[ {"id":"8d25658d-9518-59af-83b0-4e71e8f52324","type":"article","starttime":"1487857882","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T06:51:22-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"food-and-cooking":"lifestyles/food-and-cooking"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Philly mayor says $5.7M soda tax haul doubles projections","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_8d25658d-9518-59af-83b0-4e71e8f52324.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/philly-mayor-says-m-soda-tax-haul-doubles-projections/article_8d25658d-9518-59af-83b0-4e71e8f52324.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Philadelphia-Mayor-Jim-Kenney-says-the-city-s-soda-tax-raised-5-7-million-in-January-more-than-double-what-city-officials-projected/id-9a31850f8cf741d6af11e34ca046e15e","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PHILADELPHIA (AP) \u2014 Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney says the city's soda tax raised $5.7 million in January, more than double what city officials had projected.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","food and drink","general news","health","national taxes","government taxation and revenue","government finance","government business and finance","government and politics","national governments","local taxes","local governments","municipal governments"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"8d25658d-9518-59af-83b0-4e71e8f52324","body":"

PHILADELPHIA (AP) \u2014 Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney says the city's soda tax raised $5.7 million in January, more than double what city officials had projected.

Kenney's announcement Thursday comes a day after some supermarkets and beverage distributors say they're gearing up for layoffs after seeing beverage sales fall by 30 percent to 50 percent \u2014 worse than the city predicted.

Kenney's announcement says the city projected the tax, which took effect last month, would generate about $2.3 million in January.

The city has projected the tax will raise about $91 million this year and that its revenue collections would pick up steam as the year progressed.

City officials expect soda sales to rebound once customers get used to the higher prices, and they say talk of layoffs is fearmongering meant to keep other cities from imposing a similar tax.

"}, {"id":"7a6eab6d-7768-523e-83ea-e5850f0a9488","type":"article","starttime":"1487857041","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T06:37:21-07:00","lastupdated":"1487859479","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Governor: Dakota Access protesters can leave without arrest","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_7a6eab6d-7768-523e-83ea-e5850f0a9488.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/governor-dakota-access-protesters-can-leave-without-arrest/article_7a6eab6d-7768-523e-83ea-e5850f0a9488.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/North-Dakota-s-governor-says-few-dozen-Dakota-Access-pipeline-protesters-still-occupying-a-sprawling-encampment-on-federal-land-will-have-another-chance-to-leave-peacefully-Thursday/id-def6d4ae9bba429a99b0a7936c589b6b","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":6,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By BLAKE NICHOLSON and JAMES MacPHERSON\nAssociated Press","prologue":"CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 A few dozen people still occupying a sprawling encampment on federal land to protest construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline will have another chance to leave peacefully Thursday, North Dakota's governor said, after public officials pleaded with the self-named \"water protectors\" to leave so the site can be cleared.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","arrests","crime","law and order","dakota access pipeline protests","protests and demonstrations","political and civil unrest","pipeline construction","heavy construction industry","construction and engineering","industrial products and services","state governments","government and politics","oil and gas transportation","oil and gas industry","energy industry"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1cd912a6-b362-5f65-b46d-f81cb1eb4f20","description":"A fire set by protesters burns in the background as opponents of the Dakota Access pipeline leave their main protest camp Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, near Cannon Ball, N.D. Most of the pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp Wednesday ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities moved to arrest some who defied the order in a final show of dissent. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)","byline":"Tom Stromme","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"215","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cd/1cd912a6-b362-5f65-b46d-f81cb1eb4f20/58ae85ae1136a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C215"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"42","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cd/1cd912a6-b362-5f65-b46d-f81cb1eb4f20/58ae85ae1136a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C42"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"126","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cd/1cd912a6-b362-5f65-b46d-f81cb1eb4f20/58ae85ae1136a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C126"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"430","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cd/1cd912a6-b362-5f65-b46d-f81cb1eb4f20/58ae85ae1136a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"435fb812-6dfa-5cc1-83e6-02571d30259d","description":"Tribune Tori Ramos, left, and Riley Cogburn, both of Albany, N.Y., leave as opponents of the Dakota Access pipeline leave their main protest camp Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, near Cannon Ball, N.D. Most of the pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp Wednesday ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities moved to arrest some who defied the order in a final show of dissent. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)","byline":"Tom Stromme","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"502","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/35/435fb812-6dfa-5cc1-83e6-02571d30259d/58ae85ae36d4e.image.jpg?resize=512%2C502"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"98","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/35/435fb812-6dfa-5cc1-83e6-02571d30259d/58ae85ae36d4e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C98"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"294","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/35/435fb812-6dfa-5cc1-83e6-02571d30259d/58ae85ae36d4e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C294"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1004","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/35/435fb812-6dfa-5cc1-83e6-02571d30259d/58ae85ae36d4e.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"9da58d1b-193b-5bca-b258-2a1fb539f867","description":"Smoke from fires set by protesters goes up as they leave their protest camp on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers property in southern Morton County, near Cannon Ball, N.D., Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Most of the Dakota Access pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp Wednesday ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities moved to arrest some who defied the order in a final show of dissent. Earlier in the day, some of the last remnants of the camp went up in flames when occupants set fire to makeshift wooden housing as part of a leaving ceremony. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)","byline":"Tom Stromme","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da58d1b-193b-5bca-b258-2a1fb539f867/58ae85ae5ae38.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da58d1b-193b-5bca-b258-2a1fb539f867/58ae85ae5ae38.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da58d1b-193b-5bca-b258-2a1fb539f867/58ae85ae5ae38.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da58d1b-193b-5bca-b258-2a1fb539f867/58ae85ae5ae38.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"9e6fcfb5-9288-5b92-b97a-e68fd3670a54","description":"Jasper Spillman, of Lawrence, Kan., leaves the protest camp as opponents of the Dakota Access pipeline leave their main protest camp Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, near Cannon Ball, N.D. Most of the pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp Wednesday ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities moved to arrest some who defied the order in a final show of dissent. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)","byline":"Tom Stromme","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"372","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/e6/9e6fcfb5-9288-5b92-b97a-e68fd3670a54/58ae85ae7ca2a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C372"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/e6/9e6fcfb5-9288-5b92-b97a-e68fd3670a54/58ae85ae7ca2a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C73"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"218","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/e6/9e6fcfb5-9288-5b92-b97a-e68fd3670a54/58ae85ae7ca2a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C218"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"744","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/e6/9e6fcfb5-9288-5b92-b97a-e68fd3670a54/58ae85ae7ca2a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"21637e89-5b13-538c-9791-163ece3e6c7e","description":"A fire on a building at a camp that has been home to demonstrators against the Dakota Access pipeline is seen after protesters set fire in Cannon Ball, N.D., in the early morning of Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Most of the pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp Wednesday ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities moved to arrest some who defied the order in a final show of dissent. Earlier in the day, some of the last remnants of the camp went up in flames when occupants set fire to makeshift wooden housing as part of a leaving ceremony. (Mike Mccleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)","byline":"Mike Mccleary","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"404","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/16/21637e89-5b13-538c-9791-163ece3e6c7e/58ae5e73783d5.image.jpg?resize=404%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"127","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/16/21637e89-5b13-538c-9791-163ece3e6c7e/58ae5e73783d5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C127"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"380","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/16/21637e89-5b13-538c-9791-163ece3e6c7e/58ae5e73783d5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C380"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1298","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/16/21637e89-5b13-538c-9791-163ece3e6c7e/58ae5e73783d5.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"075973f7-8f04-5315-a4b5-49816204f2fb","description":"People peacefully leave the Dakota Access pipeline main protest camp near Cannon Ball, N.D., as authorities prepare to shut it down in advance of the spring flooding season. The Army Corps of Engineers ordered the camp closed at 2 p.m. Wednesday. (AP Photo/Blake Nicholson)","byline":"Blake Nicholson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"384","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/75/075973f7-8f04-5315-a4b5-49816204f2fb/58aee1140f76c.image.jpg?resize=384%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/75/075973f7-8f04-5315-a4b5-49816204f2fb/58aee1140f76c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/75/075973f7-8f04-5315-a4b5-49816204f2fb/58aee1140f76c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C400"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1365","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/75/075973f7-8f04-5315-a4b5-49816204f2fb/58aee1140f76c.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"7a6eab6d-7768-523e-83ea-e5850f0a9488","body":"

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 A few dozen people still occupying a sprawling encampment on federal land to protest construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline will have another chance to leave peacefully Thursday, North Dakota's governor said, after public officials pleaded with the self-named \"water protectors\" to leave so the site can be cleared.

Most of the protesters marched out of the area ahead of the 2 p.m. Wednesday deadline imposed by the Army Corps of Engineers. Authorities arrested 10 people who defied the order in a final show of dissent. North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum said law enforcement officers remained outside the camp.

\"They will have every opportunity again to leave tomorrow without arrest,\" Burgum said Wednesday evening, referring to the estimated 25 to 50 remaining protesters.

Burgum said law enforcement will decide Thursday morning what to do, noting that cleanup of the site was scheduled to resume at 9 a.m. Corps Col. John Henderson said the taxpayer-funded cleanup could take about a month and cost as much as $1.2 million. The Corps had warned that the protesters need to leave the site before the spring melt floods the land.

The camp \u2014 known as Oceti Sakowin \u2014 near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation has been home since August to sometimes thousands of demonstrators trying to thwart construction of the final section of the $3.8 billion pipeline. The Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux, whose reservation is downstream, say Dakota Access threatens their drinking water and cultural sites. Pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners disputes that.

When complete, the project will carry oil through the Dakotas and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois.

Early Wednesday, protesters burned down some wooden structures on site in what they described as a leaving ceremony. Authorities said about 20 fires were set and a 7-year-old boy and a 17-year-old girl were taken to a Bismarck hospital to be treated for burns.

Shortly before the deadline passed, about 150 people marched arm-in-arm out of the soggy camp, singing and playing drums as they walked down a highway. One man carried an American flag hung upside-down. It was not clear where they were headed. New camps have appeared on private land, including one the Cheyenne River Sioux set up about a mile from the main camp.

Police said that as many as 75 people outside the camp taunted officers. Police then took 10 people into custody for obstructing a government function, authorities said.

Authorities sent buses to take protesters to Bismarck, where they were offered fresh clothing, bus fare home, and food and hotel vouchers. Officials said at least 70 protesters asked about transportation.

Nathan Phillips, a member of the Omaha Tribe in Nebraska who has been in North Dakota since Thanksgiving, said he was moving to a new camp in the area because \"there's still work to be done.\"

Protester Matthew Bishop, from Ketchikan, Alaska, said he too was headed to a camp on private land.

\"We're going to regroup and see what we can do,\" Bishop said.

"}, {"id":"3da7c3cd-ad93-56fc-970f-b96376482f99","type":"article","starttime":"1487854806","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T06:00:06-07:00","lastupdated":"1487856983","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Kohl's profit falls on weak sales, but tops 4Q forecasts","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_3da7c3cd-ad93-56fc-970f-b96376482f99.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/kohl-s-profit-falls-on-weak-sales-but-tops-q/article_3da7c3cd-ad93-56fc-970f-b96376482f99.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Kohl-s-reports-lower-profit-on-weak-sales-but-beats-Wall-Street-forecasts/id-009aa52736f7ec19f36d2258b5d20988","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Kohl's Corp. on Thursday reported a drop in fiscal fourth-quarter profit as sales declined, but the performance still topped Wall Street's expectations and the retailer raised its quarterly dividend.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","earnings reports","earnings","financial performance","corporate news","earnings estimates"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"3da7c3cd-ad93-56fc-970f-b96376482f99","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Kohl's Corp. on Thursday reported a drop in fiscal fourth-quarter profit as sales declined, but the performance still topped Wall Street's expectations and the retailer raised its quarterly dividend.

Shares climbed more than 2 percent before the market open on Thursday.

The Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin-based company saw profit fall 15 percent to $252 million, or $1.44 per share, while revenue dropped 2.8 percent to $6.21 billion.

The results still managed to beat Wall Street expectations. Analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research predicted earnings of $1.32 per share on revenue of $6.2 billion.

Sales results were weak because of declines in consumer traffic at retail locations, though online demand was stronger. Same-store sales, a key metric of a retailer's health, slipped 2.2 percent during the quarter.

Kohl's and its competitors have been facing a tougher market with more competition from online retailers as consumers increasingly enjoy the ease and speed at which they can shop from electronic devices.

Meanwhile, the company boosted its quarterly dividend by 10 percent to 55 cents per share.

For the year, Kohl's reported a profit of $556 million, or $3.11 per share, on revenue of $18.69 billion.

Kohl's expects fiscal 2017 earnings between $3.50 and $3.80 per share. Analysts polled by FactSet expect $3.73 per share.

_____

Elements of this story were generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on KSS at https://www.zacks.com/ap/KSS

_____

Keywords: Kohl's, Earnings Report

"}, {"id":"2a944e6f-c561-5503-848c-be59240782fb","type":"article","starttime":"1487854655","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T05:57:35-07:00","lastupdated":"1487857214","priority":0,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"INFLUENCE GAME: GM bill is self-driving and self-interested","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/article_2a944e6f-c561-5503-848c-be59240782fb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/influence-game-gm-bill-is-self-driving-and-self-interested/article_2a944e6f-c561-5503-848c-be59240782fb.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/General-Motors-is-trying-to-persuade-state-lawmakers-to-approve-self-driving-car-rules-that-would-benefit-the-automaker-while-potentially-keeping-its-competitors-off-the-road/id-fb906060c89442a3b17cf800f00b3455","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JOAN LOWY\nAssociated Press","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 With states seizing the initiative on shaping the future of self-driving cars, General Motors is trying to persuade legislators across the country to approve rules that would benefit the automaker while potentially keeping its competitors off the road.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","business","government and politics","technology","automotive industry regulation","industry regulation","government business and finance","government regulations","bills","legislation","legislature","automobile manufacturing","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services","lobbying","political issues","driving laws and regulations","driverless cars","automotive technology","industrial technology"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"72e05f2a-05f7-523e-8cc2-636432318fe2","description":"In this photo provided by General Motors a self-driving car is seen in Detroit. General Motors is trying to persuade state lawmakers across the country to pass legislation that would clear the way for the automaker to make self-driving cars publicly available while potentially barring GM\u2019s competitors from putting their own vehicles on the road. (Photo by Steve Fecht for General Motors)","byline":"Steve Fecht","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2e/72e05f2a-05f7-523e-8cc2-636432318fe2/58aea4bbd7dc1.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2e/72e05f2a-05f7-523e-8cc2-636432318fe2/58aea4bbd7dc1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2e/72e05f2a-05f7-523e-8cc2-636432318fe2/58aea4bbd7dc1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2e/72e05f2a-05f7-523e-8cc2-636432318fe2/58aea4bbd7dc1.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":18,"commentID":"2a944e6f-c561-5503-848c-be59240782fb","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 With states seizing the initiative on shaping the future of self-driving cars, General Motors is trying to persuade legislators across the country to approve rules that would benefit the automaker while potentially keeping its competitors off the road.

The carmaker denies trying to freeze out other brands, but legislators in four states say GM lobbyists asked them to sponsor bills that the company's competitors contend would do just that. The bills set a blueprint for the introduction of fully self-driving cars that are part of on-demand, ride-sharing fleets, but they must be owned by an automaker.

Competitors working on self-driving technology like Uber and Alphabet's Waymo fear the measures could shut out their companies because they don't manufacture cars. And some automakers that are developing autonomous cars say they could be shut out, too, because their vehicles still rely on having a driver ready to step in.

GM began by getting a bill passed last year on its home turf, in Michigan. In response to complaints from Waymo, a compromise bill was also passed to allow participation by technology companies. But Bryant Walker Smith, a leading legal expert on self-driving cars, said the compromise was poorly worded, and it's unclear what it would do.

This year, bills similar to the Michigan law, but without the compromise language, have been introduced in at least five states: Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts and Tennessee. GM lobbyists have also urged lawmakers in other states to introduce versions of the bill.

Prospects for passage of the bills are uncertain. But the state-by-state lobbying by the powerful automaker and its competitors shine light on the behind-the-scenes fight to determine how self-driving cars will operate on American roads and which companies will have the competitive edge.

With no federal regulations for self-driving cars in place, states are assuming responsibility for ensuring the benefits of the technology can be reaped without sacrificing safety. Federal regulators provided safety guidance to states and automakers last year, but stopped short of issuing binding rules. Key members of Congress say they also are exploring legislation. Eight states have self-driving car laws, and bills have been introduced in 20 states this year, according to tracking by Volvo.

General Motors' dealerships throughout the United States, many of which have close ties to local politicians, give the giant carmaker a lobbying advantage. GM has also made campaign contributions to state lawmakers who introduced the legislation it favors.

GM supports restricting who can deploy self-driving cars because \"public acceptance of the technology is going to be very critical,\" said Harry Lightsey, a top GM lobbyist. \"If somebody is allowed to put technology on the roads and highways that proves to be unsafe, that could have very harmful repercussions.\"

The Self-Driving Coalition for Safer Streets, which includes Ford, Lyft, Uber, Volvo and Waymo, opposes the bills, saying they \"would favor one company, create an uneven playing field and deter life-saving innovations from reaching citizens in these states by precluding or severely limiting technology companies from testing or deploying fully autonomous vehicles.\"

Audi and its parent company, Volkswagen, worry that the bills could exclude partially self-driving cars like the one Audi plans to introduce next year, said Brad Stertz, Audi's government affairs director. GM hasn't been willing to see the bills modified or to answer other companies' concerns so far, he said.

Lightsey said lawmakers who have introduced bills are acting on their own, not at GM's behest.

\"These bills aren't being introduced at GM's urging,\" he said.

But several lawmakers told The Associated Press that GM lobbyists asked them to introduce bills based on the Michigan law.

Illinois state Rep. Mike Zalewski, a Democrat, said he sponsored a bill after GM sought him out. State records show Zalewski has received $2,000 in GM campaign contributions. The bill's Republican co-sponsor, state Rep. Tom Demmer, has received $2,500 from GM and the bill's state Senate sponsor, Democrat Martin Sandoval, has received $3,500.

\"I don't make a connection between campaign contributions and policy,\" Zalewski said.

Maryland state Sen. William Ferguson said he introduced a bill at GM's urging in part because he hoped the automaker would expand its transmission facility near Baltimore, creating jobs.

The Democrat said GM lobbyists told him the company would \"certainly look more favorably toward expanding in Maryland if there were a legal framework to test and develop (self-driving cars) more freely.\" After the AP asked GM about the transmission facility, Ferguson sought to clarify his remarks, saying the automaker didn't explicitly promise to expand its operations.

Several bill sponsors said they're willing to consider changes to the measures.

Tennessee state Sen. Mark Green, a Republican, said he wants to reach a compromise. Language that has drawn objections \"is there now to get people to join the discussion,\" he said. Green's political action committee has received $3,000 from GM. The bill's Tennessee House sponsor, Republican William Lamberth II, received a $2,000 contribution from GM a month before introducing his bill.

Lamberth said the contribution had nothing to do with his decision to introduce a bill. Green, Demmer and Sandoval didn't respond to questions from the AP about the contributions.

Some lawmakers said they didn't introduce bills despite GM's requests because they view the measures as anti-competitive.

\"We didn't want to pick winners and losers in the autonomous vehicle arena,\" said Colorado state Rep. Faith Winter, a Democrat.

Arizona lawmakers met last month with Gov. Doug Ducey's staff, GM, Waymo, Uber, Lyft and other companies in response to GM's effort to get a bill introduced there, said state Sen. Bob Worsley, the Senate transportation committee chairman. While GM argued in favor of the measure, everyone else opposed it, he said.

