fever vaccine research and streamline information sharing.

The bill\u2019s introduction comes in response to the Center for Health Journalism Collaborative's years-long reporting series \u201cJust One Breath,\u201d which has exposed inconsistencies in how valley fever cases are tallied among local, state and federal health care agencies and highlighted the lack of attention and funding the disease receives compared to others. The Arizona Daily Star contributed to the series as part of the reporting group.

Assembly Bill 1279, sponsored by Bakersfield Democrat Rudy Salas, would bring $2 million to a California fund for valley fever vaccine research and create guidelines for how local, state and federal agencies report cases.

It's unclear whether the $2 million could be spent on the development of treatments as well as vaccine projects, or if the funding could cross state lines.

Nikkomycin Z, for example, has shown promise in treating lab mice with valley fever, but has not attracted funding for human trials. The delta-CPS1 vaccine project is being developed for dogs and could lead to a human vaccine. Both are being developed in Arizona.

The reporting group has found that lag times and disparities in reporting of cases are so great that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control would not know the full extent of a valley fever outbreak until months after it occurred.

Valley fever is an infectious respiratory disease found mainly in dusty areas of Arizona and California. When the soil is disturbed, coccidioidal fungal spores are swept into the air, and if inhaled can lead to valley fever. Most who are infected don\u2019t present symptoms, but others become severely ill, developing flu-like conditions and extreme fatigue. In rare cases it is fatal.

In Arizona alone, an estimated 30,000 people get sick from valley fever every year. State health officials say it caused the deaths of 50 people in Arizona in 2015.

"}, {"id":"d5b4dd2c-4465-5842-9050-88eeed737e29","type":"article","starttime":"1487979000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T16:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487998806","priority":44,"sections":[{"news":"news"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"State still seeking reimbursement for I-10 dust problems, inspecting 640-acre farm","url":"http://tucson.com/news/article_d5b4dd2c-4465-5842-9050-88eeed737e29.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-still-seeking-reimbursement-for-i--dust-problems-inspecting/article_d5b4dd2c-4465-5842-9050-88eeed737e29.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-still-seeking-reimbursement-for-i--dust-problems-inspecting/article_d5b4dd2c-4465-5842-9050-88eeed737e29.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Tom Beal\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality wants to recoup $600,000 spent by state agencies to stop blowing dust near San Simon in 2016.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["dust","dust storms","san simon","arizona department of environmental quality"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#bestof"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"74223"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"294f9ec0-1cea-58b5-a872-aaca0fec3751","description":"Dust storms blew over I-10 near San Simon often in April and May 2016. ADEQ continues to inspect the farm, a 640-acre field.","byline":"Courtesy of Arizona Department of Public Safety","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"600","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/94/294f9ec0-1cea-58b5-a872-aaca0fec3751/573bc6c92933b.image.jpg?resize=600%2C450"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/94/294f9ec0-1cea-58b5-a872-aaca0fec3751/573bc6c94644c.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/94/294f9ec0-1cea-58b5-a872-aaca0fec3751/573bc6c92933b.image.jpg?crop=600%2C337%2C0%2C56&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/94/294f9ec0-1cea-58b5-a872-aaca0fec3751/573bc6c92933b.image.jpg?crop=600%2C337%2C0%2C56"}}},{"id":"60bbe330-4478-5bcc-b009-349db5e12652","description":"A water truck sprays water onto a field along I-10 near milepost 376, where blowing dust has closed the interstate.","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":2400,"hiresheight":1174,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/0b/60bbe330-4478-5bcc-b009-349db5e12652/573fbad4b4138.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"303","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/0b/60bbe330-4478-5bcc-b009-349db5e12652/573fbad491965.image.jpg?resize=620%2C303"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"48","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/0b/60bbe330-4478-5bcc-b009-349db5e12652/573fbad4b63b4.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/0b/60bbe330-4478-5bcc-b009-349db5e12652/573fbad491965.image.jpg?crop=1043%2C587%2C30%2C0&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/0b/60bbe330-4478-5bcc-b009-349db5e12652/573fbad491965.image.jpg?crop=1043%2C587%2C30%2C0&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"d5b4dd2c-4465-5842-9050-88eeed737e29","body":"

State authorities say they are still pursuing legal action against a San Simon farmer whose fallowed fields were blamed for blowing dust that obscured Interstate 10 on multiple occasions in April and May last year \u2014 resulting in crashes and closures.

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality referred the issue to the Attorney General\u2019s Office on Oct. 6.

Timothy Franquist, director of the agency\u2019s air quality division, said his department is still pursing \u201cformal enforcement.\u201d

\u201cWe are still determining the depth and breadth of the violation,\u201d Franquist said. \u201cBecause it is with the AG\u2019s office, we\u2019re not allowed to talk about the details.\u201d

Mia Garcia, spokeswoman for Attorney General Mark Brnovich, said there is \u201cnothing we can say at this time.\u201d

The interstate was closed eight times in April and May for crashes or detours when dust reduced visibility adjacent to David R. Turner\u2019s Agrigold Farms near San Simon east of Tucson.

The Department of Environmental Quality ordered Turner to stabilize the dust on his land and then joined with the state Department of Transportation to begin that process.

State agencies, including the Department of Public Safety, reported spending a combined $600,000 on emergency response to three multiple-vehicle accidents, interstate detours and mitigation of Turner\u2019s fields.

Recovering those costs remains an issue, Franquist said. \u201cWe\u2019re looking at all expenses outlaid by the state and any appropriate penalties,\u201d he said.

Franquist said his department has continued to inspect conditions on Turner\u2019s orchards and has uncovered no problems since the state took action to stabilize the soil in May.

\u201cIt\u2019s a combination of a few things: Yes, the (soil stabilizer) Gorilla Snot does seem to be holding up, the farmer is vegetating some of the area and Mother Nature helped. We had some good winter rains,\u201d Franquist said.

He said ADEQ is now working to address other areas of the state where blowing dust is a chronic problem.

\u201cI think the Turner situation, in and of itself, is an isolated issue. It elucidated a larger issue along the I-10 corridor in places like Picacho Peak, northwest of Tucson,\u201d Franquist said. \u201cIf nothing else, it\u2019s been a launch pad to light a fire for all the agencies. That it is an issue statewide that we really need to address.\u201d

That dusty and deadly stretch of I-10 in Pinal County will be the focus of the sixth annual dust workshop, held by the National Weather Service, the Arizona Department of Transportation and ADEQ Tuesday at Central Arizona College in Coolidge.

"}, {"id":"6e8bc24c-faa0-11e6-93c7-67ec2684fc47","type":"article","starttime":"1487952000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T09:00:00-07:00","priority":30,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Arizona officials welcome feds reversal of transgender students rule","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_6e8bc24c-faa0-11e6-93c7-67ec2684fc47.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/arizona-officials-welcome-feds-reversal-of-transgender-students-rule/article_6e8bc24c-faa0-11e6-93c7-67ec2684fc47.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/arizona-officials-welcome-feds-reversal-of-transgender-students-rule/article_6e8bc24c-faa0-11e6-93c7-67ec2684fc47.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Dustin Quiroz\nCronkite News","prologue":"WASHINGTON _ Arizona officials Thursday welcomed the federal government's reversal of an Obama administration rule that required equal access to school facilities for transgender students, arguing that communities are better able to handle the issue locally. State advocates for transgender individuals were not immediately available for comment Thursday, but national groups worried that the Trump administration decision could have ''horrible repercussions'' on transgender students.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":1,"commentID":"6e8bc24c-faa0-11e6-93c7-67ec2684fc47","body":"

WASHINGTON _ Arizona officials Thursday welcomed the federal government's reversal of an Obama administration rule that required equal access to school facilities for transgender students, arguing that communities are better able to handle the issue locally.

State advocates for transgender individuals were not immediately available for comment Thursday, but national groups worried that the Trump administration decision could have ''horrible repercussions'' on transgender students.

But educators in Arizona said they do not see a threat on the horizon.

''Our students have been very tolerant of their fellow students and we had worked with parents and had dealt with that issue,'' said Mark Joraanstad, the executive director for Arizona School Administrators. ''And students have worked it out in a variety of different ways depending on the preferences of various students.''

The controversy is over the ruling last May by departments of Justice and Education that Title IX, which bars federal funding to schools that discriminate based on gender, also covered transgender students - those who identify as a gender different than the one on their birth certificate.

In order to provide a ''safe and nondiscriminatory environment for all students,'' schools had to accommodate transgender students in a variety of areas, including whether they were referred to as ''he'' or ''she,'' but also in their access to locker rooms, bathrooms and most other sex-segregated environment. Schools that did not could lose federal funding, the departments said.

The rule sparked several legal challenges by school districts - including one that is scheduled to be heard by the Supreme Court next month - who argued that the policy put non-transgender students at risk and infringed on their privacy. Arizona joined a lawsuit with 10 other states filed in federal court in Texas.

But the federal government reversed the policy Wednesday, saying in letters from Justice and Education that the original policy did not undergo the formal review and public comment required for such a ''substantive'' shift in policy.

The policy was withdrawn so the departments could ''more completely consider'' the issues involved, said the letters, which were quick to add that the move ''does not leave students without protections from discrimination, bullying or harassment. All schools must ensure that all students, including LGBT students, are able to learn and thrive in a safe environment.''

That was little comfort for David Fishback of PFLAG, an adocacy group made up of family members lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. He said the rules had worked to bar discrimination against transgender students.

''For the federal government to recognize this and encourage people to act humanely toward each other is a wonderful thing and it has really helped transgender students and their families,'' Fishback said.

Arizona officials said they will work to protect all students, transgender and non, but insisted that those decision should be local and not an ''inflexible,'' one-size-fits-all federal mandate.

''Talking to superintendents and principals in our local public schools seems like something that they're able to handle at the local level and we're going to be able to continue to do that now,'' said Gov. Doug Ducey, in Washington for a conference.

The Arizona Department of Education, which joined the Texas lawsuit against the Obama rules, welcomed their reversal.

