[ {"id":"e5b2bc31-36dd-5d3f-8a91-b1f6284b7bfb","type":"article","starttime":"1498261586","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T16:46:26-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Moody's upgrades Greece rating after bailout deal","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_e5b2bc31-36dd-5d3f-8a91-b1f6284b7bfb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/moody-s-upgrades-greece-rating-after-bailout-deal/article_e5b2bc31-36dd-5d3f-8a91-b1f6284b7bfb.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Moody-s-has-upgraded-Greece-s-bond-rating-after-the-country-reached-a-deal-this-month-with-bailout-lenders-for-continued-rescue-fund-payments/id-591cb3fe6b5f4429806cbe926de076cf","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"ATHENS, Greece (AP) \u2014 Moody's has upgraded Greece's bond rating after the country reached a deal this month with bailout lenders for continued rescue fund payments.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","debt and bond markets","financial markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"e5b2bc31-36dd-5d3f-8a91-b1f6284b7bfb","body":"

ATHENS, Greece (AP) \u2014 Moody's has upgraded Greece's bond rating after the country reached a deal this month with bailout lenders for continued rescue fund payments.

The credit ratings agency said late Friday that it was revising Greece's investment status up one notch, from Caa3 to Caa2, after the country received a cash installment pledge worth 8.5 billion euros ($9.5 Billion) from international creditors in exchange for a new round of austerity measures.

Moody's said Greece shows \"tentative signs of (an) economy stabilizing\" but added that \"it is too early to conclude that economic growth will be sustained.\"

"}, {"id":"03349b0f-e3ab-57d5-9b1c-f05f1242919f","type":"article","starttime":"1498261080","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T16:38:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1498263431","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Ivanka Trump ordered to testify in dispute with shoe company","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_03349b0f-e3ab-57d5-9b1c-f05f1242919f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/ivanka-trump-ordered-to-testify-in-dispute-with-shoe-company/article_03349b0f-e3ab-57d5-9b1c-f05f1242919f.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-New-York-judge-says-Ivanka-Trump-must-testify-in-a-dispute-with-an-Italian-shoemaker-over-one-of-her-company-s-shoe-designs/id-67cf9e2df7ba4d89a220e7806b899925","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By LARRY NEUMEISTER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Ivanka Trump must testify in a dispute with an Italian shoemaker over one of her company's shoe designs, a judge said Friday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","lawsuits","legal proceedings","law and order","corporate lawsuits","corporate legal affairs","corporate news","trademark infringement","trademarks","intellectual property","intellectual property violations","crime","shoes","fashion accessories","fashion","beauty and fashion","lifestyle"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"80ced8cd-a539-5971-b093-e3bef95290f8","description":"FILE - In this June 15, 2017, file photo, Ivanka Trump listens as President Donald Trump speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, during an event on Apprenticeship and Workforce of Tomorrow initiatives. A New York judge says Ivanka Trump must testify in a dispute with an Italian shoemaker over one of her company\u2019s shoe designs, Friday, June 23, 2017 . (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)","byline":"Susan Walsh","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"356","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/0c/80ced8cd-a539-5971-b093-e3bef95290f8/594da9a394d50.image.jpg?resize=512%2C356"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/0c/80ced8cd-a539-5971-b093-e3bef95290f8/594da9a394d50.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"209","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/0c/80ced8cd-a539-5971-b093-e3bef95290f8/594da9a394d50.image.jpg?resize=300%2C209"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"712","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/0c/80ced8cd-a539-5971-b093-e3bef95290f8/594da9a394d50.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"03349b0f-e3ab-57d5-9b1c-f05f1242919f","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Ivanka Trump must testify in a dispute with an Italian shoemaker over one of her company's shoe designs, a judge said Friday.

U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest rejected a request by the senior White House aide's lawyers that she be blocked from submitting to a deposition in the trademark infringement lawsuit brought by Aquazzura Italia SRL against her and her company IT Collection LLC.

The Florence, Italy-based company sued President Donald Trump's daughter last year, saying her Hettie shoe was a \"virtually identical\" knockoff of its popular Wild Thing Shoe, including nearly the same color, shape and tassel on the heel. Its lawsuit seeks unspecified damages.

The judge says Ivanka Trump must submit to questions posed during a deposition lasting no more than two hours, \"given Ms. Trump's competing professional obligations,\" and occurring in Washington, if that's Trump's preference. The judge said the deposition should occur by the end of October on a mutually acceptable schedule.

In ruling, the judge said \"Ms. Trump's public statements regarding active and comprehensive brand management lead to a reasonable inference that the shoe at issue would not have been released without her approval.\"

\"In such a situation,\" she said, \"a deposition is appropriate.\"

In a declaration filed with the court last week, Trump described herself as the former president of the company, saying she is now an assistant to the Republican president of the United States and maintains an office in the White House.

\"I had no involvement in the conception, design, production or sale of the 'Hettie Shoe,'\" she said, adding that those responsibilities belonged to the company's licensee, Marc Fisher, which was also sued.

\"My involvement was strictly limited to the final sign-off of each season's line after it was first reviewed and approved by the company's design team,\" Trump said.

In requesting Trump's testimony, Aquazzura's lawyers cited public statements by Trump, including one in which she was quoted saying: \"There's not a shoe I'm not intimately involved in designing.\"

\"The purpose of the deposition is not for harassment, but because Ms. Trump possesses individual knowledge not only of what did or did not occur with regard to the shoes at issue, but of how she handles the supervision of her licensees generally, and what steps she takes to avoid licensees' intentional copying,\" the lawyers wrote.

In ruling, the judge said: \"While that declaration does assert a lack of personal knowledge of the design at issue, plaintiff asserts otherwise. That is the stuff of which factual disputes in litigation are made.\"

Trump's lawyers haven't responded to messages seeking comment.

Aquazzura, in its lawsuit, said its shoe designs have \"skyrocketed to fame in the fashion world\" since the company was formed in 2011, with its shoes \"coveted by fashionistas and celebrities alike.\"

It said the Wild Thing is one of its best-selling shoes and is not the first to be copied by Trump's company. According to the lawsuit, Trump's company, which has been operating since 2010, stopped selling another shoe after Aquazzura complained that one of its shoes had been copied.

"}, {"id":"44b9ed03-6103-5d60-8942-3f00da814474","type":"article","starttime":"1498258990","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T16:03:10-07:00","lastupdated":"1498261929","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Christie signs order aimed at health insurer","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_44b9ed03-6103-5d60-8942-3f00da814474.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/christie-signs-order-aimed-at-health-insurer/article_44b9ed03-6103-5d60-8942-3f00da814474.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/New-Jersey-Gov-Chris-Christie-has-signed-an-executive-order-requiring-state-agencies-to-publish-opinions-and-decisions-online-a-move-apparently-aimed-at-the-state-s-biggest-health-insu/id-9277b9cda4dd45e9ad42262ddf98ec42","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By MICHAEL CATALINI\nAssociated Press","prologue":"TRENTON, N.J. (AP) \u2014 New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie signed an executive order Friday requiring state agencies to publish opinions and decisions online, a move apparently aimed at the state's biggest health insurer.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","government budgets","government finance","government business and finance","government and politics","drug addiction","diseases and conditions","health","drug abuse","addiction and substance abuse","human welfare","social issues","social affairs","addiction treatment","diagnosis and treatment","state governments","health insurance providers","insurance industry","financial services","epidemics","public health","state budgets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":6,"commentID":"44b9ed03-6103-5d60-8942-3f00da814474","body":"

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) \u2014 New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie signed an executive order Friday requiring state agencies to publish opinions and decisions online, a move apparently aimed at the state's biggest health insurer.

The signing of the order followed the announcement this week that the insurer, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield, was fined $15.5 million for Medicaid contract violations.

Christie is seeking to use $300 million of Horizon's $3 billion surplus to combat opioid addiction; Horizon opposes the plan.

The Republican's months-long effort to tap into Horizon's reserves is being met with resistance from Democratic lawmakers and has become a stumbling block in budget talks ahead of next Friday's deadline.

Christie's proposal was part of his budget address to the Legislature in late February and he has lobbied publicly for the idea, which the nonprofit insurer adamantly opposes. The plan has also drawn criticism from some right-leaning groups, including the conservative Americans for Prosperity.

Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto seemed to close the door on the idea on Thursday, saying that his caucus wouldn't support the \"bad bill\" and won't consider any other proposals ahead of the budget deadline.

He added that he is willing to consider legislation affecting other nonprofits, but not just Horizon. \"Negotiations are give and take and there are certain things that are just not part of it,\" Prieto said.

On Wednesday, Christie spotlighted the citations against Horizon over its Medicaid contract compliance with the state, which the governor said predates his effort to use their surplus.

Christie didn't share the citations, and an attempt to obtain the documents through an Open Public Records Act request resulted in a response that said contractual obligations prevented the release of the documents but that the administration was reaching out to Horizon to try to release them.

Friday's executive order is retroactive.

\"Every agency shall post on its Internet website interim agency orders, decisions, and opinions that pre-date this Executive Order, including, but not limited to, notices of contract violations or sanctions, enforcement actions, and fines,\" the order reads.

Horizon spokesman Kevin McArdle didn't immediately return a message seeking comment late Friday. Earlier Friday, before the signing of the executive order, he said the insurer was not agreeing to release the violation, but he declined to specify why.

Christie said in a statement Friday the order will \"prevent repeat offenders like Horizon from hiding behind their vaults of money.\"

Horizon said it was \"blindsided\" by the governor's criticism and suggested that his noting the citations publicly amounted to retaliation for opposing his plan.

\"I've never seen a governor go out there and announce fines. It's out of the ordinary,\" Prieto said, pointing to the news conference when he was asked why he opposed the proposal.

Christie's proposal is part of his efforts in his final year in office to address the state's opioid epidemic, including leading a commission for President Donald Trump on the issue, but they have also become closely tied to the state budget negotiations. The Horizon change and another Christie plan to dedicate lottery revenue to the state's woefully underfunded public workers' pensions has become tied together with the budget and Democrats' changes to school funding.

Meanwhile, Senate President Steve Sweeney and fellow Democratic state Sen. Joe Vitale are working on legislation that would deliver on some of Christie's aims but wouldn't result in ratepayer increases, which has been the biggest stumbling block for Horizon.

\"The one thing we all agree on is protecting the ratepayers,\" Sweeney said. \"We are not gonna do anything that's gonna risk ratepayers having increased fees.\"

The governor's push comes as his proposed roughly $35.5 billion budget is being considered by lawmakers, who must enact a balanced spending plan by July 1.

Vetoing the bill could risk a government shutdown, something Christie said he was confident would not occur.

Prieto and other lawmakers said Thursday the governor has agreed to an education spending overhaul put forward by Prieto and Sweeney, but with some \"tweaks,\" according to the speaker. He declined to specify.

___

Contact Catalini at https://www.twitter.com/mikecatalini

Associated Press writer David Porter in Newark contributed to this story.

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WORCESTER, Mass. (AP) \u2014 A man accused of killing a Google employee who went out for a run near her mother's Massachusetts home last summer has been indicted.

Worcester (WUS'-tur) County District Attorney Joseph Early Jr. says a grand jury handed down the indictment Friday against Angelo Colon-Ortiz.

The Worcester resident was arrested in connection with the death of 27-year-old Vanessa Marcotte last August in Princeton, a small town 40 miles (64 kilometers) west of Boston.

Prosecutors say Colon-Ortiz was apprehended in April after his DNA matched samples on Marcotte's body, which was found in the woods not far from her family home.

Colon-Ortiz faces charges of aggravated assault and battery and assault with attempt to rape. He's been in custody since his arrest and will be arraigned later. His lawyer hasn't commented.

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LONDON (AP) \u2014 The Latest on London's public housing tower fire on June 14 that has killed at least 79 people (all times local):

10:10 p.m.

Residents of a public housing complex being evacuated in north London because of fire safety concerns say they are both angry and frightened about being forced from their homes.

Resident Michelle Urquhart says she's angry because residents were assured as late as Thursday that the problem was being addressed.

The Camden Council decided to empty about 800 households in five buildings it owns on Friday. Expedited inspections heightened concerns about exterior insulation panels like the ones on Grenfell Tower, a high-rise where a June 14 fire killed at least 79 people.

Resident Shirley Philips, who lives in one of the evacuated buildings, told British broadcaster she was given no notice before she was asked to pack up and leave.

She says: \"Why have they left it 'til half past eight on Friday night to start getting residents out? Where do they think we're all going?\"

London Mayor Sadiq Khan says there was a \"particular set of circumstances on this estate that make this necessary.\"

___

9:35 p.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May has tweeted that her thoughts are with hundreds of public housing residents who are being evacuated because of fire safety concerns.

May said Friday that \"she will work with and support the emergency services and relevant authorities to safeguard the public.\"

She says she asked the country's secretary for communities and local government to keep her updated on \"ensure we are offering every support we can to residents & those working onsite.\"

The northwest London borough of Camden announced Friday that is evacuating 800 households in five buildings it owns during renovations that are expected to take two to three weeks.

The move was prompted after the Camden Council learned that the buildings had combustible cladding like the one on Grenfell Tower, where at least 79 people died in a fast-moving fire last week.

___

8:55 p.m.

The London borough of Camden says it has begun evacuating 800 households in tower blocks after fire authorities said they could not guarantee the safety of residents following a devastating fire in a high-rise in a nearby area.

Camden council leader Georgia Gould told Sky News Friday that a rest center has been set up and that hotels were being found for residents.

She says the move came after firefighters said they \"could not guarantee our residents safety.\"

Camden is one of the councils in England which has learned that combustible cladding has been placed on buildings during renovation projects, though they also had fire-resistant cladding.

Gould says the repair work is expected to take two to three weeks.

___

6 p.m.

London firefighters and emergency workers who battled the Grenfell Tower blaze have been leaving messages and tributes to the victims at a makeshift memorial near the charred apartment block.

Heartbreaking messages written on red London Fire Brigade T-shirts offer poignant tributes alongside flowers, toys and candles. At least 79 people died in the June 14 fire, which engulfed the building so quickly overnight that firefighters were unable to reach many of the victims.

One tribute, from a firefighter from a station in the Kensington and Chelsea borough read: \"20th floor, we tried... we're sorry.\" Another firefighter wrote \"Our hearts go out to everyone touched by this tragedy. We did our best I promise.\"

One shirt bearing the London Ambulance Service logo said: \"We refuse to forget you.\"

___

3 p.m.

London police are considering filing manslaughter charges related to the fire at a west London apartment tower that killed at least 79 people.

The Metropolitan Police on Friday confirmed residents' suspicions that the June 14 inferno at Grenfell Tower was touched off by a refrigerator fire. The department also said exterior cladding attached to the 24-story public housing project during a recent renovation failed safety tests conducted by investigators, and that police have seized documents from a number of organizations.

Detective Superintendent Fiona McCormack told reporters that \"we are looking at every criminal offense from manslaughter onwards ... We are looking at all health and safety and fire safety offenses, and we are reviewing every company at the moment involved in the building and refurbishment of Grenfell Tower.\"

The government has ordered an immediate examination of the refrigerator model that started the blaze. McCormack said the Hotpoint model FF175BP refrigerator-freezer had not been subject to any product recalls before the fire.

