[ {"id":"8d9b4890-e69d-5d99-bcd6-d179a62515f6","type":"article","starttime":"1475056627","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-28T02:57:07-07:00","lastupdated":"1475058728","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Tie-up of world's biggest beer makers clears final hurdle","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_8d9b4890-e69d-5d99-bcd6-d179a62515f6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/tie-up-of-world-s-biggest-beer-makers-clears-final/article_8d9b4890-e69d-5d99-bcd6-d179a62515f6.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/tie-up-of-world-s-biggest-beer-makers-clears-final/article_0a6d57e1-b7e4-5950-966f-9856950c1491.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DANICA KIRKA\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LONDON (AP) \u2014 A deal worth over $100 billion to combine the world's two biggest beer companies cleared its last major hurdle Wednesday when the shareholders of SABMiller approved the takeover by Budweiser maker Anheuser-Busch Inbev.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","brexit referendum","ownership changes","corporate news","events","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":2,"commentID":"8d9b4890-e69d-5d99-bcd6-d179a62515f6","body":"

LONDON (AP) \u2014 A deal worth over $100 billion to combine the world's two biggest beer companies cleared its last major hurdle Wednesday when the shareholders of SABMiller approved the takeover by Budweiser maker Anheuser-Busch Inbev.

SABMiller shareholders approved the 79 billion pound ($103 billion) deal despite opposition from some investors who saw their share of the payout shrink when the pound plunged following Britain's vote to the leave the European Union. AB InBev shareholders also backed the transaction.

Regulators around the world have already approved the deal, which AB InBev says will create \"the first truly global brewer.\" The takeover is expected to be formally completed on Oct. 10, AB InBev said.

Acquiring SABMiller, which traces its roots to the former South African Breweries, gives AB InBev a large presence in Africa while increasing its business in South America and Europe. The combined company will control almost a third of the global beer market.

The complicated deal was nearly derailed by the currency havoc caused by Britain's vote to leave the EU.

In order to win approval from SABMiller's two largest shareholders, AB InBev offered the U.S. tobacco company Altria and BevCo, an investment vehicle of the Santo Domingo family, a cash-and-stock deal that allows them to remain invested in the beer industry while avoiding taxes on a large cash payout. Other shareholders will receive a cash payment for their shares in British pounds.

The value of the cash offer declined in relation to the cash-and-stock deal as the pound weakened against the euro after the EU vote.

A group of smaller investors led by Aberdeen Asset Management opposed the deal, saying it undervalued SABMiller and left them at a disadvantage to Altria and BevCo, which together own about 40 percent of the company. In response, SABMiller agreed to recognize two classes of investors, with the deal requiring approval from 75 percent of smaller shareholders.

A British court must still approve the measure next week, but the hearing is largely considered uncontentious.

"}, {"id":"649775f0-68dc-522a-87ea-07db3d70a68a","type":"article","starttime":"1475055725","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-28T02:42:05-07:00","lastupdated":"1475057788","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Shareholders in brewer SABMiller accept AB InBev takeover offer, clearing final hurdle to deal","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_649775f0-68dc-522a-87ea-07db3d70a68a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/shareholders-in-brewer-sabmiller-accept-ab-inbev-takeover-offer-clearing/article_649775f0-68dc-522a-87ea-07db3d70a68a.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/shareholders-in-brewer-sabmiller-accept-ab-inbev-takeover-offer-clearing/article_db52c89a-28b1-5ee9-812c-aec9f77fe413.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"LONDON (AP) \u2014 Shareholders in brewer SABMiller accept AB InBev takeover offer, clearing final hurdle to deal.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","track and field","sports"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":2,"commentID":"649775f0-68dc-522a-87ea-07db3d70a68a","body":"

LONDON (AP) \u2014 Shareholders in brewer SABMiller accept AB InBev takeover offer, clearing final hurdle to deal.

"}, {"id":"14a79100-51f1-5290-b88d-6aba5defb1eb","type":"article","starttime":"1475055282","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-28T02:34:42-07:00","lastupdated":"1475057793","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Old rivalries seen blocking OPEC deal to support oil price","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_14a79100-51f1-5290-b88d-6aba5defb1eb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/old-rivalries-seen-blocking-opec-deal-to-support-oil-price/article_14a79100-51f1-5290-b88d-6aba5defb1eb.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/old-rivalries-seen-blocking-opec-deal-to-support-oil-price/article_0bb6cc78-a634-506c-983d-31fbbd49be40.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By AOMAR OUALI\nAssociated Press","prologue":"ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) \u2014 Prospects are dim for a deal among OPEC countries on Wednesday to freeze production and support oil prices, amid disagreements between rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","oil and gas industry","energy industry","opec meetings","events"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"df8ca6be-a3ab-5ce6-ac55-299eec198c64","description":"Khalid Al-Falih Minister of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources of Saudi Arabia answers questions as part of the 15th International Energy Forum Ministerial meeting in Algiers, Algeria, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. At meetings in Algeria this week, energy ministers from OPEC and other oil-producing countries are discussing whether to freeze production levels to boost global oil prices. (AP Photo/ Sidali Djarboub)","byline":"Sidali Djarboub","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"347","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f8/df8ca6be-a3ab-5ce6-ac55-299eec198c64/57eb95800929a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C347"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f8/df8ca6be-a3ab-5ce6-ac55-299eec198c64/57eb95800929a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"203","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f8/df8ca6be-a3ab-5ce6-ac55-299eec198c64/57eb95800929a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C203"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"694","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f8/df8ca6be-a3ab-5ce6-ac55-299eec198c64/57eb95800929a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"cba582bb-ce56-504f-a245-3c13d61e8872","description":"Iran's Oil Minister Bijan Namdar Zanganeh attends the opening session of the 15th International Energy Forum Ministerial meeting in Algiers, Algeria, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. At meetings in Algeria this week, energy ministers from OPEC and other oil-producing countries are discussing whether to freeze production levels to boost global oil prices. (AP Photo/ Sidali Djarboub)","byline":"Sidali Djarboub","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"340","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/ba/cba582bb-ce56-504f-a245-3c13d61e8872/57eb958036db3.image.jpg?resize=512%2C340"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/ba/cba582bb-ce56-504f-a245-3c13d61e8872/57eb958036db3.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"199","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/ba/cba582bb-ce56-504f-a245-3c13d61e8872/57eb958036db3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C199"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"680","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/ba/cba582bb-ce56-504f-a245-3c13d61e8872/57eb958036db3.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"14a79100-51f1-5290-b88d-6aba5defb1eb","body":"

ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) \u2014 Prospects are dim for a deal among OPEC countries on Wednesday to freeze production and support oil prices, amid disagreements between rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Officials from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries will meet informally on the sidelines of an energy conference in Algiers to try to find common ground on how to stabilize oil markets. Experts say that would require a decision to limit output \u2014 an idea Iran still views with skepticism, as it's trying to restore its oil industry since emerging from international sanctions this year.

On Tuesday, Iranian Petroleum Minister Bijan Namdar Zanganeh played down the OPEC gathering, calling it \"just a consultation meeting ... If there is a decision, it should be taken at the next (OPEC) meeting in Vienna in November.\"

The price of crude oil has fallen sharply since mid-2014, when it was over $100 a barrel, dropping below $30 at the start of this year. On Wednesday, the U.S. contract was trading at $44.87 a barrel, up 20 cents on the day.

Saudi Arabia, the world's biggest oil producer and Iran's rival for power in the Middle East, appears to be more amenable to some sort of production limit, certainly more so than in April when OPEC failed to agree on measures to curb supplies.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih has this week promised to \"support any decision aimed at stabilizing the market.\"

Over the past couple years, OPEC countries, led by Saudi Arabia, had been willing to let the oil price drop as a means of driving some U.S. shale oil and gas producers out of business. Shale oil and gas requires a higher price to break even.

Those lower prices have hurt many oil-producing nations hard, particularly OPEC members Venezuela and Nigeria, but also Russia and Brazil.

"}, {"id":"23a4534a-780f-5a90-a56a-c8fb6ae28498","type":"article","starttime":"1475052878","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-28T01:54:38-07:00","lastupdated":"1475055116","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"UK's globalized car industry wary of Brexit impact","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_23a4534a-780f-5a90-a56a-c8fb6ae28498.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/uk-s-globalized-car-industry-wary-of-brexit-impact/article_23a4534a-780f-5a90-a56a-c8fb6ae28498.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/uk-s-globalized-car-industry-wary-of-brexit-impact/article_e09bf6e4-b2ce-5994-a903-a3a599d922de.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By GREGORY KATZ\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LONDON (AP) \u2014 This should be a fine time for British carmakers, with sales increasing nicely, but for one major storm front \u2014 the impossible-to-predict ramifications of the country's vote to leave the European Union.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","brexit referendum","international trade","events","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services","financial performance","corporate news","economy"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"0c0af3c1-2998-5591-b92f-8da96c44e173","description":"Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in London, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)","byline":"Frank Augstein","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"388","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c0/0c0af3c1-2998-5591-b92f-8da96c44e173/57eb8a2bdeda9.image.jpg?resize=512%2C388"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"76","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c0/0c0af3c1-2998-5591-b92f-8da96c44e173/57eb8a2bdeda9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C76"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"227","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c0/0c0af3c1-2998-5591-b92f-8da96c44e173/57eb8a2bdeda9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C227"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"776","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c0/0c0af3c1-2998-5591-b92f-8da96c44e173/57eb8a2bdeda9.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"23a4534a-780f-5a90-a56a-c8fb6ae28498","body":"

LONDON (AP) \u2014 This should be a fine time for British carmakers, with sales increasing nicely, but for one major storm front \u2014 the impossible-to-predict ramifications of the country's vote to leave the European Union.

With the Paris Auto Show preparing to open, and British industry leaders gathering there Wednesday to boast of the strength of their brands, Britain's EU exit, or Brexit, remains vexing in part because it's still not clear exactly how the complex and highly globalized auto trade will be affected.

Most expect Brexit to be disruptive, and to raise costs for companies, but the hard talk negotiations between Britain and the EU on the crucial issues of tariffs and the free movement of labor are still months away and will possibly take years to resolve.

That means years of uncertainty over the cost of building cars in Britain and the ease of exporting them to other EU countries. It will also create doubts about how difficult it will become to import vital car parts from other EU countries, to say nothing of the restrictions likely to be put in place on the free movement of skilled workers needed to assemble vehicles.

\"You won't think at the moment of investing in Britain,\" said Stefan Bratzel, director of the Center of Automotive Management in Bergisch, Germany. \"You need stability, you want to know you are investing in a stable environment, and you don't have it.\"

This is the main reason investment has slowed in industry that was enjoying a good run of health \u2014 production grew more than 12 percent in the first half of 2016 compared to the year before. While the drop in the pound since the June vote to leave the EU can help car exports from Britain, the overall uncertainties are great enough to cast a shadow over the longer-term outlook.

Bratzel said carmakers do not know how much production costs will surge, and whether the increases, possibly in the form of higher tariffs, will end Britain's attractiveness as a platform for building cars and getting them into the European market. Several major British brands are owned by foreign companies \u2014 Vauxhall by U.S. giant General Motors Co., Jaguar Land Rover by India's Tata Motors and Mini by Germany's BMW.

Bratzel said Brexit will hurt carmakers based in Europe as well as those based in the UK. The immediate impact, he said, has been the reluctance of major companies like BMW to put more money into operations.

Cars are exceptionally complex in terms of the way tariffs are structured, and taking Britain out of the easy world of EU trade, with its ample single market, raises a host of issues.

Many British carmakers, for example, rely on part imported from other EU countries. That is red-tape-free at the moment, because of EU easy access rules, but will become much more troublesome when new rules have to be negotiated and implemented, said Arndt Ellinghorst, an analyst with Evercore ISI in London.

\"It's not simple at all,\" he said. \"The question is what the trade framework will be. The second you use a component from the EU in a U.K. car, you need a new trade agreement for that car when it leaves the country. So it's very complicated.\"

He said this will not only make it more difficult to export finished vehicles to EU countries but will also complicate sales to the United States and other parts of the world.

\"Right now, most companies are maintaining their production footprint, but they are limiting expansion,\" he said. \"And that is very rational. For any major expansion, you need to know the legal framework, and that's currently unclear.\"

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BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) \u2014 A Verizon Wireless spokeswoman says it appears that \"fewer than 500 customers\" had their private information accessed in 2014 in a federal computer breach case involving a former Verizon Wireless network technician.

Federal prosecutors say the ex-employee, Daniel Eugene Traeger, used company computers to obtain customers' private call records \u2014 plus data showing where customers' phones were \u2014 and then sold them to an unnamed private investigator. He worked in the Birmingham, Alabama, area.

Court records don't say how many customers were affected.

But Verizon Wireless spokeswoman Kate Jay said in a statement to The Associated Press that it appears the information of fewer than 500 customers may have been accessed in 2014.

Court records show Traeger pleaded guilty to a felony count of unauthorized access to a protected computer as part of a plea deal.

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BERLIN (AP) \u2014 A closely watched survey shows German consumer confidence has dropped slightly amid concerns over Britain's decision to leave the EU and extremist attack threats.

The GfK research group said Wednesday its forward-looking consumer climate index fell to 10.0 points for October from 10.2 points in September.