''Our top priority at the Arizona Department of Education is to ensure all students can attend school in a safe environment that is free from bullying and discrimination,'' according to a statement released by the department Thursday. ''Our districts and schools already have policies in place to ensure that. Those policies should be developed at the local level with input from each community.''

Educators in the state acknowledged that the Obama rules sparked a discussion that led to development of model language from the Arizona School Boards Association for member school districts to consider. Heidi Vega, a spokeswoman for the school boards association, said that any actions that arise as a result now would be more ''embracing at the district level.''

''If anything, what some of the school districts wanted to do was be more descriptive in their policies and include gender identity,'' Vega said.

The University of Arizona made its decision, announcing Thursday that it will continue to abide by the suggested guidance issued by the Obama administration and its own policy that allows individuals to use restrooms that correspond with their gender identity.

''We strive to ensure that everyone who comes to our campus feels safe, respected, and supported,'' said a statement from the university's Office of Institutional Equity.

Joraanstad said school districts had been dealing the issue of transgender students long before the Obama administration got involved, but that its issuance of guidance pushed the issue into a larger arena, including parents.

''They were instantly very upset with situations that they've never concerned themselves with before,'' Joraanstad said. ''Situations which had been ongoing and that had been handled but they never really had an awareness of it.''

But Fishback says the reversal is more than just parental concerns. He called it a ''signal'' that the Trump administration does not value transgender students or their struggles.

''Transgender children are all of our children,'' Fishback said. ''Our straight children are all of our children, our gay children are all our children, we are an American community.''

Cronkite News reporter Anthony Marroquin contributed to this report.

"}, {"id":"daceee87-84df-5388-a9b9-fea742df2a6f","type":"article","starttime":"1487905200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T20:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487917079","priority":20,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"House dealing with bill package to restrict AZ voter initiatives","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_daceee87-84df-5388-a9b9-fea742df2a6f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/house-dealing-with-bill-package-to-restrict-az-voter-initiatives/article_daceee87-84df-5388-a9b9-fea742df2a6f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/house-dealing-with-bill-package-to-restrict-az-voter-initiatives/article_daceee87-84df-5388-a9b9-fea742df2a6f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"One bill, though, was pulled after it was determined to be unconstitutional.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e","description":"Rep. Vince Leach, R-Tucson","byline":"","hireswidth":1528,"hiresheight":1356,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff32ee.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"550","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff1694.image.jpg?resize=620%2C550"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff1694.image.jpg?crop=1528%2C859%2C0%2C79&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff1694.image.jpg?crop=1528%2C859%2C0%2C79&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff1694.image.jpg?crop=1528%2C859%2C0%2C79&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":9,"commentID":"daceee87-84df-5388-a9b9-fea742df2a6f","body":"

The state House late Thursday approved a measure designed to make it more difficult to get initiatives on the ballot by limiting the use of paid circulators.

The preliminary vote on HB 2404 came after Rep. Vince Leach, R-Tucson, agreed to drop his demand that groups which want to circulate initiative petitions buy a $50,000 bond. That came after Rep. Ken Clark, D-Phoenix, said bonding companies may not write such policies, effectively outlawing petitions.

Also gone from HB 2404 are new registration requirements for petition circulators.

But that leaves what Leach said is his main goal: Outlaw the ability of groups that want to put measures on the ballot to pay circulators based on the number of signatures they get. He contends that will help eliminate the financial incentive for fraud.

Separately, a proposal to increase the burden on getting the signatures \u2014 whether with paid-per-signature circulators or volunteers \u2014 was pulled from the Thursday debate agenda after House staff attorney Tim Fleming said it may not be constitutional.

Current law requires those who want to write their own statutes to submit petitions with the names of at least 10 percent of those who voted in the last gubernatorial election. The current burden is 150,642.

The proposal by Rep. Don Shooter, R-Yuma, would apply that test to each of the state\u2019s 30 legislative districts. So if 50,000 people voted for governor in 2014 in the district he represents, at least 5,000 of the signatures needed to put a measure on the ballot would have to come from his district.

And the same rule would apply 29 more times statewide.

Fleming told members of the House Rules Committee that such a district-by-district requirement may not be constitutional.

He noted Arizona used to have a requirement for candidates for statewide office to get signatures on their nominating petitions from at least three counties. The state stopped enforcing that law when election officials conceded it was illegal.

Based on that, the Rules Committee refused to clear HCR 2029 for floor debate.

But House Speaker J.D. Mesnard said that does not necessarily kill the proposal. He said the staff attorneys just wanted more time to study the issue.

The two measures are part of a package of five bills that opponents contend are a major assault on the right of Arizonans to create their own laws and keep them free from legislative tinkering.

Aside from the two proposals dealing with signature gathering, the House late Thursday approved two measures designed to undermine the Voter Protection Act.

That constitutional provision says that once something gains voter approval, it can be amended only with a three-fourths vote of both the House and Senate. And the only changes allowed are those that \u201cfurther the purpose\u201d of the original initiative, with outright repeal forbidden.

It was enacted by voters in 1998 after state lawmakers repealed the state\u2019s first voter-approved medical marijuana law in 1996.

One version, HCR 2002, asks voters to kill the Voter Protection Act outright, freeing lawmakers to alter not just future ballot measures, but those already approved. That includes the newly approved Proposition 206, which increased the state\u2019s minimum wage.

Rep. Mitzi Epstein, D-Tempe, said her constituents see this attempt as \u201can attack on the will of the voters.\u201d

\u201cShe may be right,\u201d Mesnard responded. But he pointed out that, as a constitutional change, HCR 2002 would require voter approval in November.

The House also approved a scaled-back version of the same measure. HCR 2007, if approved by voters, would limit the power of lawmakers to repeal voter-approved measures to only those proposals they sent to the ballot themselves.

That would keep legal protections in place for initiatives like the minimum wage.

The House did give preliminary approval Thursday to a fifth measure that would leave the Voter Protection Act in place but require a notice on all advertising for future ballot measures that, once approved, lawmakers are limited in their ability to make changes.

"}, {"id":"50a30cd8-2956-5b94-9de0-8c76894cc64e","type":"article","starttime":"1487903400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T19:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487905569","priority":25,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"House OKs bill prohibiting jail release of immigrants feds want detained","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_50a30cd8-2956-5b94-9de0-8c76894cc64e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/house-oks-bill-prohibiting-jail-release-of-immigrants-feds-want/article_50a30cd8-2956-5b94-9de0-8c76894cc64e.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/house-oks-bill-prohibiting-jail-release-of-immigrants-feds-want/article_50a30cd8-2956-5b94-9de0-8c76894cc64e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Jails, their personnel could face lawsuits, fines if they violate federal detainer requests.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["arizona immigration","jails","immigration detainers","local jail","sheriffs"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"74212"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf","description":"Rep. Bob Thorpe","byline":"Capitol Media Services photo by Howard Fischer","hireswidth":1280,"hiresheight":1618,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58af9c5d7b258.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"490","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58782d9f0d939.image.jpg?resize=490%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58782d9f0d939.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C719%2C0%2C250&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58782d9f0d939.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C719%2C0%2C250&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f5cd52f-d8e9-5c6e-b986-69b2fde2d5cf/58782d9f0d939.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C719%2C0%2C250&resize=1024%2C575&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"50a30cd8-2956-5b94-9de0-8c76894cc64e","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The state House voted late Thursday to forbid jail officials from releasing someone who immigration authorities want them to hold.

HB 2121 would make it illegal for any public official to refuse to comply with an \u201cimmigration detainer.\u201d That is a formal request by the Department of Homeland Security that a state or local agency keep for up to 48 hours someone not in this country legally, giving time for federal agents to pick them up.

But the measure by Rep. Bob Thorpe, R-Flagstaff, goes even further \u2014 creating daily fines if an agency or representative for that agency is found by a judge to have violated the immigration detainer request and released someone from custody.

HB 2121 also spells out that any person who is injured by someone who is released when there is a detainer request can sue the individual, agency or official responsible for the release.

The move comes on the heels of the decision by Maricopa County Sheriff Paul Penzone that his jails will hold people no longer than necessary to process them for the state charges they are facing if a judge has ordered them released.

It does not stop notification of Immigration and Customs Enforcement that the county has someone the feds may want. But it spells out that if federal agents want someone they have to arrive before release processing is done.

Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery said that\u2019s what\u2019s required by federal law.

\u201cThe Fourth Amendment does not allow a local law enforcement official to detain someone longer than necessary to process a state court-ordered release,\u201d he said.

Mark Napier, newly sworn in as Pima County sheriff, said he is keeping a policy of predecessor Chris Nanos about handling ICE detainers.

He said if federal agents tell them they want an inmate, his agency will inform them of when the release process starts. That generally provides them about 90 minutes.

And if no one from ICE shows up in that time, the person is released if that\u2019s what a judge has ordered, just the same as anyone who is a legal resident.

"}, {"id":"365ae65a-481c-5773-95c1-fe4ee2d01aaf","type":"article","starttime":"1487811600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T18:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487902444","priority":35,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"House panel endorses $2.5 million for memorial to Tucson shooting victims","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_365ae65a-481c-5773-95c1-fe4ee2d01aaf.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/house-panel-endorses-million-for-memorial-to-tucson-shooting-victims/article_365ae65a-481c-5773-95c1-fe4ee2d01aaf.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/house-panel-endorses-million-for-memorial-to-tucson-shooting-victims/article_365ae65a-481c-5773-95c1-fe4ee2d01aaf.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Plus, other legislative news in brief.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["jan. 8 memorial","tucson jan. 8","2011 shooting","shooting memorial","arizona legislature","gabrielle giffords"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"74175"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"3ac636a7-0bbf-527a-88bb-89722834fd4d","description":"Design for the Jan. 8th Memorial to be built in El Presidio Park. Completion is expected in 2018.","byline":"Courtesy of Chee Salette Architecture/","hireswidth":2346,"hiresheight":883,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/ac/3ac636a7-0bbf-527a-88bb-89722834fd4d/581d30810db5e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"233","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/ac/3ac636a7-0bbf-527a-88bb-89722834fd4d/581d30810bc62.image.jpg?resize=620%2C233"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"38","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/ac/3ac636a7-0bbf-527a-88bb-89722834fd4d/581d30810bc62.image.jpg?resize=100%2C38"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"113","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/ac/3ac636a7-0bbf-527a-88bb-89722834fd4d/581d30810bc62.image.jpg?resize=300%2C113"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"385","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/ac/3ac636a7-0bbf-527a-88bb-89722834fd4d/581d30810bc62.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C385"}}}],"revision":12,"commentID":"365ae65a-481c-5773-95c1-fe4ee2d01aaf","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The House Appropriations Committee voted Wednesday to provide $2.5 million over five years to help construct a memorial in Tucson to honor the victims of the Jan. 8, 2011, shooting that left six dead and others injured, including then-Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

Pam Simon, a Giffords aide who at the \u201cCongress on Your Corner\u201d event in a Safeway parking lot, called the incident \u201can assault on democracy.\u201d

\u201cThe ability for Americans to speak to their elected representatives is the core of our democracy,\u201d she said.