__

12:05 p.m.

Downing Street has ordered an immediate examination of the model of refrigerator that is believed to have sparked last week's Grenfell Tower fire that killed at least 79 people.

Metropolitan Police Detective Supt. Fiona McCormack said the Hotpoint FF175BP fridge-freezer had not been subject to any product recall.

The fire spread quickly through the tower block, leading to concerns that cladding on the building did not meet fire safety rules.

___

11:30 a.m.

London Police say manslaughter charges are among moves being considered over the Grenfell Tower fire that killed at least 79 people.

Metropolitan Police Detective Supt. Fiona McCormack says authorities are \"looking at every health and safety and fire safety offense and we are reviewing every company at the moment involved in the building and refurbishment of Grenfell Tower.\"

McCormack also repeated calls for anyone with information on who might have been in the tower to come forward. The call comes after London Mayor Sadiq Khan's pledge to seek an amnesty for people who may have been living in the tower illegally.

McCormack says: \"What we haven't got is a picture of how many people might have been in there. That's the number I'm really worried about.\"

___

10:50 a.m.

British police investigating the fire at Grenfell Tower in west London in which 79 people are believed to have died say the blaze started in a fridge freezer. They added that insulation and tiles recovered from the building have failed fire safety tests.

Detective Superintendent Fiona McCormack says officers have seized documents in the investigation into the fire.

\"What we are being told at the moment by the Building Research Establishment is that the cladding and insulation failed all safety tests,\" she told reporters Friday.

___

8:55 a.m.

British authorities are studying samples of similar to that used on the west London apartment building that caught fire, killing at least 79 people.

Eleven buildings have now been identified as having combustible cladding such as that used on the Grenfell Tower. The cladding is being studied amid fears that the panels fueled the fire in the 24-story building that was engulfed in less than an hour.

Buildings in London, Manchester and Plymouth are among those where problem cladding has been identified.

Fears about cladding is not limited to apartment buildings, and at least one hotel chain is calling in experts to make certain it meets safety regulations. Premier Inn said Friday it had \"concerns\" about the material on some of its buildings, though it is different to the type used on Grenfell.

"}, {"id":"8058a8e0-27b2-50f5-87a7-d4f9704972ce","type":"article","starttime":"1498255240","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T15:00:40-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Mountain Valley review finds limited environmental impacts","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_8058a8e0-27b2-50f5-87a7-d4f9704972ce.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/mountain-valley-review-finds-limited-environmental-impacts/article_8058a8e0-27b2-50f5-87a7-d4f9704972ce.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Federal-regulators-are-scheduled-to-release-an-assessment-of-the-environmental-impacts-of-a-proposed-natural-gas-pipeline-that-would-part-of-Virginia/id-b907c3e2f6e440c5887c298a28ae736b","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By SARAH RANKIN\nAssociated Press","prologue":"RICHMOND, Va. (AP) \u2014 A 303-mile pipeline that would carry fracked natural gas across West Virginia and Virginia would have \"significant\" impacts on forests but other adverse effects would be limited, federal regulators said Friday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","energy and utilities regulation","industry regulation","government business and finance","government and politics","government regulations","oil and gas industry","energy industry","pipeline construction","heavy construction industry","construction and engineering","industrial products and services","environmental impact assessments","environment","environment and nature","coastlines and beaches","regulatory agencies","mountains","oil and gas transportation","forests","environmental activism"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"8058a8e0-27b2-50f5-87a7-d4f9704972ce","body":"

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) \u2014 A 303-mile pipeline that would carry fracked natural gas across West Virginia and Virginia would have \"significant\" impacts on forests but other adverse effects would be limited, federal regulators said Friday.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's final environmental impact statement is largely favorable for developers of the $3.5 billion Mountain Valley Pipeline, which is strenuously opposed by environmental groups and many landowners along its path.

Like the similar Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which has been proposed by different developers, it would carry gas from the Marcellus and Utica shale deposits to U.S. markets. The companies involved say the pipelines will deliver cheap and abundant energy that is cleaner than coal, and they've promised billions of dollars in economic benefits.

But opponents say the projects will infringe on landowners' property rights, damage pristine areas and commit the region to fossil fuels just when global warming makes it essential to invest in renewable energy instead.

Once the U.S. Senate confirms President Donald Trump's nominees and the commission reaches a quorum, the commissioners will make FERC's final decision on whether the project can proceed, agency spokeswoman Tamara Young-Allen said. That will be based on the impact statement as well as determinations of whether the project meets a public need and whether its proposed gas rates are just and reasonable.

The impact statement, a 930-page document supplemented with dozens of appendices, includes sections on soil, water, forest, wildlife, recreational areas, socio-economic issues and other aspects of life that could be affected by the Mountain Valley Pipeline and its related Equitrans Expansion Project, about 8 miles of pipelines in six segments connecting to other systems.

Overall, FERC staff \"determined that construction and operation of the projects would result in limited adverse environmental impacts, with the exception of impacts on forest.\" That determination took into account the total acres of forest affected, the quality and use of forest for wildlife habitat, and the amount of time it takes to restore forest that would be disrupted, the statement said.

That conclusion is not scientifically credible and defies common sense, one environmental group said Friday.

\"Some wounds on our forests can never be healed once they are inflicted, including forest fragmentation, loss of valuable core forest areas, and loss of watershed integrity,\" Wild Virginia President Ernie Reed said in a statement. \"Damage to the Jefferson National Forest and the Appalachian Trail will sacrifice the public's ability to use these national treasures in the interest of profit-making corporations and no one else.\"

Environmental groups also contend the analysis does not look closely enough at the cumulative impacts of the Mountain Valley Pipeline and Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which would cross West Virginia, Virginia and North Carolina.

\"They make a pass at mentioning this in relation to the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, but it's a pretty poor attempt,\" said David Sligh with Wild Virginia.

In 2015, a coalition of pipeline opponents asked for a comprehensive review, but FERC denied that request. The commission plans to release a separate final environmental impact statement for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline next month.

The staff did evaluate the impact of merging the two proposed pipelines, but found it \"would not be technically feasible or practical.\" It also considered other route options, including one that would largely run side by side with an electric transmission line, but said none offered a significant environmental advantage.

The document partly addresses a key sticking point for environmentalists \u2014 whether there's a true public need for the pipeline \u2014 saying that question will be more fully explained by the commissioners. Opponents have challenged the \"need\" argument, saying developers are overestimating the demand for natural gas and underestimating the capacity of existing infrastructure to get profitable projects approved.

The impact statement said the existing infrastructure lacks the capacity to handle the additional volumes of gas that would be shipped along the full length of the 42-inch-wide pipeline, which would run south from northern West Virginia through the center of the state, cross into Virginia west of Roanoke, and then cut southeast to a point north of Danville.

Pipeline spokeswoman Natalie Cox said the development team has revised the route hundreds of times over the last three years to avoid sensitive areas and has worked with residents and landowners to make sure the project is constructed in ways that minimize impacts on their land and daily lives.

\"It is unfortunate, although not surprising, that steadfast opponents of the MVP project would reflexively dismiss findings that do not align with their view,\" Cox said.

She said the project team was \"pleased with the thorough evaluation and review\" by FERC.

Now that the environmental impact statement has been released, a final decision from FERC can come at any time after a quorum is reached, Young-Allen said. Other state and federal permits are also still pending.

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LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 Gov. Rick Snyder said Friday that some companies based in Europe are considering expanding into Michigan or adding to existing operations there, and he wants to ensure that the state has enough qualified engineers and technicians to fill the potential jobs in the long term.

Snyder, who will return Saturday after a weeklong trade trip to France, Germany and Italy, said he focused in part on selling Michigan industry as not just being automotive-centric. He spent two days at the Paris Air Show, where he had 55 meetings. He said Michigan has more than 680 companies in the aerospace supply chain.

\"That's huge. We needed to tell that story more, and it got a great response,\" Snyder told The Associated Press by phone from Milan. He plans to return to Europe in September for the Frankfurt auto show in what would be his administration's sixth European trade mission.

In Italy, Snyder said he met with a major auto supplier that may expand its existing Michigan operations and a biotech company that is looking to have a U.S. presence. While he declined to name the biotech company, his office later issued a news release saying he had met with leaders from Clerici-Sacco, whose customers include dairy and pharmaceutical companies.

\"I think we have a good chance to attract them to west Michigan,\" Snyder said.

He said executives from companies already operating in Michigan gave \"positive feedback,\" and the concern he heard most often is whether Michigan will have enough workers in the skilled trades.

\"They just want to make sure we're filling the long-term pipeline,\" said Snyder, who said he emphasized existing community college and robotic programs that train engineers and technicians.

___

Follow David Eggert on Twitter at https://twitter.com/DavidEggert00 . His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/David%20Eggert .

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___

Five GOP senators now oppose health bill \u2014 enough to sink it

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Nevada Republican Dean Heller became the fifth GOP senator to declare his opposition to the party's banner legislation to scuttle much of Barack Obama's health care overhaul on Friday. That's more than enough to sink the measure and deliver a stinging rebuke to President Donald Trump unless some of them can be brought aboard.

___

Kids today: They don't work summer jobs the way they used to

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Instead of baling hay, scooping ice cream or stocking supermarket shelves in July and August, today's teens are increasingly likely to be enrolled in summer school, doing volunteer work to burnish their college credentials or just hanging out with friends.

___

Google to stop reading your Gmail to help sell ads

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 Google is going to stop reading your Gmail in search of opportunities to sell ads. The change announced Friday will end a practice that Google has embraced since the company introduced Gmail in 2004, even though it raised concerns among privacy watchdogs and creeped out some users. Google still plans to show ads within Gmail, but will rely on signals other than scanning through email content.

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The pain and gain of Brexit vote: British economy a year on

LONDON (AP) \u2014 Few events outside of war can have quite as much impact on the economy of a country as Britain's decision a year ago to leave the European Union. The momentous vote on June 23, 2016 has the potential to sever Britain's ties to its main trading partner. One year on from the vote, the economy has defied predictions of recession, but it has seen the expected slide in the pound and rise in inflation.

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US indexes inch higher as energy stocks claw from the hole

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 U.S. stock indexes nudged higher Friday after rising prices for oil and natural gas helped energy companies claw back some of their sharp losses from earlier in the week.

___

Honda denies covering up dangers of Takata air bags

DETROIT (AP) \u2014 Honda is going public in an effort to debunk claims by lawyers that it knew about the hazards of exploding Takata air bag inflators nearly two decades ago but covered them up. The public escalation of Honda's fight comes just three days before Takata Corp. is expected to file for bankruptcy protection in Japan and the United States.

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New homes sales rebounded 2.9 percent in May

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Sales of new homes rebounded in May, helped by strong sales gains in the South and West. The Commerce Department says sales of new single-family homes rose 2.9 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 610,000.

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Qatar weighs demands to end crisis amid threat of long siege

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) \u2014 The tiny Gulf nation of Qatar is weighing an onerous list of demands by its neighbors as a way out of a regional crisis, and a top Emirati official warned it to brace for a long-term economic squeeze unless it complies. Qatar did not immediately respond after receiving a clear set of demands for the first time, but the ultimatum was quickly rejected by ally Turkey and blasted as an assault on free speech by Qatari broadcaster Al-Jazeera.

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Kansas jury awards $218M to farmers in Syngenta GMO suit

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) \u2014 A federal jury in Kansas has awarded nearly $218 million to farmers who sued Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its introduction of a genetically engineered corn seed. Syngenta vowed to appeal the verdict in what served as the first test case of tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits assailing Syngenta's decision to introduce its Viptera seed strain to the U.S. market before China approved it for imports. The lawsuits say that wrecked an increasingly important export market for U.S. corn, causing years of depressed corn prices.

___

Sears closes another 20 stores

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Sears Holdings Corp. is shutting down another 20 stores, on top of more than 200 closings already announced this year, as the ailing retailer tries to turn around its business.

___

The Standard & Poor's 500 rose 3.80 points, or 0.2 percent, to end at 2,438.30. The Dow Jones industrial average slipped 2.53 points, or less than 0.1 percent, to 21,394.76, and the Nasdaq composite gained 28.56, or 0.5 percent, to 6,265.25.

Benchmark U.S. crude added 27 cents to settle at $43.01 per barrel. Brent crude, the international standard, gained 32 cents to $45.54 and natural gas rose 4 cents, or 1.2 percent, to $2.93 per 1,000 cubic feet. Heating oil was close to flat at $1.37 per gallon and wholesale gasoline was little changed at $1.43 per gallon.

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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Sears is closing another 20 stores as the ailing retailer tries to turn around its business.

Real estate investment trust Seritage, which owns the 20 real estate properties, confirmed the closings\u2014 18 Sears stores and two Kmart stores \u2014 in a government filing Friday.

In 2015, Sears Holdings Corp. sold 235 Sears and Kmart store locations to Seritage as part of an agreement in which Sears leases the stores back from the real estate company. Under the agreement with Seritage, if a store is unprofitable, Sears Holdings has the option to exit the lease by making a payment equal to one year's rent.

\"We have been strategically and aggressively evaluating our store space and productivity, and have accelerated the closing of unprofitable stores as previously announced,\" Sears Holdings spokesman Howard Riefs said in a statement emailed to The Associated Press.

Riefs said the stores will close in mid-September. Liquidation sales will begin by the end of June.

The closures come in addition to the closing of 226 stores \u2014 164 Kmart stores and 62 Sears stores\u2014 already announced this year, according to research firm Fung Global & Retail Technology, which tracks retailers' closings.

On Thursday, Sears announced the opening of its first Sears Appliances & Mattresses concept store, located in Pharr, Texas. The company said the store builds on the success of the Sears Appliances store that opened in Fort Collins, Colorado, last year.

Shares of Sears Holdings, which is based in Hoffman Estates, Illinois, ended Friday up 13 cents, or almost 2 percent, to $6.95.

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Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., third from left, accompanied by Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., second from left, Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., right, and healthcare leaders, discuss the effects of the proposed Republican healthcare legislation on families at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. 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John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, speaks following a closed-door strategy session, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 20, 2017. Sen. McConnell says Republicans will have a \"discussion draft\" of a GOP-only bill scuttling former President Barack Obama's health care law by Thursday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)","byline":"J. 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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the Senate GOP health care bill (all times EDT):

5:20 p.m.

A health insurance industry trade group says it's encouraged by provisions of the Senate GOP health care bill, but stopped short of voicing support.

The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association represents plans that are the backbone of HealthCare.gov and state health insurance markets created under former President Barack Obama's law.

The group said in a statement Friday it's encouraged that the Senate bill would take immediate action to stabilize shaky insurance markets by guaranteeing billions of dollars in subsidies under jeopardy due to a legal dispute and political maneuvering. The subsidies help reduce deductibles and copayments for people with modest incomes.

The Senate bill would make the payments through 2019, but then cut them off.

___

5:05 p.m.

A Republican senator up for re-election next year just got some bad news about the Senate GOP health care bill.

Sen. Jeff Flake's home state of Arizona could lose at least $7.1 billion through 2026 under the Senate proposal to roll back former President Barack Obama's health care law. The estimate was released Friday by Arizona's Medicaid agency, which analyzed the effects of the legislation on the state health insurance program for low-income people.