Worsley, a Republican, called GM's proposal \"a protectionist measure for everybody in manufacturing.\"

___

Follow Joan Lowy at http://twitter.com/AP_Joan_Lowy. Her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/joan-lowy

"}, {"id":"ecfe2ecf-d82e-5ca7-8b8d-3263d99146a2","type":"article","starttime":"1487853410","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T05:36:50-07:00","lastupdated":"1487855896","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Global stocks steady as Fed minutes fail to sway investors","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_ecfe2ecf-d82e-5ca7-8b8d-3263d99146a2.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/global-stocks-steady-as-fed-minutes-fail-to-sway-investors/article_ecfe2ecf-d82e-5ca7-8b8d-3263d99146a2.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Global-stocks-were-trading-in-narrow-ranges-Thursday-after-the-minutes-to-the-last-policymaking-meeting-of-the-Federal-Reserve-failed-to-provide-much-of-a-steer-as-to-the-timing-of-the-c/id-d99c3133199d4cb0b1ce322fe506d37f","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":5,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By The Associated Press","prologue":"LONDON (AP) \u2014 Global stock markets were trading in narrow ranges Thursday after the minutes to the last policymaking meeting of the Federal Reserve failed to provide much of a steer as to the timing of the U.S. central bank's next interest rate increase.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","stock price movements","stock performance","corporate stock","corporate news","central bank interest rates","monetary policy","economic policy","economy","government business and finance","government and politics","government policy","stock indices and averages","stock markets","financial markets","currency markets","japanese yen","brent crude markets","crude oil markets","energy markets","commodity markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97","description":"A woman walks past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"331","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/a5/8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97/58ae5b740b20b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C331"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/a5/8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97/58ae5b740b20b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"194","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/a5/8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97/58ae5b740b20b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C194"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"662","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/a5/8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97/58ae5b740b20b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670","description":"A woman waits to cross a street in front of an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"324","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a8/ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670/58ae5b742e93b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C324"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"63","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a8/ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670/58ae5b742e93b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C63"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"190","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a8/ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670/58ae5b742e93b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C190"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"648","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a8/ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670/58ae5b742e93b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62","description":"People walk past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"319","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/48/b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62/58ae5b744ed02.image.jpg?resize=512%2C319"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"62","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/48/b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62/58ae5b744ed02.image.jpg?resize=100%2C62"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"187","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/48/b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62/58ae5b744ed02.image.jpg?resize=300%2C187"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"638","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/48/b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62/58ae5b744ed02.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7","description":"People walk past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"344","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/0a/20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7/58ae5b7477da0.image.jpg?resize=512%2C344"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/0a/20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7/58ae5b7477da0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/0a/20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7/58ae5b7477da0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"688","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/0a/20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7/58ae5b7477da0.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc","description":"A man walks past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"327","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a8/7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc/58ae5b749ab4f.image.jpg?resize=512%2C327"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a8/7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc/58ae5b749ab4f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a8/7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc/58ae5b749ab4f.image.jpg?resize=300%2C192"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"654","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a8/7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc/58ae5b749ab4f.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"ecfe2ecf-d82e-5ca7-8b8d-3263d99146a2","body":"

LONDON (AP) \u2014 Global stock markets were trading in narrow ranges Thursday after the minutes to the last policymaking meeting of the Federal Reserve failed to provide much of a steer as to the timing of the U.S. central bank's next interest rate increase.

KEEPING SCORE: In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares was down 0.1 percent at 7,294 while Germany's DAX fell 0.2 percent to 11,981. The CA 40 in France bucked the trend somewhat to trade 0.1 percent higher at 4,890. U.S. stocks were poised for a steady opening with Dow futures and the broader S&P 500 futures unchanged.

RATE HORIZON: At their meeting last month, Federal Reserve officials discussed the need to raise a key interest rate again \"fairly soon,\" especially if the world's No. 1 economy maintains its strength, according to the minutes. Analysts said next week's official U.S. jobs figures for February could have a major impact on the prospects of a rate hike as soon as March.

ANALYST TAKE: \"It was always likely that the Fed would want to keep its policy options open, fiscal policy uncertainties notwithstanding, which is why last night's minutes from the January Fed meeting were unlikely to add anything new to what we already knew, that a rate hike was coming 'fairly soon',\" said Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets.

ASIA'S DAY: Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 lost less than 0.1 percent to close at 19,371.46 and South Korea's Kospi finished 0.1 percent higher at 2,107.63. Hong Kong's Hang Seng shed 0.4 percent to 24,114.86 and the Shanghai Composite index retreated 0.3 percent to 3,251.38. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 lost 0.4 percent to 5,784.70.

CURRENCIES: The euro rose 0.2 percent to $1.0564 while the dollar fell 0.4 percent to 112.92 yen.

ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude oil futures rebounded, rising 76 cents to $54.35 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Brent crude, the standard for pricing international oils, rose 81 cents to $56.85 a barrel in London.

"}, {"id":"254eb21d-8d1d-5509-94a5-bc68c57c84b9","type":"article","starttime":"1487852465","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T05:21:05-07:00","lastupdated":"1487855140","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Chesapeake reports 4Q loss","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_254eb21d-8d1d-5509-94a5-bc68c57c84b9.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/chesapeake-reports-q-loss/article_254eb21d-8d1d-5509-94a5-bc68c57c84b9.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Chesapeake-Energy-reports-4th-quarter-loss-of-343-million/id-416f9676f48a6abd2a8ae303611d9830","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) \u2014 Chesapeake Energy Corp. on Thursday reported a loss of $343 million in its fourth quarter.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","corporate stock","corporate news","earnings reports","earnings","financial performance"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"254eb21d-8d1d-5509-94a5-bc68c57c84b9","body":"

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) \u2014 Chesapeake Energy Corp. on Thursday reported a loss of $343 million in its fourth quarter.

On a per-share basis, the Oklahoma City-based company said it had a loss of 84 cents. Earnings, adjusted for non-recurring costs, came to 7 cents per share.

The results topped Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 11 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of 6 cents per share.

The natural gas company posted revenue of $2.02 billion in the period. Its adjusted revenue was $678 million, which missed Street forecasts. Four analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $1.06 billion.

Chesapeake shares have fallen 16 percent since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has increased 5.5 percent. The stock has more than doubled in the last 12 months.

_____

This story was generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on CHK at https://www.zacks.com/ap/CHK

_____

Keywords: Chesapeake Energy, Earnings Report

"}, {"id":"ba6dcccc-f7e2-5997-aa66-89f9e8af7176","type":"article","starttime":"1487852278","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T05:17:58-07:00","lastupdated":"1487855141","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Barclays bank ahead of schedule in recovery plan","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_ba6dcccc-f7e2-5997-aa66-89f9e8af7176.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/barclays-bank-ahead-of-schedule-in-recovery-plan/article_ba6dcccc-f7e2-5997-aa66-89f9e8af7176.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Barclays-Group-says-it-will-complete-its-restructuring-six-months-earlier-than-planned-as-it-sheds-risky-assets-and-focuses-on-consumer-corporate-and-investment-banking-in-New-York-and-/id-48450adb29b042b8945c8f68ad5532f3","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DANICA KIRKA\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LONDON (AP) \u2014 Banking group Barclays said Thursday it will complete its restructuring plan six months early as it sheds risky assets and focuses on consumer, corporate and investment banking in New York and London.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","investment banking and brokerage","banking and credit","financial services","personal investing","personal finance"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"096bc7bd-ec9c-529e-98b0-e991089b78b8","description":"FILE - This is a Tuesday, March 1, 2016 file photo of the sign on a branch of Barclays Bank in London. Barclays Group said Thursday Feb. 23, 2017, that it will complete its restructuring six months earlier than planned as it sheds risky assets and focuses on consumer, corporate and investment banking in New York and London. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)","byline":"Kirsty Wigglesworth","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"333","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/96/096bc7bd-ec9c-529e-98b0-e991089b78b8/58aed9aab2aad.image.jpg?resize=512%2C333"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/96/096bc7bd-ec9c-529e-98b0-e991089b78b8/58aed9aab2aad.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"195","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/96/096bc7bd-ec9c-529e-98b0-e991089b78b8/58aed9aab2aad.image.jpg?resize=300%2C195"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"666","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/96/096bc7bd-ec9c-529e-98b0-e991089b78b8/58aed9aab2aad.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"ba6dcccc-f7e2-5997-aa66-89f9e8af7176","body":"

LONDON (AP) \u2014 Banking group Barclays said Thursday it will complete its restructuring plan six months early as it sheds risky assets and focuses on consumer, corporate and investment banking in New York and London.

Barclays Group now plans to finish selling businesses that are not part of its main markets by the end of June. They include retail banking in continental Europe and corporate banking in Africa and the Middle East, among others.

Shares rose more than 4 percent in early trading in London to 239.95 pence.

The bank says its core businesses, which mainly focus on the U.K. and U.S. markets, posted fourth-quarter net income of 649 million pounds ($808 million), compared with a loss of 1.24 billion pounds a year earlier. Group net income, including the non-core business, was 99 million pounds versus a loss of 2.42 billion pounds.

\"In short, we have accomplished a lot in a year,\" CEO Jes Staley said. The bank, he added, can soon begin to move on from its restructuring plan, \"shifting our focus solely to the future, and in particular to how we can generate attractive, sustainable, and distributable returns for our shareholders.\"

Corporate and investment banking pretax profits were up 14 percent to 2.7 billion pounds. The bank was also helped by lower costs for bad conduct, dropping from 4.4 billion pounds in 2015 to 1.4 billion pounds in 2016.

\"Overall, Barclays is in better shape than it was, and the accelerated timetable for the run-down of its non-core assets will be received positively by the market,\" said Laith Khalaf, senior analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown. \"However, once the bad bank is consigned to the history books, there will be nothing for management to hide behind if the core business is not delivering.\"

Staley reiterated past remarks that Barclays had no plans to move large numbers of employees to Europe, saying he would use subsidiaries in countries like Ireland and Germany when Britain pulls out of the European Union.

\"I don't think any of those plans reflect a dramatic departure from London,\" he told the BBC. \"We may add some people in Dublin. We may add some people across Europe but our core operations and center will continue to be London. I continue to believe that London will be the financial center for Europe even without the (EU's) single market and we're committed to the U.K.\"

"}, {"id":"27d8a060-96b3-5e91-850b-a31d325a7674","type":"article","starttime":"1487851491","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T05:04:51-07:00","lastupdated":"1487853996","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"France's PSA seeks to be 'European car champion' with Opel","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_27d8a060-96b3-5e91-850b-a31d325a7674.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/france-s-psa-seeks-to-be-european-car-champion-with/article_27d8a060-96b3-5e91-850b-a31d325a7674.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-chairman-of-French-carmaker-PSA-Group-wants-to-create-a-European-car-champion-with-the-purchase-of-General-Motors-European-car-business/id-b8213d63d0e14cd99844ec52770b8437","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By ANGELA CHARLTON\nAssociated Press","prologue":"PARIS (AP) \u2014 The chairman of French carmaker PSA Group wants to create a \"European car champion\" with the purchase of General Motors' European car business and pledged to work with governments and unions worried over job cuts.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","automobile manufacturing","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services","dividends","corporate stock","corporate news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"fa581daf-0255-50fa-9382-cac406a202fe","description":"PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Carlos Tavares delivers his speech during the presentation of the company's 2016 full year results, in Paris, Thursday, Feb.23, 2017. French carmaker PSA Group saw its profits jump last year and is giving dividends for the first time since 2011, burnishing its image as it weighs a buyout of General Motors' money-losing European operations. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)","byline":"Christophe Ena","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"346","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a5/fa581daf-0255-50fa-9382-cac406a202fe/58aeb64027249.image.jpg?resize=512%2C346"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a5/fa581daf-0255-50fa-9382-cac406a202fe/58aeb64027249.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"203","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a5/fa581daf-0255-50fa-9382-cac406a202fe/58aeb64027249.image.jpg?resize=300%2C203"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"692","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a5/fa581daf-0255-50fa-9382-cac406a202fe/58aeb64027249.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"0c660a1e-2901-510e-adb0-f65cd0bf6e8b","description":"PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Carlos Tavares arrives to deliver his speech during the presentation of the company's 2016 full year results, in Paris, Thursday, Feb.23, 2017. French carmaker PSA Group saw its profits jump last year and is giving dividends for the first time since 2011, burnishing its image as it weighs a buyout of General Motors' money-losing European operations. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)","byline":"Christophe Ena","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"319","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c6/0c660a1e-2901-510e-adb0-f65cd0bf6e8b/58aeb640464f3.image.jpg?resize=512%2C319"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"62","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c6/0c660a1e-2901-510e-adb0-f65cd0bf6e8b/58aeb640464f3.image.jpg?resize=100%2C62"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"187","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c6/0c660a1e-2901-510e-adb0-f65cd0bf6e8b/58aeb640464f3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C187"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"638","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c6/0c660a1e-2901-510e-adb0-f65cd0bf6e8b/58aeb640464f3.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"33a0a466-d40f-5096-94bd-e660d93f16a1","description":"The logo of French carmaker Peugeot is pictured during the presentation of the company's 2016 full year results, in Paris, Wednesday, Feb.22, 2017. French carmaker PSA Group saw its profits jump last year and is giving dividends for the first time since 2011, burnishing its image as it weighs a buyout of General Motors' money-losing European operations. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)","byline":"Christophe Ena","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3a/33a0a466-d40f-5096-94bd-e660d93f16a1/58aeb64065e32.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3a/33a0a466-d40f-5096-94bd-e660d93f16a1/58aeb64065e32.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3a/33a0a466-d40f-5096-94bd-e660d93f16a1/58aeb64065e32.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3a/33a0a466-d40f-5096-94bd-e660d93f16a1/58aeb64065e32.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"0e57c3c0-e394-5003-af8e-410ad43c8789","description":"The logo of French carmaker Peugeot is pictured during the presentation of the company's 2016 full year results, in Paris, Wednesday, Feb.22, 2017. French carmaker PSA Group saw its profits jump last year and is giving dividends for the first time since 2011, burnishing its image as it weighs a buyout of General Motors' money-losing European operations. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)","byline":"Christophe Ena","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"327","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/e5/0e57c3c0-e394-5003-af8e-410ad43c8789/58aeb640868aa.image.jpg?resize=512%2C327"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/e5/0e57c3c0-e394-5003-af8e-410ad43c8789/58aeb640868aa.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/e5/0e57c3c0-e394-5003-af8e-410ad43c8789/58aeb640868aa.image.jpg?resize=300%2C192"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"654","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/e5/0e57c3c0-e394-5003-af8e-410ad43c8789/58aeb640868aa.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"27d8a060-96b3-5e91-850b-a31d325a7674","body":"

PARIS (AP) \u2014 The chairman of French carmaker PSA Group wants to create a \"European car champion\" with the purchase of General Motors' European car business and pledged to work with governments and unions worried over job cuts.

After reporting a near-doubling in 2016 profits, Carlos Tavares lauded the benefits of a deal that could reshape the continent's car market and leave PSA, the maker of Peugeot and Citroen cars, leapfrogging the Renault Nissan alliance to be second behind Germany's Volkswagen.

Speaking in Paris Thursday, Tavares said PSA's ambition to buy GM's loss-making Germany subsidiary Opel and its British brand Vauxhall is rooted in its remarkable financial turnaround. The company, which had to be bailed out by Chinese investors and the French government just three years ago, was able to announce Thursday its first dividend payment in six years alongside the profit jump.

Tavares insisted that the potential deal is \"nice to have\" but \"not a must\" and laid out a string of reasons why he thinks it would be a good idea: it could improve Opel's bottom line, expand PSA's market, and keep both companies competitive globally.

He said a combined company, which would be Europe's No. 2 carmaker behind Volkswagen, could have volumes of 5 million cars.

Detroit-based GM has been trying to boost prospects for its European business, which last made a full-year profit there in 1999.

\"We believe there is an opportunity to create a European car champion, resulting from the combination of a French company and German company and without forgetting our U.K. friends,\" Tavares said.

\"Opel has making red ink for 10 years, and burning approximately 1 billion in cash every year,\" he said. \"We believe we can help.\"

He insisted that Opel would remain a German company, in part to benefit from Germany's strong reputation for car engineering.

He said PSA would respect existing labor agreements, though he didn't explicitly rule out job cuts. Tavares has spoken with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and met with Opel employee representatives since the takeover discussions were announced last week.

\"The best way ... is to have unions and governments on your side,\" he said.

Jobs are an especially sensitive issue in what is election year in both Germany and France. The German and French economy ministers are expected to discuss the potential deal at a meeting in Paris on Thursday.

Opel employee representatives and union leaders in Germany say they will push to keep current jobs and factories, and Britain's biggest trade union has demanded that the government protect Vauxhaull, as Britain prepares to leave the EU and PSA considers the buyout.

While revenues last year were largely stable, PSA's group income was 1.7 billion euros last year, up from 899 million in 2015, attributed in part to a faster-than-expected cost-cutting. The company also announced plans for a 48 euro cents dividend per share.

Beyond Europe, Tavares acknowledged that PSA is frustrated with lost market share in China, but said PSA hopes to double sales in Iran this year after the lifting of sanctions allowed the French carmaker to revive activities there.

Chief Financial Officer Jean-Baptiste de Chatillon said PSA took a \"big hit\" on currency volatility, especially in Britain after its vote to leave the EU sent the pound plunging against the euro.

"}, {"id":"b5915d91-4dc6-5eff-a0e8-e5dd956326cf","type":"article","starttime":"1487851309","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T05:01:49-07:00","lastupdated":"1487853996","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Income tax cut defeated in Republican-led Michigan House","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_b5915d91-4dc6-5eff-a0e8-e5dd956326cf.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/income-tax-cut-defeated-in-republican-led-michigan-house/article_b5915d91-4dc6-5eff-a0e8-e5dd956326cf.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-Michigan-House-has-failed-to-approve-an-income-tax-cut-rejecting-a-scaled-back-plan-after-a-lengthy-session-and-the-unsuccessful-cajoling-of-some-resistant-members-of-the-GOP-majori/id-22bb8a4d3c944d4e98f6d034aebaf784","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DAVID EGGERT\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 The Republican-controlled Michigan House has failed to approve an income tax cut, rejecting the plan early Thursday after a lengthy session and the unsuccessful cajoling of some resistant members of the majority.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government and politics","political parties","political organizations","state taxes","government taxation and revenue","government finance","government business and finance","state governments","state legislature","legislature"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":7,"commentID":"b5915d91-4dc6-5eff-a0e8-e5dd956326cf","body":"

LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 The Republican-controlled Michigan House has failed to approve an income tax cut, rejecting the plan early Thursday after a lengthy session and the unsuccessful cajoling of some resistant members of the majority.

The legislation would have lowered the 4.25 percent tax to 4.05 percent by 2019 and then to 3.9 percent by 2021 as long as the state savings, or rainy day, fund doesn't fall below $1 billion. The fund has $734 million now but could grow to more than $1 billion in the next fiscal year.

The 52-55 vote at 1:45 a.m. \u2014 three short of the number needed to move the bill to the GOP-led Senate \u2014 came after several revisions to the measure. Republican Gov. Rick Snyder had voiced concerns about the budget implications of a tax cut.

\"It's unfortunate. We wanted to produce legislation that was going to bring income tax relief to the hard-working taxpayers of this state,\" House Speaker Tom Leonard told reporters after the measure's surprise defeat.

As passed by a House committee last week, the bill would have cut the tax to 3.9 percent next year and phased it out completely by 2057. But GOP leaders could not muster support in the full chamber and on Tuesday amended the bill to reduce the tax to 3.9 percent over four years and to end the bid for full elimination.

Republicans changed the legislation some more early Thursday before the vote, which capped a 12-hour late-night session that was rare so early in a new two-year term. With all but one Democrat opposed, Leonard spent hours trying to coax hold-out GOP members.

But 12 in the 63-member caucus voted no. Leonard said he called for the vote knowing it would likely fail \u2014 an unusual move as opposed to instead clearing the voting board once support was lacking \u2014 because \"I had an overwhelmingly majority of my caucus that wanted to let the world where they stood in terms of defending taxpayers in this state.\"

The bill could be revived later, though Leonard said the House would next work on Snyder's budget proposal in coming months and tackle other big agenda items.

Snyder had expressed \"serious concerns\" with earlier versions of the income tax proposal, pointing to tax cuts already enacted under his watch and to approaching budget pressures such as increased road spending.

The nonpartisan House Fiscal Agency estimates revenue in the $10.5 billion general fund would fall by $195 million in the next budget under the legislation, growing to a $1.1 billion reduction in the 2021-22 fiscal year if fully implemented. In 2021, a person with $50,000 in annual taxable income could pay $175 less than today if the measure is signed into law.

Republicans said workers should keep more of their paycheck and billed the tax cut as a way to fulfill a \"promise\" made in 2007, when the then-3.9 percent tax was raised to 4.35 percent to balance the budget. The tax was scheduled to gradually drop back to 3.9 percent by 2015.

That never happened because Snyder and the GOP-led Legislature in 2011 froze the rate at 4.25 percent while slashing the main business tax, taxing retirement income and making other tax changes.

\"We have a responsibility in government to fulfill our promises. Where I'm from, when you make a promise you keep your word,\" said Rep. Thomas Albert, a Lowell Republican.

Democrats criticized the cut as disproportionately benefiting the wealthy and said it should be targeted to the middle class. They also warned of reduced funding for universities, local communities that need state aid for police and firefighters, and the social safety net for low-income residents.

\"House Democrats, we have been fighting for a long time to give these working families tax relief. But the problem Mr. Speaker that I have with your solution ... is that the biggest winners are Michigan's wealthiest residents,\" said Rep. Jeremy Moss, a Southfield Democrat.

Democratic Rep. Brian Elder of Bay City said his average constituent would get a tax cut equaling a \"paltry $3 a week.\"

Rep. Scott Dianda of Calumet was the lone Democrat to join 51 Republicans in voting yes. Republicans opposing the bill were Reps. Chris Afendoulis of Grand Rapids Township, Julie Calley of Portland, Kathy Crawford of Novi, Daniela Garcia of Holland, Larry Inman of Williamsburg, Jim Lilly of Park Township, David Maturen of Vicksburg, Michael McCready of Bloomfield Hills, Dave Pagel of Berrien Springs, Brett Roberts of Eaton Township, Jason Sheppard of Temperance and Scott VanSingel of Grant.

Fallout from the vote was already underway.

Leonard removed Sheppard from his position as chair of the House Financial Services Committee, accusing him of lying about his planned vote. Sheppard could not immediately be reached for comment.