The group said that \"it looks as if the Brexit decision from June has now started to have an impact. In the three months since the referendum, economic expectations have continuously fallen. The announcement that Great Britain will leave the EU has caused uncertainty to rise.\"

Moreover, GfK said, consumers are feeling more unsettled due to greater public awareness of terror threats following a series of attacks in the summer.

Some 2,000 consumers were surveyed for the report on behalf of the European Commission.

"}, {"id":"abec4fff-5f37-5cf9-a3dc-8a90462fd455","type":"article","starttime":"1475046227","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-28T00:03:47-07:00","lastupdated":"1475048813","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Greenwood company gets $34.5M in defense contracts","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_abec4fff-5f37-5cf9-a3dc-8a90462fd455.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/greenwood-company-gets-m-in-defense-contracts/article_abec4fff-5f37-5cf9-a3dc-8a90462fd455.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/greenwood-company-gets-m-in-defense-contracts/article_67cffdd3-9ce7-5811-beba-bdd9ba938a8c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"GREENWOOD, Miss. (AP) \u2014 A Greenwood company has received defense contracts totaling $34.5 million this week for work in South Carolina.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","contracts and orders","aerospace and defense industry","military facilities","armed forces","military recruitment","corporate news","government business and finance","government and politics","military and defense","industrial products and services"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":2,"commentID":"abec4fff-5f37-5cf9-a3dc-8a90462fd455","body":"

GREENWOOD, Miss. (AP) \u2014 A Greenwood company has received defense contracts totaling $34.5 million this week for work in South Carolina.

The Pentagon's daily lists of contracts signed include two for R.C. Construction Co. Inc. \u2014 both at facilities in South Carolina.

Tuesday's list included a $22.9 million Navy contract for firing range improvement and modernization at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot at Parris Island. It was one of six bidders on the job.

The Pentagon said Monday that the company was getting an $11.6 million Air Force contract to repair a taxiway at Joint Base Charleston. Two other bids were received for the work.

"}, {"id":"530bd943-ef48-528d-a80b-1478ec835628","type":"article","starttime":"1475046446","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-28T00:07:26-07:00","lastupdated":"1475048840","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Trump turned over tax returns _ for lawsuits, loans, casinos","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_530bd943-ef48-528d-a80b-1478ec835628.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/trump-turned-over-tax-returns-for-lawsuits-loans-casinos/article_530bd943-ef48-528d-a80b-1478ec835628.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/trump-turned-over-tax-returns-for-lawsuits-loans-casinos/article_f04ad9eb-5ceb-563d-8c27-1fc00deb3011.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By CHAD DAY and JEFF HORWITZ\nAssociated Press","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 While Donald Trump won't publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs \u2014 if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government and politics","united states presidential election","events","personal taxes","2016 united states presidential election","legal proceedings","municipal governments","government finance","government business and finance","national governments","personal finance","national elections","elections","state governments","local governments","law and order","general news","politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"42ed7a59-5839-528f-87e0-cc3293b77871","description":"In this Sept. 27, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Melbourne, Fla. While Trump won\u2019t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs, if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him. (AP Photo/John Locher)","byline":"John Locher","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"359","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/2e/42ed7a59-5839-528f-87e0-cc3293b77871/57eb717f724eb.image.jpg?resize=512%2C359"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/2e/42ed7a59-5839-528f-87e0-cc3293b77871/57eb717f724eb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"210","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/2e/42ed7a59-5839-528f-87e0-cc3293b77871/57eb717f724eb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C210"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"718","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/2e/42ed7a59-5839-528f-87e0-cc3293b77871/57eb717f724eb.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"530bd943-ef48-528d-a80b-1478ec835628","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 While Donald Trump won't publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs \u2014 if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him.

Pennsylvania gaming regulators were given at least five years' worth and eight boxes full of Trump's tax documents. Nevada, Michigan, Missouri, Indiana and other state gaming officials also had access to multiple years of his returns. Large banks that lent Trump money over the years have also obtained Trump's returns.

One common thread ties all those who have seen the documents: They can't talk about them.

In all cases reviewed by The Associated Press, each person, organization, company or government office that has seen Trump's tax returns is barred from discussing their full contents by professional or legal restrictions.

For example, employees of the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board could face criminal penalties if they leaked information from Trump's tax returns maintained in the board's electronic files. Missouri officials are similarly barred from discussing the returns by state law.

That leaves the public knowing little about Trump's more recent finances beyond the few details that have trickled out in public documents unearthed by reporters, Trump's own self-reported estimations of his wealth and statements like the one he made in Monday's debate.

While Democrat Hillary Clinton questioned whether Trump's tax returns might reveal that he has paid little or no taxes, Trump said he was \"smart\" for not paying federal income taxes in some years.

Trump referred to public documents unearthed by Politico showing he didn't pay any federal income tax during at least two years in the early 1990s because he lost more money than he earned. Other documents show he also didn't pay any federal income taxes in 1978, 1979 and 1984, but the documents provided only limited information about other aspects of Trump's finances that could be settled by him releasing his tax returns.

Trump has repeatedly refused to release his tax returns citing an IRS audit, but the IRS and tax experts have said an audit doesn't bar Trump from making the documents public. Since 1976, every major party nominee has released the returns and Clinton has publicly released nearly 40 years' worth. Even Trump's running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, released 10 years of his tax returns.

Trump's tax returns would reveal his charitable contributions. Despite boasting of sweeping generosity, the AP reported more than a year ago that there is little record of substantial personal philanthropy from Trump. Trump has been dogged by questions about his personal giving and how his namesake foundation operates. The Washington Post has reported that Trump used donations given by others to pay for legal settlements, political contributions and even purchase portraits of himself.

The returns would also reveal how much Trump earned from his assets, helping someone work back to an approximation of his net worth to compare to his own estimation. Though the returns wouldn't give an exact measure.

Trump's own estimates of his income and net worth have previously been scrutinized by those who had access to his taxes.

For a decade, Trump tangled with New York City authorities over his city tax bill, a battle first reported in June by journalist David Cay Johnson in The Daily Beast.

In Trump's 1984 tax filings, he said he had lost money during a time in which he had just completed Trump Tower and regularly boasted about the success of his business deals. Trump also declared that he was primarily a consultant that year, and that his consulting business had $684,000 in business expenses and no income. He provided no receipts to justify the claimed expenses.

City tax authorities didn't buy it \u2014 and after Trump appealed his tax bill, they fought with him for the next ten years. Trump lost and was ordered to pay the taxes on more than $1 million in income.

Trump's multibillion-dollar fortune has also been questioned by banks that demanded his tax returns before lending him money. Commercial lenders generally require both personal and business tax returns as part of a loan application, and Trump provided such information to North Fork Bank in 2004 and 2005.

According to a deposition of Trump taken in a defamation lawsuit he filed against journalist Tim O'Brien, North Fork concluded that Trump's net worth was $1.2 billion and not the $3.5 billion he had said. Deutsche Bank also reviewed Trump's finances as of 2004, deeming him to be worth \"give or take $788 million,\" according to the deposition.

Trump, who disputed the findings in the deposition, lost the defamation suit.

___

AP Polling Editor Emily Swanson contributed to this report.

___

Follow Chad Day and Jeff Horwitz on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/ChadSDay and http://twitter.com/JeffHorwitz

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 While Donald Trump won't publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs \u2014 if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him.

Pennsylvania gaming regulators were given at least five years' worth and eight boxes full of Trump's tax documents. Nevada, Michigan, Missouri, Indiana and other state gaming officials also had access to multiple years of his returns. Large banks that lent Trump money over the years have also obtained Trump's returns.

One common thread ties all those who have seen the documents: They can't talk about them.

Such legal restrictions leave the public with only small glimpses into what Trump's taxes might hold.

In Monday night's debate, Democrat Hillary Clinton cited documents unearthed by reporters to question whether Trump doesn't want to release his tax returns because he has paid little or no federal income taxes.

Trump's response? \"That makes me smart,\" a comment he disavowed just minutes after the debate. Asked by reporters if he had admitted to not paying federal income taxes, Trump said, \"I didn't say that at all.\"

Clinton cited documents unearthed by Politico showing Trump didn't pay any federal income tax during at least two years in the early 1990s because he lost more money than he earned. Other documents show he also didn't pay any federal income taxes in 1978, 1979 and 1984.

Voters know little about Trump's more recent finances beyond his own self-reported estimations of his wealth and listings of his business interests.

In all cases reviewed by The Associated Press, each person, organization, company or government office that has seen Trump's tax returns is barred from discussing their full contents by professional or legal restrictions.

For example, employees of the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board could face criminal penalties if they leaked information from Trump's tax returns maintained in the board's electronic files, said board spokesman Doug Harbach.

When asked whether Trump had turned over any returns to the Missouri Gaming Commission, officials said they were barred by state law from saying what Trump turned over.

\"I could not tell you whether we had them,\" said Edward Grewach, the commission's general counsel.

Responses like these leave the decision to publicly release the taxes solely with Trump, who has repeatedly refused. Trump has cited an IRS audit as his reason for withholding the information, but the IRS and tax experts have said an audit doesn't bar Trump from releasing his taxes. At the debate, Trump said he would release his returns \u2014 over what he described as his attorney's objections \u2014 only after Clinton released roughly 30,000 emails she had deleted from her private server that she had deemed personal.

Earlier this month, Donald Trump Jr. gave a different reason why his father wouldn't release the returns: The American people would ask too many questions.

\"He's got a 12,000-page tax return that would create . financial auditors out of every person in the country asking questions that would detract from (his father's) main message,\" the younger Trump told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

Since 1976, every major party nominee has released the returns and Clinton has publicly released nearly 40 years' worth. Even Trump's running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, released 10 years of his tax returns.

Tax returns don't measure net worth, so they wouldn't verify whether Trump is worth the $10 billion he says he is. But the returns would reveal how much Trump earned from his assets, helping someone work back to an approximation of his net worth.

Trump's own estimates of his income and net worth have previously been scrutinized by those who had access to his tax returns.

For a decade, Trump tangled with New York City authorities over his city tax bill, a battle first reported in June by journalist David Cay Johnson in The Daily Beast.

In Trump's 1984 tax filings, he said he had lost money during a time in which he had just completed Trump Tower and regularly boasted about the success of his business deals. Trump also declared that he was primarily a consultant that year, and that his consulting business had $684,000 in business expenses and no income. He provided no receipts to justify the claimed expenses.

City tax authorities didn't buy it \u2014 and after Trump appealed his tax bill, they fought with him for the next 10 years. Trump lost and was ordered to pay the taxes on more than $1 million in income.

Trump's multibillion-dollar fortune has been questioned by banks that demanded his tax returns before lending him money. Commercial lenders generally require both personal and business tax returns as part of a loan application, and Trump provided such information to North Fork Bank in 2004 and 2005.

Though the bank's evaluations aren't public, discussion of them in a later deposition of Trump revealed they were unflattering. The deposition was taken in a defamation lawsuit Trump filed against journalist Tim O'Brien, who wrote a book that questioned Trump's net worth. Trump lost the suit.

\"(North Fork) concluded in their estimation that your net worth was actually $1.2 billion instead of $3.5 billion as you claimed. Are you aware of that?\" asked O'Brien's attorney, Andrew Ceresney.

Trump said he had not known that, but dismissed the quality of the bank's opinion.

\"The numbers are wrong,\" he said.

North Fork wasn't alone in marking down Trump's net worth. Deutsche Bank also reviewed Trump's finances as of 2004, deeming him to be worth \"give or take $788 million,\" Ceresney said in the deposition. The attorney did not say whether Deutsche Bank relied on Trump's tax return in its calculation.

Deutsche Bank declined to comment about its evaluation of Trump's worth, but the bank is required to keep customer information confidential by law. Capital One Bank \u2014 it bought North Fork in 2006 \u2014 did not respond to requests for comment by phone and email.

O'Brien did not respond to requests for comment, but in a story he wrote for Bloomberg, O'Brien said he was barred from discussing the contents of Trump's tax returns because they were produced under seal in the court case.

In addition to a suggestion of his worth, Trump's tax returns would reveal his charitable contributions. Despite boasting of sweeping generosity, the AP reported more than a year ago that there is little record of substantial personal philanthropy from Trump.

Trump has been dogged by questions about his personal giving and how his namesake foundation operates. The Washington Post has reported that Trump used donations given by others to pay for legal settlements, political contributions and even purchase portraits of himself.

Public disclosure would resolve many of these questions for voters.

A new Associated Press-GfK poll found that just under half of registered voters\u2014 46 percent \u2014 say it is very important for candidates to release their tax returns, though Democrats were far more likely say it was very or extremely important than Republicans.

A recent Monmouth University poll also found that most Americans are aware that Trump has not released his tax returns, and just over half think it's because he is hiding something he does not want the public to know.

___

AP Polling Editor Emily Swanson contributed to this report.

___

Follow Chad Day and Jeff Horwitz on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/ChadSDay and http://twitter.com/JeffHorwitz

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, who has been in the hot seat over the central bank's interest-rate policy, now has another headache: Wells Fargo.

Yellen is likely to face sharp questions from a House committee Wednesday over whether federal banking regulators fell down on the job by not detecting practices at Wells Fargo that allegedly had the nation's second largest bank opening millions of accounts without customers' permission.

Yellen is scheduled to testify before the House Financial Services Committee on the Fed's responsibilities to supervise the nation's largest banks.