Arizona's Republican Gov. Doug Ducey said Friday the Senate GOP bill falls short of what his state needs.

Flake is politically popular but faces a primary challenge from a conservative. Neither he nor fellow Arizona Sen. John McCain has said how he will vote.

___

3:50 p.m.

Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst is suggesting Iowans would not be losing Medicaid coverage even as the Senate GOP health care bill would phase out financing to expand the low-income insurance program.

The Republican senator told reporters Friday, \"I wouldn't say they are losing it.\" She was asked about the bill's impact on lower-income Iowans now covered by Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

The GOP-controlled Senate bill introduced Thursday would phase out federal money to states which opted to expand the low-income health insurance program. Iowa opted to expand, and has added more than 150,000 people to its rolls since 2014.

Ernst declined to comment on any other provisions during a news conference at the Iowa Capitol, saying, \"We have 142 pages to go through.\"

___

3:10 p.m.

Nevada Republican Sen. Dean Heller says he opposes the GOP bill scuttling much of the Obama health care law, complicating the effort by party leaders to guide the measure through the Senate.

Heller faces a difficult re-election fight next year. He said Friday he would vote against the bill in its current form but did not rule out supporting a revamped, final version of it.

The Senate measure would make major cuts in the Medicaid program for poor and disabled people.

Facing unanimous Democratic opposition, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell must get yes votes from 50 of the 52 GOP senators to avoid a defeat that would be a major embarrassment to President Donald Trump and the entire Republican Party.

___

3:45 a.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has finally unwrapped his plan for dismantling President Barack Obama's health care law.

Now he's facing his next challenge \u2014 persuading enough Republicans to back the measure.

Passage would move President Donald Trump and the GOP closer to one of their marquee pledges \u2014 erasing Obama's 2010 statute. But a defeat would be a bitter and damaging blow to Trump and his party.

McConnell drafted the measure after spending weeks seeking middle ground between conservatives seeking an aggressive repeal of Obama's statute and centrists warning about going too far.

The bill would cut and redesign the Medicaid program for low-income and disabled people. It would erase taxes on higher earners and the medical industry that helped Obama's law expand coverage by roughly 20 million Americans.

"}, {"id":"0ce14f46-6e46-5b78-8c54-e580eb575588","type":"article","starttime":"1498252437","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T14:13:57-07:00","lastupdated":"1498254506","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Sonic, Forestar post gains; BlackBerry, Regeneron fall","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_0ce14f46-6e46-5b78-8c54-e580eb575588.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/sonic-forestar-post-gains-blackberry-regeneron-fall/article_0ce14f46-6e46-5b78-8c54-e580eb575588.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Sonic-Forestar-post-gains-BlackBerry-Regeneron-fall/id-43b4585e6da74062ada6da29f4bfc09f","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday:","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","earnings surprises","earnings","financial performance","corporate news","mobile phone manufacturing","mobile telecommunications equipment manufacturing","telecommunications equipment manufacturing","telecommunications","consumer electronics manufacturing","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services","oil and gas industry","energy industry","earnings estimates","financial markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"0ce14f46-6e46-5b78-8c54-e580eb575588","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday:

Bed Bath & Beyond Inc., down $4.09 to $29.65

The home goods retailer posted earnings and revenue that missed analysts' forecasts.

Forestar Group Inc., up $1.15 to $17.65

The developer said a revised offer from D.R. Horton was superior to a deal it agreed to with Starwood Capital, which it now intends to terminate.

Synchronoss Technologies Inc., up $4.06 to $16.24

The technology company confirmed it had received an offer from Siris Capital Group to be acquired for $18 a share in cash.

Sonic Corp., up 51 cents to $28.01

The operator of a chain of quick-service restaurants reported earnings that were higher than analysts were expecting.

BlackBerry Ltd., down $1.35 to $9.71

The struggling smartphone maker reported revenue that didn't meet analysts' forecasts.

Synnex Corp., up $6.53 to $128.37

The maker of computer systems reported earnings and revenue that easily beat forecasts.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc., down $9.20 to $517.33

A day after posting big gains, health-care companies fell more than the rest of the market.

Range Resources Corp., up 83 cents to $22.26

Energy companies did better than the rest of the market as prices for crude oil and natural gas turned higher.

"}, {"id":"e0164134-e0ff-55e2-a709-b78447996d26","type":"article","starttime":"1498252673","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T14:17:53-07:00","lastupdated":"1498255236","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Google to stop reading your Gmail to help sell ads","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_e0164134-e0ff-55e2-a709-b78447996d26.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/google-to-stop-reading-your-gmail-to-help-sell-ads/article_e0164134-e0ff-55e2-a709-b78447996d26.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Google-is-going-to-stop-reading-your-Gmail-in-search-of-opportunities-to-sell-ads/id-fdc08ca629a549829c3dd200eafb8be9","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 Google is going to stop reading your Gmail in search of opportunities to sell ads.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","technology"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1cdf1de8-545b-5b19-9aa9-390ef220e74f","description":"FILE - This March 23, 2010, file photo shows the Google logo at the Google headquarters in Brussels. Google is going to stop reading your Gmail in search of opportunities to sell ads. The change announced Friday, June 23, 2017 will end a practice that Google has embraced since the company introduced Gmail in 2004, even though it raised concerns among privacy watchdogs and creeped out some users.(AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)","byline":"Virginia Mayo","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"299","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cd/1cdf1de8-545b-5b19-9aa9-390ef220e74f/594d7792a97cd.image.jpg?resize=512%2C299"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cd/1cdf1de8-545b-5b19-9aa9-390ef220e74f/594d7792a97cd.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C5&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cd/1cdf1de8-545b-5b19-9aa9-390ef220e74f/594d7792a97cd.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C5&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cd/1cdf1de8-545b-5b19-9aa9-390ef220e74f/594d7792a97cd.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C5"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"e0164134-e0ff-55e2-a709-b78447996d26","body":"

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 Google is going to stop reading your Gmail in search of opportunities to sell ads.

The change announced Friday will end a practice that Google has embraced since the company introduced Gmail in 2004. The practice has raised concerns among privacy watchdogs and creeped out some users.

To help finance the free service, Google has been scanning through what Gmail users were discussing and then showing ads connected to some of the topics. Someone writing about running, for instance, might see ads for Nike or Asics shoes.

Google still plans to show ads within Gmail. But instead of scanning through email content, the company's software will rely on other signals to determine which ads are most likely to appeal to each of its 1.2 billion Gmail users.

The Mountain View, California, company said it would stop the ad-driven scanning of Gmail later this year.

Google says it's changing course so its free Gmail service operates more like the subscription version that it has sold to more than 3 million companies. The paid Gmail doesn't include ads, so the company has never tried to scan the content of those users' emails for marketing purposes.

Despite that, Google said some of its business customers incorrectly assumed the company was scanning those accounts as well. By ending all scanning, Google hopes to end the confusion and sell Gmail to even more businesses.

Gmail now ranks as the world's largest email service, an indication that most people didn't care about Google's scanning methods. Both Microsoft and Apple have publicly skewered Google for having the audacity to mine users' emails for ad sales, but those attacks didn't undercut Gmail's popularity.

"}, {"id":"08cce9d4-4e3c-5d5b-8825-a40e9f676f39","type":"article","starttime":"1498251713","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T14:01:53-07:00","lastupdated":"1498254520","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Trump admin OKs drone sale to India, manufacturer says","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_08cce9d4-4e3c-5d5b-8825-a40e9f676f39.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/trump-admin-oks-drone-sale-to-india-manufacturer-says/article_08cce9d4-4e3c-5d5b-8825-a40e9f676f39.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-Trump-administration-is-set-to-authorize-the-2-billion-sale-of-unarmed-surveillance-drones-to-India/id-fda31f9dc6a540888eb20823703e0983","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By MATTHEW PENNINGTON\nAssociated Press","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Trump administration has authorized the sale of unarmed surveillance drones to India, the manufacturer said Friday, as the two nations' leaders prepare for their first face-to-face meeting.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","business","general news","government and politics","drone surveillance and warfare","drone aircraft","military and defense"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"6ff793e0-c365-5996-8920-cd4e7ec650ac","description":"FILE - In this June 2, 2017, file photo Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Trump administration is set to authorize the sale of surveillance drones to India as the two nations' leaders prepare for their first face-to-face meeting on June 26. That's according to a congressional aide and an industry representative speaking to The Associated Press. (Mikhail Metzel/TASS News Agency Pool Photo via AP)","byline":"Mikhail Metzel","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"333","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ff/6ff793e0-c365-5996-8920-cd4e7ec650ac/594d58701e466.image.jpg?resize=512%2C333"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ff/6ff793e0-c365-5996-8920-cd4e7ec650ac/594d58701e466.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"195","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ff/6ff793e0-c365-5996-8920-cd4e7ec650ac/594d58701e466.image.jpg?resize=300%2C195"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"666","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ff/6ff793e0-c365-5996-8920-cd4e7ec650ac/594d58701e466.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":18,"commentID":"08cce9d4-4e3c-5d5b-8825-a40e9f676f39","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Trump administration has authorized the sale of unarmed surveillance drones to India, the manufacturer said Friday, as the two nations' leaders prepare for their first face-to-face meeting.

India initiated its request to buy 22 Guardian MQ-9B unmanned aircraft for maritime surveillance last year. The deal is estimated to be worth about $2 billion. The offer is still subject to congressional approval.

The green light from the administration marks a further deepening in defense ties as India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi meets with President Donald Trump at the White House on Monday.

Modi's two-day visit to Washington, which starts Sunday, takes place amid uncertainty over the relationship because of differences on trade and other issues.

So far in his presidency, Trump has focused on outreach to China, India's strategic rival, as he looks to Beijing to rein in North Korea. But Washington and New Delhi share concerns about China's rise as a military power.

India reportedly wants the drones for surveillance of the Indian Ocean \u2014 waters that China's navy increasingly traverses after establishing its first overseas base in the Horn of Africa nation of Djibouti. India's archrival Pakistan would also likely be opposed to the drone sale.

\"We are pleased that the U.S. government has cleared the way for the sale of the MQ-9B Guardian to the Indian government,\" Linden Blue, CEO of the manufacturer, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, said in a statement. Blue added that it would \"significantly enhance India's sovereign maritime domain awareness in the Indo-Pacific.\"

A congressional staffer familiar with the matter confirmed the administration has approved the sale. The staffer was not authorized to discuss the potential deal and requested anonymity.

David McKeeby, spokesman for the State Department bureau of political-military affairs, said it does not comment on proposed defense sales before Congress is formally notified.

A senior White House official said Friday that the U.S. is interested in providing India the kind of high technology it provides to its closest allies and defense partners. That is important to the strategic partnership and for cooperation in areas like the Indian Ocean, and also creates U.S. jobs, said the official, who requested anonymity to brief reporters on the preparations for Modi's visit.

India does not have a formal alliance with the U.S., but defense ties have intensified in recent years with joint drills between the two militaries and defense sales. The South Asian nation, which has traditionally bought most of its defense equipment from Russia, is looking to upgrade its capabilities.

Since 2008, India has signed more than $15 billion in U.S. defense contracts, including for C-130J and C-17 transport aircraft, P-8I maritime patrol aircraft, Harpoon missiles and Apache and Chinook helicopters.

Ashley Tellis, an expert on South Asia at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said the U.S. decision to offer the Guardian aircraft to India is significant as the U.S. has a standing policy of declining export of such advanced drones other than to allies involved in combined operations with U.S. forces.

\"Much bureaucratic china within the U.S. government had to be broken to get to this decision,\" he said.

There could still be pushback from Congress. While there is bipartisan support for closer U.S.-India security ties, some lawmakers remain wary of the export of U.S. drone technology to non-allies.

Modi, a Hindu nationalist, will be making his fourth visit to the U.S. since he took office in 2014. He forged a strong relationship with President Barack Obama, and on his last visit in June 2016, he addressed Congress and described the U.S. as an \"indispensable partner.\"

The visit is likely to be lower key and aimed at building a personal bond between the two leaders, who have spoken twice by phone since Trump took office. Modi will be the first foreign dignitary to be hosted for dinner at the White House during Trump's presidency.

They share a populist streak and a knack for using social media, and are likely to find common ground on combating Islamic extremism. Modi will be urging a tougher stance on Pakistan over militants that India blames for attacks on its territory.

But there could be increased strains on trade issues.

India is among nations singled out by the Trump administration for their trade surpluses with the U.S., which in India's case totaled $30.8 billion in 2016. New Delhi is also closely watching the administration's review of the H1B visa program, under which thousands of skilled Indian workers come to the U.S.

New Delhi was irked by Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris climate accord. In making the announcement, the U.S. president said New Delhi had made its participation \"contingent on receiving billions and billions and billions of dollars in foreign aid.\" India denies that and says it will continue to be part of the accord, regardless of U.S. participation.

____

Associated Press writer Vivian Salama contributed to this report.

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) \u2014 Puerto Rico's governor said Friday that he will go to court to fight a federal control board's call to cut a public pension system by 10 percent, furlough tens of thousands of government workers and eliminate Christmas bonuses.

The comments by Gov. Ricardo Rossello come amid rising tensions between his administration and the board created by Congress last year to oversee the finances of a U.S. territory mired in a 10-year recession.

\"We will take any steps necessary to protect the people of Puerto Rico,\" Rossello said.

He said the board cannot impose those measures unilaterally by July 1 without the consent of his administration.

A spokesman for the seven-member board did not respond to a request for comment.

The board has proposed furloughs of two days a month for teachers and four days a month for other government workers as a way to cut government spending by up to $40 million a month in savings. In addition, all Christmas bonuses could be eliminated by fiscal year 2018.

Rossello rejected those proposals on Thursday in response to a letter the board sent his administration last week.

\"The oversight board is now trying to strong-arm the government into accepting the expenditure controls,\" he said. The proposed cuts \"carry with them the significant threat of triggering a serious drag on Puerto Rico's economy, which could quickly spiral out of control.\"

The board has said those measures would go into effect if Rossello's administration did not take sufficient cost-saving steps as it faces nearly $50 billion in pension liabilities and seeks to restructure a portion of the island's $73 billion public debt load.

The board also admonished Rossello's administration last Friday in a letter that warned about plans to generate savings that are \"inadequate or poorly executed.\"

\"If that happens, Puerto Rico is all but certain to run out of money to fund the central government's payroll come November or December of this year,\" the board said.

It also stressed the need for Rossello's administration to come up with a plan to generate enough money to ensure the government can provide essential services without interruption.

\"Beginning in July, Puerto Rico will face a worsening cash flow problem because of loss of federal funds and the depletion of pension funds' assets,\" the board said.

The board also is awaiting a proposed budget that Rossello presented to legislators nearly a month ago. Final approval has been held up by disagreements between legislators and the board over some $25 million, which local officials believe should be used for government services instead of being set aside as a reserve.