___

Online:

House Bill 4001: http://bit.ly/2kqZL3Y

___

Follow David Eggert on Twitter at https://twitter.com/DavidEggert00 . His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/author/david-eggert

"}, {"id":"16195003-a6f4-5098-9501-7a3b4ffdf10b","type":"article","starttime":"1487850963","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T04:56:03-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"travel":"travel"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Low-cost Norwegian Air promises bargain flights to Europe","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_16195003-a6f4-5098-9501-7a3b4ffdf10b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/low-cost-norwegian-air-promises-bargain-flights-to-europe/article_16195003-a6f4-5098-9501-7a3b4ffdf10b.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Norwegian-Air-Shuttle-is-promising-cheap-trans-Atlantic-flights-when-it-starts-service-to-Europe-this-summer-from-Rhode-Island-Connecticut-and-New-York-s-Hudson-Valley/id-01994ad40a404147b8e7e22032325b29","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) \u2014 Low-cost carrier Norwegian Air Shuttle is promising cheap trans-Atlantic flights when it starts service to Europe this summer from Rhode Island, Connecticut and New York's Hudson Valley.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","travel"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"16195003-a6f4-5098-9501-7a3b4ffdf10b","body":"

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) \u2014 Low-cost carrier Norwegian Air Shuttle is promising cheap trans-Atlantic flights when it starts service to Europe this summer from Rhode Island, Connecticut and New York's Hudson Valley.

Norwegian announced Thursday that it's opening new flight crew bases at Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport and Stewart International Airport in Newburgh, New York. Year-round flights from those airports to Edinburgh, Scotland, begin in June, and to Ireland and Northern Ireland in July.

There also will be flights to Scotland from Connecticut's Bradley International Airport.

One-way flights will start at $65 for the first 10,000 seats. Once the introductory phase is over, flights will start at $99.

The service includes flights to Cork, Dublin and Shannon airports in Ireland, and to Belfast in Northern Ireland.

"}, {"id":"eb40a2de-aab2-5959-a8f2-0e1815bfece6","type":"article","starttime":"1487848426","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T04:13:46-07:00","lastupdated":"1487850440","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"JPMorgan Chase announces $1.2M in grants to boost Detroit","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_eb40a2de-aab2-5959-a8f2-0e1815bfece6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/jpmorgan-chase-announces-m-in-grants-to-boost-detroit/article_eb40a2de-aab2-5959-a8f2-0e1815bfece6.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/JPMorgan-Chase-says-more-than-1-2-million-in-funding-will-help-boost-the-revitalization-of-Detroit-neighborhoods/id-ee1f7744463c4e37aecea7e08cbba4c3","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"DETROIT (AP) \u2014 JPMorgan Chase says more than $1.2 million in funding will help boost the revitalization of Detroit neighborhoods.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","urban renewal","social issues","social affairs","business schools","higher education","education","neighborhoods","residential real estate","lifestyle","corporate giving","philanthropy","corporate news","housing policy","government policy","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"eb40a2de-aab2-5959-a8f2-0e1815bfece6","body":"

DETROIT (AP) \u2014 JPMorgan Chase says more than $1.2 million in funding will help boost the revitalization of Detroit neighborhoods.

The company says Thursday the money is for six community development programs that involve housing development, blight removal, new business creation, parent education and neighborhood beautification.

The programs involve Southwest Housing, Vanguard Community Development Corp., Grandmont Rosedale Community Stabilization Program, Eastside Community Network, Michigan Community Resources and Community Development Advocates of Detroit.

The grants are part of JPMorgan Chase's previous $100 million commitment to Detroit's economic recovery.

"}, {"id":"a37571fe-22f4-5082-8cd5-722d45ad776f","type":"article","starttime":"1487845067","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T03:17:47-07:00","lastupdated":"1487847765","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"German federal police say British hacker arrested in London","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_a37571fe-22f4-5082-8cd5-722d45ad776f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/german-federal-police-say-british-hacker-arrested-in-london/article_a37571fe-22f4-5082-8cd5-722d45ad776f.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Germany-s-federal-police-say-a-29-year-old-Briton-has-been-arrested-on-a-European-arrest-warrant-on-suspicion-of-a-cyberattack-on-Deutsche-Telekom/id-63f0a4f27da740dcbd269f9e5e020428","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"BERLIN (AP) \u2014 A 29-year-old Briton was taken into custody in London on a European arrest warrant issued by Germany on suspicion of a carrying out a cyberattack on Deutsche Telekom, federal police said Thursday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","technology","computer crime","crime","general news","arrests","law and order"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"a37571fe-22f4-5082-8cd5-722d45ad776f","body":"

BERLIN (AP) \u2014 A 29-year-old Briton was taken into custody in London on a European arrest warrant issued by Germany on suspicion of a carrying out a cyberattack on Deutsche Telekom, federal police said Thursday.

Germany's Federal Criminal Police Office, or BKA, said the man, whose name wasn't released, is suspected of conducting a cyberattack on an internet access router in November that meant more than 1 million Deutsche Telekom customers couldn't go online.

Cologne prosecutors, who are handling the case, called the attack \"an especially severe case of computer sabotage,\" saying the nationwide hack threatened critical communication infrastructures.

The suspect, who was arrested Wednesday at a London airport, allegedly planned to hack the router to integrate it into a networked \"botnet\" for cybercrimes, the BKA said in a statement. A botnet is a number of internet-connected devices used to perform various tasks including sending spam or stealing data.

German prosecutors said the Briton allegedly offered to sell the botnet over the so-called darknet \u2014 an area of cyberspace invisible on the open internet often used for illegal activity \u2014 for \"attack scenarios like so-called DDoS attacks.\"

A DDoS, or \"Distributed Denial of Service,\" attack is an attempt to make an online service unavailable by overwhelming it with traffic from multiple sources.

"}, {"id":"4ea6f6ca-456a-589b-a975-cd1c930a5dec","type":"article","starttime":"1487843742","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T02:55:42-07:00","lastupdated":"1487845971","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"US, Mexico at odds over deportation as top officials meet","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_4ea6f6ca-456a-589b-a975-cd1c930a5dec.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/us-mexico-at-odds-over-deportation-as-top-officials-meet/article_4ea6f6ca-456a-589b-a975-cd1c930a5dec.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Mexico-s-mounting-unease-and-resentment-over-President-Donald-Trump-s-immigration-crackdown-are-looming-over-a-gathering-of-U-S-and-Mexican-leaders-that-the-U-S-had-hoped-would-project/id-b51d9a22b06f4fbaa6822914bdc635cb","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":7,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JOSH LEDERMAN\nAssociated Press","prologue":"MEXICO CITY (AP) \u2014 Mexico's mounting unease and resentment over President Donald Trump's immigration crackdown are looming over a gathering of U.S. and Mexican leaders that the U.S. had hoped would project a strong future for relations between neighbors.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government and politics","international relations","immigration","social issues","social affairs","military and defense"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"2d021c8c-b22f-547f-9476-761cf7c2b70b","description":"U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is welcome by U.S. ambassador Roberta Jacobson, left,as he arrives at Benito Juarez international Airport in Mexico City, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. (Carlos Barria/Pool photo via AP)","byline":"Carlos Barria","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d0/2d021c8c-b22f-547f-9476-761cf7c2b70b/58ae23c325212.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d0/2d021c8c-b22f-547f-9476-761cf7c2b70b/58ae23c325212.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d0/2d021c8c-b22f-547f-9476-761cf7c2b70b/58ae23c325212.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d0/2d021c8c-b22f-547f-9476-761cf7c2b70b/58ae23c325212.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"450605a7-ba35-58b2-acc9-9a014e64322c","description":"U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, center, is welcomed by U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Roberta Jacobson, right, and Mauricio Ibarra Ponce de Leon, North America director with Mexico's foreign ministry, as he arrives at the airport in Mexico City, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. President Donald Trump has sent Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly to Mexico on a fence-mending mission made all the more challenging by the actual fence he wants to build on the southern border. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)","byline":"Rebecca Blackwell","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"349","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450605a7-ba35-58b2-acc9-9a014e64322c/58aea113946fb.image.jpg?resize=512%2C349"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450605a7-ba35-58b2-acc9-9a014e64322c/58aea113946fb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450605a7-ba35-58b2-acc9-9a014e64322c/58aea113946fb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C204"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"698","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450605a7-ba35-58b2-acc9-9a014e64322c/58aea113946fb.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"c42c4414-6650-55eb-be80-815e94f0e1ba","description":"U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, right, walks with U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Roberta Jacobson, as he arrives at the airport in Mexico City, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. President Donald Trump has sent Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly to Mexico on a fence-mending mission made all the more challenging by the actual fence he wants to build on the southern border. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)","byline":"Rebecca Blackwell","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"347","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/42/c42c4414-6650-55eb-be80-815e94f0e1ba/58aea113b70c1.image.jpg?resize=347%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"148","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/42/c42c4414-6650-55eb-be80-815e94f0e1ba/58aea113b70c1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C148"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"443","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/42/c42c4414-6650-55eb-be80-815e94f0e1ba/58aea113b70c1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C443"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1511","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/42/c42c4414-6650-55eb-be80-815e94f0e1ba/58aea113b70c1.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"0a2aa5ac-6bbb-5afd-9c0a-77f7a11d823a","description":"Secretary of State Rex Tillerson boards his plane at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, before his departure to Mexico. President Donald Trump is sending his Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly to Mexico on a fence-mending mission made all the more challenging by the actual fence he wants to build on the southern border. (Carlos Barria via AP, Pool)","byline":"Carlos Barria","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"345","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a2/0a2aa5ac-6bbb-5afd-9c0a-77f7a11d823a/58aea113dc2ff.image.jpg?resize=512%2C345"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a2/0a2aa5ac-6bbb-5afd-9c0a-77f7a11d823a/58aea113dc2ff.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a2/0a2aa5ac-6bbb-5afd-9c0a-77f7a11d823a/58aea113dc2ff.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"690","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a2/0a2aa5ac-6bbb-5afd-9c0a-77f7a11d823a/58aea113dc2ff.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"9eadec2f-1d1e-5ec0-aa1d-5f2dec373463","description":"FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2017 file photo, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly speaks in Munich, Germany. President Donald Trump is sending Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Kelly to Mexico on a fence-mending mission made all the more challenging by the actual fence he wants to build on the southern border. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)","byline":"Matthias Schrader","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"411","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ea/9eadec2f-1d1e-5ec0-aa1d-5f2dec373463/58ade0544c721.image.jpg?resize=512%2C411"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ea/9eadec2f-1d1e-5ec0-aa1d-5f2dec373463/58ade0544c721.image.jpg?resize=100%2C80"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"241","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ea/9eadec2f-1d1e-5ec0-aa1d-5f2dec373463/58ade0544c721.image.jpg?resize=300%2C241"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"822","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ea/9eadec2f-1d1e-5ec0-aa1d-5f2dec373463/58ade0544c721.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"c8992f8e-5fc5-5222-ba8b-6a15be935150","description":"Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is seen at the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. President Donald Trump is sending his Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly to Mexico on a fence-mending mission made all the more challenging by the actual fence he wants to build on the southern border. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)","byline":"Molly Riley","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"387","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/89/c8992f8e-5fc5-5222-ba8b-6a15be935150/58ade05419016.image.jpg?resize=512%2C387"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"76","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/89/c8992f8e-5fc5-5222-ba8b-6a15be935150/58ade05419016.image.jpg?resize=100%2C76"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"227","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/89/c8992f8e-5fc5-5222-ba8b-6a15be935150/58ade05419016.image.jpg?resize=300%2C227"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"774","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/89/c8992f8e-5fc5-5222-ba8b-6a15be935150/58ade05419016.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"5822af51-b959-53a0-9ea8-265811c996e5","description":"U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson arrives at Benito Juarez international Airport in Mexico City, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. (Carlos Barria/Pool photo via AP)","byline":"Carlos Barria","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/82/5822af51-b959-53a0-9ea8-265811c996e5/58aeb63f984f4.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/82/5822af51-b959-53a0-9ea8-265811c996e5/58aeb63f984f4.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/82/5822af51-b959-53a0-9ea8-265811c996e5/58aeb63f984f4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/82/5822af51-b959-53a0-9ea8-265811c996e5/58aeb63f984f4.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"4ea6f6ca-456a-589b-a975-cd1c930a5dec","body":"

MEXICO CITY (AP) \u2014 Mexico's mounting unease and resentment over President Donald Trump's immigration crackdown are looming over a gathering of U.S. and Mexican leaders that the U.S. had hoped would project a strong future for relations between neighbors.

There is no shortage of tension points as U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly meet Thursday with top Mexican officials. After all, it's Kelly who's tasked with executing Trump's plan to target millions for possible deportation, and Tillerson who must explain it to the rest of the world.

As the pair arrived in Mexico City, the two countries seemed much farther apart than their close geographical proximity would suggest.

\"I think Secretary Tillerson and Secretary Kelly are going to have a great discussion down there,\" said White House press secretary Sean Spicer. He called the relationship \"phenomenal.\"

But while Spicer said the officials would \"talk through the implementation of the executive order,\" Mexico made clear it intended to do nothing of the sort.

\"I want to say clearly and most emphatically that the Mexican government and the Mexican people have no reason to accept unilateral decisions imposed by one government on another,\" said Mexico's foreign relations secretary, Luis Videgaray. \"We are not going to accept that, because we don't have to.\"

Videgaray added a cryptic but pointed warning that Mexico wouldn't hesitate to challenge the U.S. move at the United Nations or other global venues.

The visiting Americans planned to meet Thursday with Videgaray before a working lunch with Mexican officials and a formal meeting with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto.

The worsening rift over deportations and illegal immigration adds to an array of disputes that have sent U.S.-Mexico relations plunging since Trump took office a month ago. Trump's insistence that Mexico pay billions for a border wall led Pena Nieto to cancel a planned Washington visit. Mexican officials are also apprehensive over Trump's pledge to overhaul the trade relationship and possible apply steep taxes to Mexican products, a move with profound impacts for Mexico's export-heavy economy.

New immigration enforcement memos signed by Kelly this week call for sending send some immigrants who have crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally back into Mexico \u2014 even those from third countries who have no connection to Mexico. The memos also prioritize deportation for anyone charged or convicted of any crime, rather than just serious crimes, potentially subjecting millions in the U.S. illegally to deportation, including many Mexicans.

Those policies have raised fears in Mexico about the possibility of deportee and refugee camps emerging along Mexico's northern border. Mexican officials are also likely to seek answers about whether a forthcoming report ordered by Trump's administration that will list all current U.S. aid to Mexico is intended to threaten Mexico into compliance over immigration or the wall.

Dismayed by the deteriorating relations, six Democratic senators urged Tillerson and Kelly to strike a more cooperative tone than Trump.

\"We urge you to use your visit to disavow vitriolic rhetoric and forge a strong partnership based on mutual respect with the government of Mexico,\" the senators wrote in an open letter to be released Thursday.

Kelly arrived in the Mexican capital from Guatemala on a visit intended to deter Guatemalans from trying to enter the U.S. illegally. Though Kelly promised \"there will be no mass roundups,\" he acknowledged that those caught will be removed from the U.S. much more quickly than in the past.

\"My best advice is to not do it,\" he said.

___

Reach Josh Lederman on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAP

"}, {"id":"56678db0-5a71-5bc0-b51c-9b2d73176d49","type":"article","starttime":"1487843055","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T02:44:15-07:00","lastupdated":"1487845974","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Hawaii bill would ban licenses for some foreign fishermen","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_56678db0-5a71-5bc0-b51c-9b2d73176d49.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/hawaii-bill-would-ban-licenses-for-some-foreign-fishermen/article_56678db0-5a71-5bc0-b51c-9b2d73176d49.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-proposal-in-the-Hawaii-Legislature-has-the-potential-to-cripple-the-state-s-commercial-fishing-industry-after-an-Associated-Press-investigation-found-foreign-fishermen-confined-to-boat/id-e33dd673261d4fae86db86c84e50ce8c","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":5,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By CATHY BUSSEWITZ\nAssociated Press","prologue":"HONOLULU (AP) \u2014 Hawaii lawmakers are considering a proposal with the potential to cripple the state's commercial fishing industry after an Associated Press investigation found foreign fishermen confined to boats and living in subpar conditions.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","government and politics","small business","laws","legislation","legislature","government regulations","industry regulation","government business and finance","commercial fishing and hunting","agriculture","state legislature","state governments"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"9c33547f-474e-50f0-8727-c23b2b4bd653","description":"FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017 file photo, a man stands on a commercial fishing boat docked at Pier 38 in Honolulu. A proposal in the Hawaii Legislature has the potential to shake up the fishing industry and the permit process for foreign fishermen. The bill will be heard in two Hawaii Senate Committees Wednesday, Feb. 23. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)","byline":"Caleb Jones","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"343","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c3/9c33547f-474e-50f0-8727-c23b2b4bd653/58ae3ecd3ac7f.image.jpg?resize=512%2C343"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c3/9c33547f-474e-50f0-8727-c23b2b4bd653/58ae3ecd3ac7f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c3/9c33547f-474e-50f0-8727-c23b2b4bd653/58ae3ecd3ac7f.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"686","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c3/9c33547f-474e-50f0-8727-c23b2b4bd653/58ae3ecd3ac7f.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"f74ad4d2-07b8-50e8-b8ba-d8fa4ab39989","description":"In this Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017 file photo, a catch of fish is unloaded from a commercial fishing boat at Pier 38 in Honolulu. A proposal in the Hawaii Legislature has the potential to shake up the fishing industry and the permit process for foreign fishermen. The bill will be heard in two Hawaii Senate Committees Wednesday, Feb. 23. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)","byline":"Caleb Jones","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"343","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/74/f74ad4d2-07b8-50e8-b8ba-d8fa4ab39989/58ae3ecd68925.image.jpg?resize=512%2C343"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/74/f74ad4d2-07b8-50e8-b8ba-d8fa4ab39989/58ae3ecd68925.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/74/f74ad4d2-07b8-50e8-b8ba-d8fa4ab39989/58ae3ecd68925.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"686","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/74/f74ad4d2-07b8-50e8-b8ba-d8fa4ab39989/58ae3ecd68925.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"2f978f7b-c5f3-5c7c-9129-2d8333c422de","description":"In this Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017 photo Hawaii state Sen. Karl Rhoads talks about legislation he proposed that could change the way foreign fishermen get permits in Honolulu. A federal legal loophole allows the fishermen to fish off the coast of Hawaii, even though they are technically not allowed to enter the United States. Rhoads wants to change that by barring state officials from issuing fishing licenses to crew members who don't have permission to land in the country. (AP Photo/Cathy Bussewitz)","byline":"Cathy Bussewitz","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/f9/2f978f7b-c5f3-5c7c-9129-2d8333c422de/58ae2ac2a1114.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/f9/2f978f7b-c5f3-5c7c-9129-2d8333c422de/58ae2ac2a1114.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/f9/2f978f7b-c5f3-5c7c-9129-2d8333c422de/58ae2ac2a1114.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/f9/2f978f7b-c5f3-5c7c-9129-2d8333c422de/58ae2ac2a1114.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"868ffc19-3c77-5e8f-9517-0d30e9331ecd","description":"FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 file photo, a federal law enforcement officer talks to foreign fishermen in Hawaii's commercial fleet during a vessel inspection in Honolulu. A proposal in the Hawaii Legislature has the potential to shake up the fishing industry and the permit process for foreign fishermen. The bill will be heard in two Hawaii Senate Committees Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)","byline":"Caleb Jones","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"344","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/68/868ffc19-3c77-5e8f-9517-0d30e9331ecd/58ae3ecdc56ee.image.jpg?resize=512%2C344"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/68/868ffc19-3c77-5e8f-9517-0d30e9331ecd/58ae3ecdc56ee.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/68/868ffc19-3c77-5e8f-9517-0d30e9331ecd/58ae3ecdc56ee.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"688","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/68/868ffc19-3c77-5e8f-9517-0d30e9331ecd/58ae3ecdc56ee.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"27790d5b-da1f-5db8-9665-48ea52a46ddb","description":"This Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017 file photo shows commercial fishing boats docked at Pier 38 in Honolulu. A proposal in the Hawaii Legislature has the potential to shake up the fishing industry and the permit process for foreign fishermen. A federal legal loophole allows the fishermen to fish off the coast of Hawaii, even though they are technically not allowed to enter the United States. The bill will be heard in two Hawaii Senate Committees Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)","byline":"Caleb Jones","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"343","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/27790d5b-da1f-5db8-9665-48ea52a46ddb/58ae3ecdf0536.image.jpg?resize=512%2C343"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/27790d5b-da1f-5db8-9665-48ea52a46ddb/58ae3ecdf0536.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/27790d5b-da1f-5db8-9665-48ea52a46ddb/58ae3ecdf0536.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"686","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/77/27790d5b-da1f-5db8-9665-48ea52a46ddb/58ae3ecdf0536.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"56678db0-5a71-5bc0-b51c-9b2d73176d49","body":"

HONOLULU (AP) \u2014 Hawaii lawmakers are considering a proposal with the potential to cripple the state's commercial fishing industry after an Associated Press investigation found foreign fishermen confined to boats and living in subpar conditions.