Earlier this month, U.S. and California regulators fined Wells Fargo $185 million. They charged that bank employees opened unauthorized accounts and signed up customers for online banking, debit cards and other services without their knowledge in an effort to meet aggressive sales targets.

The Labor Department, meanwhile, is investigating possible abuse of Wells Fargo employees. A group of Democratic senators asked the department to see whether tellers, branch managers and customer service reps were harassed and threatened with termination unless they met sales goals for pushing bank products such as new credit cards.

About 5,300 Wells Fargo employees have been fired since 2011 over the sales practices.

In testimony last week before the Senate Banking Committee, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf apologized for the misconduct and promised assistance to affected customers. He is scheduled to testify Thursday before the House panel.

Yellen could also face questions Wednesday about a Fed recommendation that Congress limit the ability of banks to hold ownership stakes in nonfinancial firms.

The Fed last week voted 7-3 to keep its key interest rate where it has been all year. But it did send a strong signal that it is prepared to raise rates before the end of the year, with many expecting a move in December.

At a press conference after the Fed's rate decision, Yellen was asked about the Wells Fargo case. She said she was \"distressed\" to see banks only addressing problems of employee misconduct after they crop up, rather than having solid procedures in place to ensure that employees act \"in an ethical and appropriate manner.\"

The actions at San Francisco-based Wells Fargo, which are believed to have gone on for many years, have raised questions about the role of regulators \u2014 including the Fed \u2014 in monitoring banks. Yellen told reporters last week that Fed examiners will pay close attention to banks' control procedures to prevent such lapses in the future.

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BEIJING (AP) \u2014 Major Asian stock markets were lower Wednesday after investors were reassured by trade-friendly Hillary Clinton's performance in a U.S. presidential debate with rival Donald Trump.

KEEPING SCORE: Tokyo's Nikkei 225 index fell 1.5 percent to 16,426.61 and Hong Kong's Hang Seng lost 0.6 percent to 23,440.18. The Shanghai Composite Index lost 0.2 percent to 2,990.97 and benchmarks in Singapore and Indonesia also declined. Sydney's S&P ASX 200 gained 0.4 percent to 5,497.40 and Seoul's Kospi advanced 0.9 percent to 2,017.94. Bangkok, Manila and New Zealand also gained.

THE TRUMP EFFECT: Investors sold gold and other assets they had bought as hedges against a possible victory by the Republican Trump, who has called for controls on trade and immigration. Markets also have been unnerved by Trump's tax and economic plans. They were reassured by what some commentators saw as his poor showing in a nationally televised debate with the Democrat Clinton, who is seen as more favorable to trade and continuity in U.S. economic policy.

ANALYST'S TAKE: \"The strong performance by Hillary Clinton against Donald Trump in the first presidential debate had a major impact on markets as some of the Trump-related hedges saw a pullback,\" said Angus Nicholson of IG Markets in a report. \"A number of safe haven assets had been bid up during the Trump poll surge as investors worried about what Trump would mean for the global economy, and particularly the global security risks he poses. Gold saw its biggest one-day decline in more than a month losing 0.8 percent as Trump's probability of becoming president was seemingly diminished after his poor showing in the debate.\"

WALL STREET: U.S. stocks rebounded after a Conference Board survey showed consumer confidence is at a nine-year high, a sign Americans will keep spending in the months to come. Technology and consumer stocks made the largest gains. Technology companies jumped, and solid results from cruise line operator Carnival sent travel-related companies higher. Energy companies slumped with oil prices as hopes for an international cut in fuel production faded. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 133.47 points, or 0.7 percent, to 18,228.30. The Standard & Poor's 500 index picked up 13.83 points, or 0.6 percent, to 2,159.93. The Nasdaq composite gained 48.22 points, or 0.9 percent, to 5,305.71.

ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude lost 6 cents to $44.61 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract plunged $1.26 on Tuesday to close at $44.67. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added 10 cents to $46.62 in London. The contract dropped $1.41 the previous session to close at $46.52.

CURRENCY: The dollar gained to 100.56 yen from Tuesday's 100.29 yen. The euro was unchanged at $1.12.

"}, {"id":"82c63b08-6cc0-5679-9b5d-6038fea04e6b","type":"article","starttime":"1475042400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T23:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1475058736","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"3 Reasons \"Armchair Income\" Could Trounce Social Security","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_82c63b08-6cc0-5679-9b5d-6038fea04e6b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/reasons-armchair-income-could-trounce-social-security/article_82c63b08-6cc0-5679-9b5d-6038fea04e6b.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/reasons-armchair-income-could-trounce-social-security/article_37797167-fca8-5822-ad2f-9d8415a4f5d8.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"newsfeedback@fool.com (Austin Smith)","prologue":"10,000 hardworking Americans will retire each day for the next 14 years, and I think they're insane not to consider an \"Armchair Income\" strategy that's helping many people build a foundation of consistent and reliable wealth.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"32a24a3c-316c-5ede-80a0-5db4320aa487","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"580","height":"385","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/2a/32a24a3c-316c-5ede-80a0-5db4320aa487/57eb8a2ecd291.image.jpg?resize=580%2C385"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/2a/32a24a3c-316c-5ede-80a0-5db4320aa487/57eb8a2ecd291.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"199","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/2a/32a24a3c-316c-5ede-80a0-5db4320aa487/57eb8a2ecd291.image.jpg?resize=300%2C199"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"680","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/2a/32a24a3c-316c-5ede-80a0-5db4320aa487/57eb8a2ecd291.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"82c63b08-6cc0-5679-9b5d-6038fea04e6b","body":"

10,000 hardworking Americans will retire each day for the next 14 years, and I think they're insane not to consider an \"Armchair Income\" strategy that's helping many people build a foundation of consistent and reliable wealth.

I've personally seen ordinary Americans use this clever system to rack up instant income like $630, $2,850, and $3,117.

After learning more about this strategy, I'm thinking about adding years to my retirement. Meanwhile many Americans are wondering if they'll be able to retire at all.

And the sad truth is their concerns are completely justified.

Everywhere retirees look there are reasons to worry. Experts are predicting a collapse in Social Security, another real estate bubble in the United States, a new student debt bubble, and another bear market for stocks to rival 2009.

As you probably already know, any ONE of those events could be enough to stop retirement plans dead in their tracks.

Can you imagine what a few at once would do...?

And with stock and bond yields near all-time lows, it's getting harder to find reliable income streams to live off in retirement.

That's precisely why I was so excited to find a quietly issued \"Ultimate Income Report\" that revealed a totally different way to generate wealth during retirement. The system was so straightforward it can be managed completely without ever leaving your armchair. That might mean no need for a part-time job. No need to go collect rent checks from rude tenants. No need to load up on overpriced dividend stocks. No need to buy bonds yielding a measly 2%.

In the report I learned how you can turn just about any stock into an income-producing cash cow \u2013 even if it doesn't pay a dividend!

And that was just the beginning. After reading on I learned how this system can create:

  1. Consistent, predictable income you control. (Page 4)
  2. A contractual obligation guaranteeing that you are paid today. (Page 5)
  3. Repeatable income that can be cashed in over, and over again.\u00a0(Page 7)

And a lot more.

Imagine never worrying about whether your Social Security check arrives in the mail, whether your messy tenants pay rent on time (if at all!), or whether stocks are about to take a nose dive.

It sounds hard to believe, but I've met a lucky individual who retired decades early with his family to Costa Rica, cutting income checks for himself while he was still young enough to enjoy beach life.

In fact, he's the author of the very same Ultimate Income Report that woke me up to this whole system.

After reading the report I'm sure you'll agree that this \"armchair income\" strategy trounces the traditional pillars of a comfortable retirement like Social Security, dividends, and bonds \u2013 many of which look like they're crumbling before us.

You can read the report in its entirety by\u00a0clicking here now.

The Motley Fool has a\u00a0disclosure policy.

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TOKYO (AP) \u2014 Uber, which has struggled to win Japan over to its ride-sharing service, is hoping to fare better with takeout deliveries.

UberEats opens Thursday, initially just in central Tokyo, ranging from simple dishes costing just hundreds of yen to Michelin-star dining at the equivalent of hundreds of dollars.

Delivery is free at first, although fees are expected to be added at a later date. Consumers download a software application in iOS, Android or a desktop version to choose food off menus from 150 restaurants.

Drivers hired by UberEats are tapped online, pick up food at restaurants, and make deliveries, ensuring food arrives relatively hot and fresh. The global average for deliveries is about a half hour.

Japan is the eighth nation, and Tokyo the 34th city, for UberEats, already available in San Francisco, Dubai, Singapore and Paris.

Ride-sharing has stumbled in Japan partly because of a strong taxi lobby. Uber offers just a high-end taxi service in Japan, and has begun a limited ride-sharing in a rural area, where populations are declining, Uber Japan Co. President Masami Takahashi said Wednesday.

But hopes are high that food delivery would be popular for Japanese working late in the office and at parties. It may also be handy for tourists, more familiar with the service and whose ranks are growing in recent years.

Uber takes a percentage of the revenue from the restaurants, but dishes come at the same price as at the restaurants.

Daisuke Nomura, owner and chef of Sougo, a Michelin two-star restaurant, hopes UberEats will help not only Japanese but also visitors from abroad rediscover the delights of his traditional shoujin-style cooking.

\"I have used the car service, and so I trust the brand and the quality of its service,\" he told reporters in Tokyo.

___

Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at twitter.com/yurikageyama

Her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/yuri-kageyama

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DETROIT (AP) \u2014 Former Indy Racing League driver Sam Schmidt has done a lot in the 16 years since an accident left him paralyzed from the neck down. He runs a racing team and a foundation. He's raced a sailboat using his chin. But the man who raced in the Indianapolis 500 hasn't been able to drive around his neighborhood \u2014 until now.

On Wednesday, Schmidt is set to receive the first license restricted to an autonomous vehicle in the U.S. The license allows him to drive on Nevada roads in his specially modified Corvette, which requires no hands on its steering wheel or feet on its pedals. Schmidt uses head motions to control the car's direction.

Fully driverless cars \u2014 several steps beyond the car that Schmitt is driving \u2014 are expected to reach U.S. roads in the next five to ten years, and the disabled community is eager for their arrival. More than 4 million people in the U.S. need assistance with daily tasks like eating or leaving home, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Others have less severe disabilities but are still unable to drive.

Disabled people are less likely than the non-disabled to be employed and are more likely to experience poverty, the bureau says. But that could change with the arrival of self-driving cars.

\"It's coming. We're looking for something to help us get that level of independence,\" Schmidt told The Associated Press.

Schmidt is the bridge to that future. His car isn't fully autonomous; it uses four cameras to monitor his head and transmit his movements to the tires. He breathes into a tube to accelerate and sucks the air out when he wants to brake.

The car isn't practical for most people. Centennial, Colorado-based Arrow Electronics bought and modified Schmidt's $80,000 2016 Corvette Z06. It spent an additional six figures on cameras, sensors and computers and even more to add a steering wheel and brake pedals on the passenger side.

Schmidt's license requires that a licensed driver accompany him in the passenger seat to take over in case of emergency. When he drives, Schmidt must follow a pilot car. He can't drive in ice or snow. Those restrictions could eventually be eased, Nevada officials say.

Some in the disabled community would like to move directly to fully self-driving cars which wouldn't require licenses at all, says Henry Claypool, policy director of the Community Living Policy Center at the University of California, San Francisco.

\"There are some people who are just so isolated that it really compromises their ability to enjoy their basic civil rights,\" Claypool said.

But Claypool says it's important to be patient and work with the industry now so when autonomous vehicles do arrive, they're accessible.

\"There are real barriers to transportation and we need to be clear about what those are and make sure we leverage the technology to address them,\" said Claypool, who is wheelchair-bound but drives a $62,000 modified minivan.

Many companies are thinking inclusively. Google has worked closely with the blind while developing its self-driving cars. Tesla Motors has said it's working on an urban transport vehicle that would accommodate wheelchairs. Arrow is working on other projects, including a modified bicycle for a paraplegic athlete.

\"Sam is our astronaut,\" said Joe Verrengia, Arrow's global director of social responsibility.

Arrow is making its design and software freely available in the hope that other companies will build on what it has done. Over the next 18 months, Schmidt hopes to modify a more advanced, semi-autonomous car that could drive itself for short stretches and could help him override potential mistakes. Right now, for example, he could accidentally turn the car if he looks to the side when he means to go straight. A car that was watching the road ahead could correct that.

But for now, the license means an end to 16 years in the passenger seat of a conversion van for trips around town.

\"My wife hates driving that van. It makes us look like we're 75 and retired,\" said Schmidt, 52.

Schmidt is thrilled by the pace of improvement in technology. Within the first year of his partnership with Arrow, in an earlier version of his Corvette, Schmidt completed qualifying laps at the 2014 Indianapolis 500. Earlier this year, he raced to the summit of Pike's Peak.

\"Me driving is a lifetime-old problem and these people came together and solved it in seven months,\" he said. \"When you have the right people and the right resources and everyone concentrates on the goal, it gets done.\"

Schmidt, who co-owns the racing team Schmidt Peterson Motorsports and is chairman of the Conquer Paralysis Now foundation, can hardly narrow the list when asked where he wants to drive first. One stop is the Las Vegas Motor Speedway, where he won a race in 1999. He'd also like to cruise down the Las Vegas strip.