"}, {"id":"c5070d96-1ab1-53eb-bd1e-fba8db7c874f","type":"article","starttime":"1498250385","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T13:39:45-07:00","lastupdated":"1498252567","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Court tosses woman's victory in key Iowa sex harassment case","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_c5070d96-1ab1-53eb-bd1e-fba8db7c874f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/court-tosses-woman-s-victory-in-key-iowa-sex-harassment/article_c5070d96-1ab1-53eb-bd1e-fba8db7c874f.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-divided-Iowa-Supreme-Court-has-overturned-orders-requiring-an-ethanol-company-to-pay-2-5-million-to-a-lab-manager-who-suffered-severe-workplace-sexual-harassment-from-her-boss/id-cc84b3a5b84f45148861c52b41405972","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 A divided Iowa Supreme Court has overturned orders requiring an ethanol company to pay $2.5 million to a lab manager who suffered severe workplace sexual harassment from her boss.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","state courts","state governments","government and politics","courts","judiciary","corporate legal affairs","corporate news","ethanol manufacturing","biofuel manufacturing","alternative energy industry","energy industry","sexual harassment","sex in society","social issues","social affairs","workplace discrimination","labor issues","personnel","discrimination","human rights and civil liberties"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"c5070d96-1ab1-53eb-bd1e-fba8db7c874f","body":"

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 A divided Iowa Supreme Court has overturned orders requiring an ethanol company to pay $2.5 million to a lab manager who suffered severe workplace sexual harassment from her boss.

The court said Friday that jurors who ordered Homeland Energy Solutions to pay Tina Haskenhoff $1.4 million in damages for back pay and emotional distress were given faulty instructions during the monthlong 2014 trial.

The ruling also overturns a post-trial decision requiring the company, which operates an ethanol plant in Lawler, to pay $846,000 to Haskenhoff's attorneys and $240,000 in front pay. It orders a new trial.

Justice Thomas Waterman says Haskenhoff experienced an \"unseemly and unprofessional\" work environment, which included a supervisor who repeatedly talked about her breasts, clothing and sexual activities. But he says the company should be allowed to argue that it took prompt corrective action once it was reported.

"}, {"id":"74e53f57-fe72-5b2c-b769-96868da6028a","type":"article","starttime":"1498249788","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T13:29:48-07:00","lastupdated":"1498251794","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Kentucky governor seeks dismissal of right-to-work lawsuit","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_74e53f57-fe72-5b2c-b769-96868da6028a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/kentucky-governor-seeks-dismissal-of-right-to-work-lawsuit/article_74e53f57-fe72-5b2c-b769-96868da6028a.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Gov-Matt-Bevin-has-filed-a-motion-asking-a-judge-to-dismiss-a-legal-challenge-to-Kentucky-s-new-law-banning-mandatory-union-fees-in-workplaces/id-a1e10ad4ae754c808952dbe1bf5bfe7c","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) \u2014 Gov. Matt Bevin has filed a motion asking a judge to dismiss a legal challenge to Kentucky's new law banning mandatory union fees in workplaces.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","state governments","government and politics","labor regulation","industry regulation","government business and finance","government regulations","lawsuits","legal proceedings","law and order"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"74e53f57-fe72-5b2c-b769-96868da6028a","body":"

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) \u2014 Gov. Matt Bevin has filed a motion asking a judge to dismiss a legal challenge to Kentucky's new law banning mandatory union fees in workplaces.

The Republican governor and Labor Secretary Derrick Ramsey are defendants in the lawsuit, which claims the right-to-work law violates Kentucky's Constitution.

The Kentucky State AFL-CIO and Teamsters Local 89 filed the suit last month.

The governor's motion to dismiss the suit says the new law is \"sound legislation\" that meets constitutional requirements.

Bevin's administration said Friday the lawsuit seeks to rob Kentuckians of job opportunities. His office points to an aluminum company that recently credited the right-to-work law as a significant factor in its decision to build a $1.3 billion plant in northeastern Kentucky.

State AFL-CIO President Bill Londrigan calls the new law \"misnamed\" and \"punitive.\"

"}, {"id":"858d5dcc-4ab0-5be4-bc4f-d6bd808ecde7","type":"article","starttime":"1498248903","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T13:15:03-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Q&A: A look at the Alaska special legislative session","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_858d5dcc-4ab0-5be4-bc4f-d6bd808ecde7.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/q-a-a-look-at-the-alaska-special-legislative-session/article_858d5dcc-4ab0-5be4-bc4f-d6bd808ecde7.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Alaska-legislators-see-their-passage-of-a-state-budget-to-avoid-a-government-shutdown-as-a-partial-win-/id-cd8b4498c096492ea048de0967f7cb2f","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By BECKY BOHRER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) \u2014 Alaska lawmakers were within days of a government shutdown before they were able to hammer out an agreement on a budget that keeps the government operating for another year.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","government and politics","oil and gas industry","energy industry","legislature","tax refunds","government taxation and revenue","government finance","government business and finance","energy subsidies","government subsidies","government aid for industry","economic policy","economy","government policy","government budgets","state governments","state budgets","government budget deficits","energy and utilities regulation","industry regulation","government regulations","state legislature"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"858d5dcc-4ab0-5be4-bc4f-d6bd808ecde7","body":"

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) \u2014 Alaska lawmakers were within days of a government shutdown before they were able to hammer out an agreement on a budget that keeps the government operating for another year.

The budget approved late Thursday night limits the size of the check Alaskans will receive this year from the state's oil wealth fund.

Lawmakers also again used savings to help keep state government functioning. They did not address a long-term solution to the state's ongoing budget deficit, leaving House Speaker Bryce Edgmon to say the job is \"only half done.\"

It's possible that lawmakers could still address a fiscal plan at some point this year. But, right now, Edgmon acknowledged the 40 members of the state House are weary after being in Juneau for five consecutive months.

Here's a look at how the state got to this point and what remains:

___

HOW DID WE GET HERE?

Typically, lawmakers pass a budget in April during their regular 90-day session. This year, it passed after lawmakers had been meeting for 157 days.

The House and Senate butted heads about how best to address the multibillion-dollar budget deficit that has persisted as oil prices have remained low.

The Republican-led Senate favored cuts to make the budget more manageable and limits on future spending. But the House majority coalition, composed mostly of Democrats, saw a need for new tax revenue. This contributed to a stalemate that marked the 90-day regular session, which was extended to 121 days with no resolution. The bickering continued through the first 30-day special session, prompting Gov. Bill Walker to narrow the focus during the second special session, which began June 16, to simply passing the budget.

Meanwhile, state workers were worried as they watched the days to a potential shutdown tick by. They received warnings that they could be laid off if a budget wasn't finalized by July 1.

This was the second time in three years that a budget fight resulted in thousands of state workers receiving such warnings.

___

WHO ARE THE WINNERS AND LOSERS IN THE BUDGET?

State workers will still have jobs on July 1, and Alaskans this fall will get a little windfall from the state's oil wealth fund.

However, the budget compromise caps the size of the dividend check this year at $1,100 per person. Last year's check was $1,022 after Gov. Bill Walker cut the size of everyone's check roughly in half after lawmakers failed to pass a fiscal plan.

The budget fully funds K-12 education, but higher education was cut. The budget cuts the University of Alaska system, which has had $53 million slashed over the past three years, by another $8 million, a scenario that system President Jim Johnsen concedes could have been worse.

The budget also provides $57 million for oil and gas tax credits, less than the minimum set out by state law for the tax-credit fund.

House and Senate leaders called the spending plan a true compromise. But it remains to be seen how credit rating agencies will view it, as the state continues a draw-down of savings to help cover the deficit.

___

ARE LAWMAKERS LEAVING JUNEAU NOW?

No, they didn't gavel out after passing the operating budget.

Lawmakers still have unfinished business, such as approving the capital budget. Walker gave them more work late Thursday after they passed the budget: He added oil and gas tax credits to the agenda.

The capital budget, once peppered with pet projects when the state was flush with oil money, is a shell of what it once was, a victim of cutbacks.

Now the capital budget partly serves to provide matching funds needed for transportation and other projects. It wasn't immediately clear when lawmakers would take that up.

There appeared to be little appetite in immediately renewing a fight over oil and gas tax credits. Lawmakers have said they intend to end the program of providing cashable credits for small oil and gas producers and explorers.

Senate President Pete Kelly said lawmakers are \"worn out.\" There are logistical challenges, too, with hotel rooms and cars hard to come by during tourist season, he said.

"}, {"id":"8d4bd47b-68f3-53bb-8022-a626d8a83f01","type":"article","starttime":"1498248798","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T13:13:18-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Minuteman Health coop to close, reopen as for-profit insurer","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_8d4bd47b-68f3-53bb-8022-a626d8a83f01.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/minuteman-health-coop-to-close-reopen-as-for-profit-insurer/article_8d4bd47b-68f3-53bb-8022-a626d8a83f01.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-health-insurance-cooperative-that-covers-37-000-individuals-in-Massachusetts-and-New-Hampshire-is-shutting-down-but-hopes-to-reopen-as-a-for-profit-company-in-January/id-c7e4bb17419b4c33a7154c306a465e7c","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By HOLLY RAMER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"CONCORD, N.H. (AP) \u2014 A health insurance cooperative with 37,000 customers in Massachusetts and New Hampshire is shutting down but hopes to reopen as a for-profit company in January.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","insurance industry regulation","financial industry regulation","industry regulation","government business and finance","government and politics","government regulations","patient protection and affordable care act","health care policy","government policy","health care reform","political issues","health insurance providers","insurance industry","financial services","state governments","personal health insurance","personal insurance","personal finance"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"8d4bd47b-68f3-53bb-8022-a626d8a83f01","body":"

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) \u2014 A health insurance cooperative with 37,000 customers in Massachusetts and New Hampshire is shutting down but hopes to reopen as a for-profit company in January.

Minuteman Health and 22 other small nonprofit insurers were created by the Affordable Care Act to stimulate competition and lower prices, but nearly all of them have since folded. In an announcement Friday, Minuteman blamed a provision of the law that requires insurers with healthier customers to make payments to insurers with sicker customers.

\"The risk adjustment program has been highly volatile. It hasn't worked as intended,\" CEO Tom Policelli said in an interview.

In a federal lawsuit filed last year, the company argued that it has been punished for offering lower-cost products because the risk adjustment payments are based in part on how a company's premiums compare to statewide averages. It said its premiums were substantially lower than average not because its customers were healthier but because its business model focused on keeping costs low and because its members were more likely to purchase less-expensive plans.

Policelli said the company has had to spend about a third of the amount it collects in premiums on risk adjustment payments, and for 2018, was seeking to increase premiums by 30 percent. Further, as a cooperative, the company was not allowed to expand beyond the individual and small-group market.

\"We're forced to be in the penalty box, basically,\" he said.

Minuteman started in Massachusetts and later expanded to New Hampshire, where it has about 27,000 customers and has the second-largest share of the individual market among four companies offering such plans under the Affordable Care Act. In Massachusetts, Minuteman is one of the smaller players among 11 companies, said insurance division spokesman Chris Goetcheus.

Minuteman is the second co-op to stop offering plans in New Hampshire. Maine's Community Health Options pulled out for 2017 to focus on Maine, and recently announced it had achieved a surplus after two years of losses.

Nationally, competition in many markets has dwindled to one insurer, or in some cases, none. Insurers are retreating from some markets or charging a lot more to stay in others. And Republicans in Washington are hoping to get their bill scuttling much of Barack Obama's health care overhaul through the Senate next week.

\"Today's announcement by Minuteman Health is more clear evidence that Obamacare has failed and that our nation's health care system demands reform,\" said New Hampshire's Republican Gov. Chris Sununu. \"This environment of instability was created by Obamacare's costly regulations and taxes that are causing premiums to sky rocket. Washington must work together to end the partisan gridlock and move reform forward otherwise more Granite Staters are likely to be negatively impacted.

Policelli said the new company, Minuteman Insurance, is committed to staying in the exchanges in Massachusetts and New Hampshire and to continuing its model of partnering with low-cost, high-quality providers. He declined to respond to Sununu's comments but said there's no question the risk adjustment program has created instability and increased premiums. Beyond that, the company considers itself \"purple\" when it comes to politics, he said.

\"There were some good ideas and some bad ideas in the ACA, and I think there are good ideas and bad ideas in the new Republican version being kicked around,\" he said. \"I don't think anyone has a monopoly on genius.\"

Current Minuteman Health members will see no interruption in coverage and providers will be fully paid through the remainder of their policies. According to the New Hampshire Insurance Department, the new company would need to be authorized to write insurance in Massachusetts and New Hampshire before August 16 in order for it to be eligible to offer insurance on New Hampshire's federally facilitated exchange and the Massachusetts Connector as of January 1, 2018.

Open enrollment is Nov. 1 to Dec. 15.

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 In a story June 20, The Associated Press reported that airplanes take off and stay aloft because of lift, the force from the movement of air underneath the plane's wings that push it upward. The story quoted a scientist who explained that heat makes air expand and become less dense, reducing the amount of force the air can exert on the wings. The story should have made clear that lift is created by movement of air both above and underneath the plane's wing. The movement of air above the wing creates an area of low pressure. The movement of air below creates an area of high pressure. That difference pulls the plane up.

"}, {"id":"c475f138-168d-5cb8-a0d5-95590b8731a3","type":"article","starttime":"1498248779","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T13:12:59-07:00","lastupdated":"1498251124","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Markets Right Now: US stock indexes end slightly higher","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_c475f138-168d-5cb8-a0d5-95590b8731a3.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/markets-right-now-us-stock-indexes-end-slightly-higher/article_c475f138-168d-5cb8-a0d5-95590b8731a3.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Stocks-ticked-higher-as-energy-companies-clawed-back-some-of-their-sharp-losses-from-earlier-in-the-week-/id-d60fe6aa7c8045219e600f37949ee35a","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local):","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","stock indices and averages","stock markets","financial markets","retail industry","retail and wholesale","consumer services","consumer products and services","stock prices","leading economic indicators","economy"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":6,"commentID":"c475f138-168d-5cb8-a0d5-95590b8731a3","body":"

The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local):

4:00 p.m.

Stocks ticked higher as energy companies clawed back some of their sharp losses from earlier in the week.

After getting off to a slow start, the Standard & Poor's 500 index finished with a modest gain Friday, leaving it slightly higher for the week.

Energy companies benefited from a second day of gains in oil prices. EQT jumped 8 percent, the biggest gain in the S&P 500.

Health care and technology stocks had the biggest gains of the week. Energy companies trimmed their weekly loss to 2.9 percent.

Bed Bath & Beyond plunged 12 percent after reporting weak earnings.

The S&P 500 added 3 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,438.

The Dow Jones industrial average slipped 2 points to 21,394. The Nasdaq gained 28 points, or 0.5 percent, to 6,265.

___

11:45 a.m.

U.S. stock indexes ticked higher as energy companies clawed back some of their sharp losses from earlier in the week.

After flipping from modest losses to gains Friday, the Standard & Poor's 500 index is on track to end the week roughly where it started.

EQT, a producer of natural gas and crude, rose 4.8 percent.

Bed Bath & Beyond plunged 11.5 percent after the household goods seller reported earnings that fell far short of what analysts were looking for.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index tacked on 4 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,438.

The Dow Jones industrial average edged up 6 points, less than 0.1 percent, to 21,403. The Nasdaq composite added 12 points, or 0.2 percent, to 6,249.