A 2016 AP investigation found that some fishermen earned less than $1 an hour and worked without most basic labor protections while catching premium seafood. The boats often have crews of fishermen from Southeast Asia and Pacific Island nations, and the men are restricted to their vessels when docked in Honolulu because they lack proper documentation to enter the U.S.

A bill in the Hawaii Legislature aims to change rules for how fishing licenses are issued to foreign crew members that make up the majority of the state's commercial fleet.

Now, boat owners or captains bring foreign crew members' passports and customs documents to a state agency to get their licenses \u2014 without the fishermen present. A federal legal loophole allows foreign fishermen to work off the coast of Hawaii, but they are technically not allowed to enter the country.

The bill would require anyone seeking a commercial fishing license in Hawaii to appear in person. State Sen. Karl Rhoads says he wants to change the law so people who are not permitted to enter the U.S. cannot get a license to fish on American-flagged boats sailing from Honolulu.

\"They just feel like the underdogs to me, and I don't like to see people taken advantage of,\" he said.

Despite the federal loophole, state laws require anyone applying for a fishing license to be \"lawfully admitted\" to the country.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection says these men are banned, raising questions about whether the state has been violating its own law for years by allowing the foreign workers to catch and sell seafood in Hawaii.

\"As the state, we don't have a lot of jurisdiction over it, and this is a way to legitimately insert ourselves into the process, because we do require a license,\" Rhoads said.

The Hawaii Longline Association opposed the bill, saying the industry is already regulated and additional requirements are unnecessary.

\"It could lead to the use of no foreign crew in the fishery, which would be very devastating,\" said Jim Cook, a member of the association's board of directors. \"It would be similar to having no immigrant people in agriculture in Hawaii or any other part of the United States.\"

Two Hawaii Senate committees discussed the proposal Wednesday. A religious group that works with foreign fishermen opposed the bill saying the fishermen rely on the money they earn in the U.S. But Kathryn Xian who works with trafficking victims said some fishermen are treated better than others, and the industry cannot be relied upon to self-regulate.

The committee postponed making a decision until next week.

Typically, when commercial fishing boats arrive in Honolulu, they are met by federal customs agents who ban foreign workers from entering the country by stamping \"refused\" on their landing permits.

But a written opinion by Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin said the state Department of Land and Natural Resources provides the landing permits as proof the fishermen are \"lawfully admitted.\"

Rhoads says the form allows someone to land but does not allow lawful entry as required for a license.

\"Right now, it just feels like lots of gray area,\" Rhoads said. \"I think when there are gray areas, it's easier to take advantage of people.\"

Cook, of the fishing industry group, suggested that the fishermen who are refused entry could be granted \"parole\" to go to the office to apply for their licenses.

Federal customs officials referred AP to federal immigration law that says parole can be given on a case-by-case basis for \"urgent humanitarian reasons\" or \"significant public benefit.\"

Foreign fishermen usually get parole only when they have a medical emergency or they are being escorted to the airport to leave the country.

But Cook said he believes there is also a parole category for ship business. Federal officials did not immediately respond to a request for clarification on that possibility.

___

Associated Press Writers Caleb Jones, Margie Mason and Martha Mendoza contributed to this report.

"}, {"id":"8bc3279d-fc9a-5315-99a9-9ec29a38303b","type":"article","starttime":"1487841340","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T02:15:40-07:00","lastupdated":"1487844066","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Repsol closes 2016 with best net profit in 4 years","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_8bc3279d-fc9a-5315-99a9-9ec29a38303b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/repsol-closes-with-best-net-profit-in-years/article_8bc3279d-fc9a-5315-99a9-9ec29a38303b.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Spanish-energy-company-Repsol-has-reported-its-best-full-year-earnings-in-four-years-as-it-booked-fewer-impairment-charges-related-to-low-oil-and-gas-prices/id-2865e24a89424bd1abfb0d4f18b24ece","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"MADRID (AP) \u2014 Spanish energy company Repsol has reported its best annual earnings in four years as it booked fewer impairment charges related to low oil and gas prices.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","earnings reports","earnings","financial performance","corporate news","oil and gas industry","energy industry"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"8bc3279d-fc9a-5315-99a9-9ec29a38303b","body":"

MADRID (AP) \u2014 Spanish energy company Repsol has reported its best annual earnings in four years as it booked fewer impairment charges related to low oil and gas prices.

Its net profit of 1.73 billion euros ($1.82 billion) compared with a loss of 1.4 billion euros in 2015.

In the final quarter of 2016, it made a net 616 million euros, overturning a loss of 2.84 billion euros in the same period one year before.

CEO Josu Jon Imaz said Thursday that the company had reduced its operational costs by more than 1.6 billion euros. Repsol also benefited from the acquisition of Canadian oil company Talisman, which increased production and exploration assets.

Shares in Repsol S.A. gained 1.5 percent to 13.9 euros in early Madrid trading.

"}, {"id":"caa97d41-dcb9-5d12-8f34-c48ca2c2e749","type":"article","starttime":"1487840491","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T02:01:31-07:00","lastupdated":"1487843113","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"The Latest: House leader replaces panel chair he says lied","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_caa97d41-dcb9-5d12-8f34-c48ca2c2e749.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/the-latest-house-leader-replaces-panel-chair-he-says-lied/article_caa97d41-dcb9-5d12-8f34-c48ca2c2e749.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-fallout-over-Michigan-House-Republicans-failure-to-pass-an-income-tax-cut-is-already-underway/id-d07c8b1bf998481db284cfb140e40d25","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the Michigan House's income tax proposal (all times local):","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government and politics","legislation","legislature","government budgets","government finance","government business and finance","state legislature","state governments","state taxes","government taxation and revenue"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"caa97d41-dcb9-5d12-8f34-c48ca2c2e749","body":"

LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the Michigan House's income tax proposal (all times local):

4 a.m.

The fallout over Michigan House Republicans' failure to pass an income tax cut is already underway.

GOP House Speaker Tom Leonard announced after 3 a.m. Thursday that he removed Republican Rep. Jason Sheppard of Temperance as chairman of the Financial Services Committee. Leonard says Sheppard, who voted against a bill to cut the 4.25 percent income tax to 3.9 percent over four years, told him he would vote yes.

Leonard says in statement that it's \"unacceptable\" that Sheppard \"lied\" about his position. Sheppard could not immediately be reached to comment.

The House early Thursday fell three votes short of the 55 needed to move the legislation to the Senate.

Leonard named Republican Rep. Diana Farrington of Utica the new chairwoman of the committee. Sheppard will no longer serve on the panel.

___

1:55 a.m.

The Republican-led Michigan House has defeated legislation to lower the state's income tax.

The bill that fell three votes short of passage early Thursday would lower the 4.25 percent tax to 4.05 percent by 2019 and then to 3.9 percent by 2021 as long as the state savings, or rainy day, fund is not below $1 billion.

Eleven Republicans joined all but one Democrat in opposing the legislation.

Republican Gov. Rick Snyder has voiced concerns about the budget implications of a tax cut.

Conservatives say Michigan's income tax should return to 3.9 percent, where it was as recently as 2007 before being increased to address a budget deficit.

___

12:25 a.m.

The Michigan House is meeting overnight as majority Republicans struggle to gain support for an income tax cut.

Legislation that would reduce the 4.25 tax to 3.9 percent over four years is on the agenda for a vote. But the GOP is at odds early Thursday over the proposal that's opposed by Democrats. Republican Gov. Rick Snyder has cited \"serious concerns\" about the budget implications of the tax cut.

Conservatives say Michigan's income tax should return to 3.9 percent, where it was as recently as 2007 before being increased to address a budget deficit. New House Republican leaders are making the tax cut a priority early in the two-year term.

Snyder says taxes already have been lowered under his watch.

The House session began Wednesday afternoon and extended beyond midnight.

"}, {"id":"7695ab19-8664-583d-9ccd-ce8206d3abd3","type":"article","starttime":"1487837652","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T01:14:12-07:00","lastupdated":"1487839512","priority":0,"sections":[{"travel":"travel"},{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Lawmakers renew push for drilling in Alaska wildlife refuge","url":"http://tucson.com/travel/article_7695ab19-8664-583d-9ccd-ce8206d3abd3.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/travel/lawmakers-renew-push-for-drilling-in-alaska-wildlife-refuge/article_7695ab19-8664-583d-9ccd-ce8206d3abd3.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-possibility-of-petroleum-drilling-in-Alaska-s-Arctic-National-Wildlife-Refuge-wasn-t-a-consideration-under-President-Barack-Obama-but-it-s-getting-renewed-attention-under-the-new-ad/id-c708ce0a922e493190e191880b7f67b4","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DAN JOLING\nAssociated Press","prologue":"ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) \u2014 Former U.S. Sen. Frank Murkowski in 2001 gave a speech urging colleagues to approve oil drilling in America's largest wildlife refuge. The Alaska Republican held up a blank sheet of paper to illustrate his point.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","government and politics","travel","energy and the environment","environment","environment and nature","state governments","oil and gas exploration and extraction","oil and gas industry","energy industry","coastlines and beaches","wildlife management","natural resource management","wildlife","deer","animals","nature reserves","legislature","legislation","oil and gas transportation","environmental laws and regulations","government regulations"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"0de2d3fe-1897-57be-80b1-a33d4ead6df0","description":"FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2015, file photo, Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chair Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, voices her opposition after President Barack Obama waded into a decades-long fight over drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Washington. Petroleum drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was not a consideration under Obama but it's getting renewed attention under the new administration. Murkowski and other members of the state\u2019s congressional delegation are pushing legislation to allow drilling in the coastal plain of the refuge. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)","byline":"J. Scott Applewhite","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/de/0de2d3fe-1897-57be-80b1-a33d4ead6df0/58ae9e0530c4c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/de/0de2d3fe-1897-57be-80b1-a33d4ead6df0/58ae9e0530c4c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/de/0de2d3fe-1897-57be-80b1-a33d4ead6df0/58ae9e0530c4c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/de/0de2d3fe-1897-57be-80b1-a33d4ead6df0/58ae9e0530c4c.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"da5232a5-1b34-5b01-85f8-e10374bb157b","description":"undated aerial photo provided by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a herd of caribou on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. Petroleum drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was not a consideration under President Barack Obama but it's getting renewed attention under the new administration. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)","byline":"uncredited","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/a5/da5232a5-1b34-5b01-85f8-e10374bb157b/58ae9e0553044.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/a5/da5232a5-1b34-5b01-85f8-e10374bb157b/58ae9e0553044.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/a5/da5232a5-1b34-5b01-85f8-e10374bb157b/58ae9e0553044.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/a5/da5232a5-1b34-5b01-85f8-e10374bb157b/58ae9e0553044.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"1190ff18-2235-5ea2-bf9b-015cf83162f5","description":"This undated aerial photo provided by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a herd of caribou on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. Petroleum drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was not a consideration under President Barack Obama but it's getting renewed attention under the new administration. Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski and other members of the state\u2019s congressional delegation are pushing legislation to allow drilling in the coastal plain of the refuge. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)","byline":"uncredited","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"346","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/19/1190ff18-2235-5ea2-bf9b-015cf83162f5/58ae9e0573f31.image.jpg?resize=512%2C346"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/19/1190ff18-2235-5ea2-bf9b-015cf83162f5/58ae9e0573f31.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"203","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/19/1190ff18-2235-5ea2-bf9b-015cf83162f5/58ae9e0573f31.image.jpg?resize=300%2C203"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"692","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/19/1190ff18-2235-5ea2-bf9b-015cf83162f5/58ae9e0573f31.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"3c7b5b3b-86be-58d9-9b4e-f13de90f6d84","description":"FILE - In this July 2001 file photo shows the coastal plain of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Petroleum drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was not a consideration under President Barack Obama but it's getting renewed attention under the new administration. Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski and other members of the state\u2019s congressional delegation are pushing legislation to allow drilling in the coastal plain of the refuge. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)","byline":"Al Grillo","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"339","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c7/3c7b5b3b-86be-58d9-9b4e-f13de90f6d84/58ae9e0598b33.image.jpg?resize=339%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"151","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c7/3c7b5b3b-86be-58d9-9b4e-f13de90f6d84/58ae9e0598b33.image.jpg?resize=100%2C151"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"453","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c7/3c7b5b3b-86be-58d9-9b4e-f13de90f6d84/58ae9e0598b33.image.jpg?resize=300%2C453"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1547","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/c7/3c7b5b3b-86be-58d9-9b4e-f13de90f6d84/58ae9e0598b33.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"7695ab19-8664-583d-9ccd-ce8206d3abd3","body":"

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) \u2014 Former U.S. Sen. Frank Murkowski in 2001 gave a speech urging colleagues to approve oil drilling in America's largest wildlife refuge. The Alaska Republican held up a blank sheet of paper to illustrate his point.

The field of white, he said, was all you could see each winter on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, implying that such a barren landscape would not be harmed by oil rigs.

Sixteen years later, Murkowski's daughter is trying again. U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski is sponsoring legislation to open the refuge that takes up Alaska's northeast corner and is larger than West Virginia and Connecticut combined. With a Republican Congress and president, she's hopeful that the timing is right.

\"If you ask me,\" she told The Associated Press by phone from Washington, D.C., \"it's always been a good time to open it.\"

The coastal plain is not the apex of Alaska scenery, but it's a nursery for polar bears, muskoxen and the vast Porcupine Caribou Herd. Migratory birds from all 50 states nest there. Few people visit, but the coastal plain is part of a refuge that's the very definition of wilderness: no roads, no campgrounds, not even any established trails. Environmental groups are planning strategies to keep drill rigs out.

\"There are some places that are just too sacred to drill,\" said Alli Harvey, a Sierra Club campaigner in Anchorage.

Legislation signed by President Dwight Eisenhower in 1960 created the Arctic National Wildlife \"Range.\" Congress in 1980 changed the name, expanded the refuge to 30,136 square miles and declared much of it wilderness.

However, recognizing the potential for oil, Congress also declared that 2,300 square miles of Beaufort Sea coastal plain were to be studied for natural resources. Another act of Congress can open it to drilling.

The Arctic refuge has since been one of Alaska's great development-versus-environment issues, causing a stalemate that has lasted more than 36 years.

Congress approved drilling in 1995, but President Bill Clinton vetoed it. Drilling has been a non-issue for the past eight years. President Barack Obama instead urged Congress to formally designate the coastal plain as wilderness.

Members of the Gwich'in Steering Committee, an Alaska Native organization tied to U.S. and Canadian villages south and east of the refuge, were grateful. They say their subsistence lifestyle, and identity, are closely tied to a healthy Porcupine Caribou Herd, which uses the coastal plain for calving.

\"This place is so special,\" said Bernadette Demientieff, executive director. \"We have to keep some places as is. We don't need to be tearing into everything.\"

Most Alaskans feel otherwise. Politicians of all stripes jeopardize their re-election chances if they don't endorse \"opening ANWR.\"

The prospect is just 60 miles from the trans-Alaska pipeline, which has plenty of space for moving more oil toward refineries. The pipeline currently operates at around one-quarter capacity because production from Alaska's major oil fields has declined since the late 1980s. Alaska state government, which runs on oil revenue, is blowing through savings, hit hard by the double-whammy of lower production and low oil prices.

The U.S. Geological Survey estimates the coastal plain of the refuge holds 10.4 billion barrels of oil and possibly as much as 16 billion barrels. It's North America's greatest prospect for conventional oil production, according to Sen. Lisa Murkowski.

The bill sponsored by Murkowski and other Alaska congressional delegates would limit infrastructure \u2014 drilling pads, roads and pipelines \u2014 to 2,000 acres. Drilling advocates say restrictions already in place will protect caribou. No infrastructure would be allowed in areas crucial to caribou survival, such as the ice fields and uplands where caribou retreat to escape blood-sucking insects.

Alaska already has demonstrated at other North Slope oil fields that development and caribou can co-exist, Murkowski said. Extended-reach drilling, reaching oil from a pad nearly 8 miles away, is now possible.

\"Think about how far the technologies that we have put in place have taken us, from the early days of Prudhoe and how we operated,\" she said. \"What is coming about now on the North Slope in terms of how we access the resource \u2014 it's a world apart.\"

But environmentalists say the 2,000-acre figure is misleading. It's akin to assessing the amount of space in a room affected by a table by measuring only the area where the legs touch the floor, said Kristen Miller, conservation director for the Alaska Wilderness League. Gravel mining, seismic testing and air pollution will take a toll, she said. Oil is spread across the entire coastal plain, she said, and infrastructure will be too.

\"You will have a spider web of pipelines, roads and everything else it takes to support these intensive activities,\" Miller said.