And one simple pleasure: A trip to the drive-thru at In-N-Out Burger.

\"It might be kind of fun just to sit there in line with 15 other people,\" he said.

"}, {"id":"0317cc32-934d-5f1b-b01b-402ab97c5af9","type":"article","starttime":"1475035345","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T21:02:25-07:00","lastupdated":"1475039278","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Wells Fargo claws back part of CEO, other executive's salary","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_0317cc32-934d-5f1b-b01b-402ab97c5af9.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/wells-fargo-claws-back-part-of-ceo-other-executive-s/article_0317cc32-934d-5f1b-b01b-402ab97c5af9.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/wells-fargo-claws-back-part-of-ceo-other-executive-s/article_5ce45592-3c42-50e3-baf2-caebc118999b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By KEN SWEET\nAP Business Writer","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Wells Fargo says CEO John Stumpf and the executive who ran the bank's retail banking division will forfeit tens of millions of dollars in pay as the bank tries to stem a scandal over its sales practices.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","banking and credit","government and politics","corporate management","corporate news","personnel","wages and salaries","financial services"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":3,"commentID":"0317cc32-934d-5f1b-b01b-402ab97c5af9","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Wells Fargo says CEO John Stumpf and the executive who ran the bank's retail banking division will forfeit tens of millions of dollars in pay as the bank tries to stem a scandal over its sales practices.

The independent directors at the nation's second-largest bank said Tuesday that Stumpf will forfeit $41 million in stock awards, while former retail banking executive Carrie Tolstedt will forfeit $19 million of her stock awards, effective immediately. Both are also giving up any bonuses for 2016, and Tolstedt will not receive any severance or any other compensation in connection with her retirement, the bank's directors said.

The announcement comes ahead of Stump's planned appearance before the House Financial Services Committee on Thursday, where he is expected to face a bipartisan grilling similar to what he experienced last week from the Senate Banking Committee.

The San Francisco-based bank's independent directors are also launching their own investigation, hiring the law firm Shearman & Sterling to assist them.

In their announcement, the independent directors said the moves did not preclude the board from pursuing more salary clawbacks from Stumpf or Tolstedt, depending on the results of the investigation. Stumpf, as a member of Wells Fargo's board of directors and chairman of the board, has recused himself from any decisions that may come from that investigation, the board said.

\"We will proceed with a sense of urgency but will take the time we need to conduct a thorough investigation,\" Stephen Sanger, Wells Fargo's lead independent director, said in a statement.

Wells Fargo had been under pressure from lawmakers and others to implement its executive compensation clawback provisions after the bank agreed to pay $185 million to settle allegations its employees opened millions of accounts without customers' permission to reach aggressive sales targets.

Stumpf has faced bipartisan outrage for his handling of the scandal. Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee said at a Banking Committee hearing where Stumpf testified last week that it would be \"malpractice\" if Wells Fargo didn't institute any compensation clawbacks. Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts told Stumpf he should resign and \"give back the money you took while the scam was going on.\"

Stumpf, a 34-year veteran of Wells Fargo and CEO since 2007, earned $19.3 million last year. Tolstedt announced her retirement in July and had been expected to leave with as much as $125 million in salary, stock options and other compensation before the board's announcement.

The consumer banking giant, which is also the nation's biggest mortgage lender, has fired about 5,300 employees over the sales practices. Lawmakers told Stumpf at the hearing those dismissals didn't go high enough up the chain.

Stumpf was long admired for keeping Wells \u2014 until recently \u2014 free of scandal. The bank did not invest in as many toxic mortgages in the 2000s as its counterparts, and Stumpf initially declined to take bailout money from Washington before accepting it in a sign of solidarity.

He also was able to expand Wells significantly as a result of the crisis, buying up Wachovia. That gave the bank known for its stagecoach logo, which was primarily a West Coast and Southern bank, access to the lucrative East Coast and New York banking markets.

Stumpf was also well-known in the banking industry for his company's ability to sell products to customers. While quotas varied by branch size and other factors, a typical employee had to sell between 13 and 15 banking products a day \u2014 a new account, a mortgage, a retirement account, or even online banking. The targets were high even in small towns.

Federal and local authorities said Wells Fargo & Co. employees trying to meet those targets opened bank and credit card accounts, moved money between those accounts and even created fake email addresses to sign customers up for online banking \u2014 all without customer authorization. Debit cards were issued and activated, as well as PINs created, without customers' knowledge.

The Labor Department is investigating whether Wells Fargo abused its employees while driving them to meet the lofty sales targets. The bank says it has refunded to customers $2.6 million in fees charged for products that were sold without authorization.

Wells Fargo is also ending its sales-goals targets for its employees, now effective Oct. 1 instead of the earlier Jan. 1 goal. The date change appeared in Stumpf's prepared remarks, seen by The Associated Press, for his planned appearance in front of the Financial Services Committee on Thursday.

____

Ken Sweet covers banking and consumer financial affairs for The Associated Press. Follow him on Twitter at @kensweet.

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GUANICA, Puerto Rico (AP) \u2014 Puerto Ricans are buying rice produced on the island for the first time in nearly 30 years. They are also eating locally grown mushrooms, kale and even arugula, along with more traditional crops such as plantains and pineapples.

The U.S. territory is seeing something of an agricultural renaissance as new farms spring up across the island, supplying an increasing number of farmers' markets and restaurants to meet consumer demand for fresher produce.

Farming has become one of the few areas of growth on an island struggling to emerge from a 10-year-old recession and a still-unfolding debt crisis. The most recent statistics from the governor's office show farm income grew 25 percent to more than $900 million in 2012-2014. The amount of acreage under cultivation rose 50 percent over the past four years, generating at least 7,000 jobs.

\"More and more people have noticed that this is one of the only successful ways of living on the island right now,\" said Tara Rodriguez Besosa, a farming advocate and owner of an organic restaurant in San Juan that buys from local farms, including one started by her mother several years ago.

Agriculture is a small part of the economy in Puerto Rico, well behind manufacturing, finance and tourism. But the growth is notable simply because things are so bad overall. Many businesses have closed, tens of thousands of people have decamped to the U.S. mainland, unemployment is at nearly 12 percent and the government is in default. Congress gave the territory some breathing room in June with legislation to enable the restructuring of what the governor has called its \"unpayable\" $70 billion debt, but the effects of that legislation have yet to be felt widely.

The agricultural rebirth can be seen in the aisles of supermarkets, where local rice went on sale in August for the first time since the last producer closed in 1989, and in the shimmering green fields where the grain is grown on the outskirts of the southwestern town of Guanica. The government helped launch Finca Fraternidad, or \"Fraternity Farm,\" by providing 1,350 acres of vacant public land.

The rice venture is one of about 350 farms that the government supported to reduce Puerto Rico's reliance on expensive food imports and spur the growth of a sector that dominated the economy until the 1940s, when the territory began a decades-long transformation into a more urban, developed society where few wanted to work on farms.

\"It's satisfying to change the perspective of an island that once viewed agriculture as a thing of the past, as something for people without education,\" Puerto Rican Agriculture Secretary Myrna Comas said.

It can still be a challenge to find workers, especially for labor-intensive crops like coffee. But 25-year-old Jonathan Rodriguez, who has been working on the harvest at Finca Fraternidad, said the job appeals to him.

\"I like it because it's something that we sow for the island,\" he said on a scorching recent morning. \"And that's why we're here, to make Puerto Rico better.\"

In the west and the south, the government has launched a project to supply the local rum industry with homegrown sugarcane, which dominated the economy in the 19th century but all but disappeared as it became cheaper to produce elsewhere. About 870 acres of cane have been planted so far, and Comas said the plan is to expand to 11,600 acres.

In addition to the many small, independent farms, the island has seen investment in large-scale agriculture.

Bayer, the German medicine and farm-chemical maker, announced this month that it would spend $17 million to develop two agriculture biotech facilities in the U.S. territory. Monsanto, the Missouri-based seed and weed-killer company, has large fields of corn, soy and cotton in Puerto Rico and recently invested $5 million in its projects.

Even pot growers are looking to set up shop.

Following a 2015 executive order legalizing medical marijuana derivatives, GreenVision LLC, a subsidiary of Nevada-based StereoVision Entertainment Inc., announced plans in August to build a 40,000-square-foot (3,700-square-meter) cultivation and manufacturing facility in Puerto Rico.

But it's the small-scale farming that is most visible to consumers.

The number of farmers' markets has tripled in the past four years to more than a dozen across the island, said Mayra Nieves, president of a local nonprofit organic food cooperative. That has quadrupled overall business to some $35 million a year, spurred in large part by interest in organic produce, Comas said.

There are also urban community gardens popping up across the capital that cater to people who want something fresher than the shrink-wrapped imports that have long been standard at stores and restaurants.

\"People are becoming more open-minded,\" Nieves said. \"They no longer see us as 'those hippies.'\"

___

Danica Coto on Twitter: www.twitter.com/danicacoto

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TORONTO (AP) \u2014 Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has approved a $27 billion liquefied natural gas project on British Columbia's northwest coast in a decision that's considered a litmus test for a government that has vowed to do more for the environment.

Three cabinet ministers made the announcement late Tuesday. It's Trudeau's first decision on a major energy project. It comes ahead of some of important pipeline decisions that will cause him problems from either industry or environmentalists and aboriginals.

The proposed liquefied natural gas processing plant by Petronas near Prince Rupert, British Columbia, would ship 19 million tons a year of frozen, liquefied gas to markets in Asia.

Trudeau still faces decisions on Enbridge's controversial Northern Gateway pipeline proposal that would bring oil to the Pacific Coast for shipment to Asia as well as Kinder Morgan's TransMountain pipeline.

"}, {"id":"01e2775f-c250-5e3a-8f8f-7c80caec8207","type":"article","starttime":"1475024664","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T18:04:24-07:00","lastupdated":"1475028105","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Justice Dept. top national security official to leave post","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_01e2775f-c250-5e3a-8f8f-7c80caec8207.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/justice-dept-top-national-security-official-to-leave-post/article_01e2775f-c250-5e3a-8f8f-7c80caec8207.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/justice-dept-top-national-security-official-to-leave-post/article_2652d5b0-26a6-5736-a9b7-cdf1a8747a2a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Justice Department's top national security official is leaving his position next month, the department announced Tuesday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","government and politics","technology","national security","military and defense","computer crime","hacking","military legal affairs","crime","general news","technology issues"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":9,"commentID":"01e2775f-c250-5e3a-8f8f-7c80caec8207","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Justice Department's top national security official is leaving his position next month, the department announced Tuesday.

John Carlin, who has led the department's national security division since 2014, will be leaving government on Oct. 15.

The department did not reveal what Carlin, 43, plans to do next, but it said he would take some time off and spend time with his family.

\"John Carlin has been a trusted and tireless leader of the Justice Department's National Security Division,\" Attorney General Loretta Lynch said in a statement. \"He is wholly devoted to the department's most important mission \u2014 protecting our country against acts of terrorism and other national security threats \u2014 and he has set a high standard by relentlessly pursuing those who seek to harm our people and threaten our assets.\"

Carlin's exit leaves the Obama administration without one of its most vocal advocates for publicly identifying and blaming foreign government hackers for cyberattacks on American institutions. His departure comes as the administration weighs whether and how to respond to a Democratic National Committee cyberbreach that U.S. officials believe was committed by the Russians.

During his tenure, the Justice Department brought indictments against five Chinese military officials accused of hacking into American corporations in a case of economic espionage. The department this year also secured indictments of Iranian hackers accused of digital intrusions on banks and a small dam outside New York City.

It's unclear whether those actions will result in courtroom prosecutions, but Carlin has repeatedly encouraged the use of indictments and other sanctions as a deterrent against foreign hackers and the nations that sponsor them and said such cases were effective.

Other notable prosecutions brought by national security division lawyers under Carlin's watch include the case against Ardit Ferizi, a computer hacker who helped the Islamic State group by providing names of U.S. government and military workers as potential targets. They also prosecuted members of the so-called Syrian Electronic Army, who have been charged with computer hacking-related conspiracies that targeted the U.S. government, media and private-sector companies.

The division has also overseen the prosecutions of young Americans who have lent support to the Islamic State.

Carlin previously served as chief of staff and senior counsel to former FBI director Robert Mueller and was also a federal prosecutor in Washington.

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CHANDLER \u2014 Gov. Doug Ducey says he\u2019s preparing a list of state regulations and state agencies he wants to kill.

Speaking Tuesday at a conference of small business advocates, Ducey cited legislation he championed since taking office in early 2015 to eliminate restrictions, and his executive orders freezing new rules. He said more are on the way when lawmakers convene in January.

\u201cWe want to shrink the 220 boards and commissions that exist and are standing in the way of job creation,\u201d the Republican governor said, calling for accountability from agencies \u201cthat want to justify their existence just by creation of more taxes or spending in regulation.\u201d

The governor was not ready, however, to provide specifics.

\u201cI\u2019m not going to give you a preview of the State of the State (speech) in September,\u201d he said when questioned after his address. He insisted nothing is off limits, however.

\u201cWe\u2019re going to look at any regulation that gets in the way of job creation that isn\u2019t beneficial, doesn\u2019t help the state protect the citizen or protect the consumer,\u201d Ducey said.