___

9:35 a.m.

Stocks are opening lower on Wall Street, led by declines in retailers and health care companies.

Bed Bath & Beyond plunged 11.5 percent in the first few minutes of trading after the household goods seller reported earnings that fell far short of what analysts were looking for.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals dropped 4.1 percent.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index slipped 1 point, less than 0.1 percent, to 2,433.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 42 points, or 0.2 percent, to 21,353. The Nasdaq composite lost 9 points, or 0.2 percent, to 6,227.

"}, {"id":"9623b389-575d-52a4-a0f3-2b791b9bfc4d","type":"article","starttime":"1498248699","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T13:11:39-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Grain mixed, livestock higher","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_9623b389-575d-52a4-a0f3-2b791b9bfc4d.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/grain-mixed-livestock-higher/article_9623b389-575d-52a4-a0f3-2b791b9bfc4d.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/grain-mixed-livestock-higher/article_966a939d-0386-5459-a7f5-a2a6d273cf8d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 Grain futures were mostly lower Friday on the Chicago Board of Trade.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","live cattle markets","livestock markets","livestock and meat markets","soft commodity markets","commodity markets","financial markets","business","pork markets","meat markets","pig and hog markets","coarse grain markets","grain markets","grain and edible oil markets","soybean markets","feeder cattle markets","beef markets","wheat markets","corn markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"9623b389-575d-52a4-a0f3-2b791b9bfc4d","body":"

CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 Grain futures were mostly lower Friday on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Wheat for July lost 1.50 cents at 4.5975 a bushel; July corn fell 5 cents at 3.5775 bushel; July oats was off 2.75 cents at $2.5450 a bushel; while July soybeans rose .50 cent at $9.0450 a bushel.

Beef and pork were higher on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. June live cattle was up .58 cent at $1.1920 a pound; Aug. feeder cattle rose 1.50 cents at $1.4495 a pound; while July lean hogs gained .28 cent at $.8530 a pound.

"}, {"id":"a890e7ad-dfad-5b49-ad99-a16c2bc61033","type":"article","starttime":"1498248410","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T13:06:50-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"BC-Cash Prices, 1st Ld-Writethru,0342","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_a890e7ad-dfad-5b49-ad99-a16c2bc61033.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_a890e7ad-dfad-5b49-ad99-a16c2bc61033.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_47f584f8-09f9-5906-a01a-da71a3587a39.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","copper markets","base metal markets","metal markets","commodity markets","financial markets","business","pig and hog markets","livestock markets","livestock and meat markets","soft commodity markets","minor metal markets","lead markets","coarse grain markets","grain markets","grain and edible oil markets","wheat markets","pork markets","meat markets","precious metal markets","aluminum markets","platinum markets","cotton markets","soybean markets","feeder cattle markets","poultry markets","coffee markets","cocoa butter markets","vegetable oil markets","feed meal markets","corn markets","cocoa markets","textile markets","soybean oil markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"a890e7ad-dfad-5b49-ad99-a16c2bc61033","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday

Fri. Thu.

F

Foods

Broilers national comp wtd av 1.0779 1.0779

Eggs large white NY Doz. .75 .75

Flour hard winter KC cwt 16.65 16.50

Cheddar Cheese Chi. 40 block per lb. 2.2100 2.2100

Coffee parana ex-dock NY per lb. 1.1941 1.2124

Coffee medlin ex-dock NY per lb. 1.4257 1.4485

Cocoa beans Ivory Coast $ metric ton 2139 2278

Cocoa butter African styl $ met ton 4838 5272

Hogs Iowa/Minn barrows & gilts wtd av 86.38 86.61

Feeder cattle 500-550 lb Okl av cwt 172.50 172.50

Pork loins 13-19 lb FOB Omaha av cwt 119.62 117.09

Grains

Corn No. 2 yellow Chi processor bid 3.57\u00be 3.61\u00be

Soybeans No. 1 yellow 8.79\u00bd 8.79

Soybean Meal Cen Ill 48pct protein-ton 295.80 298.90

Wheat No. 2 Chi soft 4.54\u00be 4.56\u00bc

Wheat N. 1 dk 14pc-pro Mpls. 7.81\u00bc 7.68\u00be

Oats No. 2 heavy or Better 2.67\u00bd 2.59\u00be

Fats & Oils

Corn oil crude wet/dry mill Chi. lb. .381/8 .381/8

Soybean oil crude Decatur lb. .30\u00bd .30\u00be

Metals

Aluminum per lb LME .8490 .8461

Antimony in warehouse per ton 8550 8700

Copper Cathode full plate 2.6017 2.5627

Gold Handy & Harman 1255.70 1250.80

Silver Handy & Harman 16.690 16.570

Lead per metric ton LME 2181.00 2121.00

Molybdenum per metric ton LME 16,000 16,000

Platinum per troy oz. Handy & Harman 927.00 933.00

Platinum Merc spot per troy oz. 929.40 925.60

Zinc (HG) delivered per lb. 1.2232 1.1700

Textiles, Fibers and Miscellaneous

Cotton 1-1-16 in. strict low middling 66.59 65.63

Raw Products

Coal Central Appalachia $ per short ton 52.35 52.35

Natural Gas Henry Hub, $ per mmbtu 2.85 2.88

b-bid a-asked

n-Nominal

r-revised

n.q.-not quoted

n.a.-not available

"}, {"id":"e73ee771-fb2d-5db5-ac66-c56e02304139","type":"article","starttime":"1498248409","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T13:06:49-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"BC-Cash Prices, 1st Ld-Writethru,0342","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_e73ee771-fb2d-5db5-ac66-c56e02304139.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_e73ee771-fb2d-5db5-ac66-c56e02304139.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_5d5ddb04-7b33-5b90-8c65-9fde2854b918.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","cocoa butter markets","vegetable oil markets","grain and edible oil markets","soft commodity markets","commodity markets","financial markets","business","base metal markets","metal markets","feed meal markets","grain markets","corn markets","coarse grain markets","coffee markets","poultry markets","meat markets","livestock and meat markets","minor metal markets","lead markets","wheat markets","soybean oil markets","textile markets","copper markets","soybean markets","pig and hog markets","livestock markets","precious metal markets","aluminum markets","pork markets","cocoa markets","platinum markets","feeder cattle markets","cotton markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"e73ee771-fb2d-5db5-ac66-c56e02304139","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday

\u2003 \u2002\u2003Fri.\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003Thu.

F

Foods

\u2003Broilers national comp wtd av \u20021.0779\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.0779

\u2003Eggs large white NY Doz. \u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.75\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.75

\u2003Flour hard winter KC cwt \u2002\u200216.65\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u200216.50

\u2003Cheddar Cheese Chi. 40 block per lb. \u20022.2100\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20022.2100

\u2003Coffee parana ex-dock NY per lb. \u20021.1941\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.2124

\u2003Coffee medlin ex-dock NY per lb. \u20021.4257\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.4485

\u2003Cocoa beans Ivory Coast $ metric ton \u2002\u2002\u20022139\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20022278

\u2003Cocoa butter African styl $ met ton \u2002\u2002\u20024838\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20025272

\u2003Hogs Iowa/Minn barrows & gilts wtd av \u2002\u200286.38\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u200286.61

\u2003Feeder cattle 500-550 lb Okl av cwt \u2002172.50\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002172.50

\u2003Pork loins 13-19 lb FOB Omaha av cwt \u2002119.62\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002117.09

Grains

\u2003Corn No. 2 yellow Chi processor bid \u20023.57\u00be\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20023.61\u00be

\u2003Soybeans No. 1 yellow \u20028.79\u00bd\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20028.79\u2003

\u2003Soybean Meal Cen Ill 48pct protein-ton 295.80\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002298.90

\u2003Wheat No. 2 Chi soft \u20024.54\u00be\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20024.56\u00bc

\u2003Wheat N. 1 dk 14pc-pro Mpls. \u20027.81\u00bc\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20027.68\u00be

\u2003Oats No. 2 heavy or Better \u20022.67\u00bd\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20022.59\u00be

Fats & Oils

\u2003Corn oil crude wet/dry mill Chi. lb. \u2002.381/8\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.381/8

\u2003Soybean oil crude Decatur lb. \u2002.30\u00bd\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.30\u00be

Metals

\u2003Aluminum per lb LME \u2002.8490\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002.8461

\u2003Antimony in warehouse per ton \u2002\u20028550\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20028700

\u2003Copper Cathode full plate 2.6017\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20022.5627

\u2003Gold Handy & Harman 1255.70\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20031250.80

\u2003Silver Handy & Harman \u200216.690\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u200216.570

\u2003Lead per metric ton LME 2181.00\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20032121.00

\u2003Molybdenum per metric ton LME \u200216,000\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u200216,000

\u2003Platinum per troy oz. Handy & Harman \u2002927.00\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002933.00

\u2003Platinum Merc spot per troy oz. \u2002929.40\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002925.60

\u2003Zinc (HG) delivered per lb. \u20021.2232\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.1700

Textiles, Fibers and Miscellaneous

\u2003Cotton 1-1-16 in. strict low middling \u2002\u200266.59\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u200265.63

Raw Products

\u2003Coal Central Appalachia $ per short ton \u2002\u200252.35\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u200252.35

\u2003Natural Gas Henry Hub, $ per mmbtu \u2002\u20022.85\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20022.88\u2003

b-bid a-asked

n-Nominal

r-revised

n.q.-not quoted

n.a.-not available

"}, {"id":"97f4c9c2-a8a1-5786-b8ce-5b084143d161","type":"article","starttime":"1498247011","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T12:43:31-07:00","lastupdated":"1498250120","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Honda denies covering up dangers of Takata air bags","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_97f4c9c2-a8a1-5786-b8ce-5b084143d161.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/honda-denies-covering-up-dangers-of-takata-air-bags/article_97f4c9c2-a8a1-5786-b8ce-5b084143d161.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Honda-is-going-public-in-an-effort-to-debunk-claims-by-lawyers-that-it-knew-about-the-hazards-of-exploding-Takata-air-bag-inflators-nearly-two-decades-ago-but-covered-them-up/id-4ab64787fb894e8e8a76125167f7db94","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By TOM KRISHER\nAP Auto Writer","prologue":"DETROIT (AP) \u2014 Honda is going public in an effort to debunk claims by lawyers that it knew about the hazards of exploding Takata air bag inflators nearly two decades ago but covered them up.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","corporate bankruptcy","financial performance","corporate news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"d38f4aa6-a767-55a8-9d45-d6ae497d1942","description":"File-This Feb. 10, 2010, file photo shows Honda Motor Co.'s vehicle on display in front of the automaker's headquarters in Tokyo, Japan. Honda is going public in an effort to debunk claims by lawyers that it knew about the hazards of exploding Takata air bag inflators nearly two decades ago but covered them up. The automaker issued a statement Friday, June 23, 2017, that outlines its defense against claims that Honda should compensate car owners because the use of Takata air bags caused their vehicles to lose value. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"414","height":"512","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/38/d38f4aa6-a767-55a8-9d45-d6ae497d1942/594d7582cf836.image.jpg?resize=414%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"124","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/38/d38f4aa6-a767-55a8-9d45-d6ae497d1942/594d7582cf836.image.jpg?resize=100%2C124"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"371","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/38/d38f4aa6-a767-55a8-9d45-d6ae497d1942/594d7582cf836.image.jpg?resize=300%2C371"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1266","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/38/d38f4aa6-a767-55a8-9d45-d6ae497d1942/594d7582cf836.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"97f4c9c2-a8a1-5786-b8ce-5b084143d161","body":"

DETROIT (AP) \u2014 Honda is going public in an effort to debunk claims by lawyers that it knew about the hazards of exploding Takata air bag inflators nearly two decades ago but covered them up.

The automaker issued a statement Friday that outlines its defense against claims that Honda should compensate car owners because the use of Takata air bags caused their vehicles to lose value.

The public escalation of Honda's fight comes just three days before Takata Corp. is expected to file for bankruptcy protection in Japan and the United States. The company's inflators can explode with too much force, blowing apart a metal canister and hurling shrapnel into drivers and passengers.

The faulty inflators have killed at least 16 people worldwide and injured another 180. Many are suing Takata as well as Honda and other automakers over deaths and injuries, and for loss of value of their cars. The problem touched off the largest automotive recall in U.S. history involving 42 million vehicles and 69 million inflators.

Unlike other air bag makers, Takata uses the explosive chemical ammonium nitrate to inflate air bags, but it can deteriorate over time and burn too fast.

Honda, which for years was Takata's biggest customer, released an email from a company engineer that seems to show he knew about Takata problems and was afraid to speak up. But Honda says the email is being taken out of context by plaintiffs' lawyers. It also released an affidavit from the engineer saying he had incorrectly concluded that a 1999 Takata inflator explosion was caused by the same problem that plagues the inflators today.

U.S. District Judge Federico Moreno in Miami is overseeing pretrial evidence-gathering in the cases.

Honda said it has asked Moreno to admit Takata's criminal plea bargain as evidence, a strategy that other automakers will also pursue. Plea documents say Takata concealed the inflator problems and agreed to pay penalties and restitution. Honda also wants to admit deposition testimony of Takata employees that \"establishes that Honda was a victim of Takata's fraud, not a participant.\"

Attorneys say Honda and at least four other automakers knew the inflators were dangerous, yet continued to use them because they were inexpensive. Automakers have denied the allegations.

Lawyers suing Honda want the Japanese engineer to testify. In the 2013 email, the unidentified engineer wrote to a colleague that he is a \"witness in the dark\" who knows the truth about Takata inflators. The engineer wrote that if he spoke to government safety regulators \"it will cause a complete reversal in the auto industry\" on Takata.

In the affidavit, the engineer says a prototype Takata inflator blew apart when he tested it in October 1999. Takata blamed it on a welding problem, but he didn't believe Takata did a thorough investigation. When he wrote the email, the engineer believed that the 1999 rupture was caused by deteriorating ammonium nitrate. But the prototype inflator was too new to have deteriorated, he wrote. \"I now understand that I was incorrect and the root cause of the (inflator explosions) is not related to the root cause of the October 1999 prototype rupture,\" the engineer wrote.

Peter Prieto, lead attorney for the Takata plaintiffs, said in a statement that the engineer's email is one of many that lawyers have uncovered showing that Honda was aware of the safety risks of Takata inflators. \"Even after dozens of air bag ruptures killed or seriously injured Honda customers, Honda continued to equip its vehicles with dangerous Takata air bags and waited years to take action to protect consumers,\" the statement said.

"}, {"id":"a2101df8-a4f3-5384-b3a6-cc512da456cb","type":"article","starttime":"1498246961","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T12:42:41-07:00","lastupdated":"1498250137","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Farm disaster: Losses from April, May rains in 7 parishes","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_a2101df8-a4f3-5384-b3a6-cc512da456cb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/farm-disaster-losses-from-april-may-rains-in-parishes/article_a2101df8-a4f3-5384-b3a6-cc512da456cb.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Farmers-and-ranchers-in-seven-Louisiana-parishes-are-eligible-for-federal-disaster-loans-if-they-lost-money-because-of-excessive-rain-throughout-much-of-April-and-May/id-79a5b800b89a43dab11fed42d59250ca","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) \u2014 Farmers and ranchers in seven Louisiana parishes are eligible for federal disaster loans if they lost money because of excessive rain throughout most of April and May.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"a2101df8-a4f3-5384-b3a6-cc512da456cb","body":"

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) \u2014 Farmers and ranchers in seven Louisiana parishes are eligible for federal disaster loans if they lost money because of excessive rain throughout most of April and May.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture designated Evangeline Parish as a primary natural disaster area because of rains from April 4 through May 23.