"}, {"id":"3a9efd33-c81e-5621-b8e7-73fb8a3957a8","type":"article","starttime":"1487832083","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T23:41:23-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Plight of company towns: finding a new identity","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_3a9efd33-c81e-5621-b8e7-73fb8a3957a8.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/plight-of-company-towns-finding-a-new-identity/article_3a9efd33-c81e-5621-b8e7-73fb8a3957a8.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Company-towns-like-Peoria-Illinois-have-long-relied-on-major-employers-to-provide-generations-of-locals-with-jobs-and-give-the-cities-their-central-identity/id-9913c98a4d3a4eda81919ba42ec39211","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":10,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By SARA BURNETT\nAssociated Press","prologue":"PEORIA, Ill. (AP) \u2014 Peoria Mayor Jim Ardis planned to open this year's State of the City speech by thanking Caterpillar Inc. for its longtime commitment to the central Illinois town, declaring \"We wouldn't be Peoria without Caterpillar.\"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","corporate identity","marketing and advertising","corporate news","mass transit systems operation","transportation and shipping","industrial products and services","labor economy","economy","employment figures","leading economic indicators","manufacturing sector performance","corporate offices"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"db0b6ea9-7a9f-512c-96e0-b6b73c1c69d1","description":"FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2012 file photo, the Archer Daniels Midland Company plant is seen in Decatur, Ill. In 2014, Decatur, Ill., lost Archer Daniels Midland to Chicago after 40 years in the town. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)","byline":"Seth Perlman","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/b0/db0b6ea9-7a9f-512c-96e0-b6b73c1c69d1/58ae8c9feddaa.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/b0/db0b6ea9-7a9f-512c-96e0-b6b73c1c69d1/58ae8c9feddaa.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/b0/db0b6ea9-7a9f-512c-96e0-b6b73c1c69d1/58ae8c9feddaa.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/b0/db0b6ea9-7a9f-512c-96e0-b6b73c1c69d1/58ae8c9feddaa.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"5975886b-0efb-57a3-a366-f5311cfcd40d","description":"FILE - In this June 15, 2016 file photo shows Caterpillar Inc. products on display at the Caterpillar visitors center in Peoria, Ill. Caterpillar's recent decision to move 300 top headquarters jobs to the Chicago area made Peoria the latest city with a vacuum to fill. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit.\u00a0 (Ron Johnson/Journal Star via AP File)","byline":"Ron Johnson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"348","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/97/5975886b-0efb-57a3-a366-f5311cfcd40d/58ae8ca01a735.image.jpg?resize=512%2C348"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/97/5975886b-0efb-57a3-a366-f5311cfcd40d/58ae8ca01a735.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/97/5975886b-0efb-57a3-a366-f5311cfcd40d/58ae8ca01a735.image.jpg?resize=300%2C204"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"696","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/97/5975886b-0efb-57a3-a366-f5311cfcd40d/58ae8ca01a735.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"ff076d7b-a282-5fab-bfbf-c01abb6454a3","description":"This Feb. 2, 2017 photo shows merchandise at the Caterpillar visitors center in Peoria, Ill. Caterpillar's recent decision to move 300 top headquarters jobs to the Chicago area made Peoria the latest city with a vacuum to fill. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit.\u00a0(AP Photo/Sara Burnett)","byline":"Sara Burnett","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/f0/ff076d7b-a282-5fab-bfbf-c01abb6454a3/58ae8ca0476bf.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/f0/ff076d7b-a282-5fab-bfbf-c01abb6454a3/58ae8ca0476bf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/f0/ff076d7b-a282-5fab-bfbf-c01abb6454a3/58ae8ca0476bf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/f0/ff076d7b-a282-5fab-bfbf-c01abb6454a3/58ae8ca0476bf.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"3ddeea69-a367-5053-8626-e1cc6c2bc07b","description":"FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017 file photo, flags fly out the Caterpillar global headquarters building in downtown Peoria, Ill. Caterpillar's recent decision to move 300 top headquarters jobs to the Chicago area made Peoria the latest city with a vacuum to fill. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit. (Ron Johnson/Journal Star via AP)","byline":"Ron Johnson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"327","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/dd/3ddeea69-a367-5053-8626-e1cc6c2bc07b/58ae8ca06901d.image.jpg?resize=512%2C327"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/dd/3ddeea69-a367-5053-8626-e1cc6c2bc07b/58ae8ca06901d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/dd/3ddeea69-a367-5053-8626-e1cc6c2bc07b/58ae8ca06901d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C192"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"654","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/dd/3ddeea69-a367-5053-8626-e1cc6c2bc07b/58ae8ca06901d.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"505fdbdf-83e7-541c-ac17-01179ed85c35","description":"FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017 file photo, flags fly out the Caterpillar global headquarters building in downtown Peoria, Ill. Caterpillar's recent decision to move 300 top headquarters jobs to the Chicago area made Peoria the latest city with a vacuum to fill. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit. (Ron Johnson/Journal Star via AP File)","byline":"Ron Johnson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"328","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/05/505fdbdf-83e7-541c-ac17-01179ed85c35/58ae8ca08c541.image.jpg?resize=512%2C328"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/05/505fdbdf-83e7-541c-ac17-01179ed85c35/58ae8ca08c541.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/05/505fdbdf-83e7-541c-ac17-01179ed85c35/58ae8ca08c541.image.jpg?resize=300%2C192"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"656","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/05/505fdbdf-83e7-541c-ac17-01179ed85c35/58ae8ca08c541.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"3f51db5d-e27c-5426-9d16-764aee9995e7","description":"FILE - In this Tuesday, June 30, 2015, file photo, flags fly over ConAgra Foods world headquarters in Omaha, Neb. ConAgra Foods moved 1,000 jobs in 2016 from Omaha to Chicago. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit.\u00a0(AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)","byline":"Nati Harnik","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"332","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/f5/3f51db5d-e27c-5426-9d16-764aee9995e7/58ae8ca0b7d86.image.jpg?resize=512%2C332"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/f5/3f51db5d-e27c-5426-9d16-764aee9995e7/58ae8ca0b7d86.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"195","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/f5/3f51db5d-e27c-5426-9d16-764aee9995e7/58ae8ca0b7d86.image.jpg?resize=300%2C195"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"664","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/f5/3f51db5d-e27c-5426-9d16-764aee9995e7/58ae8ca0b7d86.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"97fcaaa4-2b9f-5484-aeaf-37b7114e5a34","description":"FILE - In this June 20, 2012 file photo, earth-moving tractors and equipment made by Peoria, Ill.-based Caterpillar Inc. are seen in Clinton, Ill. Caterpillar's recent decision to move 300 top headquarters jobs to the Chicago area made Peoria the latest city with a vacuum to fill. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)","byline":"Seth Perlman","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7f/97fcaaa4-2b9f-5484-aeaf-37b7114e5a34/58ae8ca0d89cd.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7f/97fcaaa4-2b9f-5484-aeaf-37b7114e5a34/58ae8ca0d89cd.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7f/97fcaaa4-2b9f-5484-aeaf-37b7114e5a34/58ae8ca0d89cd.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7f/97fcaaa4-2b9f-5484-aeaf-37b7114e5a34/58ae8ca0d89cd.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"e3b3780c-5732-598b-99a2-d83b12a0f2bc","description":"FILE - This July 2, 2009 file photo shows the Archer Daniels Midland Company logo on a tanker truck at the ADM plant in Decatur, Ill. In 2014, Decatur, Illinois, lost Archer Daniels Midland to Chicago after 40 years in the town. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)","byline":"Seth Perlman","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/3b/e3b3780c-5732-598b-99a2-d83b12a0f2bc/58ae8ca10c32b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/3b/e3b3780c-5732-598b-99a2-d83b12a0f2bc/58ae8ca10c32b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/3b/e3b3780c-5732-598b-99a2-d83b12a0f2bc/58ae8ca10c32b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/3b/e3b3780c-5732-598b-99a2-d83b12a0f2bc/58ae8ca10c32b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"c6c53623-b215-5c35-add0-4f0e01d45e76","description":"FILE - In this March 6, 2009 photo, the Caterpillar Inc. corporate offices, right, dominates the skyline along the Illinois River Peoria, Ill. Caterpillar's recent decision to move 300 top headquarters jobs to the Chicago area made Peoria the latest city with a vacuum to fill. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit.\u00a0(AP Photo/Seth Perlman File)","byline":"Seth Perlman","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"312","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/6c/c6c53623-b215-5c35-add0-4f0e01d45e76/58ae8ca14aa0a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C312"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"61","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/6c/c6c53623-b215-5c35-add0-4f0e01d45e76/58ae8ca14aa0a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C61"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"183","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/6c/c6c53623-b215-5c35-add0-4f0e01d45e76/58ae8ca14aa0a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C183"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"624","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/6c/c6c53623-b215-5c35-add0-4f0e01d45e76/58ae8ca14aa0a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"65152d08-270a-592b-938e-2dbb9a5710dc","description":"In this Feb. 2, 2017 photo Peoria Mayor Jim Ardis poses for a photo in Peoria, Ill. Caterpillar's recent decision to move 300 top headquarters jobs to the Chicago area made Peoria the latest city with a vacuum to fill. Many midsize communities are looking to redefine themselves as more companies trade longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and the lifestyle that talented young workers want, with nightlife and public transit.\u00a0(AP Photo by Sara Burnett)","byline":"Sara Burnett","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/65152d08-270a-592b-938e-2dbb9a5710dc/58ae8ca16ee39.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/65152d08-270a-592b-938e-2dbb9a5710dc/58ae8ca16ee39.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/65152d08-270a-592b-938e-2dbb9a5710dc/58ae8ca16ee39.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/65152d08-270a-592b-938e-2dbb9a5710dc/58ae8ca16ee39.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"3a9efd33-c81e-5621-b8e7-73fb8a3957a8","body":"

PEORIA, Ill. (AP) \u2014 Peoria Mayor Jim Ardis planned to open this year's State of the City speech by thanking Caterpillar Inc. for its longtime commitment to the central Illinois town, declaring \"We wouldn't be Peoria without Caterpillar.\"

It's been that way for decades in Peoria and in other company towns across the United States. A major employer provided generations of locals with jobs and gave the cities a central identity, while executives helped keep cultural institutions, Rotary clubs and higher-end housing markets healthy.

Now many of those midsize communities are looking for a new identity as more companies trade their longtime hometowns for major cities with easier access to global markets and to the lifestyle talented young workers want, with public transit, nightlife and trendy restaurants.

Caterpillar's recent decision to move 300 top headquarters jobs to the Chicago area made Peoria the latest city with a vacuum to fill. In 2014, Decatur, Illinois, lost Archer Daniels Midland to Chicago after 40 years in the town. ConAgra Foods moved 1,000 jobs last year from Omaha to Chicago.

Some companies also are leaving suburban areas for downtowns, though the suburbs are still a popular choice. General Electric is moving its executives from a suburban campus in Fairfield, Connecticut, to downtown Boston, and McDonald's said last year it will relocate downtown Chicago from a sprawling headquarters in suburban Oak Brook.

A study by the virtual think tank CityObservatory.org found the number of jobs located within three miles of the city center grew by nearly 2 percent between 2011 and 2014, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. Center city jobs grew slightly faster than those in the periphery in one recent seven-year period, a reversal from much of the past several decades.

\"I don't know that I'd call it a trend yet but it certainly is becoming one,\" said Tom Murphy, a former Pittsburgh mayor and senior resident fellow at the Urban Land Institute. \"Maybe for the first time in history, rather than having people follow where jobs are ... we're beginning to see jobs following people instead.\"

By a 2-to-1 margin, young college graduates are now choosing a place to live first, then finding a job, said Joe Cortright, director of CityObservatory.org.

For companies recruiting top talent, \"the biggest competitive advantage is to be in the city,\" Cortright said.

The change is adding to the divide between urban and smaller communities in the U.S., especially in the Midwest, which is beset with sagging manufacturing industries.

\"We joke about that there's the great state of Chicago, and then there's the rest of Illinois,\" said Bishop Harold Dawson Jr., a lifelong Peoria resident and pastor of New Life Christian Church.

Like many locals, Dawson can rattle off a list of relatives whose livelihoods in Peoria have depended on Caterpillar. The company known as CAT for short established its first plant in Peoria in 1909 and employs more than 12,000 workers in the area, even after several layoffs.

The city of about 110,000 has been trying to breathe more life into its downtown and a scenic stretch along the Illinois River. But while new restaurants, coffee shops and apartments are opening, Ardis acknowledged few people would call the area \"dynamic.\" And parts of the city's core are seeing growing poverty.

The headquarters move has been a blow to the city's collective morale.

\"There is emotion around\" the decision, said Jeff Griffin, president of the Peoria Area Chamber. \"Peoria is not unique in that tragedy across the country.\"

Griffin said he and his counterpart in Omaha talked recently about the importance of diversifying the local economy \u2014 relying on small business rather than large corporations.

\"Part of the big challenge is leadership needs to recognize the rules have changed,\" Murphy said. \"They need to think about how they build their cities and the amenities they offer, and be really clear about what their competitive advantages are today, not what they were 100 years ago.\"

A city should perhaps think about spending on public transit rather than highways, he said.

Improving the atmosphere of downtown seems to be helping some midsize cities recoup from the loss of major businesses, urban experts say.

In Greenville, South Carolina, where the decline of the textile industry left a huge gap in the economy, leadership arranged to remove a four-lane bridge that obstructed the view of a scenic waterfall, and added trees and cafes and sidewalks. A downtown that was once \"dead\" is now \"beautiful and hugely successful,\" Murphy said. In addition to drawing tourists, the city has a booming advanced manufacturing industry, anchored by companies such as BMW.

But other places, such as Decatur, are struggling to find a new identity. The city has the second-highest unemployment rate in Illinois, and Moody's Analytics warns the lack of jobs could push the city back into recession.

Across the Midwest and Northeast in particular, a number of midsize cities are facing \"big challenges,\" Cortright said.

\"What do we do with the Peorias?\" he added. \"I don't' think we know what the answer to that is.\"

Peoria has a growing health care industry and is home to other companies such as Maui Jim sunglasses and Bump Box, a monthly delivery of skincare and other products for pregnant women.

Ardis said the city just has to find more.

\"We're not just going to roll over and play dead,\" he said.

"}, {"id":"62fd4fdf-3fe2-53fa-8644-c25b02b363a6","type":"article","starttime":"1487830113","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T23:08:33-07:00","lastupdated":"1487833436","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Japanese Nissan executive tapped to replace Ghosn as CEO","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_62fd4fdf-3fe2-53fa-8644-c25b02b363a6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/japanese-nissan-executive-tapped-to-replace-ghosn-as-ceo/article_62fd4fdf-3fe2-53fa-8644-c25b02b363a6.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Carlos-Ghosn-who-leads-Nissan-and-Renault-has-tapped-Hiroto-Saikawa-a-veteran-Japanese-executive-at-Nissan-to-replace-him-as-chief-executive-at-the-Japanese-automaker-although-Ghosn/id-c09940aca974493b86960533068c7f4f","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By YURI KAGEYAMA\nAP Business Writer","prologue":"TOKYO (AP) \u2014 Carlos Ghosn, who leads the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi alliance, is handing over the helm at Nissan to Hiroto Saikawa, a veteran Japanese executive at Nissan, but Ghosn is staying on as chairman.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","automobile manufacturing","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services","executive changes","corporate management","personnel","corporate news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"ca41ad39-bbf8-53ea-b5ed-b44a4cff6081","description":"FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2015, file photo, Nissan Motor Co. Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn delivers a speech during the Japanese automaker's presentation at the Tokyo Motor Show in Tokyo. Ghosn, who leads Nissan and Renault, has tapped Hiroto Saikawa, a veteran Japanese executive at Nissan, to replace him as chief executive at the Japanese automaker, although Ghosn will stay on as chairman. Nissan, based in Yokohama, made the announcement in a statement Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. The appointment, effective April 1, will be up for shareholders' approval in June. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama, File)","byline":"Shuji Kajiyama","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"363","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/a4/ca41ad39-bbf8-53ea-b5ed-b44a4cff6081/58ae3bda29b87.image.jpg?resize=512%2C363"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/a4/ca41ad39-bbf8-53ea-b5ed-b44a4cff6081/58ae3bda29b87.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"213","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/a4/ca41ad39-bbf8-53ea-b5ed-b44a4cff6081/58ae3bda29b87.image.jpg?resize=300%2C213"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"726","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/a4/ca41ad39-bbf8-53ea-b5ed-b44a4cff6081/58ae3bda29b87.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"af30acb9-54bc-5017-a89e-b0e7507e95a5","description":"This undated photo released by Nissan Motor Co. shows Nissan Motor Co. Chief Executive Hiroto Saikawa. Carlos Ghosn, who leads Nissan and Renault, has tapped Saikawa, a veteran Japanese executive at Nissan, to replace him as chief executive at the Japanese automaker, although Ghosn will stay on as chairman. Nissan, based in Yokohama, made the announcement in a statement Thursday. The appointment, effective April 1, will be up for shareholders' approval in June. (Nissan Motor Co. via AP)","byline":"HONS","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"339","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f3/af30acb9-54bc-5017-a89e-b0e7507e95a5/58ae80e744b31.image.jpg?resize=512%2C339"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f3/af30acb9-54bc-5017-a89e-b0e7507e95a5/58ae80e744b31.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"199","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f3/af30acb9-54bc-5017-a89e-b0e7507e95a5/58ae80e744b31.image.jpg?resize=300%2C199"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"678","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f3/af30acb9-54bc-5017-a89e-b0e7507e95a5/58ae80e744b31.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"d0693a3e-40ea-542b-8f35-5a21ebbf2691","description":"FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2016, file photo, Nissan Motor Co. Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn speaks during a press conference in Tokyo. Ghosn, who leads Nissan and Renault, has tapped Hiroto Saikawa, a veteran Japanese executive at Nissan, to replace him as chief executive at the Japanese automaker, although Ghosn will stay on as chairman. Nissan, based in Yokohama, made the announcement in a statement Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. The appointment, effective April 1, will be up for shareholders' approval in June. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/06/d0693a3e-40ea-542b-8f35-5a21ebbf2691/58ae3bda7d3a6.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/06/d0693a3e-40ea-542b-8f35-5a21ebbf2691/58ae3bda7d3a6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/06/d0693a3e-40ea-542b-8f35-5a21ebbf2691/58ae3bda7d3a6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/06/d0693a3e-40ea-542b-8f35-5a21ebbf2691/58ae3bda7d3a6.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"6bb1f914-a1f1-5f7c-ba05-7f9753c0692a","description":"This Nov. 2016 photo released by Nissan Motor Co., shows Nissan Motor Co. Chief Executive Hiroto Saikawa. Carlos Ghosn, who leads Nissan and Renault, has tapped Saikawa, a veteran Japanese executive at Nissan, to replace him as chief executive at the Japanese automaker, although Ghosn will stay on as chairman. Nissan, based in Yokohama, made the announcement in a statement Thursday. The appointment, effective April 1, will be up for shareholders' approval in June. (Nissan Motor Co. via AP)","byline":"HONS","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"339","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/bb/6bb1f914-a1f1-5f7c-ba05-7f9753c0692a/58ae80e78c636.image.jpg?resize=339%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"151","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/bb/6bb1f914-a1f1-5f7c-ba05-7f9753c0692a/58ae80e78c636.image.jpg?resize=100%2C151"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"453","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/bb/6bb1f914-a1f1-5f7c-ba05-7f9753c0692a/58ae80e78c636.image.jpg?resize=300%2C453"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1547","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/bb/6bb1f914-a1f1-5f7c-ba05-7f9753c0692a/58ae80e78c636.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"62fd4fdf-3fe2-53fa-8644-c25b02b363a6","body":"

TOKYO (AP) \u2014 Carlos Ghosn, who leads the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi alliance, is handing over the helm at Nissan to Hiroto Saikawa, a veteran Japanese executive at Nissan, but Ghosn is staying on as chairman.

Saikawa will become chief executive at Nissan Motor Co., based in Yokohama, effective April 1, and up for shareholders' approval in June, the company said Thursday.

The move does not signal a smaller role for Ghosn. Besides leading the Nissan-Renault alliance, Ghosn is also chairman at scandal-ridden Japanese automaker Mitsubishi Motors Corp., in which Nissan took a controlling stake last year. And Ghosn said he needs to focus on the expanded three-automaker alliance.

Ghosn, sent in by Renault SA of France in 1999, led near-bankrupt Nissan to a turnaround. He has said for years he hoped to hand over the running of Nissan.

\"I will continue to supervise and guide the company, both independently and within the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance. This planned change will also allow me to devote more time and energy to managing the strategic and operational evolution and expansion of the alliance,\" he said.

Saikawa was groomed for the role, serving as co-CEO with Ghosn since late last year. A graduate of the prestigious University of Tokyo, he has overseen various operations at Nissan, which makes the March subcompact, Leaf electric car and Infiniti luxury models.

\"I am confident that the management team I have developed at Nissan over the past 18 years has the talent and experience to meet the company's operational and strategic goals,\" Ghosn said.

After joining Nissan in 1977, he has managed Nissan's U.S. and European businesses and its supply chain and customer satisfaction. More recently, he had complete control over its research, design and other overall operations.

Rebecca Lindland, executive analyst for Kelley Blue Book, stressed Ghosn remains very much in command.

\"After years of playing maestro to a multi-cultural, multi-branded behemoth, Mr. Ghosn is focusing solely on orchestrating the strategic and operation success of his latest alliance, the symphony of Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi,\" she said.

\"He's leaving the day-to-day tasks of Nissan to Saikawa-san, and there's no indication Mr. Ghosn is contemplating hanging up his baton,\" she added, using the honorific \"san\" for Japanese names.

It is still unclear what Ghosn specifically has in mind for Mitsubishi, under the alliance. But the brand, although tarnished over scandals that go back decades, is believed to have potential in Southeast Asia.

Nissan stepped in after Mitsubishi was found inflating fuel economy figures for its minicar models, also sold under the Nissan brand. Buyers were compensated with cash rebates.

In an earlier scandal, Mitsubishi's reputation was hammered by a massive cover-up of defects that surfaced in the early 2000s, and had been going on for decades.

Bigger manufacturers are often better placed to ride out intense competition in the auto industry and Ghosn has said he grabbed at an opportunity to gain scale as Mitsubishi shares nose-dived after the mileage scandal surfaced.

Combining global vehicles sales for the three brands, Ghosn's alliance is among the biggest groups in the industry, although it still trails Volkswagen AG, at No. 1, Japanese rival Toyota Motor Corp., and Detroit-based General Motors Co.

___

Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyama

Her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/yuri-kageyama

"}, {"id":"42dc0cce-f78b-58de-be01-5882dd7bff1a","type":"article","starttime":"1487829600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T23:00:00-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"application":"editorial","title":"JDA/PwC Survey Says Retail CEOs Making Digital Transformation Their Highest Investment Priority This Year","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_42dc0cce-f78b-58de-be01-5882dd7bff1a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/jda-pwc-survey-says-retail-ceos-making-digital-transformation-their/article_42dc0cce-f78b-58de-be01-5882dd7bff1a.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/jda-pwc-survey-says-retail-ceos-making-digital-transformation-their/article_42dc0cce-f78b-58de-be01-5882dd7bff1a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Fourth annual survey reveals that digital transformation has firmly taken hold in retail with nearly half of retail executives surveyed having a defined digital strategy in place SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The next wave of change is sweeping across retail as the industry looks to leverage digital technologies to reach the modern shopper. The","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#prwire"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"42dc0cce-f78b-58de-be01-5882dd7bff1a","body":"

Fourth annual survey reveals that digital transformation has firmly

taken hold in retail with nearly half of retail executives surveyed

having a defined digital strategy in place

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The next wave of change is sweeping across retail as the industry looks

to leverage digital technologies to reach the modern shopper. The

Internet of Things (IoT), big data, robotics and augmented reality are

some of the ways CEOs reveal they are choosing to invest their capital

in the coming year to better compete. The fourth annual JDA survey of

more than 350 global retailers finds that a digital transformation

strategy is their No. 1 priority in 2017; 69 percent of executives say

they plan to increase their investment in digital transformation over

the next year (tweet

this).

This and other key findings are highlighted in the \u201cCEO

Viewpoint 2017: The Transformation of Retail,\u201d a new report prepared

for JDA

Software Group, Inc., by PwC.

\u201cThe investment in technologies underscoring digital transformation was

a major undercurrent within this year\u2019s survey results, which is no

surprise, since retail CEOs understand just how important it is to

invest in the technology that will improve the customer experience,\u201d

said Lee Gill, group vice president, global retail strategy, JDA. \u201cThe

next wave of results also reveal the continued balancing act retailers

are struggling to maintain with delivering superior omni-channel

execution and profitability, all while meeting the demands of the modern

shopper, and keeping pace with the digital transformation underway

across the supply chain.\u201d

Digital Transformation Driving Technology Investments

Retailers are leveraging digital technologies to better understand and

connect with their consumers, giving customers reason to engage with

them across retail channels. Despite the obvious importance of having a

digital transformation strategy in place, surprisingly, more than half

of respondents \u2013 52 percent \u2013 have not defined or started implementing a

digital transformation strategy yet (tweet

this). Globally, Chinese retailers are more likely to be

implementing their defined digital transformation strategy (58 percent)

than the U.S. (40 percent), with 19 percent of U.S. retailers struggling

to or choosing not to define this strategy at all.

Mobile-enabled applications (85 percent), big data (86 percent) and use

of social media data (85 percent) are the top technologies survey

respondents are investing in or plan to over the next 12 months (tweet

this), while automation and IoT are lower on the list for investment

but gaining momentum as they are perceived as true game changers. The

use of social media and big data is highly valuable in giving retailers

deep insights into rich sources of customer information, allowing them

to create credible customer segments, while gaining insight into shopper

preferences.