The promise of more deregulation comes on the heels of the Legislature scrapping requirements for some professions to be licensed. Ducey cited in particular the elimination of state oversight of vegetable packers and yoga instructors. \u201cWe want freedom for our yoga instructors,\u201d he quipped.

In response to a question from the audience, Ducey acknowledged that some U.S. firms have moved their manufacturing operations offshore. But the governor, questioned afterwards, was not jumping on the proposal by GOP presidential hopeful Donald Trump at Monday\u2019s debate to put a tax on goods imported from those countries.

\u201cI believe in free trade,\u201d Ducey said.

He did say it might be appropriate to discuss what is free, and fair, trade. But Ducey said that\u2019s not really the answer to disappearing manufacturing jobs.

\u201cWe\u2019re doing a lot of things at the federal level where you\u2019re actually pushing a company out,\u201d Ducey said. \u201c ... Are there things we can do at the state level and at the federal level, like getting rid of regulations, like lowering taxes, like allowing people to bring their dollars back into this country at a reasonable tax rate?\u201d

As to companies being able to pay their workers much less elsewhere, Ducey said, \u201cWell, we always want to have our workers paid well here with ever-increasing wages.\u201d

While the cost of labor may be \u201cthe most important part\u201d of a firm\u2019s decision to move offshore, Ducey said taxes and regulations can weigh in the computation. \u201cAnd that\u2019s something that governors and governments can deal with,\u201d he said.

In speaking to the Job Creators Network, Ducey also touted the fact that Arizona has recovered all the jobs it lost in the recession.

But that recovery has not been across the board. The most recent figures from the state Office of Economic Opportunity put manufacturing employment at 159,100. That\u2019s just 11,000 more than when the sector hit bottom in 2010 \u2014 and 29,000 fewer than the pre-recession peak of 188,200 in April 2006.

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A historic hotel on the Arizona-Mexico border could be shut down for good if no one steps forward to purchase it.

The extravagant Gadsden Hotel in Douglas has been featured in movies and ghost hunting TV shows. Douglas is 100 miles southeast of Tucson and across the border from Agua Prieta, Sonora.

Owner Hartman Brekhus turns 93 in October and says he can\u2019t keep the 109-year-old hotel open much longer. He bought the hotel with his wife in 1988, but she has since died and his health is declining.

Brekhus\u2019 daughter-in-law, Robin Brehus, is a former manager of the hotel and a spokeswoman for the family.

She said the hotel has hosted weddings, proms and quince\u00f1eras for the community. \u201cI don\u2019t think I know anybody who doesn\u2019t have some memory of the Gadsden,\u201d she said.

The Gadsden Hotel is on the National Register of Historic Places and former Douglas mayor Michael Gomez says it is an anchor for the city\u2019s downtown. It\u2019s held noted guests like Eleanor Roosevelt, Amelia Earhart, John Dillinger and several Arizona governors.

The hotel\u2019s elaborate interior includes a 42-foot Tiffany & Co. stained-glass mural, an original marble staircase, an old-fashioned elevator and skeleton room keys that still hang behind the front desk.

\u201cStill to this day I walk in here and look around and appreciate the beauty and the detail of this hotel, and it\u2019s just sad to think about the doors closing and nobody walking in and out like they do every day,\u201d said Adam Carrasco, the hotel\u2019s general manager, who has memories of visiting the building as a child.

If the Gadsden closes, it would also displace 14 hotel employees and 10 businesses.

The Brekhus family says they have no current asking price and are willing to consider all offers.

"}, {"id":"c12fc644-64b8-5172-b81a-f2509e127bda","type":"article","starttime":"1475024400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T18:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1475053377","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"application":"editorial","title":"New JDA/Centiro Report Reveals More Than Three-Quarters of European Online Customers Are Willing to Exceed Minimum Order Thresholds for Free Delivery","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_c12fc644-64b8-5172-b81a-f2509e127bda.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/new-jda-centiro-report-reveals-more-than-three-quarters-of/article_c12fc644-64b8-5172-b81a-f2509e127bda.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/new-jda-centiro-report-reveals-more-than-three-quarters-of/article_c12fc644-64b8-5172-b81a-f2509e127bda.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Yet \u201clast-mile\u201c online fulfillment issues continue to blight retailers in the face of heightened customer expectations BRACKNELL, England & SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--More than three-quarters (80 per cent) of European online shoppers are willing to exceed minimum order thresholds if it qualifies them for free","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#prwire"],"customProperties":{},"revision":2,"commentID":"c12fc644-64b8-5172-b81a-f2509e127bda","body":"

Yet \u201clast-mile\u201c online fulfillment issues continue to

blight retailers in the face of heightened customer expectations

BRACKNELL, England & SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--More than three-quarters (80 per cent) of European online shoppers are

willing to exceed minimum order thresholds if it qualifies them for free

delivery or collection, according to data from the JDA/Centiro

Customer Pulse Report Europe 2016, conducted by YouGov. The survey

of 8,190 adults online across the UK, Germany, France and Sweden

revealed that despite this willingness to spend more with retailers,

European online shoppers continue to be intolerant of poor service.

Overall, nearly two-thirds (63 per cent) of respondents stated they

would likely switch to an alternative retailer as a result of a poor

experience with an online home delivery, or when using a Click & Collect

service (tweet

this). UK online shoppers were the least tolerant, with nearly

three-quarters (74 per cent) stating they would likely switch to an

alternative retailer (tweet

this).

Ongoing online home delivery problems fuels Click & Collect growth

The research reveals that 1 in 2 European shoppers experienced a problem

with an online order in the last 12 months (tweet

this). As problems with home deliveries continue, Click & Collect is

gaining increasing popularity among European online shoppers. Almost

half of those surveyed (49 per cent) stated they had used this service

over the past 12 months (tweet

this), growing by 17 per cent since 2014. The French (59 per cent)

and the UK markets (54 per cent) saw the highest rate of adoption of

Click & Collect services over the last year.

Despite the growing popularity of Click & Collect, more than half (54

per cent) of European adults that used the service had encountered an

issue (tweet

this). This figure is lower in the UK (45 per cent), due in part to

it being a more mature market for Click & Collect. In other regions

where issues were more frequent (Germany 65 per cent, France 56 per

cent, Sweden 56 per cent) retailers are still learning and refining how

to run an effective in-store Click & Collect service.

\u201cThe growth of online retail shows no sign of slowing down \u2013 with

retailers competing ever more aggressively for sales and offering an

increasing array of fulfillment options. Delivering a high level of

service in an efficient and profitable manner remains a challenge for

many retailers,\u201d said Jason Shorrock, vice president, retail strategy

EMEA at JDA. \u201cAs our research shows, last-mile issues continue to

negatively impact the customer experience and customers are more willing

to go elsewhere if their expectations aren\u2019t being met. The good news

for retailers is that customers appear to be willing to exceed order

thresholds if it qualifies them for free delivery or collection. Now,

more than ever, it is important for retailers to ensure they are

offering outstanding customer service, or they risk damaging customer

relationships and revenue.\u201d

Differing responses to minimum order values

When ordering goods online for home delivery, cost (50 per cent)

continues to be the most important factor for European online shoppers,

followed by convenience (26 per cent) and speed (18 per cent) (tweet

this). Interestingly, speed was much more important for German (21

per cent) and French (21 per cent) online shoppers than those in the UK

(16 per cent) and Sweden (12 per cent).

Over the last 12 months, many retailers have introduced measures such as

minimum order values and charges for Click & Collect orders, as they

look to boost the profitability of their online operations. Despite the

majority (79 per cent) of European online shoppers indicating they would

be happy to exceed minimum order thresholds, the research shows that

behavior differs by delivery option. Twenty-five per cent would do so

for same-day delivery and 22 per cent for next-day delivery, but this

drops to 15 per cent for standard (3-5 days) delivery (tweet

this). Responses also varied by geography, with a third (33 per

cent) of UK respondents exceeding minimum order values to qualify for

next-day delivery, compared to just 16 per cent of French respondents.

Regarding free delivery, UK respondents had the highest expectations

with almost three-quarter (72 per cent) expecting standard (3-5 days)

delivery to be free (tweet

this). In comparison, this expectation was far less in Sweden (61

per cent), Germany (55 per cent) and France (55 per cent).

Returns remain a conundrum for European retailers

Returns continue to put stress on European retailers from both an

operational and margin perspective. The research shows that 30 per cent

of European online adults return items bought online twice in an average

year, with a further 25 per cent returning items three or more times (tweet

this). Overall, 46 per cent of European online shoppers returned

items as a result of them not meeting their expectations. A further 16

per cent stated they bought multiple items with the intention of

returning the goods they did not want. Significantly, that figure was

higher in Germany (23 per cent) and the UK (19 per cent) specifically,

which indicates a possible trend towards \u201cserial returners\u201c in those

regions.

\u201cProcessing online returns continues to pose an operational and

financial challenge for retailers. At the same time, the returns

experience is having an increasing influence on who consumers shop with

online,\u201d said Niklas Hedin, CEO of Centiro. \u201cA significant number

of customers are now buying multiple items online with the intention of

sending back those they don\u2019t want. It will become increasingly

important for retailers to identify these \u2018serial returners\u2019 \u2013 so they

can better tailor their returns offering and use it as a source of

greater customer engagement.\u201d

Stores to retain a key role in online retail

According to the research, online home delivery (61 per cent will be the

most popular way to shop in five years\u2019 time (tweet

this). However, a significant number of European shoppers stated

they will use Click & Collect (28 per cent) or use the store to shop and

pick up in store (35 per cent), or shop and opt for home delivery (21

per cent). This indicates that the store will continue to play a

significant role in the retail industry in the future.

Another trend is the increased use of third-party fulfillment services

to enable shoppers to pick up their goods from locations such as train

stations and convenience stores (tweet

this). More than a quarter (27 per cent) of European adults online

said they would use such services in the future, with it being

especially popular in Sweden (37%) and France (36 per cent).

\u201cIt is clear that there are differing levels of maturity within the

European online retail market and customer behavior varies from country

to country. For international retailers, it is important to understand

these regional differences so they can tailor their approach to meet

local needs. Key to this will be mining the volume and variety of

customer data to generate and use insights to serve shoppers in a much

more personal and segmented manner. Aligning this insight with their

supply chains will help retailers deliver a better and more

cost-effective service to their customers,\u201d added Jason Shorrock.

All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. The results

are based on data from JDA\u2019s Customer Pulse Reports 2016. The total

sample size was UK (2,096), France (2,057), Germany (2,023) and Sweden

(2,014). Fieldwork was undertaken between April \u2013 May 2016. The survey

was carried out online. The figures have been given an even weighting

for each country to produce an average value.

Tweet This: JDA/Centiro

Report: 3/4 of Euro Online Customers Will Exceed Min Order Thresholds

for Free Delivery http://bit.ly/2dmKsmj

About JDA Software Group, Inc.

At JDA, we\u2019re fearless leaders. We\u2019re the leading provider of

end-to-end, integrated retail, omni-channel and supply chain planning

and execution solutions for more than 4,000 customers worldwide. Our

unique solutions empower our clients to reduce costs, increase

profitability and improve collaboration so they can deliver on their

customer promises every time. Using JDA, you can plan to deliver. www.jda.com

About Centiro

Centiro is the leading innovator in cloud-based transportation and

delivery management solutions. Centiro\u2019s products empower companies and

finer supply chains in more than 105 countries. The company has won

several awards and accolades over the years, and is ranked as one of the

best places to work in Europe by Great Place to Work\u00ae. For further

information, please visit: www.centiro.com.

RSS Feeds:

JDA press releases: https://jda.com/rss?feed=press

JDA

news: https://jda.com/rss?feed=news

JDA

events: https://jda.com/rss?feed=events

Social Networks:

Web: https://jda.com

Blog:

http://blog.jda.com

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/JDASoftware

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/JDASoftwareGroup

LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/company/jda-software

YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/user/JDASoftware

\u201cJDA\u201d is a trademark or registered trademark of JDA Software Group, Inc.

Any trade, product or service name referenced in this document using the

name \u201cJDA\u201d is a trademark and/or property of JDA Software Group, Inc.

Contacts

JDA Software Group, Inc.