Simon told lawmakers how a bullet went through her arm and into her chest. In fact she remembers waking up with Rep. Randall Friese, D-Tucson, who operated on her at the hospital, telling her she was \u201cone lucky lady\u201d with the bullet missing her vital organs.

She said a permanent memorial is appropriate, recalling how spontaneous ones went up at the shooting site and outside the hospital where she, Giffords and others were being treated.

\u201cPeople need someplace to go,\u201d she said. \u201cThey needed to be able to pray, to reflect, just be together.\u201d

Crystal Kasnoff who is chairing the memorial effort said the state\u2019s dollars, which will be matched with local funds, are actually an investment. She said experiences elsewhere where memorials have been erected show people come from out of town to see them, spending money while they are there.

The unanimous vote sends HB 2436 to the full House.

"}, {"id":"9cbe2262-f8a8-11e6-b162-87e22e939a23","type":"link","starttime":"1487761200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T04:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"'Life Below Zero' star sues; goat grazing demand; teen rampage","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/life-below-zero-star-sues-goat-grazing-demand-teen-rampage/collection_36f8f5e8-0823-5ba1-a8cf-b4be0593555f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/life-below-zero-star-sues-goat-grazing-demand-teen-rampage/collection_36f8f5e8-0823-5ba1-a8cf-b4be0593555f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Odd and interesting news from around the West.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"fd7f67b2-49da-11e3-ba1d-0019bb2963f4","description":"University of Arizona players perform a haka before taking the field against UCLA at the start of their Pac-12 game at Arizona Stadium, Saturday, November 9, 2013, Tucson, Ariz. Photo by Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Kelly Presnell/Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":5016,"hiresheight":2574,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/d7/fd7f67b2-49da-11e3-ba1d-0019bb2963f4/527f37cd33323.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"318","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/d7/fd7f67b2-49da-11e3-ba1d-0019bb2963f4/527f37c9957ab.image.jpg?resize=620%2C318"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"51","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/d7/fd7f67b2-49da-11e3-ba1d-0019bb2963f4/527f37c99adc4.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"154","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/d7/fd7f67b2-49da-11e3-ba1d-0019bb2963f4/527f37ca39f8a.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/d7/fd7f67b2-49da-11e3-ba1d-0019bb2963f4/527f37c9957ab.image.jpg?crop=565%2C318%2C27%2C0"}}}],"revision":2,"url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/life-below-zero-star-sues-goat-grazing-demand-teen-rampage/collection_36f8f5e8-0823-5ba1-a8cf-b4be0593555f.html"}, {"id":"e0135fd5-8146-59ea-8fad-49f7d36d09e7","type":"article","starttime":"1487731200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-21T19:40:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487735290","priority":20,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Legislative briefs","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_e0135fd5-8146-59ea-8fad-49f7d36d09e7.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/legislative-briefs/article_e0135fd5-8146-59ea-8fad-49f7d36d09e7.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/legislative-briefs/article_e0135fd5-8146-59ea-8fad-49f7d36d09e7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Tax cut for inflationPHOENIX \u2014 Arizonans would get a small tax break this coming year under the terms of legislation given preliminary House approval on Tuesday. Current law provides a flat exemption for individuals when preparing their state income tax forms of $2,100 for a single individual, $4,200 for a married couple or single head of household, and $6,300 for a married couple claiming at least one dependent. HB 2528 would require those figures to be adjusted for inflation.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"74105"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"5dfc757e-101d-5f16-b4f1-6b952c19dde5","description":"State Rep. J.D. Mesnard is the new House speaker.","byline":"Capitol Media Services","hireswidth":1605,"hiresheight":1291,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/df/5dfc757e-101d-5f16-b4f1-6b952c19dde5/582fa28c35d1f.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"499","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/df/5dfc757e-101d-5f16-b4f1-6b952c19dde5/582fa28c34dcb.image.jpg?resize=620%2C499"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/df/5dfc757e-101d-5f16-b4f1-6b952c19dde5/582fa28c34dcb.image.jpg?crop=1605%2C902%2C0%2C4&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/df/5dfc757e-101d-5f16-b4f1-6b952c19dde5/582fa28c34dcb.image.jpg?crop=1605%2C902%2C0%2C4&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/df/5dfc757e-101d-5f16-b4f1-6b952c19dde5/582fa28c34dcb.image.jpg?crop=1605%2C902%2C0%2C4&resize=1024%2C575&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"e0135fd5-8146-59ea-8fad-49f7d36d09e7","body":"

Tax cut for inflation

PHOENIX \u2014 Arizonans would get a small tax break this coming year under the terms of legislation given preliminary House approval on Tuesday.

Current law provides a flat exemption for individuals when preparing their state income tax forms of $2,100 for a single individual, $4,200 for a married couple or single head of household, and $6,300 for a married couple claiming at least one dependent. HB 2528 would require those figures to be adjusted for inflation.

Rep. Mark Cardenas, D-Phoenix, said the change will reduce state revenues next year by $3.6 million. So he argued that if legislators are to make that change, they should make up the lost revenues, ranging from taxing the sale of lottery tickets to requiring airlines to pay sales taxes when they buy food and beverages to provide to their customers.

But House Speaker J.D. Mesnard, R-Chandler, objected to those changes .

\u201cI think his intent is entirely valid,\u201d he said. \u201cThere are all sorts of carve-outs in our tax code that I share his interest in addressing.\u201d

Handicapped parking

Individuals who are simply handicapped would be prohibited from parking in spaces that are specifically reserved for wheelchair users.

Current law permits anyone who has a special license plate or placard to park in any space designed for the handicapped. That includes spaces of normal width and those extra-wide slots designed to accommodate vans with side doors to make it easier to load and unload someone in a wheelchair.

HB 2408 would put those extra-wide spaces \u2014 there has to be one for every eight handicapped slots \u2014 off-limits to those who don\u2019t use wheelchairs.

Rep. Noel Campbell, R-Prescott, cited an instance when a double amputee could not park his vehicle because the only handicapped slots available were the narrower ones.

But Rep. Pamela Powers Hanley, D-Tucson, said that can lead to a situation where someone who uses a walker or a cane and qualifies as handicapped would not be able to park near a building if the only handicapped spots left were reserved for vans. She also noted that there is no data showing what percentage of handicapped drivers are wheelchair users.

The measure gained preliminary House approval on a voice vote.

Smaller vehicle fleet

State employees could soon be trading in their vehicles for a ride in a taxi or an Uber.

The state House voted Tuesday to reduce the number of vehicles in the state fleet, currently about 10,500, by 20 percent two years from now and another 20 percent the year after.

Rep. Jeff Weninger, R-Chandler, said there are too many people who have assigned vehicles who may use them only a few hours a day. One goal of HB 2440 is to take away some of those cars.

Weninger also contends the state does not need as many vehicles as it now has for sharing. So he wants the Department of Administration to look at alternatives, from renting cars as needed to requiring state workers to use taxis or hail a vehicle through one of the ride-booking services.

That possibility bothered Rep. Mitzi Epstein, D-Tempe.

She said many state workers may not feel safe being ferried around in private vehicles driven by people they don\u2019t know.

Weninger brushed aside that concern.

\u201cI don\u2019t think state government is going to put anybody in danger and make them ride in an Uber or a cab if they\u2019re not comfortable,\u201d he said.

Weninger figures that if the state decides it can live without replacing just 500 vehicles, that would save about $10.5 million in up-front costs, not counting maintenance.

The measure will go to the Senate after a final roll-cal vote.

Prison notifications

Without debate, the House gave preliminary approval to legislation requiring the Department of Corrections to notify neighbors when they plan to locate a prison or other facility within two miles.

HB 2161 was crafted by Rep. Heather Carter, R-Cave Creek, after complaints about the decision to locate a \u201cre-entry center\u201d for adults leaving prisons in north Phoenix. Residents said they learned about it only after the plans were in place.

A final roll-call vote is needed before the measure goes to the Senate.

Firefighter cancer

The House agreed to expand the list of cancers that would qualify firefighters and peace officers to automatically be considered as job-related, entitling them to worker-compensation benefits.

Current law includes brain, bladder, rectal or colon cancer as well as mesothelioma as occupational diseases. HB 2133 adds others, including lung, kidney, stomach, prostate and testicular.

The bill goes to the Senate.

City ID cards

State senators refused to restrict the ability of cities to issue their own identification cards to residents.

The proposal by Sen. John Kavanagh, R-Fountain Hills, said any city that wants to provide ID cards to residents would have to use the same standards as the state Department of Transportation. That includes providing a primary form of identification like a passport or other document not generally available to people not in this country legally.

All the Senate Democrats and three Republicans united to leave the decision to individual cities.