Omni-channel Execution Issues Continue

As omni-channel retailing continues to mature and retailers have blurred

the lines between online and store, their attention has shifted to

execution and profitability. Omni-channel execution amongst global

retailers continues to lag in areas of order fulfillment, and

profitability is still a challenge, with only 10 percent of those

surveyed able to make a profit while fulfilling omni-channel demand (tweet

this). Only 12 percent of CEOs surveyed, down from 19 percent in

2014, provide a seamless shopping experience across channels. These

retailers are finding their omni-channel offerings to be too complex or

expensive and are choosing to scale back.

Omni-channel Fulfillment and Returns Spending Priorities

Seventy-four percent of respondents believe that the cost of customer

returns is impacting profits to at least some extent (tweet

this). Retailers in the U.S. are less likely to experience profit

erosion from customer returns than other markets. As CEOs look to regain

profitability, their chosen areas for order fulfillment investment are

prioritized by those that are the most important and net the most

financial return.

The survey found that retail CEOs are increasing their investment in buy

online, pick up in-store (BOPIS), with 51 percent of survey respondents

saying they offer or plan to offer BOPIS in the next 12 months \u2013 up from

47 percent in 2016 (tweet

this). Buy online, ship to store has picked up steam in the past

year with 48 percent of retail CEOs investing in this service or

planning to in the next 12 months. Conversely, fulfillment options that

are becoming costlier and less profitable are areas where CEOs are

decreasing investments in 2017. These include same day delivery (reduced

to 33 percent, down from 43 percent in 2016), and providing specific

delivery time slots (down to 27 percent vs. 48 percent in 2016).

The rising costs of order fulfillment are also pushing executives to

rethink their strategy overall. 2017 will see increased charges for

online orders (57 percent plan to or will make this change in the next

12 months), a rise in minimum order thresholds for free standard home

delivery (62 percent plan to or will make this change in the next 12

months), and raising the minimum order value for BOPIS (55 percent plan

to or will make this change in the next 12 months).

\u201cWhile retailers have increased fulfillment options over the last year

to meet consumer demands, as BOPIS becomes a staple and buy online, ship

to store emerges as another core fulfillment capability, retailers now

need to balance the effectiveness and profitability of the fulfillment

channels they offer - with customer satisfaction. Because if shoppers

experience a problem with home delivery or in store pickups, that is a

lost sale \u2013 and customer \u2013 that retailers can\u2019t afford in a highly

competitive market,\u201d noted Gill.

\u201cSince JDA first commissioned PwC to conduct this survey in 2014, we

have witnessed unprecedented change sweeping across the retail industry

that continues in earnest as retailers reimagine their strategies to

transform the customer experience, making it seamless and personalized,

no matter how they shop. Supply chain complexities and cost will

continue to challenge retailers, and the difference between winners and

non-winners will be how much, or how little, retailers understand their

customers moving forward,\u201d concluded Gill.

Survey Methodology

PwC conducted this survey in late 2016 with 351 responses from

executives in the United States, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Germany,

China and Japan. Thirty-two percent of responses were from top 250

retailers (> $5 billion revenue), with another 53 percent from top 1,000

retailers. Respondents identified themselves as coming from hard goods,

soft lines, grocery, ecommerce and CPG verticals, and from related

retail and consumer goods sectors.

Additional Resources:

Tweet this: .@JDASoftware

PwC Survey Finds Retailers Making Digital Transformation Their Highest

Priority This Year #JDASurvey http://bit.ly/2lDGJHw

About JDA Software Group, Inc.

JDA Software is the leading provider of seamless supply chain planning

and execution solutions for retailers, manufacturers, logistics

providers and wholesale distributors. Our unmatched solution portfolio

enables our clients to reduce costs, increase profitability and improve

visibility so they can deliver on customer promises every time. More

than 4,000 global customers run JDA, including 73 of the top 100

retailers, 71 of the top 100 consumer goods companies, and 13 of the top

16 3PLs. With JDA, you can plan to deliver. www.jda.com

RSS Feeds:

JDA press releases: https://jda.com/rss?feed=press

JDA

news: https://jda.com/rss?feed=news

JDA

events: https://jda.com/rss?feed=events

Social Networks:

Web: https://jda.com

Blog:

http://blog.jda.com

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/JDASoftware

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/JDASoftwareGroup

LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/company/jda-software

YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/user/JDASoftware

\u201cJDA\u201d is a trademark or registered trademark of JDA Software Group, Inc.

Any trade, product or service name referenced in this document using the

name \u201cJDA\u201d is a trademark and/or property of JDA Software Group, Inc.

Contacts

JDA Software Group, Inc.

Jolene Peixoto, +1 978-475-0524

Director,

Corporate Communications

jolene.peixoto@jda.com

"}, {"id":"7e05e5f0-a543-5163-8c19-815c74d850fc","type":"article","starttime":"1487829600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T23:00:00-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"application":"editorial","title":"ON Semiconductor Sampling Industry\u2019s Lowest Power Bluetooth\u00ae Low Energy SoC for IoT and Connected Health & Wellness","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_7e05e5f0-a543-5163-8c19-815c74d850fc.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/on-semiconductor-sampling-industry-s-lowest-power-bluetooth-low-energy/article_7e05e5f0-a543-5163-8c19-815c74d850fc.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/on-semiconductor-sampling-industry-s-lowest-power-bluetooth-low-energy/article_7e05e5f0-a543-5163-8c19-815c74d850fc.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Highly flexible Bluetooth 5 certified Radio System-on-Chip (SoC) provides faster data rates & greater functionality while maximizing system battery life BARCELONA, Spain--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mobile World Congress - ON Semiconductor (Nasdaq: ON), driving energy efficient innovations, has positioned itself at the forefront of","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#prwire"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"7e05e5f0-a543-5163-8c19-815c74d850fc","body":"

Highly flexible Bluetooth 5 certified Radio System-on-Chip (SoC)

provides faster data rates & greater functionality while maximizing

system battery life

BARCELONA, Spain--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mobile World Congress - ON Semiconductor (Nasdaq: ON), driving

energy efficient innovations, has positioned itself at the forefront of

ultra-low-power wireless connectivity with its latest product offering.

The RSL10

highly flexible, ultra-miniature multi-protocol Bluetooth 5 certified

radio System-on-Chip (SoC) is capable of supporting the advanced

wireless functionalities emerging in the IoT and Connected Health &

Wellness sectors without compromising battery life or overall system

size. Target applications for this device include wearables such as

fitness trackers and smart watches, smart locks, and electronics like

lighting or appliances.

The RSL10 capitalizes on the increased data rate throughput capabilities

of Bluetooth low energy technology, while optimizing power consumption.

The sophisticated SoC provides an incredibly power-efficient operation

for a wide range of applications with its superior overall power

profile, including some of the best numbers in the industry for peak Rx

in Receive Mode and Deep Sleep Modes. Unlike competing solutions, it is

ideal for applications using 1.2 and 1.5 V batteries, and provides a

voltage supply range between 1.1 and 3.6 V without an external DC/DC

converter.

The highly-integrated dual-core architecture is built around the

user-programmable ARM\u00ae Cortex\u00ae-M3 processor, which provides clocking

speeds up to 48 MHz and the flexibility to support 2.4 gigahertz (GHz)

proprietary protocol stacks. Also featured is an ultra-low-power 32-bit

Dual-Harvard Digital Signal Processing (DSP) system, which enables

signal processing intensive applications such as wireless audio codecs.

\u201cAdvancements in wearables and health and wellness devices are

continually pushing for reductions in system size and optimization of

battery life,\u201d stated Bob Klosterboer, executive vice president and

general manager of the Analog Solutions Group at ON Semiconductor.

\u201cUsing our decades\u2019 worth of experience and expertise developing

ultra-low-power System-on-Chips (SoC) targeting hearing aids, we have

developed a solution that sets new benchmarks in power consumption.\u201d

To accelerate customer design in and reduce customer time to market, ON

Semiconductor is making available a complete

development platform, including hardware board, software tools, full

documentation set and a large range of Bluetooth protocols and firmware

profile libraries. The RSL10 SoC is currently sampling in an

ultra-miniature 5.50 mm2 51-pin WLCSP package. Samples of the

6x6 mm 48-pin QFN are planned to be available at the end of April.

To learn more, visit our RSL10

product page and read the \u201cAdvanced

Low Power Wireless Technology Creates New Possibilities in Wearables and

\u2018Connected\u2019 Health and Wellness Devices\u201d blog. To request

engineering samples or order an Evaluation

Board, please contact your local ON Semiconductor sales

representative.

About ON Semiconductor

ON Semiconductor (Nasdaq: ON)

is driving energy efficient innovations, empowering customers to reduce

global energy use. The company is a leading supplier of

semiconductor-based solutions, offering a comprehensive portfolio of

energy efficient, power management, analog, sensors, logic, timing,

connectivity, discrete, SoC and custom devices. The company\u2019s products

help engineers solve their unique design challenges in automotive,

communications, computing, consumer, industrial, medical, aerospace and

defense applications. ON Semiconductor operates a responsive,

reliable, world-class supply chain and quality program, a robust

compliance and ethics program, and a network of manufacturing

facilities, sales offices and design centers in key markets throughout

North America, Europe and the Asia Pacific regions. For more

information, visit http://www.onsemi.com.

ON Semiconductor and the ON Semiconductor logo are registered

trademarks of Semiconductor Components Industries, LLC. All other brand

and product names appearing in this document are registered trademarks

or trademarks of their respective holders. Although the company

references its website in this news release, information on the website

is not to be incorporated herein.

Contacts

ON Semiconductor

Brittany Baguio

Corporate Public Relations

(408)

822-2196

brittany.baguio@onsemi.com

or

Parag

Agarwal

Vice President Investor Relations and Corporate Development

(602)

244-3437

parag.agarwal@onsemi.com

"}, {"id":"6c4b36f9-b3c0-5bc1-a597-3bab3ba18e29","type":"article","starttime":"1487826660","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T22:11:00-07:00","sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national-and-international":"business/national-and-international"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Social Security and You: Two widows present unusual Social Security cases","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_6c4b36f9-b3c0-5bc1-a597-3bab3ba18e29.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/social-security-and-you-two-widows-present-unusual-social-security/article_6c4b36f9-b3c0-5bc1-a597-3bab3ba18e29.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/social-security-and-you-two-widows-present-unusual-social-security/article_6c4b36f9-b3c0-5bc1-a597-3bab3ba18e29.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Sometimes you need to go to a Social Security office and find someone who knows what's going on.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5biz"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"9cb615c6-2f02-51ee-854b-64197e85d010","description":"Tom Margenau","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"269","height":"323","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb615c6-2f02-51ee-854b-64197e85d010/585302741f700.image.jpg?crop=269%2C323%2C102%2C33&resize=269%2C323&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb615c6-2f02-51ee-854b-64197e85d010/585302741f700.image.jpg?crop=507%2C285%2C0%2C73&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"364","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb615c6-2f02-51ee-854b-64197e85d010/585302742b638.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb615c6-2f02-51ee-854b-64197e85d010/585302741f700.image.jpg?crop=507%2C285%2C0%2C73"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"6c4b36f9-b3c0-5bc1-a597-3bab3ba18e29","body":"

I am constantly amazed! I have either worked for the Social Security Administration, or been writing a column about Social Security issues, for about 44 years. And you would think that in all of that time, I have bumped up against almost every possible Social Security scenario one could imagine.

Yet, just recently, I received two emails from readers, both of them widows, who related two different Social Security experiences that I have never encountered! And here they are.

I am a workingwoman who turned 66 several years ago and filed for my full retirement age benefits at that time. I received exactly one check when something unexpected happened. My husband died.

When I talked to the Social Security people about this, they said that my widow's benefits were slightly higher than my retirement rate. So they switched me to my husband's benefits. Fast-forward four years. I am still working and am now about to turn 70. I wondered if my own benefit might now be higher than my widow's rate. When I called Social Security's hotline about this, the woman who answered told me I could not switch. She said I'm allowed only one benefit switch in my lifetime, and I got that when I changed to widow's benefits four years ago. If I had known that at the time, I never would have switched. My widow's rate was only a few dollars more than my retirement, which I knew would continue to grow because of my added earnings over the years. What can I do?

A: You can call the Social Security people back, or visit your local Social Security office, and hope you don't get such a clunker of an agent! I will never know where that phone representative you talked to came up with the \"only one benefit switch\" rule. She is just plain wrong. You can and should switch to your own retirement benefits.

You said your widow's benefit rate was just \"slightly higher\" than your retirement benefit \u2014 and that was four years ago. But now, your retirement rate should be significantly more than your widow's rate.

Your retirement benefit has increased for two reasons. One: The extra earnings you've had since age 66 very likely have increased your own benefit by -- I'm guessing -- about $50 to $100 per month. On top of that, you get what are called \"delayed retirement credits.\" That credit equals two-thirds of one percent for each month after age 66 that you didn't get a retirement check. There are 48 months between 66 and 70, and you got a retirement check for just one of those months. So you are due an increase for the other 47 months, or about 31 percent.

You actually will have two choices. You can take that extra $50 to $100 per month and get the 31 percent bonus on top of that -- effective with age 70. Or you can take six months' worth of retroactive benefits. In that scenario, you'd get the $50 to $100 boost along with roughly a 28 percent bonus, minus the widow's benefits you've already received.

So again, go back to the Social Security people, find the right agent who knows his or her stuff, and go over your options.

I am 64 years old. About four months ago, my 62-year-old husband was taken very ill. He was unable to function for himself. I went to the Social Security office to file for disability benefits for him.

It was a very stressful time for me, but somehow I got through all the paperwork. Very sadly, my husband died after getting just one Social Security check. I went back to Social Security to file for widow's benefits. And I was told that because he got reduced retirement benefits, my widow's benefits would also be reduced. But I don't think he got retirement benefits. I was trying to get him disability checks. What is going on?

A: Bear in mind that I don't have all the facts in your case. But I'm going to suggest you go to your local Social Security office and ask to speak to a supervisor. You need someone with a little more experience because you have a bit of an odd situation.

When you thought you were filing for disability benefits, my hunch is that you actually filed for what is essentially a retirement/disability joint claim. When a claim is filed by anyone pushing age 62 who alleges a disability, they almost always automatically take both a retirement and a disability claim. They do that because they can process the retirement claim quickly and start paying benefits while they work on the disability claim, which can take months. Then when the disability claim is approved, they simply switch the case from a reduced retirement to full disability. This happens all the time

But the twist in your husband's case is that he died after getting just that one reduced retirement check -- before the disability claim was processed. And the fact that he got reduced retirement does impact your widow's benefits.

So you need to talk to someone at Social Security to go over all of this. If they had a disability claim in the works, they obviously should be able to now approve that claim and switch him (posthumously) from reduced retirement to disability. Even if they say you only filed for reduced retirement benefits (which I find unlikely), then I'd still ask if there is some way they could switch that to a disability claim.

I know it will be a hassle going to your local Social Security office. But all of this certainly would be worth asking about. And again, the key is finding the right person -- someone with lots of experience. That's why you really need to talk to a supervisor.

"}, {"id":"95555037-8a37-5a4a-aa5c-c5a4e10bdbb1","type":"article","starttime":"1487826000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T22:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487858655","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Diamond Resorts International Delivers Momentous Vacation Experience as Legendary Race Car Driver Michael Waltrip Drives His Last Laps at Daytona","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_95555037-8a37-5a4a-aa5c-c5a4e10bdbb1.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/diamond-resorts-international-delivers-momentous-vacation-experience-as-legendary-race/article_95555037-8a37-5a4a-aa5c-c5a4e10bdbb1.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/diamond-resorts-international-delivers-momentous-vacation-experience-as-legendary-race/article_95555037-8a37-5a4a-aa5c-c5a4e10bdbb1.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Diamond Resorts Ambassador and two-time winner of the Daytona 500, Michael Waltrip, hosts exclusive Events of a Lifetime\u00ae experience for his final race at Daytona LAS VEGAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Diamond Resorts International\u00ae, a global leader in the hospitality and vacation ownership industries, together with legendary race car driver","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#prwire"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"95555037-8a37-5a4a-aa5c-c5a4e10bdbb1","body":"

Diamond Resorts Ambassador and two-time winner of the Daytona 500,

Michael Waltrip, hosts exclusive Events of a Lifetime\u00ae experience for

his final race at Daytona

LAS VEGAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Diamond Resorts International\u00ae, a global leader in the hospitality and

vacation ownership industries, together with legendary race car driver

Michael Waltrip delivers an Events of a Lifetime\u00ae experience for its

members at the 59th Daytona 500 on February 26, 2017.

As a part of the event, members will have the opportunity to take an

exclusive behind-the-scenes tour of the world-famous motorsports

stadium, hosted by Michael Waltrip. Immediately following the tour,

members will enjoy premium stadium seating to watch Michael Waltrip\u2019s

historic last race.

After a prosperous racing career spanning more than 30 years, Waltrip

will retire from the sport. The two-time winner of the prestigious

Daytona 500, having won in 2001 and 2003, posted more than 130 top 10

finishes on NASCAR\u2019s premier Sprint Cup series, including four career

race wins. He scored 11 wins and more than 105 top 10 finishes in

NASCAR\u2019s Xfinity Series and even has a win in NASCAR\u2019s Camping World

Truck Series division.

\u201cDriving has been a passion of mine for as long as I can remember and it

will be bittersweet to drive my last laps at Daytona,\u201d says Waltrip. \u201cI

couldn\u2019t ask for a better farewell than to spend the day with the

Diamond Resorts members and owners and help give them a vacation

experience they will hopefully remember for a lifetime. I\u2019m looking

forward to slowing down a bit and taking some time to vacation more and

enjoy Diamond Resorts all over the world.\u201d

Waltrip will continue to make personal appearances at Diamond Resorts\u2019

increasingly popular Events of a Lifetime\u00ae, which deliver exciting

vacation experiences that are unique and memorable. Throughout 2017,

members will have the opportunity to enjoy premium seating at races in

Daytona Beach, Florida, Las Vegas, Nevada, and Phoenix, Arizona. In

addition to hosting meet-and-greets and signing autographs, Waltrip will

also provide members and owners with behind-the-scenes tours of the race

track, pit row and Fox broadcast facilities.

\u201cMichael has had an outstanding career and will always be an icon in the

automotive racing industry,\u201d said Michael Flaskey, Chief Sales &

Marketing Officer, Diamond Resorts International\u00ae. \u201cWe are proud to have

him as a part of our Diamond family. We look forward to watching as he

makes his last laps this Sunday and wish him the best of luck on his

final race.\u201d

As a Diamond Resorts Ambassador, Waltrip is a part of an ever-expanding

roster of high-profile celebrities including country music stars Colt

Ford and Jana Kramer, baseball Hall of Famers Reggie Jackson and Gaylord

Perry, professional baseball player Bud Norris, PGA touring

professionals Brian Gay, Brittany Lincicome and John Cook, Super Bowl

XXVI MVP Mark Rypien and war veteran Chad Pfeifer.

About Diamond Resorts International\u00ae

Diamond Resorts International\u00ae, with its network of more than 370

vacation destinations located in 35 countries throughout the continental

United States, Hawaii, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, South America,

Central America, Europe, Asia, Australasia and Africa, provides guests

with choice and flexibility to let them create their dream vacation,

whether they are traveling an hour away or around the world. Our

relaxing vacations have the power to give guests an increased sense of

happiness and satisfaction in their lives, while feeling healthier and

more fulfilled in their relationships, by enjoying memorable and

meaningful experiences that let them Stay Vacationed.\u2122

Diamond Resorts International\u00ae manages vacation ownership resorts and

sells vacation ownership points that provide members and owners with

Vacations for Life\u00ae at over 370 managed and affiliated properties and

cruise itineraries.

Contacts

Diamond Resorts International\u00ae

Stevi Wara, 702-823-7069

Fax:

702-684-8705

media@diamondresorts.com

"}, {"id":"28ad18f5-cca6-54e7-88f0-183d2d561db5","type":"article","starttime":"1487824704","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T21:38:24-07:00","lastupdated":"1487828184","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Australia's highest-paid public servant quits $4.3M job","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_28ad18f5-cca6-54e7-88f0-183d2d561db5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/australia-s-highest-paid-public-servant-quits-m-job/article_28ad18f5-cca6-54e7-88f0-183d2d561db5.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Australia-s-highest-paid-public-servant-has-announced-his-resignation-two-weeks-after-a-revelation-that-he-made-5-6-million-Australian-4-3-million-last-year-sparked-a-public-furor/id-3aa1220dad874e87804c7c7b68c1169f","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By ROD McGUIRK\nAssociated Press","prologue":"CANBERRA, Australia (AP) \u2014 Australia's highest-paid public servant announced his resignation on Thursday, two weeks after a revelation that he made 5.6 million Australian ($4.3 million) last year sparked a public furor.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","government pay","government business and finance","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"28ad18f5-cca6-54e7-88f0-183d2d561db5","body":"

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) \u2014 Australia's highest-paid public servant announced his resignation on Thursday, two weeks after a revelation that he made 5.6 million Australian ($4.3 million) last year sparked a public furor.