Jolene Peixoto, +1 978-475-0524

Director,

Corporate Communications

jolene.peixoto@jda.com

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In a receptive audience full of space buffs, Musk said he envisions 1,000 passenger ships flying en masse to Mars, 'Battlestar Galactica' style. He calls it the Mars Colonial fleet, and he says it could become reality within a century. Musk's goal is to establish a full-fledged city on Mars and thereby make humans a multi-planetary species. 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On Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, SpaceX founder Elon Musk announced his company's plan for travel to the planet Mars. The engine is being tested for use in the new spacecraft. (SpaceX via AP)","byline":"HONS","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f3/6f3846ae-2641-5d80-ac3f-4eefbcdac20a/57eb12e42a239.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f3/6f3846ae-2641-5d80-ac3f-4eefbcdac20a/57eb12e42a239.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f3/6f3846ae-2641-5d80-ac3f-4eefbcdac20a/57eb12e42a239.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f3/6f3846ae-2641-5d80-ac3f-4eefbcdac20a/57eb12e42a239.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"05a3cde6-1a34-5e55-a532-fce574635649","description":"SpaceX founder Elon Musk speaks during the 67th International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. In a receptive audience full of space buffs, Musk said he envisions 1,000 passenger ships flying en masse to Mars, 'Battlestar Galactica' style. He calls it the Mars Colonial fleet, and he says it could become reality within a century. Musk's goal is to establish a full-fledged city on Mars and thereby make humans a multi-planetary species. (AP Photo/Refugio Ruiz)","byline":"Refugio Ruiz","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"292","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/5a/05a3cde6-1a34-5e55-a532-fce574635649/57eb12e45bc83.image.jpg?resize=512%2C292"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"57","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/5a/05a3cde6-1a34-5e55-a532-fce574635649/57eb12e45bc83.image.jpg?resize=100%2C57"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"171","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/5a/05a3cde6-1a34-5e55-a532-fce574635649/57eb12e45bc83.image.jpg?resize=300%2C171"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"584","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/5a/05a3cde6-1a34-5e55-a532-fce574635649/57eb12e45bc83.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"fd39da96-d2ff-51a5-9488-bc1ba06f1921","body":"

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) \u2014 On a personal quest to settle Mars, SpaceX founder Elon Musk envisions 1,000 passenger ships flying en masse to the red planet well within the next century, \"Battlestar Galactica\" style.

Musk outlined his zealous plan Tuesday to establish a self-sustaining city on Mars, complete with iron foundries and even pizzerias. He wants to make humans a multiplanetary species, and says the best way to do that is to colonize the red planet.

\"I think Earth will be a good place for a long time, but the probable lifespan of human civilization will be much greater if we're a multiplanetary species,\" he said.

Musk, who also runs electric car maker Tesla Motors, received a wildly warm reception at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico. Many in the crowd were avid space buffs.

For now, the aerospace company he founded in 2002 is focusing on satellite deliveries, as well as space station cargo runs for NASA and a future crew capsule for U.S. astronauts. Its Falcon rocket, though, is grounded for the second time in a year because of devastating accidents.

During his address, Musk did not mention the Sept. 1 launch pad explosion that destroyed a Falcon rocket and its satellite.

Instead, he noted that SpaceX already has begun work on the Mars Colonial fleet, recently test-firing a powerful new rocket engine named Raptor. The system ultimately could take people to the moons of Jupiter and beyond, he said.

Musk said it would be a \"super-exciting\" adventure to Mars but also dangerous, at least for the first few trips. His goal is to get the price down so anyone could afford to go, with a ticket costing no more than a house on Earth. He's shooting for 1 million Martians.

Would he go, someone asked? Perhaps ultimately, but it would depend on whether he had a good succession plan in place. As for being the first Martian, the risk of fatalities will be high \u2014 \"there's just no way around it\" \u2014 and he wants to see his five young sons grow up.

\"It would be basically, are you prepared to die? If that's OK, then you're a candidate for going,\" he told the audience.

In April, Musk announced plans to send an unmanned Dragon capsule to land on Mars as early as 2018. NASA is offering technical support, but no money. The space agency has its own program to get astronauts to Mars in the 2030s, using its own hardware.

Musk invited industry to join the Mars effort, which will represent a $10 billion investment. SpaceX currently is spending a few tens of millions of dollars on the enterprise, and the amount will soon grow, he said.

Musk described in detail his plans to launch a monster-size rocket \u2014 larger than even NASA's Saturn V moon rocket \u2014 from the same launch pad at Kennedy Space Center from which the Apollo astronauts departed for the lunar surface in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The first-stage boosters would return to land vertically \u2014 just like his Falcon rocket boosters do now. Reusability, in fact, is essential to any plan for getting humans to Mars, as is refilling fuel tanks in Earth orbit and creating rocket fuel at Mars for return trips, he said.

The rocket would hoist a spaceship big enough to carry 100 to 200 people to Mars, a trip lasting several months, quicker with nuclear propulsion. Musk promised no one would be stuck there; spaceships would return regularly, and \"you get a free return trip if you want.\"

\"Ultimately what I'm trying to achieve here is to make Mars seem possible, make it seem as though it's something that we can do in our lifetimes,\" he said.

___

Online:

SpaceX: http://www.spacex.com/

International Astronautical Federation: http://www.iafastro.org/

"}, {"id":"8bd6c3ad-dee2-5966-968a-81e2b58462c4","type":"article","starttime":"1475021122","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T17:05:22-07:00","lastupdated":"1475023584","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"US appeals court hears arguments in Clean Power Plan case","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_8bd6c3ad-dee2-5966-968a-81e2b58462c4.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/us-appeals-court-hears-arguments-in-clean-power-plan-case/article_8bd6c3ad-dee2-5966-968a-81e2b58462c4.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/us-appeals-court-hears-arguments-in-clean-power-plan-case/article_04bea35a-8d40-500a-b634-1e9d2f963242.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By MICHAEL BIESECKER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Lawyers for a coalition of states and businesses reliant on fossil fuels made their case Tuesday to a federal appeals court that President Barack Obama's plan to curtail climate-warming greenhouse gases is an unconstitutional power grab.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government and politics","legal proceedings","energy and the environment","judicial appointments and nominations","production facilities","environmental concerns","law and order","general news","environment","environment and nature","electric utilities","utilities","energy industry","judiciary","government appointments and nominations","air quality","corporate news","environmental laws and regulations","government regulations","climate","alternative energy industry","coal mining","metals and minerals industry","materials industry","oil and gas industry","national courts","national governments","courts","legislation","legislature"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":7,"commentID":"8bd6c3ad-dee2-5966-968a-81e2b58462c4","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Lawyers for a coalition of states and businesses reliant on fossil fuels made their case Tuesday to a federal appeals court that President Barack Obama's plan to curtail climate-warming greenhouse gases is an unconstitutional power grab.

The Clean Power Plan, which aims to ratchet down carbon emissions from coal-burning power plants, has been challenged by more than two dozen mostly Republican-led states led by West Virginia and Texas, as well as allied industry groups that profit from mining and burning coal.

The opponents contend the carbon-cutting plan unveiled by the Environmental Protection Agency will kill coal-mining jobs and drive up electricity costs. The Obama administration, some Democratic-led states and environmental groups counter it will spur hundreds of thousands of new clean-energy jobs installing emissions-free wind turbines and solar panels.

The Supreme Court has delayed implementation until the legal challenges are resolved.

The rules are considered essential to the United States meeting emissions-reduction targets in a global climate agreement signed in Paris last year. The plan aims to help stave off the worst predicted impacts of climate change by reducing carbon dioxide emissions at existing power plants by about one-third by 2030.

Regardless of which side prevails at the appeals level, the issue is considered likely to end up being decided by the Supreme Court.

Appearing Tuesday before a 10-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, West Virginia Solicitor General Elbert Lin argued that the EPA had overstepped the regulatory authority provided it by Congress to impose emissions standards under the Clean Air Act.

By limiting carbon emissions as it does other pollutants such as mercury and sulfur dioxide, Lin said the EPA was in effect requiring states to transform their electricity generation systems by favoring one source of energy over another. West Virginia's economy is reliant on coal mining and gets 96 percent of its electricity from coal-fired plants.

\"This rule is not about improving the performance of existing power plants,\" Lin told the judges. \"It's about shutting them down.\"

Much of the legal debate focused on the EPA's existing rule-making authority under the Clean Air Act to implement the \"best system of emissions reduction,\" and whether Congress meant the word \"system\" to apply only to the machinery inside power plants or more broadly to the various ways that electricity can be generated.

Justice Department lawyer Eric Hostetler said EPA was simply requiring what the free market is already doing. Demand for coal has plummeted as utilities shift to cleaner-burning natural gas made available through hydraulic fracturing and the cost of installing new wind and solar facilities decreases. In many parts of the United States, generating a kilowatt of emissions-free electricity is now the cheaper than that produced by carbon-spewing coal boilers.

\"This rule addresses the key environmental challenge of our time, and does so cost effectively,\" Hostetler said.

The judges repeatedly interrupted the lawyers for both sides to ask pointed questions about the legal underpinnings of their positions, but it did appear Tuesday that those challenging the new regulations were more often on the defensive.

Six of the 10 appeals judges on the D.C. Circuit were appointed by Democratic presidents. Chief Judge Merrick Garland, who was nominated by Obama to fill a vacant Supreme Court seat, recused himself from the case.

Even some of the Republican appointees lamented the inaction of Congress to address the threat of climate change.

\"The Earth is warming,\" declared Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who was nominated to his seat by President George W. Bush after working as a lawyer in Bush's White House. \"I understand the frustration with Congress.\"

In the absence of new legislation, the Obama administration crafted its plan relying on a new and expanded interpretation of a little used section of the Clean Air Act.

\"Why isn't this debate going on right now on the floor of the Senate, rather than before a panel of unelected judges?\" asked Judge Thomas Griffith, another Bush nominee.

Under the Clean Air Act, certain challenges to new EPA rules skip the federal district court and go directly to the appeals court. A three-judge panel had been scheduled to hear the case in June, but for issues involving \"a question of exceptional importance\" procedural rules allow for the case to proceed directly to a hearing before the full appeals court, known as an \"en banc\" review.

By using its discretion to skip a step, the appeals judges are potentially shaving months off the time before the case could be heard by the high court. Still, the legal fight over Obama's signature effort to cut carbon pollution is unlikely to be settled before he leaves office.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has said she will continue Obama's polices on carbon reduction. Republican nominee Donald Trump has suggested climate change is a hoax and said he plans to \"renegotiate\" the global climate treaty signed in Paris.

___

Follow Michael Biesecker on Twitter at https://twitter.com/mbieseck

___

This story has been corrected to show that the cost of installing new wind and solar facilities has decreased, not increased.

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LONDON (AP) \u2014 As investors and investigators weigh the damage of Yahoo's massive breach to the internet icon, information security experts worry that the record-breaking haul of password data could be used to open locks up and down the web.

While it's unknown to what extent the stolen data has been or will be circulating \u2014 or how easy it would be to use if it were \u2014 giant breaches can send ripples of insecurity across the internet.

\"Data breaches on the scale of Yahoo are the security equivalent of ecological disasters,\" said Matt Blaze, a security researcher who directs the Distributed Systems Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, in a message posted to Twitter .

A big worry is a cybercriminal technique known as \"credential stuffing,\" which works by throwing leaked username and password combinations at a series of websites in an effort to break in, a bit like a thief finding a ring of keys in an apartment lobby and trying them, one after the other, in every door in the building. Software makes the trial-and-error process practically instantaneous.

Credential stuffing typically succeeds between 0.1 percent and 2 percent of the time, according to Shuman Ghosemajumder, the chief technology officer of Mountain View, California-based Shape Security. That means cybercriminals wielding 500 million passwords could conceivably hijack tens of thousands of other accounts.

\"It becomes a numbers game for them,\" Ghosemajumder said in a telephone interview.

So will the big Yahoo breach mean an explosion of smaller breaches elsewhere, like the aftershocks that follow a big quake?

That seems unlikely given that Yahoo says the \"vast majority\" of its passwords were stored in an encrypted form believed to be difficult to unscramble. On the other hand, Yahoo said the theft occurred in late 2014, meaning that hackers have had as many as two years to try to decipher the data.

Ghosemajumder said he didn't see a surge in new breaches so much as a steady increase in attempts as cybercriminals replenish their stock of freshly hacked passwords.

The first hint that something was wrong at Yahoo came when Motherboard journalist Joseph Cox started receiving supposed samples of credentials hacked from the company in early July. Several weeks later, a cybercriminal using the handle \"Peace\" came forward with 5,000 samples \u2014 and the startling claim to be selling 200 million more.

On Aug. 1 Cox published a story on the sale , but the journalist said he never established with any certainty where Peace's credentials came from. He noted that Yahoo said most of its passwords were secured with one encryption protocol, while Peace's sample used a second. Either Peace drew his sample from a minority of Yahoo data or he was dealing with a different set of data altogether.

\"With the information available at the moment, it's more likely to be the latter,\" Cox said in an email Tuesday.

The Associated Press has been unable to locate Peace. The darknet market where the seller has been active in the past has been inaccessible for days, purportedly due to cyberattacks.

At the moment it's not known who holds the passwords or whether a state-sponsored actor, which Yahoo has blamed for the breach, would ever have an interest in passing its data to people like Peace .

Even if the hack was a straightforward espionage operation, Gartner security analyst Avivah Litan said that wouldn't be a reason to relax. Spies can mine trivial-seeming data from apparently random citizens to tease out their real targets' secrets.

\"That's how intelligence works,\" Litan said in a phone call.

Meanwhile Yahoo users who recycle the same password across the internet may still be at risk. While people can always change the passwords across all the sites they use, Yahoo's announcement that some security questions were compromised too means that the risks associated with the breach are likely to linger.

A password can be changed, after all, but how do you reset your mother's maiden name?

___

Online:

Raphael Satter can be reached at: http://raphaelsatter.com

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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The showdown between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was the most-watched presidential debate ever, with 84 million viewers.

The Nielsen company said the viewership, over 13 different networks, toppled a record that had stood for 36 years. The previous record for presidential debate viewership was the 80.6 million people who saw the only debate in 1980 between incumbent Democrat Jimmy Carter and his Republican challenger Ronald Reagan.

At the time of the Carter-Reagan debate, the U.S. population was 226 million. Now, it is 324 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

No debate since then had exceeded 70 million viewers.