The six adjacent parishes also qualify for Farm Service Agency disaster loans. Those are Acadia, Allen, Avoyelles, Jefferson Davis, Rapides and St. Landry parishes.

The Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry said in a news release Friday that the seven parishes were designated natural disaster areas June 21. Farmers have eight months from that date to apply for the loans.

"}, {"id":"a7b723e2-86c9-51da-9040-febc2675ebaa","type":"article","starttime":"1498245182","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T12:13:02-07:00","lastupdated":"1498247326","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Snyder urges Michigan House to OK incentives for Foxconn","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_a7b723e2-86c9-51da-9040-febc2675ebaa.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/snyder-urges-michigan-house-to-ok-incentives-for-foxconn/article_a7b723e2-86c9-51da-9040-febc2675ebaa.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Gov-Rick-Snyder-is-urging-the-Republican-led-state-House-to-pass-economic-development-incentives-when-it-meets-in-July-saying-there-s-still-time-to-lure-Taiwanese-electronics-giant-Fox/id-c7b8536fa1c7468f8ae36652bbbae79e","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DAVID EGGERT\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 Gov. Rick Snyder urged the Republican-led Michigan House on Friday to pass economic development tax incentives when it meets in July, saying there is still time to lure a Taiwanese electronics giant to the state despite the cancellation of a vote on the legislation.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government and politics","state governments","political parties","political organizations","state taxes","government taxation and revenue","government finance","government business and finance","state legislature","legislature","economy"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"2d6da360-7899-58cf-8184-de462cb91d01","description":"FILE - In this March 13, 2017, file photo, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder speaks during a news conference in Detroit. The governor on Friday, June 23 urged the Republican-led Michigan House to pass economic development tax incentives when it meets in July, saying there is still time to lure a Taiwanese electronics giant to the state despite the cancellation of a vote on the legislation. Foxconn, which plans to locate a display panel factory in the U.S. that could cost up to $7 billion, will announce investment plans by early August for at least three states, Chairman Terry Gou said Thursday. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)","byline":"Carlos Osorio","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"340","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d6/2d6da360-7899-58cf-8184-de462cb91d01/594d5066c3edb.image.jpg?resize=512%2C340"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d6/2d6da360-7899-58cf-8184-de462cb91d01/594d5066c3edb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"199","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d6/2d6da360-7899-58cf-8184-de462cb91d01/594d5066c3edb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C199"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"680","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d6/2d6da360-7899-58cf-8184-de462cb91d01/594d5066c3edb.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"a7b723e2-86c9-51da-9040-febc2675ebaa","body":"

LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 Gov. Rick Snyder urged the Republican-led Michigan House on Friday to pass economic development tax incentives when it meets in July, saying there is still time to lure a Taiwanese electronics giant to the state despite the cancellation of a vote on the legislation.

Foxconn, which plans to locate a display panel factory in the U.S. that could cost up to $7 billion, will announce investment plans by early August for at least three states, Chairman Terry Gou said Thursday. He mentioned Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and Texas as manufacturing states with which Foxconn hopes to work.

House Speaker Tom Leonard called off a vote on the Senate-approved bills Tuesday night and adjourned until July 12, citing concerns that the Republican governor had cut a deal with House Democrats that would \"undermine\" other GOP priorities. He did not elaborate.

Snyder, who is on a weeklong trade trip in Europe, told The Associated Press that the proposed tax incentives for large-scale business expansions are \"relatively straightforward\" and are about \"more and better jobs for Michigan.\" He traveled to Japan in early June to entice Foxconn, which assembles smartphones and other devices for Apple, Sony, Blackberry and other brands \u2014 mostly in China.

Asked about Foxconn's decision-making process, Snyder said in a phone interview from Milan, Italy: \"We're later in that timeframe but there still is time. ... If we get something done in July, we can still hit that (August) date.\"

After Snyder took office, Michigan in 2012 stopped issuing new tax credits for companies to add or retain jobs as part of an overhaul that slashed business taxes overall. The state instead awards a smaller pot of cash grants and loans for economic development.

Snyder, senators and economic development officials now say tax incentives should be offered again to help Michigan compete with other states for major projects, but some GOP lawmakers \u2014 including the House speaker \u2014 are opposed philosophically.

Snyder said he wants to hear Leonard's specific concerns about the negotiations \"first person.\" He did not say if the administration had agreed to scuttle future GOP labor-relations bills in exchange for support from Democrats already upset about a plan to coax newly hired teachers into a 401(k)-only retirement benefit.

The tax incentives, valued at up to $200 million a year for companies adding at least 250 jobs, cleared a House committee Tuesday after six of eight Republicans and three of four Democrats voted yes.

\"As a practical matter, you have a situation where a bill's going through the Legislature,\" Snyder said. \"Doesn't it make sense that I should be talking to Republicans and Democrats and trying to work together on getting something done? I thought that's how the legislative process should work. I'm not focused on partisanship. I'm focused on getting good jobs for Michiganders.\"

But Leonard spokesman Gideon D'Assandro said there is \"a lot of confusion\" over what agreement may have been cut with Democrats.

\"If a deal takes good bills and Republican priorities off the table, then it could be bad policy. ... That is why House Republicans need to get those answers from the governor,\" he said.

A GOP legislative official and a Snyder administration official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss private meetings, said the agreement included Snyder publicly saying that he saw no need for more labor-relations bills. Exceptions would be made for changes to municipal retiree health care benefits and state civil service rules in his final 18 months in office.

Snyder signed right-to-work laws in 2012. He has opposed, however, GOP bills to repeal a state law that ensures union-level pay on state-financed construction projects after Democrats helped to propose a 2015 ballot initiative to raise taxes for road repairs.

___

Follow David Eggert on Twitter at https://twitter.com/DavidEggert00 . His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/David%20Eggert

"}, {"id":"920918b1-d11d-5298-92d8-5171e27b5bad","type":"article","starttime":"1498244974","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T12:09:34-07:00","lastupdated":"1498247327","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"travel":"travel"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Revenues rise slightly in Plainridge Park's second full year","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_920918b1-d11d-5298-92d8-5171e27b5bad.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/revenues-rise-slightly-in-plainridge-park-s-second-full-year/article_920918b1-d11d-5298-92d8-5171e27b5bad.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Massachusetts-first-and-so-far-only-casino-has-enjoyed-a-modest-bump-in-revenues-in-its-second-full-year-in-operation/id-09888cba8b0c497f9fdb3cb9e0fb39cb","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By PHILIP MARCELO\nAssociated Press","prologue":"BOSTON (AP) \u2014 Massachusetts' first \u2014 and so far only \u2014 casino has enjoyed a modest revenue bump in its second full year in operation.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","travel","casino operators","hospitality and leisure industry","consumer services","consumer products and services","gambling industry","rock music","music","entertainment","arts and entertainment","horse racing","sports"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"979c12c1-6a03-592c-adbb-18a6ff924e6a","description":"FILE - In this June 23, 2015, file photograph, an automated dealer asks for players to take a seat at a black jack video slot machine on the floor of the Plainridge Park Casino in Plainville, Mass. The state's only casino generated about $157 million in gross gambling revenues since June 2016, slightly higher than the $154 million it registered in its first full year but still far short of the $300 million initially projected for the slots parlor and harness racing track when it opened. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)","byline":"Charles Krupa","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"301","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/79/979c12c1-6a03-592c-adbb-18a6ff924e6a/594c9d30abc6e.image.jpg?resize=512%2C301"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"59","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/79/979c12c1-6a03-592c-adbb-18a6ff924e6a/594c9d30abc6e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C59"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"176","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/79/979c12c1-6a03-592c-adbb-18a6ff924e6a/594c9d30abc6e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C176"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"602","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/79/979c12c1-6a03-592c-adbb-18a6ff924e6a/594c9d30abc6e.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"920918b1-d11d-5298-92d8-5171e27b5bad","body":"

BOSTON (AP) \u2014 Massachusetts' first \u2014 and so far only \u2014 casino has enjoyed a modest revenue bump in its second full year in operation.

Plainridge Park has generated roughly $157 million in gross gambling revenues since last June, or slightly higher than the $154 million it registered in its first full year, according to an Associated Press review of state data.

The modest gains come as the Plainville casino, owned by Pennsylvania-based Penn National Gaming, has taken steps in recent months to attract younger patrons by hosting rock concerts, boxing matches and other live events.

\"Overall, it's done better than I expected,\" says David Gulley, an economics professor at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts. \"It's always hard for a new gaming facility to live up to expectations and to maintain the initial excitement that surrounds the grand opening.\"

But the annual haul is still a far cry from the $300 million initially projected for the slots parlor and harness racing track when it opened June 24, 2015.

The casino also has been tilting payouts in customers' favor as it competes with Twin River, a larger, full-scale casino about 20 miles (32 kilometers) away in Lincoln, Rhode Island.

Plainridge Park is retaining about 8 percent of all slot machine wagers, down from just over 10 percent when it first opened, according to state data. Its \"hold,\" as the industry calls it, has been as low as 7 percent of wagers (or \"coin-in\") at various times this year.

Casinos outside of Las Vegas generally retain anywhere from 7 to 11 percent of wagers, depending on the level of local competition, according to Clyde Barrow, a political science professor at the University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley in Edinburg, Texas, who has spent years studying casinos in the Northeast.

\"Plainridge is having to return more money to its customers to keep them coming back,\" he said.

Penn National Gaming officials, who declined to comment on the AP's revenue-related questions, have previously touted Plainridge Park as one of the more lucrative of their casinos.

Indeed, the casino's 1,250 slot machines have consistently averaged above the industry standard of $300 a day in revenue, says Paul DeBole, a political science professor at Lasell College in Newton, Massachusetts, who has been analyzing the casino's monthly revenues.

The result has been a \"significant economic plus\" for the state, which collects 49 percent of Plainridge's gambling revenues, says Stephen Crosby, chairman of the state Gaming Commission.

Plainridge has generated $152 million in state funds over two years, created 500 jobs (of which 90 percent are currently held by state residents) and spent nearly $2 million annually at local businesses, he said.

But Plainridge Park's run as the lone casino in Massachusetts will soon come to an end. MGM is scheduled to open a Las Vegas-style destination resort casino in Springfield in late 2018 and Wynn Resorts is slated to open its own in the Boston-area in summer 2019.

DeBole estimates the facility could see gross revenues drop to $92 million to $110 million annually when the two facilities \u2014 as well as potentially two Native American tribe-operated casinos \u2014 open.

\"No matter how you look at it, Plainridge Park is a success,\" he said. \"They seem to be making all of the right moves to attract and keep a loyal customer base. The question is will these numbers hold.\"

___

Follow Philip Marcelo at twitter.com/philmarcelo.

"}, {"id":"3f8d2305-ad05-5b5c-8bb0-c1e1e992fe54","type":"article","starttime":"1498244955","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T12:09:15-07:00","lastupdated":"1498247327","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Weekly Summary Corporate dividends, name changes, new listings","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_3f8d2305-ad05-5b5c-8bb0-c1e1e992fe54.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/weekly-summary-corporate-dividends-name-changes-new-listings/article_3f8d2305-ad05-5b5c-8bb0-c1e1e992fe54.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/weekly-summary-corporate-dividends-name-changes-new-listings/article_d86939ec-6318-5a4c-91b3-21c42a11c500.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Changes announced in corporate dividends Jun. 19-Jun. 23.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","banking and credit","financial services","business","dividends","corporate stock","corporate news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"3f8d2305-ad05-5b5c-8bb0-c1e1e992fe54","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Changes announced in corporate dividends Jun. 19-Jun. 23.

Increased Dividends

Ennis Inc .20 from .175

HopFed Bancorp .05 from .04

Investar Holding Corp .022 from .02

Kroger Co .125 from .12

Medtronic PLC .46 from .43

Oracle Corp .19 from .15

Trinseo SA .36 from .30

Initial Dividends

Guaranty Bancshares .13

Special Dividends

Gyrodyne LLC 1.00

g- Canadian funds

Other corporate news and listings:

Stock Splits This Week

Arena Pharmaceuticals 1 for 10 reverse split

Cel-Sci Corp 1 for 25 reverse split

Cobalt Intl Energy 1 for 15 reverse split

DryShips 1 for 5 reverse split

Spark Energy Cl A 2 for 1 split

TOP Ships Inc 1 for 15 split

Waste Connections Inc 3 for 2 split

Wipro Ltd 2 for 1 split

New Stock Listings

NYSE

Altice USA Inc

Luxotica Group

Safety Income and Growth Inc

NASDAQ Global and Global Select Markets

Span America Medical System Inc

Oxford Lane Capital 6.75pc pfd 2024

Stocks Removed from Trading

NYSE

Zions Bancorp pfd F

NASDAQ Global and Global Select Markets

MOCON Inc

PrivaeBancorp Inc Capital Trust IV pfd

Corporate Name Changes

Yahoo Inc to Altaba Inc

"}, {"id":"eb7e85c1-fc8b-5f1c-857d-71b5f9915bf0","type":"article","starttime":"1498243624","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T11:47:04-07:00","lastupdated":"1498245643","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Kansas jury awards $218M to farmers in Syngenta GMO suit","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_eb7e85c1-fc8b-5f1c-857d-71b5f9915bf0.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/kansas-jury-awards-m-to-farmers-in-syngenta-gmo-suit/article_eb7e85c1-fc8b-5f1c-857d-71b5f9915bf0.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-federal-jury-in-Kansas-has-awarded-nearly-218-million-to-farmers-who-sued-Swiss-agribusiness-giant-Syngenta-over-the-company-s-introduction-of-a-genetically-engineered-corn-seed/id-7ed3923809664b8e83709760979ffcab","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JIM SUHR\nAP Business Writer","prologue":"KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) \u2014 A Kansas federal jury awarded nearly $218 million on Friday to farmers who sued Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its introduction of a genetically engineered corn seed variety.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","court decisions","legal proceedings","law and order","general news","grain farming","crop farming","agriculture","lawsuits","genetically modified organisms","genetic engineering","genetics","biology","science","biotechnology","technology","corn farming","juries"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"91f5c9d7-b32a-5e7d-ac8d-f9dac3e9c045","description":"FILE- This April 18, 2017, file photo shows the suburban Minneapolis headquarters of Syngenta in Minnetonka, Minn. A Kansas federal jury awarded nearly $218 million Friday, June 23 to farmers who sued Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its introduction of a genetically engineered corn seed variety. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)","byline":"Jim Mone","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"295","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/1f/91f5c9d7-b32a-5e7d-ac8d-f9dac3e9c045/594d5f5836ce8.image.jpg?resize=512%2C295"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"58","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/1f/91f5c9d7-b32a-5e7d-ac8d-f9dac3e9c045/594d5f5836ce8.image.jpg?resize=100%2C58"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"173","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/1f/91f5c9d7-b32a-5e7d-ac8d-f9dac3e9c045/594d5f5836ce8.image.jpg?resize=300%2C173"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"590","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/1f/91f5c9d7-b32a-5e7d-ac8d-f9dac3e9c045/594d5f5836ce8.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":9,"commentID":"eb7e85c1-fc8b-5f1c-857d-71b5f9915bf0","body":"

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) \u2014 A Kansas federal jury awarded nearly $218 million on Friday to farmers who sued Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its introduction of a genetically engineered corn seed variety.