Australia Post managing director Ahmed Fahour said he was quitting the national mail service on the same day the government-owned corporation posted a profit of AU$131 million for the six months through December. The figure was a big jump from the AU$16 million profit the corporation made in the same half a year earlier.

The Lebanese-born former banker, 50, said he was leaving because Australia Post had transformed from a traditional mail service to a parcel and e-commerce business during his seven years at the helm.

His resignation was not caused by the widespread public outrage at his high salary, he said.

\"Clearly, this has been a very difficult and emotional decision for me and my family. But I've come to the conclusion that the timing is right. As the half-year results show, the transformation has worked,\" Fahour said.

Fahour said he would leave Australia Post in July following the announcement of his successor.

Earlier this month, a Senate committee revealed Fahour's pay despite objections from Australia Post that making it public could damage the corporation's brand.

His AU$4.4 million salary plus an AU$1.2 million bonus in the last fiscal year was more than 10 times the prime minister's salary of AU$507,000.

By contrast, U.S. Postal Service Chief Executive and Postmaster General Megan Brennan's salary was $286,137 last year.

Fahour said that Australia Post should not be compared to the loss-making U.S. Postal Service.

\"They are a letters company and, by the way, they lose $20 billion a year and have done so now for a number of years,\" Fahour said.

\"That's not the right comparison. We need to be compared to other parcels logistics companies, e-commerce companies \u2014 and those companies are global,\" he said.

When Fahour's pay was made public, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, a former merchant banker with a personal fortune estimated at exceeding AU$200 million, said he told Australia Post Chairman John Stanhope that the salary was too high.

\"As someone who spent most of his life in the business world before I came into politics, I think that is a very big salary for that job,\" Turnbull told reporters.

The highest paid Australian public servant after Fahour was Bill Morrow, chief executive of Australia's government-owned NBN Co., who was paid AU$3.6 million last year, including an AU$1.2 million bonus. NBN is rolling out Australia's national broadband network.

"}, {"id":"1034c2b2-9ec6-59f9-be23-af7ae074ebff","type":"article","starttime":"1487822400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T21:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487858655","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Avnet Strengthens UltraZed Design Ecosystem with UltraZed PCIe Carrier Card and Reference Platforms","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_1034c2b2-9ec6-59f9-be23-af7ae074ebff.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/avnet-strengthens-ultrazed-design-ecosystem-with-ultrazed-pcie-carrier-card/article_1034c2b2-9ec6-59f9-be23-af7ae074ebff.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/avnet-strengthens-ultrazed-design-ecosystem-with-ultrazed-pcie-carrier-card/article_1034c2b2-9ec6-59f9-be23-af7ae074ebff.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PHOENIX--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Avnet (NYSE: AVT), a leading global technology distributor, continues to demonstrate industry-leading commitment to facilitating customers\u2019 introduction of differentiated embedded systems with the release today of the UltraZed\u2122 PCIe Carrier Card and associated reference designs. The UltraZed PCIe","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#prwire"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"1034c2b2-9ec6-59f9-be23-af7ae074ebff","body":"

PHOENIX--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Avnet (NYSE: AVT),

a leading global technology distributor, continues to demonstrate

industry-leading commitment to facilitating customers\u2019 introduction of

differentiated embedded systems with the release today of the UltraZed\u2122

PCIe Carrier Card and associated reference designs. The UltraZed PCIe

Carrier Card is a high-performance platform that speeds prototyping and

development of next-generation embedded system-on-module (SOM)

applications utilizing the UltraZed-EG\u2122

SOM, Avnet\u2019s first platform to fully support power modes on the

scalable and flexible Xilinx\u00ae Zynq\u00ae UltraScale+\u2122

MPSoC.

The UltraZed PCIe Carrier Card provides easy access to the full 180 user

I/O, 26 PS MIO and four PS GTR transceivers available on the UltraZed-EG

SOM. Two 140-pin Micro Headers on the carrier card mate with the

UltraZed-EG SOM, connecting 180 of the UltraZed-EG Programmable Logic

(PL) I/O to FMC LPC slot, LVDS Touch Panel interface and Xilinx System

Monitor (SYSMON). The UltraZed PCIe Carrier Card costs $499 and is

available for order at http://zedboard.org/product/ultrazed-pcie-carrier-card.

The UltraZed PCIe Carrier Card also uses a 100-pin Micro Header to gain

access to the UltraZed-EG SOM PS MIO and GTR transceiver pins as well as

USB 2.0 and Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. UltraZed PCIe Carrier Card is

an excellent starting point for users to create their own custom

UltraZed-EG carrier card. Video demonstrations of the UltraZed-EG

Starter Kit and SOM can be viewed at http://www.ultrazed.org/product/ultrazed-EG.

\u201cAdding a PCIe Carrier Card to the UltraScale product family gives

customers even greater flexibility to leverage the UltraZed-EG SOM for

the development of high-performance systems in applications including

wired and 5G wireless infrastructure, cloud computing and the Industrial

IoT,\u201d said Nasser Poureh, director of technology and technical marketing

for Avnet.

To help customers in a wide variety of applications and industries

quickly and cost-effectively capture maximum performance and value from

the UltraZed technology, Avnet also offers a host of scalable reference

designs including software and hardware platform, boot files, Linux

kernel and RAMdisk.

Available reference designs for the UltraZed platform include:

PetaLinux BSP and In System QSPI and EMMC Programming Reference Design

provides Linux designers with an excellent starting point for launching

a Linux software application development using Xilinx SDK, while the

EMMC reference design demonstrates programming of the QSPI and eMMC

Flash memory boot devices without the need for external programming

cables.

Ethernet Performance Testing Reference Design enables systems

engineers to launch their own Ethernet performance tuning and testing

efforts to ensure products meet the throughput demands of a particular

network configuration.

Bare-Metal-Sensor Reference Design demonstrates the use of the

MAX31855PMB1 thermocouple temperature sensing module and MAX44000PMB1

proximity sensing module from Maxim Integrated.

For information on additional related parts and technical resources,

please visit the UltraZed product page at www.ultrazed.org.

All brands and trade names are trademarks or registered trademarks,

and are the properties of their respective owners. Avnet disclaims any

proprietary interest in marks other than its own.

Click

to Tweet: .@Avnet adds #PCIe carrier card to #UltraZed-EG SOM

portfolio based on #Xilinx #Zynq UltraScale+ #MPSoC http://bit.ly/1ll33LR

Follow Avnet on Twitter: @Avnet

Connect

with Avnet on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/avnet

Connect

with Avnet on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AvnetInc

About Avnet, Inc.

From components to cloud and design to disposal, Avnet (NYSE:AVT)

accelerates the success of customers who build, sell and use technology

globally by providing them with a comprehensive portfolio of innovative

products, services and solutions. For more information, visit www.avnet.com.

Contacts

Avnet

Maureen O\u2019Leary, 480-643-7499

Director, Media Relations

Maureen.OLeary@avnet.com

"}, {"id":"593706aa-ba35-5b06-a30d-e6fda979676c","type":"article","starttime":"1487821500","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T20:45:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487858655","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"application":"editorial","title":"STORE Capital Announces Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2016 Operating Results","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_593706aa-ba35-5b06-a30d-e6fda979676c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/store-capital-announces-fourth-quarter-and-full-year-operating-results/article_593706aa-ba35-5b06-a30d-e6fda979676c.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/store-capital-announces-fourth-quarter-and-full-year-operating-results/article_593706aa-ba35-5b06-a30d-e6fda979676c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Affirms 2017 Guidance SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--STORE Capital Corporation (NYSE: STOR), an internally managed net-lease real estate investment trust (REIT) that invests in Single Tenant Operational Real Estate, today announced operating results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2016.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#prwire"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"593706aa-ba35-5b06-a30d-e6fda979676c","body":"

Affirms 2017 Guidance

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--STORE

Capital Corporation (NYSE: STOR), an internally managed net-lease

real estate investment trust (REIT) that invests in Single Tenant

Operational Real Estate, today announced operating

results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2016.

Highlights

For the quarter ended December 31, 2016:

For the year ended December 31, 2016:

Management Commentary

\u201c2016 was another year of outperformance and growth for STORE Capital,

clearly depicting the foundational distinction that makes STORE the best

platform our team has ever created,\u201d said Christopher H. Volk, President

and Chief Executive Officer of STORE Capital. \u201cIn 2016, we grew

comparable AFFO per share by over 10% and raised our dividend by more

than 7%. During the year, we acquired 367 properties through 145

separate transactions, grew our customer count by 19% and added over 20

industry groups to our customer base as we continued to expand our

diversified capital markets strategy, locking in historically attractive

long-term spreads. Stability and quality continued to define our

portfolio, as we concluded 2016 with approximately 99.5% of our

portfolio occupied and 75% of our lease contracts of investment-grade

quality as measured by our STORE Score model. The combination of our

portfolio quality and strong financial position, together with our

modest corporate leverage targets, significant investment diversity,

increasing stockholder dividend protection and impressive internal

growth potential, convey the powerful margins of safety for our

stockholders we have built into everything we do. Our strong investment

activity in 2016, coupled with continued investment in our distinctive

origination platform, gives us good reason to be optimistic about our

future prospects and growth.\u201d

Financial Results

Total Revenues

Total revenues were $102.1\u00a0million for the fourth quarter of 2016, an

increase of 28.3% from $79.6\u00a0million for the fourth quarter of 2015.

Total revenues for 2016 were $376.3\u00a0million, an increase of 32.2% from

$284.8\u00a0million for 2015. The increase was driven primarily by the growth

in the size of STORE Capital\u2019s real estate investment portfolio, which

grew from $4.0\u00a0billion in gross investment amount representing 1,325

property locations at December 31, 2015 to $5.1\u00a0billion in gross

investment amount representing 1,660 property locations at December 31,

2016.

Net Income

Net income was $31.9\u00a0million, or $0.20 per basic and diluted share, for

the fourth quarter of 2016, an increase of 32.7% from $24.1\u00a0million, or

$0.18 per basic and diluted share, for the fourth quarter of 2015. Net

income for the fourth quarter of 2016 included $3.7\u00a0million of net gains

on the sale of properties. In comparison, net income for the fourth

quarter of 2015 included $0.6\u00a0million of net losses on the sale of

properties.

Net income for 2016 was $123.3\u00a0million, or $0.82 per basic and diluted

share, an increase of 47.2% from $83.8 million, or $0.68 per basic and

diluted share, for 2015. The Company reported gains of $13.2\u00a0million on

the sale of 31 properties during 2016. During 2015, the Company

recognized gains of $1.3\u00a0million on the sale of 13 properties.

Adjusted Funds from Operations (AFFO)

AFFO was $67.1\u00a0million, or $0.43 per basic and diluted share, for the

fourth quarter of 2016, an increase of 27.8% from $52.6\u00a0million, or

$0.40 per basic and diluted share, for the fourth quarter of 2015.

AFFO for 2016 was $245.8\u00a0million, or $1.65 per basic share and $1.64 per

diluted share, an increase of 34.0% from $183.5\u00a0million, or $1.49 per

basic and diluted share, for 2015. The increase in AFFO between years

was primarily driven by additional rental revenues and interest income

generated by the growth in the Company\u2019s real estate investment

portfolio.

Dividend Information

As previously announced, STORE Capital declared a regular quarterly cash

dividend per common share of $0.29 for the fourth quarter ended December

31, 2016. This dividend, totaling $46.2\u00a0million, was paid on January 17,

2017 to stockholders of record on December 30, 2016.

Real Estate Portfolio Highlights

Investment Activity

The Company originated $325.0\u00a0million of gross investments representing

94 property locations during the fourth quarter of 2016, adding 17 new

customers. These investments had an initial weighted average cap rate of

7.9%. Total investment activity for the year was $1.2\u00a0billion

representing 367 property locations with an initial weighted average cap

rate of 7.9%. The Company defines \u201cinitial cap rate\u201d for property

acquisitions as the initial annual cash rent divided by the purchase

price of the property.

Disposition Activity

During the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company sold 31 properties

and recognized an aggregate gain, net of tax, of $13.2\u00a0million; 10 of

these 31 properties were sold in the fourth quarter at an aggregate

gain, net of tax, of $3.7\u00a0million. The aggregate investment amount of

the 31 properties sold represented approximately 1.8% of the total

investment portfolio at the beginning of 2016.

Portfolio

At December 31, 2016, STORE Capital\u2019s real estate portfolio totaled

$5.1\u00a0billion representing 1,660 property locations. Approximately 95% of

the portfolio represents commercial real estate properties subject to

long-term leases, 5% represents mortgage loans and direct financing

receivables primarily on commercial real estate buildings (located on

land the Company owns and leases to its customers) and a nominal amount

represents loans receivable secured by the tenants\u2019 other assets. As of

December 31, 2016, the portfolio\u2019s annualized base rent and interest

(based on rates in effect on December 31, 2016 for all lease and loan

contracts) totaled $418.5\u00a0million. The weighted average non-cancelable

remaining term of the leases at December 31, 2016 was approximately

14\u00a0years.

The Company's customers operate their businesses across a diverse range

of more than 420\u00a0brand names, or concepts, and the largest single

concept represented 3.1% of the Company's annualized base rent and

interest as of December 31, 2016.


Portfolio At A Glance -- As of December 31, 2016

\u00a0

\u00a0

\u00a0

Investment property locations

\u00a0

\u00a0

1,660

States



48

Customers



360

Industries in which customers operate



106

Proportion of portfolio from direct origination



~80%

Contracts with STORE preferred terms*



91%

Weighted average annual lease escalation(1)



1.8%

Weighted average remaining lease contract term



~14 years

Occupancy(2)



99.5%

Properties not operating but subject to a lease(3)



9

Investment locations subject to a ground lease



17

Investment portfolio subject to NNN leases*



97%

Investment portfolio subject to Master Leases*(4)



82%

Average investment amount/replacement cost (new)(5)



82%

Locations subject to unit-level financial reporting



97%

Median unit fixed charge coverage ratio (FCCR)/4-Wall coverage ratio(6)



2.09x/2.59x

Contracts rated investment grade(7)

\u00a0

\u00a0

~75%


* Based on annualized base rent and interest.




(1)



\u00a0


Represents the weighted average annual escalation rate of the
entire portfolio as if all escalations occurred annually. For
escalations based on a formula including CPI, assumes the stated
fixed percentage in the contract or assumes 1.5% if no fixed
percentage is in the contract. For contracts with no escalations
remaining in the current lease term, assumes the escalation in the
extension term. Calculation excludes contracts representing less
than 0.3% of annualized base rent and interest where there are no
further escalations remaining in the current lease term and there
are no extension options.




(2)





The Company defines occupancy as a property being subject to a
lease or loan contract. As of December 31, 2016, eight of the
Company\u2019s properties were vacant and not subject to a contract.




(3)





Represents the number of the Company\u2019s investment locations
that have been closed by the tenant but remain subject to a lease.




(4)





Percentage of investment portfolio in multiple properties with
a single customer subject to master leases. Approximately 81% of
the investment portfolio involves multiple properties with a
single customer, whether or not subject to a master lease.




(5)





Represents the ratio of purchase price to replacement cost
(new) at acquisition.




(6)





STORE Capital calculates a unit\u2019s FCCR generally as the ratio
of (i) the unit\u2019s EBITDAR, less a standardized corporate overhead
expense based on estimated industry standards, to (ii) the unit\u2019s
total fixed charges, which are its lease expense, interest expense
and scheduled principal payments on indebtedness. The 4-Wall
coverage ratio refers to a unit\u2019s FCCR before taking into account
standardized corporate overhead expense.




(7)





Represents the percentage of the Company\u2019s contracts that have
a STORE Score that is investment grade. The Company measures the
credit quality of its portfolio on a contract-by-contract basis
using the STORE Score, which is a proprietary risk measure
reflective of both the credit risk of the Company\u2019s tenants and
the profitability of the operations at the properties. As of
December 31, 2016, STORE Capital\u2019s tenants had a median tenant
credit profile of approximately \u2018Ba2\u2019 as measured by Moody's
Analytics RiskCalc rating scale. Considering the profitability of
the operations at each of its properties and STORE\u2019s assessment of
the likelihood that each of the tenants will choose to continue to
operate at the properties in the event of their insolvency, the
credit quality of its contracts, or STORE Score, is enhanced to a
median of \u2018Baa2\u2019.





\u00a0

Capital Transactions

In September 2016, the Company established an \u201cat the market\u201d equity

distribution program, or ATM program, pursuant to which, from time to

time, it offers and sells registered shares of common stock up to a

maximum amount of $400\u00a0million through a group of banks acting as its

sales agents. During the fourth quarter of 2016, the Company sold

approximately 3.6\u00a0million shares and raised approximately $87.7\u00a0million

in net proceeds under the ATM program. Since the start of the program,

the Company has sold approximately 6.1\u00a0million shares at a weighted

average share price of $26.66, raising $159.3 million in aggregate net

proceeds after the payment of sales agents\u2019 commissions and offering

expenses.

On October 18, 2016, certain of the Company\u2019s consolidated special

purpose entities issued an additional series of STORE Master Funding

net-lease mortgage notes consisting of $200.0\u00a0million of Class A-1

notes, $135.0\u00a0million of Class A-2 notes and $20.0\u00a0million of Class B

notes. The Class A-1 notes are 10-year notes with an interest rate of

3.96%. The Class A-2 notes are 10.5-year notes and were retained by the

Company for sale at a future date. The Class B notes were also retained

by the Company.

2017 Guidance

Affirming its 2017 guidance presented in November 2016, the Company

currently expects 2017 AFFO per share to be within a range of $1.74 to

$1.76, based on projected 2017 annual real estate acquisition volume,

net of projected property sales, of approximately $900 million. This

AFFO per share guidance equates to anticipated net income, excluding

gains or losses on sales of property, of $0.78 to $0.79 per share, plus

$0.87 to $0.88 per share of expected real estate depreciation and

amortization, plus approximately $0.09 per share related to such items

as straight-line rent and the amortization of stock-based compensation

and deferred financing costs. AFFO per share is sensitive to the timing

and amount of real estate acquisitions and capital markets activities

during the year, as well as to the spread achieved between the lease

rates on new acquisitions and the interest rates on borrowings used to

finance those acquisitions.

Conference Call and Webcast

A conference call and audio webcast with analysts and investors will be

held later today at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time / 10:00 a.m. Scottsdale,

Arizona Time, to discuss fourth quarter and full year ended December\u00a031,

2016 operating results and answer questions.

About STORE Capital

STORE Capital Corporation is an internally managed net-lease real estate

investment trust, or REIT, that is the leader in the acquisition,

investment and management of Single Tenant Operational Real Estate,

which is its target market and the inspiration for its name. STORE

Capital is one of the largest and fastest growing net-lease REITs and

owns a large, well-diversified portfolio that consists of investments in

1,660 property locations, substantially all of which are profit centers,

in 48 states. Additional information about STORE Capital can be found on

its website at www.storecapital.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this press release that are not

historical facts contain forward-looking statements within the meaning

of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and within the

meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as

amended, that are subject to the \u201csafe harbor\u201d created by those

sections. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of

words such as \u201cestimate,\u201d \u201canticipate,\u201d \u201cexpect,\u201d \u201cbelieve,\u201d \u201cintend,\u201d

\u201cmay,\u201d \u201cwill,\u201d \u201cshould,\u201d \u201cseek,\u201d \u201capproximate\u201d or \u201cplan,\u201d or the

negative of these words and phrases or similar words or phrases.

Forward-looking statements, by their nature, involve estimates,

projections, goals, forecasts and assumptions and are subject to risks

and uncertainties that could cause actual results or outcomes to differ

materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. For

more information on risk factors for STORE Capital\u2019s business, please

refer to the periodic reports the Company files with the Securities and

Exchange Commission from time to time. These forward-looking statements

herein speak only as of the date of this press release and should not be

relied upon as predictions of future events. STORE Capital expressly

disclaims any obligation or undertaking to update or revise any

forward-looking statements contained herein, to reflect any change in

STORE Capital\u2019s expectations with regard thereto, or any other change in

events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statement is

based, except as required by law.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

FFO and AFFO

STORE Capital\u2019s reported results are presented in accordance with U.S.

generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP. The Company also

discloses Funds from Operations, or FFO, and Adjusted Funds from

Operations, or AFFO, both of which are non-GAAP measures. Management

believes these two non-GAAP financial measures are useful to investors

because they are widely accepted industry measures used by analysts and

investors to compare the operating performance of REITs. FFO and AFFO do

not represent cash generated from operating activities and are not

necessarily indicative of cash available to fund cash requirements;

accordingly, they should not be considered alternatives to net income as

a performance measure or to cash flows from operations as reported on a

statement of cash flows as a liquidity measure and should be considered

in addition to, and not in lieu of, GAAP financial measures.

The Company computes FFO in accordance with the definition adopted by

the Board of Governors of the National Association of Real Estate

Investment Trusts, or NAREIT. NAREIT defines FFO as GAAP net income,

excluding gains (or losses) from extraordinary items and sales of

depreciable property, real estate impairment losses, and depreciation

and amortization expense from real estate assets, including the pro rata

share of such adjustments of unconsolidated subsidiaries.