Social media was humming, too, with Nielsen saying there were some 17.1 million Twitter interactions involving 2.7 million people on Monday. Tivo said that the moment during the debate that caused more people to pause their television and play back what was said came near the end, when Trump said that he will \"absolutely support\" Clinton if she is elected president.

Clinton has some bragging rights at home. When final results are in, the audience for her first presidential debate will more than double what her husband, former President Bill Clinton, received for his last presidential debate in 1996 (36.3 million viewers).

Only the Super Bowl annually commands a television audience of that size. The biggest audience in U.S. television history was the 114.4 million people who watched the 2015 Super Bowl between New England and Seattle.

The news was particularly good for NBC. Not only did it have more viewers than any other network showing the debate, but \"Nightly News\" anchor Lester Holt's reviews as moderator were more positive than Matt Lauer received for his interviews with the candidates at a national security forum earlier this month, or CNBC anchors when they did a GOP debate last fall.

Watching the debate was nerve-wracking for NBC Universal chief executive Steve Burke because of the pressure on Holt. Burke said at an appearance in London on Tuesday that Holt \"ended up doing a very good job.\"

Holt was not available for an interview on Tuesday.

Some Republicans were unhappy with Holt, suggesting that he was unfair because he asked tougher questions of Trump, and challenged his facts on issues like Trump's support for the war in Iraq and a court case involving the \"stop-and-frisk\" method of policing.

That may account for an overnight change of thinking by the candidate. Interviewed by reporters immediately after the debate, Trump said that \"I thought Lester did a really good job\" and that he thought Holt brought up the topics he wanted.

Several hours later, on Fox News Channel's \"Fox & Friends,\" Trump said he thought Holt earned a C or a C-plus for his debate performance, and that he asked unfair questions.

The second of three scheduled debates will be Oct. 9. The \"town hall\"-style forum will be moderated by CNN's Anderson Cooper and ABC News' Martha Raddatz.

___

Associated Press writer Jill Lawless in London contributed to this report.

"}, {"id":"f7186a2f-4974-58f6-8c05-2901a3442443","type":"article","starttime":"1475018983","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T16:29:43-07:00","lastupdated":"1475023585","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Wells Fargo claws back part of CEO, other executive's salary","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_f7186a2f-4974-58f6-8c05-2901a3442443.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/wells-fargo-claws-back-part-of-ceo-other-executive-s/article_f7186a2f-4974-58f6-8c05-2901a3442443.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/wells-fargo-claws-back-part-of-ceo-other-executive-s/article_c9906e82-73de-52d4-baae-b54d94274d86.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By KEN SWEET\nAP Business Writer","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Wells Fargo says CEO John Stumpf and the executive who ran the bank's consumer banking division will forfeit tens of millions of dollars in bonuses as it tries to stem a scandal over its sales practices.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","corporate management","corporate news","personnel","wages and salaries","banking and credit","financial services"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":5,"commentID":"f7186a2f-4974-58f6-8c05-2901a3442443","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Wells Fargo says CEO John Stumpf and the executive who ran the bank's consumer banking division will forfeit tens of millions of dollars in bonuses as it tries to stem a scandal over its sales practices.

The board of directors at the nation's second-largest bank said Tuesday that Stumpf will forfeit $41 million in stock awards, while former retail banking executive Carrie Tolstedt will forfeit $19 million of her stock awards, effective immediately. Both are also giving up any bonuses for 2016.

The San Francisco-based bank's independent directors are also launching their own investigation.

Wells Fargo has agreed to pay $185 million to settle allegations its employees opened millions of accounts without customers' permission to reach aggressive sales targets. Stumpf has faced bipartisan outrage for his handling of the scandal.

"}, {"id":"def89db1-352d-5388-bc75-05b93ac927d6","type":"article","starttime":"1475017919","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T16:11:59-07:00","lastupdated":"1475021630","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Wells Fargo CEO Stumpf and former consumer banking exec to forfeit millions in stock awards amid sales practices scandal","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_def89db1-352d-5388-bc75-05b93ac927d6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/wells-fargo-ceo-stumpf-and-former-consumer-banking-exec-to/article_def89db1-352d-5388-bc75-05b93ac927d6.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/wells-fargo-ceo-stumpf-and-former-consumer-banking-exec-to/article_fce497c9-52a7-534b-8419-2bc68ac4fece.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 Wells Fargo CEO Stumpf and former consumer banking exec to forfeit millions in stock awards amid sales practices scandal.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","banking and credit","financial services"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":3,"commentID":"def89db1-352d-5388-bc75-05b93ac927d6","body":"

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 Wells Fargo CEO Stumpf and former consumer banking exec to forfeit millions in stock awards amid sales practices scandal.

"}, {"id":"3917255d-0b67-55e4-936d-3777c8817bbb","type":"article","starttime":"1475015987","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T15:39:47-07:00","lastupdated":"1475019019","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"West Coast dockworkers, employers to talk contract concept","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_3917255d-0b67-55e4-936d-3777c8817bbb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/west-coast-dockworkers-employers-to-talk-contract-concept/article_3917255d-0b67-55e4-936d-3777c8817bbb.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/west-coast-dockworkers-employers-to-talk-contract-concept/article_faccb1e0-47af-5557-b9ca-5aed87fe5278.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"LOS ANGELES (AP) \u2014 Representatives of dockworkers who load and unload cargo at 29 West Coast sea ports will meet with their employers to discuss the concept of extending their contract, even though it doesn't expire until 2019.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","transportation and shipping","industrial products and services"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":4,"commentID":"3917255d-0b67-55e4-936d-3777c8817bbb","body":"

LOS ANGELES (AP) \u2014 Representatives of dockworkers who load and unload cargo at 29 West Coast sea ports will meet with their employers to discuss the concept of extending their contract, even though it doesn't expire until 2019.

It's an attempt to broker labor peace at ports with a history of unrest. In early 2015, bitter negotiations over the contract now in effect caused major disruptions in the flow of billions of dollars of cargo. Ports from San Diego to Seattle handle a huge volume of trans-Pacific trade that is vital to the U.S. economy.

In a joint statement Tuesday, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association of shipping companies and port terminal operators said they will meet Nov. 1 and 2 to discuss having discussions about a new contract.

"}, {"id":"ba029778-1a41-5720-a583-9b3b6fb98988","type":"article","starttime":"1475016025","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T15:40:25-07:00","lastupdated":"1475019019","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"food-and-cooking":"lifestyles/food-and-cooking"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Reports of plastic prompt recall of Tyson chicken nuggets","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_ba029778-1a41-5720-a583-9b3b6fb98988.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/reports-of-plastic-prompt-recall-of-tyson-chicken-nuggets/article_ba029778-1a41-5720-a583-9b3b6fb98988.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/reports-of-plastic-prompt-recall-of-tyson-chicken-nuggets/article_bc71bde0-3f3e-5640-9105-75d7068f7640.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SPRINGDALE, Ark. (AP) \u2014 Tyson Foods Inc. says it's voluntarily recalling more than 132,000 pounds of chicken nuggets after receiving reports that \"hard, white plastic\" was found in some nuggets.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","food and drink","lifestyle","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services","agriculture","products and services","corporate news","food safety","public health","health"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":6,"commentID":"ba029778-1a41-5720-a583-9b3b6fb98988","body":"

SPRINGDALE, Ark. (AP) \u2014 Tyson Foods Inc. says it's voluntarily recalling more than 132,000 pounds of chicken nuggets after receiving reports that \"hard, white plastic\" was found in some nuggets.

The Springdale, Arkansas-based company said Tuesday that the 5-pound bags of fully cooked panko chicken nuggets were sold at Costco stores nationwide. A small number of 20-pound cases of chicken patties, sold under the Spare Time brand, were sold to a single wholesaler in Pennsylvania.

Tyson says \"a small number\" of consumers contacted the company after finding small pieces of plastic in the chicken. Tyson says it's issuing the recall \"out of an abundance of caution\" even though it's only received a small number of reports of plastic. No injuries have been reported.

"}, {"id":"233531d8-9032-5152-acd5-d3e33972911c","type":"article","starttime":"1475015185","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T15:26:25-07:00","lastupdated":"1475017735","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"DOJ reaches $1M settlement with former SC hospital chief","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_233531d8-9032-5152-acd5-d3e33972911c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/doj-reaches-m-settlement-with-former-sc-hospital-chief/article_233531d8-9032-5152-acd5-d3e33972911c.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/doj-reaches-m-settlement-with-former-sc-hospital-chief/article_41c44464-68f5-5a9f-ae20-524f84e9908f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SUMTER, S.C. (AP) \u2014 The U.S. Justice Department says it's reached a $1 million settlement with the former head of Tuomey Healthcare System in South Carolina for his involvement in illegal Medicare and Medicaid billings.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","health care industry","government-funded health insurance","government programs","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":2,"commentID":"233531d8-9032-5152-acd5-d3e33972911c","body":"

SUMTER, S.C. (AP) \u2014 The U.S. Justice Department says it's reached a $1 million settlement with the former head of Tuomey Healthcare System in South Carolina for his involvement in illegal Medicare and Medicaid billings.

Department officials said in a news release Tuesday that Ralph Cox III also can't participate in federal health care programs for four years. They say the illegal billings involved services referred by physicians with whom the hospital had improper financial relationships.

The arrangement resulted in a judgment of more than $237 million against Tuomey following a jury verdict. In October of last year, the federal government resolved its judgment against Tuomey for payments totaling more than $72 million.

The hospital was sold to Palmetto Health based in Columbia, South Carolina. Tuomey was based in Sumter.

"}, {"id":"dffa9aa7-2606-53fc-b535-ab8c7a0309e1","type":"article","starttime":"1475013743","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T15:02:23-07:00","lastupdated":"1475016521","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"'Dramatic slowing' seen in global trade, as rhetoric rises","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_dffa9aa7-2606-53fc-b535-ab8c7a0309e1.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/dramatic-slowing-seen-in-global-trade-as-rhetoric-rises/article_dffa9aa7-2606-53fc-b535-ab8c7a0309e1.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/dramatic-slowing-seen-in-global-trade-as-rhetoric-rises/article_a4970c21-466c-5ab4-ad5c-db5846e4929d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JAMEY KEATEN and PAN PYLAS\nAssociated Press","prologue":"GENEVA (AP) \u2014 Trade, that lifeblood of the world economy, is growing at its slowest rate in seven years and could falter even more should anti-globalization sentiment encourage governments to throw up more barriers.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","international trade","economy","economic policy","government business and finance","government and politics","government policy","international agreements","international relations","financial crisis","recessions and depressions","financial markets","brexit referendum","events","economic growth"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"8a652d0b-0424-5591-a1f0-32d655780c9e","description":"Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton shake hands during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. 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GENEVA (AP) \u2014 Trade, that lifeblood of the world economy, is growing at its slowest rate in seven years and could falter even more should anti-globalization sentiment encourage governments to throw up more barriers.

That's the verdict from the World Trade Organization, which dramatically slashed its forecast for trade growth this year by about a third to its lowest rate since 2009, when the global economy was mired in recession in the wake of the financial crisis.

In an update to its forecasts Tuesday, the world's leading trade body said anti-globalization sentiment could make matters worse, especially if policymakers respond to that in a \"misguided\" manner.

The Geneva-based WTO, perhaps best known for dealing with trade disputes, predicted that global trade will rise only 1.7 percent this year, way down from its April prediction for 2.8 percent.

It said the downgrade, which came as the WTO opened a three-day forum about ways to make trade more inclusive, was largely due to an unexpectedly sharp drop in merchandise trade volumes in the first quarter. Lower economic growth and trade in developing countries like China and Brazil as well as a deceleration in imports in North America lay at the heart of the sharp downgrade.

If the WTO's forecast comes true, it will be the first time in 15 years that global trade grows more slowly than the world economy, which it expects to expand by 2.2 percent.

\"The dramatic slowing of trade growth is serious and should serve as a wake-up call,\" WTO director-general Robert Azevedo said. \"It is particularly concerning in the context of growing anti-globalization sentiment.\"

\"We need to make sure that this does not translate into misguided policies that could make the situation much worse,\" he added, referring to job creation and economic growth.

As well as reducing its 2016 forecast, the WTO cut its project for next year to between 1.8 percent and 3.1 percent from 3.6 percent.

The WTO warned of a number of risks, such as the effect of the British vote to leave the European Union, which has increased uncertainty in a part of the world where trade has been relatively strong.

Other risks include financial market volatility stemming from changes in monetary policy in developed countries \u2014 the U.S. Federal Reserve is set to raise interest rates again while the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan could cut borrowing costs further.

It also voiced worries that growing anti-trade rhetoric around the world might affect trade policy.

One planned trade deal that looks to be in trouble is the proposed Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, commonly known as TTIP, between the United States and the EU.

TTIP aims to remove trade barriers between the two but the secretive discussions have reportedly become bogged down amid growing concerns \u2014 and protests \u2014 in Europe over what a deal would mean for food safety and privacy protections, among other things.

Trade issues featured heavily in Monday's presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

In his pitch, Trump said the U.S. has to \"renegotiate\" its trade deals and \"stop these countries from stealing our companies and our jobs.\"

Meanwhile, Clinton cited the need for \"smart, fair trade deals,\" adding that the United States accounts for only 5 percent of the world's population but needs to \"trade with the other 95 percent.\"

The WTO's downgrades came as the World Economic Forum warned that a decade-long trend away from free trade around the world is hurting economies.