"}, {"id":"36f8f5e8-0823-5ba1-a8cf-b4be0593555f","type":"collection","starttime":"1487730240","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-21T19:24:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487731950","sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"'Life Below Zero' star sues; goat grazing demand; teen rampage","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/collection_36f8f5e8-0823-5ba1-a8cf-b4be0593555f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/life-below-zero-star-sues-goat-grazing-demand-teen-rampage/collection_36f8f5e8-0823-5ba1-a8cf-b4be0593555f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/life-below-zero-star-sues-goat-grazing-demand-teen-rampage/collection_36f8f5e8-0823-5ba1-a8cf-b4be0593555f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":12,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Odd and interesting news from around the West.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["sweeps","wwest"],"internalKeywords":["#slideshow"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"paging_gallery","revision":3}, {"id":"4d9b0af3-7116-53cc-ab31-70c5c53ae5ac","type":"collection","starttime":"1487719200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-21T16:20:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487973381","priority":41,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"},{"photo":"photo"},{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"},{"photo_blog":"news/blogs/photo_blog"},{"laestrella":"laestrella"},{"retrotucson":"news/retrotucson"}],"flags":{"featured":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Photos: Tucson streets through the years","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/collection_4d9b0af3-7116-53cc-ab31-70c5c53ae5ac.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/photos-tucson-streets-through-the-years/collection_4d9b0af3-7116-53cc-ab31-70c5c53ae5ac.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/photos-tucson-streets-through-the-years/collection_4d9b0af3-7116-53cc-ab31-70c5c53ae5ac.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":13,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"A collection of photos of Tucson streets through the years from the archives of the Arizona Daily Star.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#gallery","#retrotucson","#latest","#topstory","#bestof"],"customProperties":{"label":"Tucson streets"},"presentation":"paging_gallery","images":[{"id":"7b620cb3-8dd8-512d-884c-8417b5c210cc","description":"Traffic on East Grant Road in Feb., 1981. Arizona Daily Star file","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1899,"hiresheight":1348,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b6/7b620cb3-8dd8-512d-884c-8417b5c210cc/535ff78b1976e.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"440","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b6/7b620cb3-8dd8-512d-884c-8417b5c210cc/535ff78b1b5cc.image.jpg?resize=620%2C440"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b6/7b620cb3-8dd8-512d-884c-8417b5c210cc/535ff78b93f13.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"212","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b6/7b620cb3-8dd8-512d-884c-8417b5c210cc/535ff78b950d7.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"726","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b6/7b620cb3-8dd8-512d-884c-8417b5c210cc/535ff78b516b3.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"b47a3a83-408d-54ad-b697-510c8d12f409","description":"Speedway Boulevard, looking east from Country Club, probably in the mid-1970s. Arizona Daily Star file","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1859,"hiresheight":1273,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/47/b47a3a83-408d-54ad-b697-510c8d12f409/535ff78c6f9bf.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"424","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/47/b47a3a83-408d-54ad-b697-510c8d12f409/535ff78c715eb.image.jpg?resize=620%2C424"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/47/b47a3a83-408d-54ad-b697-510c8d12f409/535ff78cc4a00.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"205","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/47/b47a3a83-408d-54ad-b697-510c8d12f409/535ff78cc6095.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"700","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/47/b47a3a83-408d-54ad-b697-510c8d12f409/535ff78ca3f49.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"e823b1c9-61ff-5470-97b1-92aff1a01b08","description":"Speedway Boulevard in Dec. 1957. Arizona Daily Star file","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":2300,"hiresheight":762,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/82/e823b1c9-61ff-5470-97b1-92aff1a01b08/535ff78c25986.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"205","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/82/e823b1c9-61ff-5470-97b1-92aff1a01b08/535ff78c26e85.image.jpg?resize=620%2C205"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"33","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/82/e823b1c9-61ff-5470-97b1-92aff1a01b08/535ff78c4fb34.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"99","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/82/e823b1c9-61ff-5470-97b1-92aff1a01b08/535ff78c50d00.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"338","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/82/e823b1c9-61ff-5470-97b1-92aff1a01b08/535ff78c3f9f8.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"3937f4cd-7945-540f-9e15-58c79109fb2a","description":"Undated aerial photo fo Tanque Verde Road and the Catalina Highway. Arizona Daily Star file","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1883,"hiresheight":1513,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/93/3937f4cd-7945-540f-9e15-58c79109fb2a/535ff78a1647a.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"498","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/93/3937f4cd-7945-540f-9e15-58c79109fb2a/535ff78a1b8b1.image.jpg?resize=620%2C498"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/93/3937f4cd-7945-540f-9e15-58c79109fb2a/535ff78a83c68.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"241","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/93/3937f4cd-7945-540f-9e15-58c79109fb2a/535ff78a8502c.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"822","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/93/3937f4cd-7945-540f-9e15-58c79109fb2a/535ff78a5b341.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"eae0214a-24ba-5e54-87fc-af4c915560a6","description":"Old Oracle Road bridge over the Rillito River in 1950. Arizona Daily Star file","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1895,"hiresheight":1403,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/ae/eae0214a-24ba-5e54-87fc-af4c915560a6/535ff7d386336.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"459","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/ae/eae0214a-24ba-5e54-87fc-af4c915560a6/535ff7d38803f.image.jpg?resize=620%2C459"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"74","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/ae/eae0214a-24ba-5e54-87fc-af4c915560a6/535ff7d3daa72.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"222","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/ae/eae0214a-24ba-5e54-87fc-af4c915560a6/535ff7d3dbd8f.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"758","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/ae/eae0214a-24ba-5e54-87fc-af4c915560a6/535ff7d3b8fc8.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"3c8e2b5c-7e3b-5109-af06-4d130612c164","description":"Ina Road under construction looking east toward La Ca\u2013ada Drive in December, 1980. By Joe Vitti / Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":2268,"hiresheight":1179,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c8/3c8e2b5c-7e3b-5109-af06-4d130612c164/535ff7d2dab11.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"322","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c8/3c8e2b5c-7e3b-5109-af06-4d130612c164/535ff7d2dfa22.image.jpg?resize=620%2C322"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"52","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c8/3c8e2b5c-7e3b-5109-af06-4d130612c164/535ff7d339b6a.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"156","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c8/3c8e2b5c-7e3b-5109-af06-4d130612c164/535ff7d33ae41.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"531","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c8/3c8e2b5c-7e3b-5109-af06-4d130612c164/535ff7d31ba2e.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"802a2929-bf1a-5545-9d73-5b78a25aa298","description":"A temporary bridge over Interstate 10 at 6th Avenue that was used while the new bridge was being built in 1990. Benjie Sanders/ Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1914,"hiresheight":1285,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/02/802a2929-bf1a-5545-9d73-5b78a25aa298/535ff7d2396f9.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"416","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/02/802a2929-bf1a-5545-9d73-5b78a25aa298/535ff7d23b182.image.jpg?resize=620%2C416"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/02/802a2929-bf1a-5545-9d73-5b78a25aa298/535ff7d28ac76.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/02/802a2929-bf1a-5545-9d73-5b78a25aa298/535ff7d28be8e.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"687","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/02/802a2929-bf1a-5545-9d73-5b78a25aa298/535ff7d269941.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"332b72e2-d5c9-5f94-a7ee-c19f127c9247","description":"Flooding under the stone Stone Ave. underpass caught a city bus. Photo probably from the 1970s. Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1626,"hiresheight":1592,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/32/332b72e2-d5c9-5f94-a7ee-c19f127c9247/535ff7d14c071.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"607","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/32/332b72e2-d5c9-5f94-a7ee-c19f127c9247/535ff7d14dab2.image.jpg?resize=620%2C607"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"97","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/32/332b72e2-d5c9-5f94-a7ee-c19f127c9247/535ff7d205882.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"293","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/32/332b72e2-d5c9-5f94-a7ee-c19f127c9247/535ff7d206e0a.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1002","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/32/332b72e2-d5c9-5f94-a7ee-c19f127c9247/535ff7d1ce350.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"a1167a25-6ff7-54a8-b4b3-e3ec164c601b","description":"Undated photo of Congress Street, probably in the 1950s. Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1749,"hiresheight":1360,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/11/a1167a25-6ff7-54a8-b4b3-e3ec164c601b/535ff7d0c159b.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"482","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/11/a1167a25-6ff7-54a8-b4b3-e3ec164c601b/535ff7d0c30fe.image.jpg?resize=620%2C482"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"77","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/11/a1167a25-6ff7-54a8-b4b3-e3ec164c601b/535ff7d129d12.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"233","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/11/a1167a25-6ff7-54a8-b4b3-e3ec164c601b/535ff7d12afd1.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"796","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/11/a1167a25-6ff7-54a8-b4b3-e3ec164c601b/535ff7d1060b4.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"2a7a846a-9736-5fea-a062-72129c868966","description":"East Broadway looking East from an unknown intersection on July 21, 1958. Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1773,"hiresheight":1211,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/a7/2a7a846a-9736-5fea-a062-72129c868966/535ff7d02f650.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"423","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/a7/2a7a846a-9736-5fea-a062-72129c868966/535ff7d030c24.image.jpg?resize=620%2C423"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/a7/2a7a846a-9736-5fea-a062-72129c868966/535ff7d07ba0f.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/a7/2a7a846a-9736-5fea-a062-72129c868966/535ff7d07c563.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"698","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/a7/2a7a846a-9736-5fea-a062-72129c868966/535ff7d05d9b1.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"7e6ca51a-b9aa-507c-8797-29fde3c8a2be","description":"Undated photo of Congress Street downtown before a city street lighting project in the 1950s. Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1765,"hiresheight":959,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/e6/7e6ca51a-b9aa-507c-8797-29fde3c8a2be/535ff7cfb9ab4.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"336","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/e6/7e6ca51a-b9aa-507c-8797-29fde3c8a2be/535ff7cfba984.image.jpg?resize=620%2C336"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"54","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/e6/7e6ca51a-b9aa-507c-8797-29fde3c8a2be/535ff7cff34d1.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"163","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/e6/7e6ca51a-b9aa-507c-8797-29fde3c8a2be/535ff7cff3f5e.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"554","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/e6/7e6ca51a-b9aa-507c-8797-29fde3c8a2be/535ff7cfdc28e.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"1a63c8f7-0c4a-5533-a384-d95c01e6cec5","description":"The railroad crossings at 22nd Street, prior to construction of the overpass. Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1741,"hiresheight":927,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a6/1a63c8f7-0c4a-5533-a384-d95c01e6cec5/535ff7cdb9bf7.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"330","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a6/1a63c8f7-0c4a-5533-a384-d95c01e6cec5/535ff7cdbae51.image.jpg?resize=620%2C330"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"53","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a6/1a63c8f7-0c4a-5533-a384-d95c01e6cec5/535ff7ce15c50.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"159","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a6/1a63c8f7-0c4a-5533-a384-d95c01e6cec5/535ff7ce1678d.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"545","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a6/1a63c8f7-0c4a-5533-a384-d95c01e6cec5/535ff7cde2ebf.preview-1024.jpg"}}},{"id":"a857a224-bf14-593c-9d0a-36334d699f89","description":"Most likely Alvernon Road north of 29th Street in the early 1980s. Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1899,"hiresheight":1258,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a857a224-bf14-593c-9d0a-36334d699f89/535ff7cd15ae6.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"410","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a857a224-bf14-593c-9d0a-36334d699f89/535ff7cd17a40.image.jpg?resize=620%2C410"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a857a224-bf14-593c-9d0a-36334d699f89/535ff7cd66bc5.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"198","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a857a224-bf14-593c-9d0a-36334d699f89/535ff7cd67861.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"677","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a857a224-bf14-593c-9d0a-36334d699f89/535ff7cd48455.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":8}, {"id":"da5c4df8-f7e8-11e6-8784-af5ecb0f9834","type":"link","starttime":"1487674800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-21T04:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487688141","sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Drive-in pot shop; plenty of prairie dogs; mom's dad costume","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/drive-in-pot-shop-plenty-of-prairie-dogs-mom-s/collection_db0370fe-b3e6-5575-b26c-e8663545ac62.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/drive-in-pot-shop-plenty-of-prairie-dogs-mom-s/collection_db0370fe-b3e6-5575-b26c-e8663545ac62.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Odd and interesting news from around the West.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"04cabd55-8372-5c93-b7cd-aebe7c45fe97","description":"FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2013, file photo, statues of La Santa Muerte are displayed at the Masks y Mas art store in Albuquerque, N.M. Bishops in the United States are finally denouncing the skeleton folk saint known as La Santa Muerte, a figure often connected to the illicit drug trade in Mexico. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)","byline":"Russell Contreras","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/4c/04cabd55-8372-5c93-b7cd-aebe7c45fe97/58ab442fe82f1.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/4c/04cabd55-8372-5c93-b7cd-aebe7c45fe97/58ab442fe82f1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/4c/04cabd55-8372-5c93-b7cd-aebe7c45fe97/58ab442fe82f1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/4c/04cabd55-8372-5c93-b7cd-aebe7c45fe97/58ab442fe82f1.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/drive-in-pot-shop-plenty-of-prairie-dogs-mom-s/collection_db0370fe-b3e6-5575-b26c-e8663545ac62.html"}, {"id":"db0370fe-b3e6-5575-b26c-e8663545ac62","type":"collection","starttime":"1487646720","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-20T20:12:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487649304","sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Drive-in pot shop; plenty of prairie dogs; mom's dad costume","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/collection_db0370fe-b3e6-5575-b26c-e8663545ac62.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/drive-in-pot-shop-plenty-of-prairie-dogs-mom-s/collection_db0370fe-b3e6-5575-b26c-e8663545ac62.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/drive-in-pot-shop-plenty-of-prairie-dogs-mom-s/collection_db0370fe-b3e6-5575-b26c-e8663545ac62.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":13,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Odd and interesting news from around the West.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["sweeps","wwest"],"internalKeywords":["#slideshow"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"paging_gallery","revision":3}, {"id":"86de1b34-eb33-59ac-9bc0-7d82b6c96c59","type":"article","starttime":"1487643060","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-20T19:11:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487961187","priority":42,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Lawmakers to consider another measure to limit voter initiatives","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_86de1b34-eb33-59ac-9bc0-7d82b6c96c59.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/lawmakers-to-consider-another-measure-to-limit-voter-initiatives/article_86de1b34-eb33-59ac-9bc0-7d82b6c96c59.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/lawmakers-to-consider-another-measure-to-limit-voter-initiatives/article_86de1b34-eb33-59ac-9bc0-7d82b6c96c59.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Would require getting petition signatures in all 30 legislative districts.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["arizona legislature","arizona voter initiatives"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"74065"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"017201d1-33ad-54f0-8bee-26a4e704b647","description":"Don Shooter","byline":"","hireswidth":1371,"hiresheight":1511,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/17/017201d1-33ad-54f0-8bee-26a4e704b647/56e0c088b6edf.hires.jpg","presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"563","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/17/017201d1-33ad-54f0-8bee-26a4e704b647/58a4d3dd7ea84.image.jpg?resize=563%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"110","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/17/017201d1-33ad-54f0-8bee-26a4e704b647/56e0c08918182.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/17/017201d1-33ad-54f0-8bee-26a4e704b647/58a4d3dd7ea84.image.jpg?crop=1371%2C771%2C0%2C123&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/17/017201d1-33ad-54f0-8bee-26a4e704b647/58a4d3dd7ea84.image.jpg?crop=1371%2C771%2C0%2C123&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":12,"commentID":"86de1b34-eb33-59ac-9bc0-7d82b6c96c59","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 Republican lawmakers are teeing up yet another measure designed to throw hurdles in the path of Arizonans who want to craft their own laws.