Syngenta vowed to appeal the verdict favoring four Kansas farmers representing roughly 7,300 growers from that state in what served as the first test case of tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits assailing Syngenta's decision to introduce its Viptera seed strain to the U.S. market before China approved it for imports.

The Kansas trial and a Minnesota one next month involving about 60,000 cases are to serve as bellwether trials, providing guidance for how the complex web of litigation in state and federal courts could be resolved. Attorneys can see how juries react and determine whether to settle other cases or take them to trial.

\"This is only the beginning,\" the Kansas farmers' attorneys said in a statement, calling Friday's verdict \"great news\" for Kansas and U.S. corn growers. \"We look forward to pursuing justice for thousands more corn farmers in the months ahead.\"

Syngenta began selling Viptera in the U.S. for the 2011 growing season, but China didn't approve it until December 2014. The lawsuits allege Syngenta's move to market the seed variety before China's clearing of it for imports wrecked an increasingly important export market for U.S. corn, causing years of depressed corn prices. Court filings show Syngenta aggressively marketed the seeds even when it knew Chinese approval was going to be a problem.

Most of the farmers suing didn't grow Viptera, but China also rejected millions of metric tons of their grain because elevators and shippers typically mix grain from large numbers of suppliers, making it difficult to source corn that was free of the trait. So they say all farmers were hurt by the resulting price drop.

Experts speaking for the farmers who sued said they estimate the economic damage at about $5 billion, though Syngenta has denied its actions caused any losses for farmers.

Friday's jury award, if upheld on appeal, would be dispersed to the more than 7,000 Kansas farmers in the class, minus unspecified attorneys' fees. But it remains unclear how much each victim ultimately will get, given that the payouts likely will be proportionate to such variables as the number of bushels each sold during a relative time period, said Don Downing, an attorney for the plaintiffs.

Syngenta said it was \"disappointed\" with Friday's outcome \"because it will only serve to deny American farmers access to future technologies even when they are fully approved in the U.S.

\"The case is without merit and we will move forward with an appeal and continue to defend the rights of American farmers to access safe and effective U.S.-approved technologies,\" the company said in a statement.

Calling Viptera \"in full compliance with U.S. regulatory and legal requirements,\" Syngenta added that \"American farmers shouldn't have to rely on a foreign government to decide what products they can use on their farms.\"

Syngenta said it invested more than $100 million and 15 years in developing Viptera, which has a trait called MIR162 that protects against pests such as earworms, cutworms, armyworms and corn borers.

Court papers show that Syngenta initially assured stakeholders that China would approve MIR162 in time for the 2011 crop, but the date kept slipping. Some exporters sent shipments containing the trait to China anyway. After two years of accepting them, China began rejecting them in late 2013.

The Kansas trial came as ChemChina \u2014 a state-owned conglomerate also known as China National Chemical Corp. \u2014 is closing in on its $43 billion acquisition of Syngenta. Chinese companies are engaged in a multibillion-dollar global buying spree to acquire technology and brands, a move to improve their competitive edge as explosive growth in their home economy slows.

"}, {"id":"b108f02e-4eeb-5264-b56e-b24525be86a7","type":"article","starttime":"1498241971","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T11:19:31-07:00","lastupdated":"1498244872","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Court says Iowa lottery rigging investigation took too long","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_b108f02e-4eeb-5264-b56e-b24525be86a7.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/court-says-iowa-lottery-rigging-investigation-took-too-long/article_b108f02e-4eeb-5264-b56e-b24525be86a7.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-Iowa-Supreme-Court-has-overturned-the-conviction-of-a-lottery-security-expert-charged-with-attempting-to-claim-a-16-5-million-Iowa-jackpot-that-he-rigged/id-fde8118a94f34bdb989ba81fbe4d3cf8","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By RYAN J. FOLEY\nAssociated Press","prologue":"IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 The Iowa Supreme Court on Friday overturned the conviction of a lottery employee implicated in a nationwide fixing scandal, saying his trial over a rigged $16.5 million jackpot was tainted by unjustified delays in the investigation.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","statutes","legislation","legislature","government and politics","crime","lotteries","criminal investigations","law and order","state courts","state governments","courts","judiciary","court decisions","legal proceedings"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"80814a3f-5280-56b1-8d7e-abd45657cc6e","description":"FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2015, file photo, former Multi-State Lottery Association security director Eddie Tipton leaves the Polk County Courthouse in Des Moines, Iowa, after his sentencing in a jackpot-fixing scandal. The Iowa Supreme Court overturned the conviction of Tipton implicated in a nationwide fixing scandal Friday, June 23, 2017, saying his trial in a rigged $16.5 million Iowa jackpot was tainted by a dawdling investigation. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall File)","byline":"Charlie Neibergall","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"377","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/08/80814a3f-5280-56b1-8d7e-abd45657cc6e/594764e395c14.image.jpg?resize=512%2C377"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"74","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/08/80814a3f-5280-56b1-8d7e-abd45657cc6e/594764e395c14.image.jpg?resize=100%2C74"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"221","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/08/80814a3f-5280-56b1-8d7e-abd45657cc6e/594764e395c14.image.jpg?resize=300%2C221"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"754","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/08/80814a3f-5280-56b1-8d7e-abd45657cc6e/594764e395c14.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"b108f02e-4eeb-5264-b56e-b24525be86a7","body":"

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 The Iowa Supreme Court on Friday overturned the conviction of a lottery employee implicated in a nationwide fixing scandal, saying his trial over a rigged $16.5 million jackpot was tainted by unjustified delays in the investigation.

The ruling is a victory for former Multi-State Lottery Association security director Eddie Tipton, whose lawyers argued that Iowa's long-running inquiry into the 2010 jackpot let the statute of limitations expire. But it might have little practical impact.

Prosecutors this month agreed to vacate the conviction under a plea agreement, regardless of the court's decision. The deal requires Tipton to plead guilty to ongoing criminal conduct for his efforts to rig other jackpots in Colorado, Oklahoma, Kansas and Wisconsin. Prosecutors are expected to seek a 25-year prison term for Tipton, who could enter his guilty plea in Iowa next week. The 56-year-old pleaded guilty in Wisconsin this month to rigging a $2 million 2007 jackpot.

Prosecutor Rob Sand declined to comment. Tipton's attorney didn't return messages.

Investigators say Tipton installed code on lottery computers that allowed him to predict the winning numbers on three days of the year. They say he worked with his brother, businessman Robert Rhodes and other associates to purchase and claim winning tickets from 2005 to 2011.

Friday's ruling was limited to the first and biggest jackpot linked to Tipton, a $16.5 million Hot Lotto drawing in December 2010. Lawyers representing a Belize-based trust came forward a year later with the winning ticket hours before the deadline, but they wouldn't say who bought it. The Iowa Lottery refused to pay and requested a criminal investigation.

After the case hit a dead-end, investigators in 2014 released surveillance video of a hooded man purchasing the winning ticket at a Des Moines gas station in 2010. Colleagues told investigators they believed the man was Tipton, who was charged and fired by the Urbandale-based association.

Jurors convicted Tipton in 2015 of fraudulently trying to redeem the ticket and tampering with lottery equipment. The court ruled Friday that the three-year statute of limitations was expired on the tampering charge, dismissing it. The court said the verdict on the redeeming charge was tainted because the statute of limitations ran out on two of three legal theories presented to jurors. The court ordered a retrial on that count, but it's not expected to happen under the plea deal.

Prosecutors theorized at trial that Tipton disabled security cameras in the drawing room and installed a self-deleting software program that rigged the outcome. After the conviction, they learned that theory may have been wrong as they linked other jackpots to Tipton and his friends. An analysis of a Wisconsin computer uncovered code that allowed Tipton to predict winning numbers on May 27, November 23 and Dec. 29.

Justice Brent Appel faulted investigators Friday for taking too long to try to interview key witnesses in Canada and Texas, saying they didn't pursue the case \"with due diligence\" and weren't entitled to an extension of the statute of limitations.

\"It took over three years for the trail to run cold when that point could have been reached by completing two simple tasks,\" he wrote.

Division of Criminal Investigation agent Matt Anderson testified that his efforts were delayed by a busy workload, which included dozens of voter fraud cases assigned to him.

After buying the ticket, Tipton passed it to Rhodes, of Sugar Land, Texas. Rhodes and Houston lawyer Robert Sonfield then passed the ticket to Phillip Johnston in Canada, who called the lottery in 2011 claiming he was the owner. Johnston later said he was representing a person who wanted to claim the ticket anonymously through the trust.

It took investigators until 2013 to interview Johnston, who identified Rhodes and Sonfield as being involved. Several more months passed before investigators traveled to try to find those two, who didn't cooperate. Rhodes has since pleaded guilty and has been cooperating with Tipton's prosecution. Sonfield has not been charged.

___

Follow Ryan J. Foley on Twitter at https://twitter.com/rjfoley

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CASPER, Wyo. (AP) \u2014 People associated with multiple failed oil and gas projects or companies in Wyoming will now have to notify regulators if they try again.

The Casper Star-Tribune reported (http://bit.ly/2sKdV1g ) Friday that state Oil and Gas Conservation Commission officials say the new practice should help keep track of bad apples.

Kim Mazza, spokeswoman for the commission, says the move is meant to give the five-person commission a chance to consider whether those businesspeople should post additional financial assurances given their history. She says it is not meant to deter people from doing business in Wyoming.

The problem escalated dramatically after a coal bed methane bust left thousands of wells abandoned or sold off to other companies and left the state with the responsibility of tracking down orphaned operations, pulling bonds and cleaning up after.

___

Information from: Casper (Wyo.) Star-Tribune, http://www.trib.com

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JACKSON, N.J. (AP) \u2014 A lawsuit seeking to block a Six Flags theme park in New Jersey from cutting down nearly 15,000 trees to make way for a solar farm to power the park has been dismissed.

A Superior Court judge said in a ruling Monday that the local governing boards in deciding to approve the project proposed by Six Flags Great Adventure and KDC Solar could weigh the environmental advantage of renewable solar energy against other environmental impacts.

Environmentalists said the project will have a devastating effect on the environment and they opposed the decision by the Jackson Township committee and planning board to allow the work to go forward. They argued in the lawsuit that the project isn't consistent with the township's master plan.

\"This project is a black eye for clean energy,\" Sierra Club director Jeff Tittel said in a statement. \"Six Flags can't have green energy by destroying a forest.\"

Project officials say the 21.9-megawatt facility will provide all the park's electrical needs and will be the largest in New Jersey. It is expected to result in a net reduction in carbon emissions of about 216,000 tons over a 15-year period.

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(Wes Guderian/The Oregonian via AP)","byline":"Wes Guderian","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"383","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/71/07110de8-6d55-5cd2-b663-5fe4d0d09465/594cd1ab27af6.image.jpg?resize=512%2C383"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/71/07110de8-6d55-5cd2-b663-5fe4d0d09465/594cd1ab27af6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"224","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/71/07110de8-6d55-5cd2-b663-5fe4d0d09465/594cd1ab27af6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C224"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"766","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/71/07110de8-6d55-5cd2-b663-5fe4d0d09465/594cd1ab27af6.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"7bce1f31-4a9b-5893-8adf-cdefa611f127","description":"On Feb. 26, 1979, the path of a solar eclipse passes over Goldendale, Wash., as William Yantis, director of Golendale Observatory, peers into a Celestron telescope. The first place to experience total darkness as the moon passes between the sun and the Earth will be in Oregon and Madras, in the central part of the state, is expected to be a prime viewing location. Up to 1 million people are expected in Oregon for the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in 99 years Aug. 21, 20127, and up to 100,000 could show up in Madras and surrounding Jefferson County. Officials are worried about the ability of the rural area to host so many visitors and are concerned about the danger of wildfire from so many people camping on public lands.(Jim Vincent/The Oregonian via AP)","byline":"Jim Vincent","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"349","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/bc/7bce1f31-4a9b-5893-8adf-cdefa611f127/594cd1ab573bf.image.jpg?resize=512%2C349"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/bc/7bce1f31-4a9b-5893-8adf-cdefa611f127/594cd1ab573bf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/bc/7bce1f31-4a9b-5893-8adf-cdefa611f127/594cd1ab573bf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C204"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"698","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/bc/7bce1f31-4a9b-5893-8adf-cdefa611f127/594cd1ab573bf.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"5d370dcb-8670-5c30-9651-c6ad709c94c5","description":"Christina Carpenter and her 11-year-old son, Evan, hold some of their chickens on the family's organic farm on June 13, 2017 as Carpenter's husband, Grant Putnam, looks on. The first place to experience total darkness as the moon passes between the sun and the Earth will be in Oregon and Madras, in the central part of the state, is expected to be a prime viewing location. Up to 1 million people are expected in Oregon for the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in 99 years and up to 100,000 could show up in Madras and surrounding Jefferson County. Carpenter is renting out camping spaces on the family's farm for nearly $1,000 and up during the four days leading up to the eclipse and will provide lives music, guest lectures, star-gazing and meals. Officials are worried about the ability of the rural area to host so many visitors and are concerned about the danger of wildfire from so many people camping on public lands. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)","byline":"Gillian Flaccus","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"288","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/d3/5d370dcb-8670-5c30-9651-c6ad709c94c5/594cd1ab86e91.image.jpg?resize=512%2C288"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/d3/5d370dcb-8670-5c30-9651-c6ad709c94c5/594cd1ab86e91.image.jpg?resize=100%2C56"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/d3/5d370dcb-8670-5c30-9651-c6ad709c94c5/594cd1ab86e91.image.jpg?resize=300%2C169"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/d3/5d370dcb-8670-5c30-9651-c6ad709c94c5/594cd1ab86e91.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"498d61c3-73ba-5ab8-a655-27ac80bb3bce","description":"A poster advertising special safety glass for viewing the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse sits on the counter at a McDonald's restaurant in Madras, Oregon on June 12, 2017. The first place to experience total darkness as the moon passes between the sun and the Earth will be in Oregon and Madras, in the central part of the state, is expected to be a prime viewing location. Up to 1 million people are expected in Oregon for the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in 99 years and up to 100,000 could show up in Madras and surrounding Jefferson County. Officials are worried about the ability of the rural area to host so many visitors and are concerned about the danger of wildfire from so many people camping on public lands. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)","byline":"Gillian Flaccus","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"304","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/98/498d61c3-73ba-5ab8-a655-27ac80bb3bce/594cd1abba65c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C304"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"59","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/98/498d61c3-73ba-5ab8-a655-27ac80bb3bce/594cd1abba65c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C59"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"178","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/98/498d61c3-73ba-5ab8-a655-27ac80bb3bce/594cd1abba65c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C178"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"608","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/98/498d61c3-73ba-5ab8-a655-27ac80bb3bce/594cd1abba65c.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"c60ce09c-864e-5149-9080-ff44dfa198ea","description":"Joe Krenowicz, executive director of the Madras-Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, gestures toward Mt. Jefferson as the sun rises over Madras, Oregon on June 13, 2017. The first place to experience total darkness as the moon passes between the sun and the Earth will be in Oregon and Madras, in the central part of the state, is expected to be a prime viewing location. Up to 1 million people are expected in Oregon for the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in 99 years and up to 100,000 could show up in Madras and surrounding Jefferson County. Officials are worried about the ability of the rural area to host so many visitors and are concerned about the danger of wildfire from so many people camping on public lands. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)","byline":"Gillian Flaccus","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"254","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/60/c60ce09c-864e-5149-9080-ff44dfa198ea/594cd1abed43b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C254"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"50","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/60/c60ce09c-864e-5149-9080-ff44dfa198ea/594cd1abed43b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C50"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"149","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/60/c60ce09c-864e-5149-9080-ff44dfa198ea/594cd1abed43b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C149"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"508","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/60/c60ce09c-864e-5149-9080-ff44dfa198ea/594cd1abed43b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"bf31aa91-e370-552f-ba3f-7bf8380fca5f","description":"The total solar eclipse crossing the continental United States on Aug. 21 will first be visible from Oregon.. The town of Madras and Jefferson County are expected to be some of the best viewing locations because of their high-desert location. (June 23)","byline":"","hireswidth":1920,"hiresheight":1080,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f3/bf31aa91-e370-552f-ba3f-7bf8380fca5f/594d2e15a5607.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1170","height":"658","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f3/bf31aa91-e370-552f-ba3f-7bf8380fca5f/594d2e15a4c23.image.jpg?resize=1170%2C658"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f3/bf31aa91-e370-552f-ba3f-7bf8380fca5f/594d2e15a4c23.image.jpg?resize=100%2C56"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f3/bf31aa91-e370-552f-ba3f-7bf8380fca5f/594d2e15a4c23.image.jpg?resize=300%2C169"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f3/bf31aa91-e370-552f-ba3f-7bf8380fca5f/594d2e15a4c23.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C576"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"967f34c3-36ff-5e5f-bd1e-d7d67a16be57","body":"