In its annual survey on competitiveness of 138 economies, WEF noted a global trend to increase barriers to trade without imposing tariffs. That can include quotas on trade, levies and other types of restrictions.

\"Declining openness in the global economy is harming competitiveness and making it harder for leaders to drive sustainable, inclusive growth,\" said Klaus Schwab, WEF's founder and executive chairman.

The WEF, which is best known for hosting an annual gathering of business and political leaders in the Swiss ski resort of Davos, ranks a country's competitiveness according to 12 factors such as the state of its infrastructure, its ability to foster innovation and the standard of its education system.

For the eighth straight year, Switzerland was ranked as the most competitive economy in the world, just ahead of Singapore and the United States.

___

Pylas contributed from London.

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___

Unhappy Target customers send strong message on pill bottles

Target's pharmacy customers are finding a change in pill bottle design hard to swallow.

After CVS began operating Target's drugstores earlier this year, distraught customers have been asking \u2014 in some cases begging \u2014 the drugstore chain to bring back the retailer's red prescription bottles, which came with color-coded rings, labeling on the top and prescription information that was easier to read.

CVS says it is working on designing a new system for dispensing prescriptions and helping people stay on their medications, but declined to share details or say whether that might involve an updated bottle design.

___

Tech and consumer companies lead US stocks higher

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 U.S. stocks rebounded Tuesday and climbed after a survey showed consumer confidence is at a nine-year high, a sign Americans will keep spending in the months to come. Technology and consumer stocks made the largest gains.

The market opened lower after two days of losses but quickly recovered. The consumer confidence report gave major indexes a boost and they locked in a big gain by early afternoon.

Technology companies jumped, and solid results from cruise line operator Carnival sent travel-related companies higher. Energy companies slumped with oil prices as hopes for an international cut in fuel production faded.

___

US home prices climbed again in July

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 U.S. home prices rose again in July, pulled up by strong gains in Portland, Seattle and Denver.

The Standard & Poor's CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index, released Tuesday, rose 5 percent in July from a year earlier after increasing 5.1 percent in June.

The latest report is further evidence that prices are being pushed higher by the limited inventory of homes on the market. That is hurting sales of both new and existing homes, despite buyer enthusiasm and historically low mortgage rates.

___

US consumer confidence jumps in September

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 U.S. consumer confidence in September rose to the highest level in nine years, a hopeful sign that economic growth will accelerate in coming months.

The Conference Board said Tuesday that its consumer confidence index rose to 104.1, up from 101.8 in August. It was the strongest reading since the index stood at 105.6 in August 2007, four months before the beginning of the Great Recession of 2007-2009.

Private economists had been forecasting the index would drop in September after a strong August reading.

___

'Dramatic slowing' seen in global trade, as rhetoric rises

GENEVA (AP) \u2014 The World Trade Organization dramatically slashed its forecast for trade growth this year by about a third to its lowest rate since 2009, when the global economy was mired in recession in the wake of the financial crisis.

In an update to its forecasts Tuesday, the world's leading trade body said the groundswell in anti-globalization sentiment could make matters worse, especially if policymakers respond to that in a \"misguided\" manner.

The Geneva-based WTO, perhaps best known for dealing with trade disputes, predicted that global trade will rise only 1.7 percent this year, way down from its April prediction for 2.8 percent.

___

US probing possible worker abuse by Wells Fargo

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The U.S. Labor Department is investigating possible abuses of employees by Wells Fargo in connection with the bank's alleged efforts to open millions of unauthorized accounts to meet sales goals.

A group of Democratic senators last week asked the department to investigate whether Wells Fargo tellers, branch managers and customer service reps were harassed and threatened with termination in the aggressive sales push. A complete review of cases and complaints is needed to determine if the second-largest U.S. bank violated the Fair Labor Standards Act, the senators said. About 5,300 employees have been fired since 2011.

___

Pilots, air traffic controllers shifting to text messaging

CHANTILLY, Va. (AP) \u2014 Airline pilots and air traffic controllers are on schedule to switch to text communications at most of the nation's busiest airports by the end of the year, a milestone that holds the potential to reduce delays, prevent errors and save billions of dollars in fuel cost, says the Federal Aviation Administration.

Controllers and pilots will still use their radios for quick exchanges like clearance for takeoff and in emergencies and situations where time is critical. But the nation's air traffic system is gradually shifting to text messages for a majority of flying instructions.

___

Reports of plastic prompt recall of Tyson chicken nuggets

SPRINGDALE, Ark. (AP) \u2014 Tyson Foods Inc. says it's voluntarily recalling more than 132,000 pounds of chicken nuggets after receiving reports that \"hard, white plastic\" was found in some nuggets.

The Springdale, Arkansas-based company said Tuesday that the 5-pound bags of fully cooked panko chicken nuggets were sold at Costco stores nationwide. A small number of 20-pound cases of chicken patties, sold under the Spare Time brand, were sold to a single wholesaler in Pennsylvania.

No injuries have been reported.

___

Air France workers on trial over ripping off bosses' shirts

BOBIGNY, France (AP) \u2014 Fifteen current and former Air France workers went on trial Tuesday for alleged violence during a union protest last year at the airline's headquarters that saw two company executives flee over a fence with their shirts ripped off.

The incident, caught on camera, was an extreme example of the often strained relations between French workers and their employers. Five Air France union members, who have since been fired, are charged with aggravated assault, and face up to three years in prison and a 45,000-euro ($51,000) fine if convicted. Ten Air France workers, who retained their jobs, face charges of property damage.

___

The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 133.47 points, or 0.7 percent, to 18,228.30. The Standard & Poor's 500 index picked up 13.83 points, or 0.6 percent, to 2,159.93. The Nasdaq composite gained 48.22 points, or 0.9 percent, to 5,305.71.

U.S. crude fell $1.26, or 2.7 percent, to $44.67 a barrel in New York. The international standard, Brent crude, lost $1.38, or 2.9 percent, to $45.97 a barrel in London. In other energy trading, heating oil declined 4 cents, or 2.7 percent, to $1.41 a gallon. Wholesale gasoline fell 1 cent to $1.39 a gallon and natural gas remained at $3 per 1,000 cubic feet.

"}, {"id":"1327b33a-193b-50b6-97ba-cc2a2055b2e6","type":"article","starttime":"1475012430","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T14:40:30-07:00","lastupdated":"1475015547","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"91-year-old ex-AIG boss Greenberg testifies at state trial","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_1327b33a-193b-50b6-97ba-cc2a2055b2e6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/year-old-ex-aig-boss-greenberg-testifies-at-state-trial/article_1327b33a-193b-50b6-97ba-cc2a2055b2e6.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/year-old-ex-aig-boss-greenberg-testifies-at-state-trial/article_895257c5-680d-5889-9ae1-254ec4761489.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By LARRY NEUMEISTER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 A 91-year-old former chief executive of insurance company AIG seemed eager to defend himself Tuesday against civil fraud charges, insisting he had no reason to attempt to hide several hundred million dollars in losses from the auto warranty wing of a mammoth business operating in 137 countries.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","insurance industry","corporate management","legal proceedings","law and order","financial services","corporate news","personnel","corporate legal affairs","fraud and false statements","accounting, tax preparation and payroll services","crime","professional services"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"revision":7,"commentID":"1327b33a-193b-50b6-97ba-cc2a2055b2e6","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 A 91-year-old former chief executive of insurance company AIG seemed eager to defend himself Tuesday against civil fraud charges, insisting he had no reason to attempt to hide several hundred million dollars in losses from the auto warranty wing of a mammoth business operating in 137 countries.

During testimony in state Supreme Court in Manhattan, Maurice Greenberg said American International Group Inc.'s accountants and lawyers did explore in 1999 and 2000 how to convert the large insurance underwriting loss in the auto warranty business into an investment loss.

Assistant Attorney General David Nachman asked the former multi-decade AIG chief executive if converting underwriting debt into investment debt would allow the company to report higher underwriting income and lower investment income.

\"It could be,\" he said. \"I don't know.\"

New York state has accused Greenberg and AIG's former chief financial officer of manipulating AIG's accounting records in 2000 and 2001 to hide hundreds of millions of dollars in losses from investors.

The state wants state Supreme Court Justice Charles E. Ramos, who is hearing the trial without a jury, to ban Greenberg from working in the securities industry or as a public company executive. It also seeks $53 million, including bonuses Greenberg received in the years he was alleged to have manipulated the company's finances.

Greenberg said he wasn't concerned about the company's bottom line in 1999 because the losses were such a small part of the company's operating revenue.

\"It was a minor effect on our overall results,\" the World War II and Korean War veteran said during daylong testimony that was set to resume Wednesday.

He said he got immersed in the troubles with the auto warranty business \"to teach a lesson to management that had concocted a bad deal and had to learn from that.\"

\"The main issue for me from the beginning was to teach a lesson to our people,\" Greenberg said.

Nachman cited email and other correspondence Greenberg had between 1999 and 2002 to refresh his memory about the auto warranty program and told Greenberg that he suspected he had reviewed the materials himself as he dealt with the state's accusations and prepared for trial.

But Greenberg was dismissive of the litigation, saying \"other things are far more important than this.\"

He added: \"I did not think this was an important matter for me,\" especially since it occurred more than 15 years ago.

AIG, one of the world's largest insurance companies, nearly collapsed in the fall of 2008 at the height of the financial crisis and received about $180 billion in bailout aid from the government.

Greenberg was forced out in 2005 after leading the company for more than 37 years after he replaced founded C.V. Starr, who died in 1968.

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JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) \u2014 Donald Trump says \"you don't learn that much from tax returns,\" a dubious assertion that has renewed attention on his refusal to release documents that could shed light on his tax rate, charitable giving and foreign business ties.

Trump's Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton, was happy to seize on the issue, questioning in the first presidential debate what Trump is trying to hide by bucking decades of campaign tradition in keeping his 1040s private. She referred to the several years in which it is known that Trump paid nothing in federal taxes.

\"So if he's paid zero, that means zero for troops, zero for vets, zero for schools or health,\" Clinton said.

Republican Trump responded by saying avoiding taxes \"makes me smart,\" adding whatever money he did pay \"would be squandered\" anyway.

Trump told CNN after the Monday night debate that \"of course\" he's paid federal taxes in other years, but Democrats pounced just the same.

\"So what does that make the rest of us? Suckers, unintelligent, dumb?\" asked Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada.

Since 1976, all major party nominees for president have released their tax returns. Clinton has disclosed nearly 40 years' worth. Both of the candidates for vice president, Democrat Tim Kaine and Trump's running mate, Mike Pence, have released theirs, too.

A recent Associated Press-GfK poll found that 45 percent of likely but undecided voters said it was very or extremely important for candidates to release their tax returns. But voters are divided along party lines. While more than six in 10 Democrats said it was very or extremely important, fewer than three in 10 Republicans said the same.

The billionaire New Yorker has said for months that because his tax returns are under a \"routine audit\" and have been for nearly 15 years, he is following the advice of his attorneys by keeping them private.

Former IRS officials have expressed skepticism that anyone would be audited so frequently, and they and other tax experts say there's no prohibition on Trump releasing his returns even if he is.

Trump's son, Donald Jr., recently told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review that the audits weren't the real issue. Releasing the documents, he said, would lead to \"every person in the country asking questions that would distract\" from his father's \"main message.\"

Indeed, tax experts say the documents could provide significant insight about the Republican nominee, including an assessment of whether Trump has overstated \u2014 or understated \u2014 his income. The documents would also reveal how Trump has used various deductions, write-offs and loopholes in his stated effort to pay \"as little\" in taxes \"as possible.\"

The returns would also shed light on the extent to which Trump is an \"ardent philanthropist,\" as his company's website once claimed.

Trump's charitable giving has come into question during the campaign. He has made no personal contributions to his foundation since 2008, and The Washington Post has found instances where he may have used the charity to pay off expenses incurred by his businesses.

Trump told the AP early in the campaign that he does most of his giving in his own name, rather than through his foundation. The only way to verify that would be through the itemized charitable donations listed on his tax returns, which would also reveal details about Trump's foreign business dealings and offshore bank accounts.

The 2012 GOP nominee, Mitt Romney, wrote in a Facebook post in May: \"While not a likely circumstance, the potential for hidden inappropriate associations with foreign entities, criminal organizations, or other unsavory groups is simply too great a risk to ignore for someone who is seeking to become commander in chief.\"

Romney resisted releasing his own tax returns before relenting during his campaign, and Trump has suggested that decision was a mistake. He told The Washington Post in August that Romney had been \"treated very unfairly\" after releasing his returns \"because people don't understand returns that are complicated and complex.\"

\"Mitt had perfect returns, they did absolutely nothing wrong,\" yet critics \"took a couple of lines\" to make him look bad, Trump said. \"And his returns are very much smaller than my returns.\"

Trump added a wrinkle during the debate, saying he'd be willing to ignore his lawyers' advice to keep the returns private if Clinton released 33,000 deleted emails from the private system she used as secretary of state.

\"As soon as she releases them, I will release,\" Trump said.

___

AP Polling Editor Emily Swanson and AP writers Chad Day and Erica Werner contributed to this report from Washington.

___

Follow Jill Colvin on Twitter on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/colvinj

"} ]