The latest plan, set for debate Wednesday in the House Appropriations Committee, would require initiative backers to gather signatures in each of the state\u2019s 30 legislative districts.

The number from each area would have to be in proportion to the number of votes cast there for governor at the last election. And if residents from any one of those areas balked, the measure would never get to the ballot.

Rep. Don Shooter, R-Yuma, the driving force behind HCR 2029, said that\u2019s precisely the purpose of the measure. He said right now it\u2019s too easy for people with money to put issues up for a vote.

\u201cIf George Soros writes a check for $2.5 million, it\u2019s on the ballot,\u201d he said Monday of the billionaire who has supported liberal ballot measures in some states like requiring background checks when guns are bought and sold. \u201cThat\u2019s a problem to me.\u201d

But what Shooter touts as an advantage, Rep. Ken Clark, D-Phoenix, sees as a hit to the democratic process of majority rule.

\u201cYou could put yourself in a situation where the vast majority of Arizonans want something to happen but one district can hold everything up,\u201d he said.

What HCR 2029 would do is make the process of gathering signatures more difficult \u2014 and more expensive for groups that need to hire paid circulators.

Under constitutional requirements it takes the signatures of 10 percent of people who voted in the last gubernatorial election to put a change in law before voters. Based on the 2014 vote total of 1,506,416, that threshold is now 150,642.

Shooter\u2019s point is that all those signatures could be gathered in just one county \u2014 most likely Maricopa where 60 percent of the state\u2019s more than 3.6 million registered voters are located.

Under his plan, if 50,000 of the people who voted for governor came from his legislative district, then 5,000 of the 150,642 signatures would need to come from that district. And the same scenario would play out 29 more times across the state.

\u201cIt gives the people more say-so,\u201d Shooter said. And he said it ensures that anything that gets on the ballot has a certain buy-in statewide.

\u201cIf Maricopa County decided the wanted to put a referral (to voters) to steal everybody else in the state\u2019s water, the rural counties have something to say about it,\u201d he said. \u201cThey can have an organized resistance in their county.\u201d

The same change in where petitions have to be circulated would apply to constitutional amendments, which require the signatures of 15 percent of those who voted in the gubernatorial race to get on the ballot. And it also would affect the referendum process where people opposed to something the Legislature enacted can put it on \u201chold\u201d until the next general election by gathering the signatures of 5 percent of voters.

Clark questioned whether the measure would survive a legal challenge.

The proposal is the latest in a series of Republican-crafted measures working their way through the legislative process in the wake of voter approval in November of an initiative to hike the state minimum wage. Other changes include bans on paid circulators, new rules that initiative circulators would need to follow and giving state lawmakers more power to overrule what voters have enacted.

Julie Erfle of AZ Schools Now, which is fighting these measures, said this is no better.

"}, {"id":"62f17c3e-d4dc-55c0-bccb-bd7f5b851c5c","type":"article","starttime":"1487539440","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-19T14:24:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487549464","sections":[{"national":"ap/national"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Flood fears renewed as another storm aims for California","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/national/article_62f17c3e-d4dc-55c0-bccb-bd7f5b851c5c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/national/flood-fears-renewed-as-another-storm-aims-for-california/article_62f17c3e-d4dc-55c0-bccb-bd7f5b851c5c.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/national/flood-fears-renewed-as-another-storm-aims-for-california/article_62f17c3e-d4dc-55c0-bccb-bd7f5b851c5c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"SAN FRANCISCO \u2014 Residents returning to homes damaged by flooding should be prepared to evacuate again as yet another powerful Pacific storm takes aim at Northern California, officials warned Sunday. The San Joaquin River was reaching flood stage, and residents of Manteca were told to be ready to evacuate in case it hit dangerous levels.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["general news","evacuations","storms","weather","disaster planning and response","accidents and disasters","property damage","floods"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"1604853a-034a-5f6e-b927-fbd4c66f95ff","description":"Water is receding in the farm community of Maxwell, California, where dozens of people sought higher ground after creeks topped their banks and inundated houses on Friday. Another powerful storm is headed toward Northern California, officials warned Sunday.","byline":"Hector Iniguez / The Associated Press","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"349","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/60/1604853a-034a-5f6e-b927-fbd4c66f95ff/58aa1d9822649.image.jpg?resize=620%2C349"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/60/1604853a-034a-5f6e-b927-fbd4c66f95ff/58aa1d9822649.image.jpg?resize=100%2C56"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/60/1604853a-034a-5f6e-b927-fbd4c66f95ff/58aa1d9822649.image.jpg?resize=300%2C169"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/60/1604853a-034a-5f6e-b927-fbd4c66f95ff/58aa1d9822649.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C576"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"62f17c3e-d4dc-55c0-bccb-bd7f5b851c5c","body":"

SAN FRANCISCO \u2014 Residents returning to homes damaged by flooding should be prepared to evacuate again as yet another powerful Pacific storm takes aim at Northern California, officials warned Sunday.