MADRAS, Ore. (AP) \u2014 Just before sunrise, there's typically nothing atop Round Butte but the whistle of the wind and a panoramic view of Oregon's second-highest peak glowing pink in the faint light.

But on Aug. 21, local officials expect this lookout point just outside the small town of Madras to be crammed with people from around the world, all hoping for the first glimpse of the moon's shadow as it crosses Mount Jefferson's snow fields. Then, a solar eclipse will throw the entire region into complete darkness for two minutes.

The first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse to cross the continental United States in 99 years will first be visible in Oregon, and Madras is predicted to be among the country's best viewing spots because of its clear, high-desert skies, flat landscape and stunning mountain views.

Up to 1 million eclipse chasers will descend on Oregon for the celestial event, and officials are bracing for as many as 100,000 of them in and around Madras.

In this vast expanse of ranches and farms, rural, two-lane roads could mean traffic jams of cosmic proportions. Every hotel in Madras is booked, some residents are renting their homes for $3,000 a night, and campers are expected to flood the national forests and grasslands during peak wildfire season.

The state's emergency coordination center will gear up, and first responders will prepare to respond to any trouble as they would for an earthquake or other natural disaster. Cell towers could be overwhelmed, traffic will be gridlocked, and police and fire stretched to the max managing the crowds.

\"Bring extra water, bring food. You need to be prepared to be able to survive on your own for 24 to 48 to 72 hours, just like you would in any sort of emergency,\" said Dave Thompson, spokesman for the Oregon Department of Transportation. \"This is pretty much a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and it's really worth seeing. But you've got to be prepared or you won't enjoy it.\"

When the moon passes between the sun and the Earth, the path of totality \u2014 meaning total darkness \u2014 from the moon's shadow will begin on Oregon's coast, then cross the north-central part of the state from west to east.

But as the hype builds, authorities are increasingly worried that people who planned to watch from the notoriously foggy coast could move east at the last minute if the forecast sours. And Oregonians who live outside the path of totality could decide to drive to one of the prime viewing spots at the spur of the moment, creating havoc on the roads, said Cory Grogan, spokesman for the Oregon Office of Emergency Management.

In addition, many tourists will be camping in hot, tinder-dry conditions, or even sleeping in their cars. First responders have been planning for months for a worst-case scenario: evacuating tens of thousands of people while trying to get fire engines through gridlocked roads. Cellular towers also may be crippled by the volume of people texting, calling and posting photos, making it difficult for fire crews to communicate.

Federal and local officials will stage engines and other resources at key locations, and firefighters from other agencies and private companies will send extra crews. But it's impossible to plan for everything, and tourists frustrated with traffic may use forest access roads as shortcuts, further raising fire risk, said Kent Koeller, a recreation planner with U.S. Forest Service outside Madras.

\"Just driving off-road - having that contact with a hot muffler or a catalytic converter - could start an ignition,\" he said. \"And in these fine fuels, it could spread very quickly.\"

Lysa Vattimo was hired two years ago to coordinate the town's planning efforts with more than 50 local, state and federal agencies. She spends her days trying to think of every possible consequence of having tens of thousands of people in a town of just 6,500 \u2014 and her nights worrying she missed something.

The town and surrounding campsites have rented nearly 700 portable toilets, including some from as far as Idaho, to meet demand. Sanitation trucks will run almost around the clock, transporting trash to 50-yard-long (46-meter-long) dumpsters before it rots in triple-digit temperatures.

Gas stations are filling their underground tanks in advance, and businesses are being told to use cash only, to avoid bringing down the wireless network. Banks are stocking their ATMs, local hospitals have canceled vacations, and pregnant women close to their due dates are being told to leave to avoid getting stuck.

\"What we've asked our residents to do is get prepared ahead of time. About a week out, fuel up on propane, gas, whatever fuels they need, get their prescriptions, go to the doctor, do what you need to do,\" she said. \"And then stay home.\"

In Madras, hotels were booked years ago, and spots at 25 campgrounds in and around the town are going fast. Farmers are renting out their land for pop-up campgrounds, and thousands of parking spaces for day trippers are getting snapped up.

The Black Bear Diner, one of the town's most popular restaurants, expects to serve 1,000 people a day during the week leading up to the eclipse. Owner Joe Davis has ordered five weeks of food for one week of business and will have an abbreviated menu of 10 items to speed service.

\"The Black Bear Diner has been here in Madras 18 years, and I'm sure this will be by far the busiest week - and probably double the busiest week - that we've seen,\" he said.

But amid all the hubbub and anxiety, most residents have kept sight of the wonder.

Darlene Hoffman is one of the few here who watched the last total solar eclipse to touch Madras 38 years ago. Hoffman, 80, recalls how the birds stopped singing and the horses prepared to sleep as the sky gradually darkened and a hush fell over the land.

\"It was really something to see. It really was,\" she said. \"That amazed me more than anything.\"

___

Follow Gillian Flaccus on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/gflaccus

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BOSTON (AP) \u2014 Prosecutors say the co-founder of a Massachusetts pharmacy linked to a deadly nationwide meningitis outbreak should be sent to prison for 35 years for showing \"an unconscionable disregard for the lives of the patients.\"

Barry Cadden will be sentenced Monday on charges of racketeering, conspiracy and fraud in the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak that killed more than 60 people and sickened more than 700 others in 20 states.

Cadden's lawyers say prosecutors are trying to demonize Cadden and to \"transform the jury's verdict into a murder case,\" despite the fact that he was acquitted of second-degree murder charges. The defense is recommending a 2\u00bd- to 3-year prison term.

During Cadden's trial, prosecutors said he skirted industry regulations on sterility in an effort to push production and make more money.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention traced the illnesses and deaths from the outbreak to medical steroids made by the now-closed NECC of Framingham. Most of the victims received the injectable steroids for back pain. Indiana, Michigan and Tennessee were hit hardest.

In a sentencing memo filed in court Thursday, Cadden's lawyer said Cadden failed to properly supervise pharmacists who worked in the so-called \"clean room\" at New England Compounding Center, but said he did not knowingly ship contaminated drugs.

\"As the jury found, Mr. Cadden is not a murderer. Nor is he the person the government portrayed him as at trial,\" attorney Bruce Singal wrote in his sentencing memo.

Prosecutors said the steroids became contaminated because of improper sterilization, testing, cleaning and disinfecting. Despite the defense claims, \"the evidence overwhelmingly demonstrated that Cadden was well-aware of these deficiencies in NECC's production processes, and the potential danger it could cause to patients, but chose to ship the deficient drugs anyway,\" Assistant U.S. Attorney George Varghese wrote in the government's sentencing memo.

In their memo, prosecutors included excerpts from victim impact statements written to the court by relatives of people who were sickened or died from the contaminated steroids. Many of the letters describe constant pain and other chronic illnesses people who received the injections continue to face.

Greg Shuff wrote about his wife, Rachelle, a mother of two who was 44 when she received steroid injections in Elkhart, Indiana, while trying to recover from a car accident.

\"Her suffering has broken everything we had into pieces,\" he wrote.

\"She is up out of bed at the most 6 hours a day and that is a struggle. She cries when the pain becomes so extreme and intolerable. ... She has been robbed of her life, my life and our beautiful children's life.\"

The case focused attention on compounding pharmacies, which differ from ordinary drugstores in that they custom-mix medications and supply them directly to hospitals and doctors. After the outbreak, Congress increased federal oversight of compounding pharmacies.

NECC filed for bankruptcy after getting slapped with hundreds of lawsuits. NECC and several related companies reached a $200 million settlement with victims and their families.

Glenn Chin, a supervisory pharmacist who ran the clean rooms where drugs were made, is scheduled to go on trial in September. He has pleaded not guilty.

"}, {"id":"f09c6a85-8005-59a4-8d53-28938531e464","type":"article","starttime":"1498238940","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T10:29:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1498258564","priority":33,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"How secure are today's ATMs? 5 questions answered","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_f09c6a85-8005-59a4-8d53-28938531e464.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/how-secure-are-today-s-atms-questions-answered/article_f09c6a85-8005-59a4-8d53-28938531e464.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/how-secure-are-today-s-atms-questions-answered/article_f09c6a85-8005-59a4-8d53-28938531e464.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Pradeep Atrey\nThe Conversation","prologue":"Automated teller machines, better known as ATMs, are turning 50 on Tuesday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["atm","banking","identity theft protection"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#topbiz"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"b336b88b-d051-5696-8d9f-2ac7eba5f363","description":"In this Thursday, April 13, 2017, file photo, a man uses a Bank of America ATM near the company's headquarters in Charlotte, N.C. ATMs are turning 50 years old on June 27.\u00a0","byline":"Chuck Burton/The Associated Press","hireswidth":1709,"hiresheight":1212,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b336b88b-d051-5696-8d9f-2ac7eba5f363/594d5c5322c43.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1072","height":"760","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b336b88b-d051-5696-8d9f-2ac7eba5f363/594d5c5321e43.image.jpg?resize=1072%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b336b88b-d051-5696-8d9f-2ac7eba5f363/594d5c5321e43.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"213","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b336b88b-d051-5696-8d9f-2ac7eba5f363/594d5c5321e43.image.jpg?resize=300%2C213"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"726","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b336b88b-d051-5696-8d9f-2ac7eba5f363/594d5c5321e43.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C726"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"f09c6a85-8005-59a4-8d53-28938531e464","body":"

Editor\u2019s note: Automated teller machines, better known as ATMs, are turning 50 on June 27. Computer science professor Pradeep Atrey, from the University at Albany, State University of New York, explains the security features and concerns of modern cash machines.

How does an ATM work?

In the broadest sense, an ATM works by accepting a cash request from a user, verifying the user\u2019s authority to access a particular bank account, ensuring that account has enough money to fulfill the request and dispensing the money \u2013 all without the assistance of a bank clerk or teller.

From the very beginning, all the way back to the first ATM placed in use in London in 1967, the user\u2019s identity was the main problem banks needed to solve. Rather than today\u2019s plastic card with a magnetic strip and embedded microchip, the first machine accepted a slip of paper with a mildly radioactive substance \u2013 carbon-14 \u2013 printed on it in a particular pattern. The machine matched the pattern to a number code entered by the user. If it matched, and if the funds were available, the machine dispensed up to \u00a310 (an amount worth just over U.S. $200 today).

When using modern ATMs, a customer inserts a plastic card into the machine\u2019s reader, which registers either the data encoded on the card\u2019s magnetic strip or its embedded chip. It prompts the customer for a personal identification number, usually called a PIN.

If the card and PIN match, then the customer can deposit money, check an account balance or, most commonly, request a cash withdrawal. When the customer specifies an amount of money, the machine uses an internet connection or a phone line to connect to the customer\u2019s bank, verifying the funds are available and dispensing the cash.

What security issues do ATMs have?

Because ATMs contain large amounts of cash, they are attractive targets for criminals. The most brazen thefts have involved physically stealing the ATM as a whole, though muggers have also accosted ATM users, who, unsurprisingly, are likely to be carrying cash.

As a result, most ATMs today have built-in cameras, to record evidence in case of a mugging or other crime, or to monitor people who might be tampering with the machine.

A more sophisticated theft involves covertly monitoring the device and its users. Thieves can install small cameras in different places on an ATM, sometimes hidden by plastic panels that look like normal parts of the machine. With those, they can capture the PIN, card number, its expiration date, the name on the card, and even the three-digit card verification value (CVV) number on the back. That\u2019s more than enough information to use the card to make unauthorized online purchases look legitimate. Fraudsters may also sell the data in online black markets.

By installing fake card slots, or even extra attachments called \u201cskimmers\u201d on top of the existing card slot, attackers can read the information on cards\u2019 magnetic strips. That can help them make fake duplicate cards to use in other ATMs.

What security measures are or can be deployed?

ATM-related fraud and theft can\u2019t be completely prevented. Banks are working to develop additional security measures, such as the three-digit CVV on the back of cards. Individuals can also take preventive measures to protect themselves when using ATMs:

How can new technology make ATMs more secure?

As the ever-escalating arms race between ATM security professionals and criminals continues, customers will find themselves urged to use increasingly advanced security methods to identify themselves at ATMs. One method is two-factor authentication, which adds an additional layer of security a user must pass before being allowed access to an account.

Often used when logging in to online services like social media and email systems, two-factor authentication has most commonly involved entering not only the PIN but also a numeric code received by text message on the user\u2019s phone and valid for only a short period of time.

This method, no longer considered secure because it is so easy to falsely simulate cellphone numbers, is being phased out in favor of smartphone apps that generate new codes every few seconds \u2013 or even physical keys. Without this one-time code, an attacker can\u2019t access the victim\u2019s bank account.

Future methods of user authentication at ATMs are likely to involve biometrics, like fingerprints, which could augment \u2013 or even replace \u2013 the cards and PINs that have gotten banks and users through the past 50 years of automated banking.

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