The San Joaquin River was reaching flood stage, and residents of Manteca were told to be ready to evacuate in case it hit dangerous levels.

Meanwhile, the water level was decreasing at Lake Oroville dam, where a damaged spillway had raised major flood concerns.

Water was also receding in the farm community of Maxwell, where dozens of people sought higher ground after creeks topped their banks and inundated houses on Friday, said Colusa County Assistant Sheriff Jim Saso said.

Nobody was hurt as crews used boats to rescue residents from a low-lying neighborhood.

\u201cWe\u2019re telling those people to keep a bag close by and get ready to leave again,\u201d Saso said. \u201cIf the water comes back up, it\u2019s going to be those areas affected.\u201d

Another round of heavy rain was expected to move in later Sunday and forecasters said several inches were expected.

\u201cWidespread flooding will be likely as an atmospheric river (of moisture) takes aim somewhere along the central California coast,\u201d the National Weather Service said.

The damage to the spillway at Lake Oroville forced the evacuation of 188,000 people last weekend.

The California Department of Water Resources, however, said Sunday that the water level continues to fall even as they decrease the amount of water flowing down the spillway.

The amount of water flowing down the spillway has been reduced to 55,000 cubic feet a second. Earlier this week, outflows were at nearly 100,000 cubic feet per second.

During recent storms, authorities up and down the state have dealt with overflowing creeks, mudslide threats in foothill areas blackened by fires and hundreds of toppled trees in neighborhoods. At least three deaths have occurred.

"}, {"id":"e962d3ff-f2a2-5a1d-bf28-68c8108816a0","type":"article","starttime":"1487445600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-18T12:20:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487538784","priority":30,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Capitol Link: How Arizona legislators voted","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_e962d3ff-f2a2-5a1d-bf28-68c8108816a0.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/capitol-link-how-arizona-legislators-voted/article_e962d3ff-f2a2-5a1d-bf28-68c8108816a0.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/national/capitol-link-how-arizona-legislators-voted/article_e962d3ff-f2a2-5a1d-bf28-68c8108816a0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Voterama In Congress","prologue":"WASHINGTON \u2014 Here is how area members of Congress voted on major issues in the week ending Feb. 17. HouseProbe of Trump-Russia Ties: Voting 233-190, the House on Feb. 15 blocked a bid by Democrats to force floor debate on a bill now in committee that would create a \u201cNational Commission on Foreign Interference in the 2016 Election\u201d for investigating ties between associates of candidate Donald Trump and Russian intelligence officials starting months before election day. A yes vote was to quash a Democratic bid for a bipartisan, outside probe of the Trump-Russia connection. (H Res 123)","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"4e6c960c-89da-5907-8925-8507bc34b7ba","description":"The U.S. Capitol dome on Capitol Hill in Washington.","byline":"Alex Brandon / The Associated Press","hireswidth":1741,"hiresheight":1191,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e6/4e6c960c-89da-5907-8925-8507bc34b7ba/5839e37146195.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"424","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e6/4e6c960c-89da-5907-8925-8507bc34b7ba/583114c3abc4d.image.jpg?resize=620%2C424"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e6/4e6c960c-89da-5907-8925-8507bc34b7ba/583114c3abc4d.image.jpg?crop=1741%2C979%2C0%2C181&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e6/4e6c960c-89da-5907-8925-8507bc34b7ba/583114c3abc4d.image.jpg?crop=1741%2C979%2C0%2C181&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e6/4e6c960c-89da-5907-8925-8507bc34b7ba/583114c3abc4d.image.jpg?crop=1741%2C979%2C0%2C181&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":13,"commentID":"e962d3ff-f2a2-5a1d-bf28-68c8108816a0","body":"

WASHINGTON \u2014 Here is how area members of Congress voted on major issues in the week ending Feb. 17.

House

Probe of Trump-Russia Ties: Voting 233-190, the House on Feb. 15 blocked a bid by Democrats to force floor debate on a bill now in committee that would create a \u201cNational Commission on Foreign Interference in the 2016 Election\u201d for investigating ties between associates of candidate Donald Trump and Russian intelligence officials starting months before election day. A yes vote was to quash a Democratic bid for a bipartisan, outside probe of the Trump-Russia connection. (H Res 123)

Voting yes: Martha McSally, R-2, Paul Gosar, R-4, Andy Biggs, R-5, David Schweikert, R-6, Trent Franks, R-8

Voting no: Tom O\u2019Halleran, D-1, Raul Grijalva, D-3, Ruben Gallego, D-7, Kyrsten Sinema, D-9

Expanded Opportunities for Retirement Savings: The House on Feb. 15 killed, 231-193, a Department of Labor rule that would help states set up privately run IRA-style retirement plans for private-sector workers who lack access to such plans at work because their employers have not established them. A yes vote was to adopt HJ Res 66 on grounds that these ventures would poorly protect workers\u2019 investments.

Yes: McSally, Gosar, Biggs, Schweikert, Franks

No: O\u2019Halleran, Grijalva, Gallego, Sinema

Jobless Benefits, Drug Tests: Voting 236-189, the House on Feb. 15 nullified as too weak and narrowly drawn a Department of Labor rule naming occupations such as aviation, railroading and pipeline safety for which states can require recipients of jobless checks to pass drug tests. A yes vote was to send HJ Res 42 to the Senate.

Yes: McSally, Gosar, Biggs, Schweikert, Franks

No: O\u2019Halleran, Grijalva, Gallego, Sinema

Clampdown on Planned Parenthood: The House on Feb. 16 nullified, 230-188, a rule affirming Planned Parenthood\u2019s eligibility to receive Title X family-planning funds despite efforts by some states to deny the funding because it provides abortions. A yes vote was to adopt HJ Res 43 over arguments it was misguided because Planned Parenthood does not use federal funds for its abortion services.

Yes: McSally, Gosar, Biggs, Schweikert, Franks

No: O\u2019Halleran, Grijalva, Gallego, Sinema

Methods of Killing Animals: The House on Feb. 16 nullified, 225-193, a Bureau of Fish and Wildlife rule that would ban inhumane methods of killing bears, wolves and coyotes on the 16 federal wildlife refuges covering 77 million acres in Alaska. A yes vote was to adopt HJ Res 69 on grounds that less restrictive state laws should take precedence.

Yes: Gosar, Biggs, Schweikert, Franks

No: O\u2019Halleran, McSally, Grijalva, Gallego, Sinema

SENATE

Serious Mental Issues, Gun Checks: The Senate on Feb. 15 nullified, 57-43, a rule under which the Social Security Administration notifies the FBI system of gun background checks about persons receiving benefits due to serious mental issues, so that they cannot buy firearms. A yes vote opposed the rule as violative of both gun and disability rights. (HJ Res 40)

Yes: John McCain, R, Jeff Flake, R

Steven Mnuchin Confirmation: The Senate on Feb. 13 confirmed, 53-47, Steven T. Mnuchin, 54, as the 77th secretary of the Treasury. He was a Wall Street partner and owned hedge funds and a bank. A yes vote was to confirm Mnuchin over criticism that his OneWest Bank harshly foreclosed on tens of thousands of homeowners.

Yes: McCain, Flake

Scott Pruitt Confirmation: Voting 52-46, the Senate on Feb. 17 confirmed Scott Pruitt as administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. A yes vote backed Pruitt, 48, over Democrats\u2019 criticism of his siding with oil, gas and agribusiness interests on many environmental issues.

Yes: Jeff Flake, R

Not voting: McCain, R

Mick Mulvaney Confirmation: The Senate on Feb. 16 confirmed, 51-49, Mick Mulvaney as Office of Management and Budget director. A yes vote backed Mulvaney, 49, over Democrats\u2019 criticism of his calls for privatizing Medicare and raising the Social Security retirement age.

Yes: Jeff Flake, R

Not voting: McCain, R

"}, {"id":"e16a2bae-a392-5b69-9bbe-9a5435a90960","type":"article","starttime":"1487363819","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-17T13:36:59-07:00","lastupdated":"1487367129","sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true","ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Arizona to death-row inmates: Bring your own execution drugs","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_e16a2bae-a392-5b69-9bbe-9a5435a90960.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/arizona-to-death-row-inmates-bring-your-own-execution-drugs/article_e16a2bae-a392-5b69-9bbe-9a5435a90960.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Arizona-has-changed-its-death-penalty-procedures-by-letting-inmates-seek-the-drugs-that-will-be-used-in-their-executions/id-1bc29bf184fd4dbca245d586028597d0","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JACQUES BILLEAUD\nAssociated Press","prologue":"PHOENIX (AP) \u2014 The recent revelation that condemned prisoners in Arizona can now provide the lethal drugs to be used in their executions has received attention around the world and raised questions about the state's rules for the death penalty.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":["wire","general news","legal proceedings","law and order","defense policy","government policy","government and politics","military and defense","criminal punishment","prisons","correctional systems","executions"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"07bad9ca-f552-11e6-a843-875fd86c252d","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"597","height":"474","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/7b/07bad9ca-f552-11e6-a843-875fd86c252d/58a763b080e2f.image.jpg?resize=597%2C474"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"79","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/7b/07bad9ca-f552-11e6-a843-875fd86c252d/58a763b080e2f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C79"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"238","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/7b/07bad9ca-f552-11e6-a843-875fd86c252d/58a763b080e2f.image.jpg?resize=300%2C238"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"813","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/7b/07bad9ca-f552-11e6-a843-875fd86c252d/58a763b080e2f.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"d8874147-4035-5778-a2b0-e3fe0f05ae9a","description":"This undated booking photo provided by the Arizona Department of Corrections shows Joseph Wood. Executions in Arizona have been on hold since the 2014 death of convicted killer Wood, who was given 15 doses of the sedative midazolam and a painkiller and who took nearly two hours to die. Arizona has recently changed its death-penalty procedures by letting inmates seek the lethal-injection drugs that will be used in their executions. The new policy emerged in a lawsuit protesting the way Arizona carries out the death penalty.(Arizona Department of Corrections via AP)","byline":"HOGP","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"410","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/88/d8874147-4035-5778-a2b0-e3fe0f05ae9a/58a7683a6057b.image.jpg?resize=410%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"125","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/88/d8874147-4035-5778-a2b0-e3fe0f05ae9a/58a7683a6057b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C125"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"375","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/88/d8874147-4035-5778-a2b0-e3fe0f05ae9a/58a7683a6057b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C375"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1279","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/88/d8874147-4035-5778-a2b0-e3fe0f05ae9a/58a7683a6057b.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":15,"commentID":"e16a2bae-a392-5b69-9bbe-9a5435a90960","body":"

PHOENIX (AP) \u2014 The recent revelation that condemned prisoners in Arizona can now provide the lethal drugs to be used in their executions has received attention around the world and raised questions about the state's rules for the death penalty.

The novel policy has drawn sneers from defense attorneys who were puzzled as to why the state would think that they would assist in killing their clients. It has inspired wisecracks about Arizona's penchant for taking on envelope-pushing criminal justice policies and left some readers on social media asking whether the bring-your-own-drugs policy was actually the product of a news parody website.

Criminal defense lawyers and death penalty experts say they have never heard of a state suggesting that condemned inmates can line up drugs to be used in their executions.

However unlikely it is that any of Arizona's 119 death-row inmates will take up the offer, the change is a reflection of the difficulties that Arizona, like other states, faces in finding execution drugs now that European pharmaceutical companies have blocked the use of their products for lethal injections.

Executions in Arizona have been on hold since the 2014 death of convicted killer Joseph Rudolph Wood, who was given 15 doses of the sedative midazolam and a painkiller and who took nearly two hours to die. The state will not be able to carry out executions until the resolution of a lawsuit that alleges Arizona has abused its discretion in the methods and amounts of drugs used in past executions.

___

WHY LET PRISONERS SEEK EXECUTION DRUGS?

The state hasn't publicly explained its aim in taking on the new policy, which surfaced last month in the lawsuit.

The Arizona Department of Corrections, which carries out executions, didn't respond to requests for comment. The Arizona Attorney General's Office, which is defending the state in the lawsuit, declined to comment.

Under the policy, the state's top prison official would be required, in one execution drug protocol, to use the barbiturate pentobarbital that's obtained by lawyers for inmates or someone acting on their behalf. The corrections director also would have the choice of picking one of two drug protocols involving the sodium pentothal if the barbiturate is obtained on behalf of a prisoner.

Douglas Berman, an Ohio State University law professor who has expertise in the death penalty, views the change as a pushback against the conditions that have made the drugs unavailable. \"I think the idea is to say in the protocol, 'You guys want pentobarbital? Then get it. If you can get us the drugs, we'll use them,' \" Berman said.

___

WILL THE POLICY WITHSTAND SCRUTINY?

No, said Dale Baich, an assistant federal public defender who represents the inmates in the lawsuit.

He explained that the policy is unfeasible because the Controlled Substances Act prohibits attorneys and inmates from getting the drugs. \"As a lawyer, I just can't go to local Walgreens and pick up a couple of vials of pentobarbital,\" Baich said.

It's the responsibility of the state, not condemned prisoners, to carry out executions, Baich added.

The policy would seem to appeal to inmates who have abandoned their appeals and want to speed up their executions.

But Baich said the Controlled Substances Act would still prevent those prisoners from getting lethal-injection drugs.

Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, which has been critical of the way executions are carried out in the United States, said the policy also raises ethical concerns.

Death-penalty lawyers are supposed to zealously represent their clients and have a duty not to take actions that harm them, Dunham said. \"No one has done it before, and the fact that it is impossible, impractical, illegal and unethical may have something to do with that,\" he said.

___

WILL INMATES REALLY SEEK THEIR OWN EXECUTION DRUGS?

Timothy Agan, a longtime criminal defense lawyer in Phoenix who has handled several death penalty cases, said he can't imagine condemned prisoners lining up to seek their own execution drugs and couldn't foresee a situation in which the policy would be used.

He described his initial reaction to the policy by playing off a joke that comedian Jon Stewart made in summing up Arizona's reputation for antiestablishment, we'll-do-things-our-way approach to governing.

\"I saw that and shook my head and thought, 'This is truly the meth lab of democracy,' \" Agan said. \"A truly crazy idea.\"

___

Follow Jacques Billeaud at twitter.com/jacquesbilleaud. His work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/jacques%20billeaud.

"}, {"id":"540a5825-0e7a-551b-a53a-92e92d94288c","type":"article","starttime":"1487298840","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-16T19:34:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487395447","priority":20,"sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"San Tan Valley incorporation bill sent to Ducey","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/article_540a5825-0e7a-551b-a53a-92e92d94288c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/san-tan-valley-incorporation-bill-sent-to-ducey/article_540a5825-0e7a-551b-a53a-92e92d94288c.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/san-tan-valley-incorporation-bill-sent-to-ducey/article_540a5825-0e7a-551b-a53a-92e92d94288c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"The measure is aimed at a provision in state law that appears limited to Pinal County.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["pinal county","doug ducey","incorporation"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"73966"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"4f16e960-61ab-5cd8-a553-93f31114d60a","description":"The Senate voted on a 28-1 margin to send San Tan Valley\u2019s incorporation bill to Gov. Doug Ducey for review.","byline":"Ross D. Franklin / The Associated Press","hireswidth":1715,"hiresheight":1208,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/f1/4f16e960-61ab-5cd8-a553-93f31114d60a/58a622c70857d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"437","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/f1/4f16e960-61ab-5cd8-a553-93f31114d60a/58a622c70688a.image.jpg?resize=620%2C437"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/f1/4f16e960-61ab-5cd8-a553-93f31114d60a/58a622c70688a.image.jpg?crop=1715%2C964%2C0%2C51&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/f1/4f16e960-61ab-5cd8-a553-93f31114d60a/58a622c70688a.image.jpg?crop=1715%2C964%2C0%2C51&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/f1/4f16e960-61ab-5cd8-a553-93f31114d60a/58a622c70688a.image.jpg?crop=1715%2C964%2C0%2C51&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":14,"commentID":"540a5825-0e7a-551b-a53a-92e92d94288c","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The question of whether San Tan Valley residents get a chance to incorporate is now in the hands of Gov. Doug Ducey.

On a 28-1 margin, the state Senate on Thursday gave final approval to legislation which removes the ability of Florence and Apache Junction to veto an incorporation vote. Only Sen. Lisa Otondo, D-Yuma, voted against the measure.

The House had voted 40-20 last week to approve HB 2088.

There was no immediate response from the governor on what he might do with the measure.

Even if Ducey signs it, that does not guarantee there will be a new town in northeast Pinal County. Backers will still have to get the support of at least half the people who show up at the polls to decide the issue.

The measure is aimed at a provision in state law that appears limited to Pinal County.

It gives existing cities of up to 5,000 a \u201cplanning area\u201d that extends three miles beyond its current boundaries. It lets the existing city veto any new incorporations within that area.

For larger cities, that veto right extends out six miles.

The issue here is that a proposal to incorporate San Tan Valley sketches out a map that comes within the planning areas of Florence. And, to date, Florence has failed to give its permission.

HB 2088 creates an exception to that veto right if the area to be incorporated has at least 15,000 people and the city objecting is smaller.

That clearly applies to San Tan Valley with an estimated population of about 110,000, depending on how the map is drawn. Florence has a population of 26,000.

Foes of the legislation argued that it was not needed. They said the lines for a new town could be drawn so they do not come within six miles of Florence.

"}, {"id":"9f951b03-ac64-5dcc-bdb1-af739b197362","type":"article","starttime":"1487289600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-16T17:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487469620","priority":45,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Arizona lawmakers advance bill to limit voter initiatives","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_9f951b03-ac64-5dcc-bdb1-af739b197362.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/arizona-lawmakers-advance-bill-to-limit-voter-initiatives/article_9f951b03-ac64-5dcc-bdb1-af739b197362.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/arizona-lawmakers-advance-bill-to-limit-voter-initiatives/article_9f951b03-ac64-5dcc-bdb1-af739b197362.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Bill that advances would effectively eliminate use of paid petition circulators.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#top5","#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"73937"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e","description":"Rep. Vince Leach, R-Tucson","byline":"","hireswidth":1528,"hiresheight":1356,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff32ee.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"550","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff1694.image.jpg?resize=620%2C550"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff1694.image.jpg?crop=1528%2C859%2C0%2C79&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff1694.image.jpg?crop=1528%2C859%2C0%2C79&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/0b/40bf37b0-10ab-539d-aa1b-7fdb1797e98e/58a6318ff1694.image.jpg?crop=1528%2C859%2C0%2C79&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"9f951b03-ac64-5dcc-bdb1-af739b197362","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 Spurred by business interests in the wake of a voter-approved minimum-wage hike, Republican lawmakers approved legislation Thursday that could curtail the ability of citizens to create their own laws.

The most significant provision of HB 2404 would effectively eliminate the ability of groups to use paid circulators by prohibiting payment by the number of signatures gathered.

Paid circulators would still be allowed \u2014 but only if compensated on an hourly or other basis. But that removes any incentive for circulators to gather as many signatures as possible.

\u201cIt reforms the incentive for fraud and forgery,\u201d said Rep. Vince Leach, R-Tucson, who is carrying the legislation that was largely crafted by the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

The measure approved by the House Government Committee on a party-line vote and sent to the full House also imposes a series of new procedural hurdles and gives those who oppose initiatives new rights to try to have them knocked off the ballot before voters get a chance to weigh in.

The legislation also requires strict compliance with all initiative requirements, something Sierra Club lobbyist Sandy Bahr said could result in disqualifying petitions simply because their margins are not the right size.

And it would require any initiative committee that uses paid circulators to purchase a bond of up to $50,000.

Leach, however, did not explain what damages that is designed to cover.

Rep. Ken Clark, D-Phoenix, questioned what happens if companies choose not to write bonds for these unspecified damages.

When Leach did not respond, Rep. Doug Coleman, R-Apache Junction, said there\u2019s a simple answer to all of this: use volunteers.

But a series of people who have been involved in the initiative process in the past three decades all testified that is not realistic.

It takes 150,642 valid signatures to put a proposed change to state law on the ballot, a figure based on 10 percent of the people who voted in the last gubernatorial election. But it realistically takes more than 200,000 names given how many signatures are disqualified through the screening process.

Constitutional changes carry an even higher burden of 225,963 valid signatures.

\u201cThis bill is killing the initiative process by small cuts,\u201d said Doris Provine, president of the Arizona Advocacy Network.

She called the changes \u201conerous.\u201d

\u201cWe can\u2019t do initiatives with volunteer signature gatherers,\u201d Provine said.

Rivko Knox of the League of Women Voters pointed out HB 2404 is one of a series of measures at the Republican-controlled Legislature designed to impose new hurdles on those who want to propose laws, \u201cleading many to believe that its goal is, in essence, to make it impossible for initiatives to be a viable method of creating legislation.\u201d

The supporters of the legislation who testified were those who unsuccessfully attempted to get voters to kill Proposition 206, which raised the state minimum wage.

That includes the Arizona Restaurant Association, whose chief operating officer Dan Bogert testified in favor of the restrictions, particularly on the use of paid circulators.

He called them \u201cprofessional compensated advocates.\u201d

But Scott Cargill of Humane Voters of Arizona pointed out that those who say paid circulators lead to fraud are not proposing to limit the ability of political candidates, including legislators, to hire and pay people by the signature to gather names on their nominating petitions.

Leach said it\u2019s not the same thing, saying lawmakers can be turned out of office every two years. Cargill sniffed at that distinction.

\u201cI haven\u2019t heard a reason as to why a fraudulent signature for a candidate should be remedied by the fact that the candidate is voted out of office in a couple of years,\u201d he said.

Former state Rep. Theresa Ulmer pointed out that many of the people supporting the legislation are members of the state chamber.

\u201cA lot of these folks are dark-money folks,\u201d she said, referring to efforts by that group to block legislation which would require groups who run so-called independent expenditure campaigns for and against candidates to disclose the source of their cash.

Ulmer, who represented the Yuma area, also chided lawmakers for pushing to curb the ability of citizens to propose laws under what they claim is a desire to ensure the process is fair.

\u201cIf you\u2019re going to erode the constitution, don\u2019t stand up and talk about integrity,\u201d she said.

"}, {"id":"63bbe6a7-795e-5df0-86d4-8520f90ed019","type":"article","starttime":"1487286900","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-16T16:15:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487625910","priority":25,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"},{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"New group attempting to get pot legalization on Arizona ballot","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_63bbe6a7-795e-5df0-86d4-8520f90ed019.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/new-group-attempting-to-get-pot-legalization-on-arizona-ballot/article_63bbe6a7-795e-5df0-86d4-8520f90ed019.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/new-group-attempting-to-get-pot-legalization-on-arizona-ballot/article_63bbe6a7-795e-5df0-86d4-8520f90ed019.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"This effort removes all criminal penalties for the possession of marijuana.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["legalize pot","pot initiative","arizona pot initiative"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"73969"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"feb5ed72-4682-5335-8b4f-bbe647d18ce8","description":"David Wisniewski and Alex Gentry filed their paperwork Thursday. They propose allowing any licensed retailer, not just dispensaries, to sell the drug.","byline":"Howard Fischer / Capitol Media Services","hireswidth":1419,"hiresheight":1460,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/eb/feb5ed72-4682-5335-8b4f-bbe647d18ce8/58a634247a697.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"603","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/eb/feb5ed72-4682-5335-8b4f-bbe647d18ce8/58a6342478a18.image.jpg?resize=603%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"103","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/eb/feb5ed72-4682-5335-8b4f-bbe647d18ce8/58a6342478a18.image.jpg?resize=100%2C103"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"309","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/eb/feb5ed72-4682-5335-8b4f-bbe647d18ce8/58a6342478a18.image.jpg?resize=300%2C309"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1054","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/eb/feb5ed72-4682-5335-8b4f-bbe647d18ce8/58a6342478a18.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1054"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"63bbe6a7-795e-5df0-86d4-8520f90ed019","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 Voters may get another chance next year to legalize marijuana use by adults.

Members of a group called Safer Arizona 2018 filed the paperwork Thursday with the Secretary of State\u2019s Office to begin collecting signatures to put the issue on the ballot. The group needs 150,642 valid signatures by July 5, 2018, to qualify.

Proposition 205, which proposed a similar change last year, failed by a narrow margin. But David Wisniewski, this group\u2019s executive director, said there are significant differences that will make this proposal more acceptable.

The big one is that it removes all criminal penalties for the possession of marijuana. That compares with Prop. 205, which limited possession to an ounce and preserved other laws about illegal sales to those younger than 21.

\u201cThis is the real deal,\u201d he said. \u201cThis is actually repealing prohibition so there are no criminal penalties associated with cannabis. And things left over, like selling to a minor or selling without a license, we hit those with fines.\u201d

Potentially more significant, this measure would allow any licensed retailer to sell the drug. That means any grocery store, tobacco shop or convenience store.

And the prohibition against being located near schools and churches that exists for liquor stores and bars \u2014 and was part of Prop. 205 \u2014 is not part of this measure.

Prop. 205, by contrast, also limited sales to a set number of state-licensed dispensaries with some limits on where they could be located. And it gave first preference to those who already are operating medical marijuana shops, a restriction that caused some criticism even by supporters of legalized marijuana.

There\u2019s one other big difference: Wisniewski said he believes he can get the required signatures with an all-volunteer effort, something that has not been done in decades.

\u201cWe\u2019re living in a different time,\u201d he said. \u201cWith social media we\u2019re reaching literally hundreds of thousands of people a week.\u201d

He conceded that even if he gets the signatures, it will take money to conduct an actual campaign.

If Prop. 205 is any indication, opponents of legalization will have plenty of cash. They spent close to $6.2 million.

The new initiative lacks some things that were put in to Prop. 205 in a bid to attract votes. One of those is a special 15 percent tax, with some of the dollars earmarked for education once the expenses of policing the initiative were paid.

Wisniewski said backers do want the taxes raised to benefit education. But he said they see no reason to levy a special tax on marijuana above and beyond the state\u2019s regular 5.6 percent sales tax.

While there would be no limits to how much marijuana someone could possess, there would be a cap on cultivation of 48 plants. Those wanting to grow more would have to get a special permit from the state Agriculture Department.

"}, {"id":"3f2bf1bc-f324-11e6-b992-3fd813a3b1f0","type":"link","starttime":"1487156400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-15T04:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Colorado pot advice; father-son drug bust; Las Vegas love","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/colorado-pot-advice-father-son-drug-bust-love-in-las/collection_b3fcb8af-efa1-50cb-a74b-c9f99e68e4c4.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/colorado-pot-advice-father-son-drug-bust-love-in-las/collection_b3fcb8af-efa1-50cb-a74b-c9f99e68e4c4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Odd and interesting news from around the West.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"b810a064-f324-11e6-ab27-b7a4a9fc5125","description":"Kalin Ivanov, dressed as Darth Vader, officiates during a wedding at the Viva Las Vegas Wedding Chapel on Valentine's Day, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. Valentine's Day is one of the busier days of the year at the wedding chapel. (AP Photo/John Locher)","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"322","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/81/b810a064-f324-11e6-ab27-b7a4a9fc5125/58a3ba2de43d5.image.jpg?resize=512%2C322"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/81/b810a064-f324-11e6-ab27-b7a4a9fc5125/58a3ba2de43d5.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C33&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/81/b810a064-f324-11e6-ab27-b7a4a9fc5125/58a3ba2de43d5.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C33&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/81/b810a064-f324-11e6-ab27-b7a4a9fc5125/58a3ba2de43d5.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C33"}}}],"revision":1,"url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/colorado-pot-advice-father-son-drug-bust-love-in-las/collection_b3fcb8af-efa1-50cb-a74b-c9f99e68e4c4.html"}, {"id":"b3fcb8af-efa1-50cb-a74b-c9f99e68e4c4","type":"collection","starttime":"1487123940","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-14T18:59:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487124732","sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Colorado pot advice; father-son drug bust; love in Las Vegas","url":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/collection_b3fcb8af-efa1-50cb-a74b-c9f99e68e4c4.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/colorado-pot-advice-father-son-drug-bust-love-in-las/collection_b3fcb8af-efa1-50cb-a74b-c9f99e68e4c4.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/colorado-pot-advice-father-son-drug-bust-love-in-las/collection_b3fcb8af-efa1-50cb-a74b-c9f99e68e4c4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":15,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Odd and interesting news from around the West.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["sweeps","wwest"],"internalKeywords":["#slideshow"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"paging_gallery","revision":2}, {"id":"93586baa-f241-11e6-ae7c-e34ed02b3a5d","type":"link","starttime":"1487070000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-14T04:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"state-and-regional":"news/state-and-regional"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Burger battle; small-town pot plan; marriage license discount","permalink":"http://tucson.com/r/news/state-and-regional/burger-battle-small-town-pot-plan-marriage-license-discount/collection_7659ce04-4c46-50ab-8f5d-de1125895bfa.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/r/news/state-and-regional/burger-battle-small-town-pot-plan-marriage-license-discount/collection_7659ce04-4c46-50ab-8f5d-de1125895bfa.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Odd and interesting news from around the West.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"f494a7ac-f242-11e6-bc88-db8dea355024","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"400","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/49/f494a7ac-f242-11e6-bc88-db8dea355024/58a23f515e954.image.jpg?resize=620%2C400"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/49/f494a7ac-f242-11e6-bc88-db8dea355024/58a23f515e954.image.jpg?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C0&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/49/f494a7ac-f242-11e6-bc88-db8dea355024/58a23f515e954.image.jpg?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C0&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/49/f494a7ac-f242-11e6-bc88-db8dea355024/58a23f515e954.image.jpg?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C0"}}}],"revision":1,"url":"http://tucson.com/r/news/state-and-regional/burger-battle-small-town-pot-plan-marriage-license-discount/collection_7659ce04-4c46-50ab-8f5d-de1125895bfa.html"} ]