To derive AFFO, the Company modifies the NAREIT computation of FFO to

include other adjustments to GAAP net income related to certain non-cash

revenues and expenses that have no impact on the Company\u2019s long-term

operating performance, such as straight-line rents, amortization of

deferred financing costs and stock-based compensation. In addition, in

deriving AFFO, the Company excludes transaction costs associated with

acquiring real estate subject to existing leases and certain other

expenses not related to its ongoing operations.

FFO is used by management, investors and analysts to facilitate

meaningful comparisons of operating performance between periods and

among the Company\u2019s peers primarily because it excludes the effect of

real estate depreciation and amortization and net gains on sales, which

are based on historical costs and implicitly assume that the value of

real estate diminishes predictably over time, rather than fluctuating

based on existing market conditions. Management believes that AFFO

provides more useful information to investors and analysts because it

modifies FFO to exclude certain additional non-cash revenues and

expenses such as straight-line rents, amortization of deferred financing

costs and stock-based compensation as such items may cause short-term

fluctuations in net income but have no impact on long-term operating

performance. Additionally, in deriving AFFO, the Company excludes

transaction costs associated with acquiring real estate subject to

existing leases. The Company views transaction costs to be a part of the

investment in the real estate it acquires, similar to the treatment of

acquisition and closing costs on sale-leaseback transactions, which are

capitalized as a part of the investment in the asset. The Company

believes that transaction costs are not an ongoing cost of the portfolio

in place at the end of each reporting period and, for these reasons, the

portion expensed is added back when computing AFFO. Similarly, in 2016

the Company excluded the offering expenses incurred on behalf of its

selling stockholder, STORE Holding, when it exited all of its holdings

in STORE Capital common stock, as those costs are not related to the

Company\u2019s ongoing operations. As a result, the Company believes AFFO to

be a more meaningful measurement of ongoing performance that allows for

greater performance comparability. Therefore, the Company discloses both

FFO and AFFO and reconciles them to the most appropriate GAAP

performance metric, which is net income. STORE Capital\u2019s FFO and AFFO

may not be comparable to similarly titled measures employed by other

companies.


\u00a0

STORE Capital Corporation

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income

(In thousands, except share and per share data)



\u00a0

\u00a0


\u00a0

\u00a0

\u00a0

\u00a0







Three months ended
December 31,






Year ended
December 31,







2016

\u00a0

\u00a0

2015



2016



2015





(unaudited)



(unaudited)


\u00a0





(audited)



Revenues:













Rental revenues



$

96,415



$

75,467




$

356,081



$

270,780

Interest income on loans and direct financing receivables




5,576




4,108





19,677




13,861

Other income



\u00a0

150



\u00a0

37

\u00a0



\u00a0

585



\u00a0

121

Total revenues



\u00a0

102,141



\u00a0

79,612

\u00a0



\u00a0

376,343



\u00a0

284,762














\u00a0

Expenses:













Interest




28,753




22,525





105,180




81,782

Transaction costs




33




153





523




1,156

Property costs




1,548




393





4,067




1,515

General and administrative




8,732




6,989





33,972




27,972

Selling stockholder costs




\u2013




\u2013





800




\u2013

Depreciation and amortization




32,992




24,884





119,618




88,615

Provision for impairment of real estate



\u00a0

1,720



\u00a0

\u2013

\u00a0



\u00a0

1,720



\u00a0

1,000

Total expenses



\u00a0

73,778



\u00a0

54,944

\u00a0



\u00a0

265,880



\u00a0

202,040














\u00a0

Income from operations before income taxes




28,363




24,668





110,463




82,722

Income tax expense



\u00a0

110



\u00a0

36

\u00a0



\u00a0

358



\u00a0

274

Income before gain on dispositions of real estate




28,253




24,632





110,105




82,448

Gain (loss) on dispositions of real estate, net of tax



\u00a0

3,687



\u00a0

(560

)



\u00a0

13,220



\u00a0

1,322

Net income



$

31,940



$

24,072

\u00a0



$

123,325



$

83,770














\u00a0

Net income per share of common stock - basic and diluted:



$

0.20



$

0.18

\u00a0



$

0.82



$

0.68














\u00a0














\u00a0


Weighted average common shares outstanding:




Basic





\u00a0

155,987,275



\u00a0

130,085,462

\u00a0



\u00a0

148,878,504



\u00a0

122,180,650


\u00a0




Diluted





\u00a0

156,199,297



\u00a0

130,275,296

\u00a0



\u00a0

149,124,010



\u00a0

122,207,505














\u00a0

Dividends declared per common share



$

0.29



$

0.27

\u00a0



$

1.12



$

1.04



















\u00a0


\u00a0

STORE Capital Corporation

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

(In thousands, except share and per share data)


\u00a0

\u00a0


\u00a0

\u00a0






December 31,
2016






December 31,
2015






(unaudited)



(audited)

Assets







Investments:







Real estate investments:







Land and improvements



$

1,536,178




$

1,187,482


Buildings and improvements




3,226,791





2,490,394


Intangible lease assets



\u00a0

92,337

\u00a0



\u00a0

88,724

\u00a0

Total real estate investments




4,855,306





3,766,600


Less accumulated depreciation and amortization



\u00a0

(298,984

)



\u00a0

(184,182

)





4,556,322





3,582,418


Loans and direct financing receivables



\u00a0

269,210

\u00a0



\u00a0

213,342

\u00a0

Net investments




4,825,532





3,795,760


Cash and cash equivalents




54,200





67,115


Other assets



\u00a0

61,936

\u00a0



\u00a0

48,513

\u00a0

Total assets



$

4,941,668

\u00a0



$

3,911,388

\u00a0







\u00a0

Liabilities and stockholders' equity







Liabilities:







Credit facility



$

48,000




$

\u2013


Unsecured notes and term loan payable, net




470,190





172,442


Non-recourse debt obligations of consolidated special purpose
entities, net




1,833,481





1,597,505


Dividends payable




46,209





38,032


Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities



\u00a0

60,533

\u00a0



\u00a0

43,616

\u00a0

Total liabilities



\u00a0

2,458,413

\u00a0



\u00a0

1,851,595

\u00a0







\u00a0

Stockholders' equity:








Common stock, $0.01 par value per share, 375,000,000 shares
authorized, 159,341,955 and 140,858,765 shares issued and
outstanding, respectively






1,593





1,409


Capital in excess of par value




2,631,845





2,162,130


Distributions in excess of retained earnings




(151,592

)




(103,453

)

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)



\u00a0

1,409

\u00a0



\u00a0

(293

)

Total stockholders' equity



\u00a0

2,483,255

\u00a0



\u00a0

2,059,793

\u00a0

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity



$

4,941,668

\u00a0



$

3,911,388

\u00a0







\u00a0


\u00a0

STORE Capital Corporation

Reconciliations of Non-GAAP Financial Measures

(In thousands, except per share data)

\u00a0

Funds from Operations and Adjusted Funds from Operations


\u00a0

\u00a0


\u00a0

\u00a0






Three months ended
December 31,






Year ended
December 31,






2016

\u00a0

\u00a0

2015



2016

\u00a0

\u00a0

2015




(unaudited)



(unaudited)













\u00a0

Net income



$

31,940




$

24,072




$

123,325




$

83,770


Depreciation and amortization of real estate assets




32,843





24,783





119,079





88,257


Provision for impairment of real estate




1,720





\u2013





1,720





1,000


(Gain) loss on dispositions of real estate, net of tax



\u00a0

(3,687

)



\u00a0

560

\u00a0



\u00a0

(13,220

)



\u00a0

(1,322

)

Funds from Operations



\u00a0

62,816

\u00a0



\u00a0

49,415

\u00a0



\u00a0

230,904

\u00a0



\u00a0

171,705

\u00a0













\u00a0

Adjustments:













Straight-line rental revenue, net




204





(505

)




(2,344

)




(2,018

)

Transaction costs




33





153





523





1,156


Amortization of:













Equity-based compensation




1,803





1,285





7,022





4,735



Deferred financing costs and other noncash interest expense






1,949





1,664





7,267





6,507


Lease-related intangibles and costs




336





543





1,657





1,390


Selling stockholder costs



\u00a0

\u2013

\u00a0



\u00a0

\u2013

\u00a0



\u00a0

800

\u00a0



\u00a0

\u2013

\u00a0

Adjusted Funds from Operations



$

67,141

\u00a0



$

52,555

\u00a0



$

245,829

\u00a0



$

183,475

\u00a0













\u00a0

Dividends declared to common stockholders



$

46,209

\u00a0



$

38,032

\u00a0



$

170,795

\u00a0



$

132,821

\u00a0













\u00a0

Net income per share of common stock:













Basic and Diluted (1)



$

0.20

\u00a0



$

0.18

\u00a0



$

0.82

\u00a0



$

0.68

\u00a0

FFO per share of common stock:













Basic (1)



$

0.40

\u00a0



$

0.38

\u00a0



$

1.55

\u00a0



$

1.40

\u00a0

Diluted (1)



$

0.40

\u00a0



$

0.38

\u00a0



$

1.54

\u00a0



$

1.40

\u00a0

AFFO per share of common stock:













Basic (1)



$

0.43

\u00a0



$

0.40

\u00a0



$

1.65

\u00a0



$

1.49

\u00a0

Diluted (1)



$

0.43

\u00a0



$

0.40

\u00a0



$

1.64

\u00a0



$

1.49

\u00a0

Contacts

Investors and Media:

Financial Profiles, Inc.

Moira

Conlon, 310-622-8220

Tricia Ross, 310-622-8226

STORECapital@finprofiles.com

Read full story here"}, {"id":"42785622-2f34-524d-9da5-eba54623d146","type":"article","starttime":"1487819810","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T20:16:50-07:00","lastupdated":"1487821684","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Asian shares dip as Fed minutes show rate hike expected soon","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_42785622-2f34-524d-9da5-eba54623d146.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/asian-shares-dip-as-fed-minutes-show-rate-hike-expected/article_42785622-2f34-524d-9da5-eba54623d146.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Asian-shares-have-slipped-after-the-latest-Fed-minutes-raised-the-possibility-that-a-U-S-rate-hike-could-come-sooner-than-expected/id-ce07c778d5c346a787bf6157cf98484f","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":17,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By KELVIN CHAN\nAP Business Writer","prologue":"HONG KONG (AP) \u2014 Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","stock price movements","stock performance","corporate stock","corporate news","financial markets","pharmaceutical manufacturing","health care industry","technology","stock prices","leading economic indicators","economy","brent crude markets","crude oil markets","energy markets","commodity markets","currency markets","stock indices and averages","stock markets","japanese yen","oil and gas industry","energy industry"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"361db655-5e93-5f5a-9f3d-fd99fc453945","description":"Trader Greg Mulligan on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/61/361db655-5e93-5f5a-9f3d-fd99fc453945/58adc63764962.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/61/361db655-5e93-5f5a-9f3d-fd99fc453945/58adc63764962.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/61/361db655-5e93-5f5a-9f3d-fd99fc453945/58adc63764962.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/61/361db655-5e93-5f5a-9f3d-fd99fc453945/58adc63764962.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"cbb9bcf4-ab0f-534e-a297-f1e3302d7e84","description":"Neil Catania, right, talks with a fellow trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bb/cbb9bcf4-ab0f-534e-a297-f1e3302d7e84/58adc637a24cb.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bb/cbb9bcf4-ab0f-534e-a297-f1e3302d7e84/58adc637a24cb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bb/cbb9bcf4-ab0f-534e-a297-f1e3302d7e84/58adc637a24cb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bb/cbb9bcf4-ab0f-534e-a297-f1e3302d7e84/58adc637a24cb.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"2ae072f9-626a-5053-af79-bb91fe43ad36","description":"Trader Michael Conlon, right, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ae/2ae072f9-626a-5053-af79-bb91fe43ad36/58adc637c89a9.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ae/2ae072f9-626a-5053-af79-bb91fe43ad36/58adc637c89a9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ae/2ae072f9-626a-5053-af79-bb91fe43ad36/58adc637c89a9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ae/2ae072f9-626a-5053-af79-bb91fe43ad36/58adc637c89a9.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"8210b926-ce93-5e23-a4aa-ea4a6d024b2d","description":"Trader Anthony Riccio, right, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/21/8210b926-ce93-5e23-a4aa-ea4a6d024b2d/58adc637f0d6d.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/21/8210b926-ce93-5e23-a4aa-ea4a6d024b2d/58adc637f0d6d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/21/8210b926-ce93-5e23-a4aa-ea4a6d024b2d/58adc637f0d6d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/21/8210b926-ce93-5e23-a4aa-ea4a6d024b2d/58adc637f0d6d.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"dbcfdeac-a97c-569a-88ac-95455e521f28","description":"Trader Dan Tandy, center, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bc/dbcfdeac-a97c-569a-88ac-95455e521f28/58adc63824eed.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bc/dbcfdeac-a97c-569a-88ac-95455e521f28/58adc63824eed.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bc/dbcfdeac-a97c-569a-88ac-95455e521f28/58adc63824eed.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bc/dbcfdeac-a97c-569a-88ac-95455e521f28/58adc63824eed.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"e87724ea-979f-595c-add1-67fdf645a6b3","description":"Traders Robert Arciero, Michael Conlon, and Tommy Kalikas, left to right, work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/87/e87724ea-979f-595c-add1-67fdf645a6b3/58adc63848f2d.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/87/e87724ea-979f-595c-add1-67fdf645a6b3/58adc63848f2d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/87/e87724ea-979f-595c-add1-67fdf645a6b3/58adc63848f2d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/87/e87724ea-979f-595c-add1-67fdf645a6b3/58adc63848f2d.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"0329ffa4-f3e2-5f84-b470-eba779f7defc","description":"Traders Patrick Casey, left, and Peter Tuchman work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/32/0329ffa4-f3e2-5f84-b470-eba779f7defc/58adc63871647.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/32/0329ffa4-f3e2-5f84-b470-eba779f7defc/58adc63871647.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/32/0329ffa4-f3e2-5f84-b470-eba779f7defc/58adc63871647.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/32/0329ffa4-f3e2-5f84-b470-eba779f7defc/58adc63871647.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"241d5ac0-4fa9-5ef6-96cf-4214c7894501","description":"Trader Glenn Kessler, center, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/41/241d5ac0-4fa9-5ef6-96cf-4214c7894501/58adc638973fe.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/41/241d5ac0-4fa9-5ef6-96cf-4214c7894501/58adc638973fe.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/41/241d5ac0-4fa9-5ef6-96cf-4214c7894501/58adc638973fe.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/41/241d5ac0-4fa9-5ef6-96cf-4214c7894501/58adc638973fe.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"adb014ff-1e07-51c9-adde-f03ef0e44902","description":"Trader Daniel Kryger, center, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/db/adb014ff-1e07-51c9-adde-f03ef0e44902/58adc638bc0fa.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/db/adb014ff-1e07-51c9-adde-f03ef0e44902/58adc638bc0fa.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/db/adb014ff-1e07-51c9-adde-f03ef0e44902/58adc638bc0fa.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/db/adb014ff-1e07-51c9-adde-f03ef0e44902/58adc638bc0fa.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"4644ea44-da03-5828-a3d7-68b2d72171f9","description":"Specialist Thomas Facchine works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/64/4644ea44-da03-5828-a3d7-68b2d72171f9/58adc638e67f1.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/64/4644ea44-da03-5828-a3d7-68b2d72171f9/58adc638e67f1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/64/4644ea44-da03-5828-a3d7-68b2d72171f9/58adc638e67f1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/64/4644ea44-da03-5828-a3d7-68b2d72171f9/58adc638e67f1.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"dc55402d-8708-5bb2-942f-69764b7c9760","description":"Specialist Robert Tuccillo works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/c5/dc55402d-8708-5bb2-942f-69764b7c9760/58adc6391bac1.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/c5/dc55402d-8708-5bb2-942f-69764b7c9760/58adc6391bac1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/c5/dc55402d-8708-5bb2-942f-69764b7c9760/58adc6391bac1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/c5/dc55402d-8708-5bb2-942f-69764b7c9760/58adc6391bac1.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"ff46635f-4c5a-50b7-b1bf-9457ab87c211","description":"Trader William McInerney, center, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Declines in energy and industrial stocks are leading U.S. indexes slightly lower in early trading as the market comes off a record closing high the day before. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/f4/ff46635f-4c5a-50b7-b1bf-9457ab87c211/58adc63939830.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/f4/ff46635f-4c5a-50b7-b1bf-9457ab87c211/58adc63939830.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/f4/ff46635f-4c5a-50b7-b1bf-9457ab87c211/58adc63939830.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/f4/ff46635f-4c5a-50b7-b1bf-9457ab87c211/58adc63939830.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97","description":"A woman walks past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"331","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/a5/8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97/58ae5b740b20b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C331"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/a5/8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97/58ae5b740b20b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"194","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/a5/8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97/58ae5b740b20b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C194"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"662","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/a5/8a538383-8db3-5c46-ab0d-f57cb3024f97/58ae5b740b20b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670","description":"A woman waits to cross a street in front of an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"324","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a8/ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670/58ae5b742e93b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C324"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"63","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a8/ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670/58ae5b742e93b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C63"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"190","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a8/ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670/58ae5b742e93b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C190"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"648","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a8/ea838a68-096e-535e-b585-673561341670/58ae5b742e93b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62","description":"People walk past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"319","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/48/b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62/58ae5b744ed02.image.jpg?resize=512%2C319"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"62","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/48/b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62/58ae5b744ed02.image.jpg?resize=100%2C62"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"187","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/48/b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62/58ae5b744ed02.image.jpg?resize=300%2C187"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"638","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/48/b488b960-3d89-5df8-94be-7107e7029b62/58ae5b744ed02.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7","description":"People walk past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"344","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/0a/20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7/58ae5b7477da0.image.jpg?resize=512%2C344"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/0a/20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7/58ae5b7477da0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/0a/20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7/58ae5b7477da0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"688","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/0a/20aeecb2-f93e-541d-9555-ddbf66b7d8d7/58ae5b7477da0.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc","description":"A man walks past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"327","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a8/7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc/58ae5b749ab4f.image.jpg?resize=512%2C327"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a8/7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc/58ae5b749ab4f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a8/7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc/58ae5b749ab4f.image.jpg?resize=300%2C192"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"654","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a8/7a8b04d5-a040-56c8-b6bd-9f86627fe8bc/58ae5b749ab4f.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":14,"commentID":"42785622-2f34-524d-9da5-eba54623d146","body":"

HONG KONG (AP) \u2014 Asian shares slipped Thursday after the latest Fed minutes raised the possibility that a U.S. rate hike could come sooner than expected.

KEEPING SCORE: Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 lost 0.4 percent to 19,312.07 and South Korea's Kospi dipped 0.1 percent to 2,104.70. Hong Kong's Hang Seng shed 0.5 percent to 24,088.57 and the Shanghai Composite index in mainland China retreated 0.3 percent to 3,251.95. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 declined 0.3 percent to 5,790.60.

RATE HORIZON: At their meeting last month, Federal Reserve officials discussed the need to raise a key interest rate again \"fairly soon,\" especially if the world's No. 1 economy maintains its strength, according to the minutes. Most economists had been expecting a rate hike no earlier than June, but the discussion raises the possibility it could come as soon as March. Investors were waiting for policymakers to follow up their talk with concrete action, but that also hinges on more details from U.S. President Donald Trump's administration on his economy-boosting plans. Ultralow interest rates have fueled a multiyear global stock rally and the prospect of higher U.S. interest rates has lifted the dollar and made the U.S. still more attractive than other markets for investors.

TRADER TALK: The minutes \"revealed a consensus among Fed members to raise rates, but the minutes offered up little more than studiously ambiguous double talk by suggesting a rate hike would be delivered 'fairly soon',\" said Stephen Innes, senior trader at OANDA. \"Short-term dollar speculators were hoping the Feds would produce a more meaningful time frame\" while Fed chief Janet Yellen was \"awaiting clarity regarding the yet-to-be implemented Trump policies,\" he said.

WALL STREET: The Dow Jones industrial average rose 0.2 percent to 20,775.60. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 0.1 percent to 2,362.82. The Nasdaq composite shed 0.1 percent to 5,860.63. The Russell 2000 index of small-company stocks slid 6.49 points, or 0.5 percent, to 1,403.86.

CURRENCIES: The dollar slipped to 113.26 yen from 113.37 yen in late trading Wednesday. The euro rose to $1.0554 from $1.0546.

ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude oil futures rebounded, rising 45 cents to $54.04 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract lost 74 cents, or 1.4 percent, to settle at $53.59 a barrel on Wednesday. Brent crude, the standard for pricing international oils, rose 44 cents to $56.48 a barrel in London.

"}, {"id":"15514929-3e8a-50e7-958f-73828c23d3cb","type":"article","starttime":"1487814676","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T18:51:16-07:00","lastupdated":"1487817307","priority":0,"sections":[{"obituaries":"news/national/obituaries"},{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Nobel-winning economist Kenneth J. Arrow dies at 95","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/obituaries/article_15514929-3e8a-50e7-958f-73828c23d3cb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/obituaries/nobel-winning-economist-kenneth-j-arrow-dies-at/article_15514929-3e8a-50e7-958f-73828c23d3cb.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Kenneth-J-Arrow-the-youngest-ever-winner-of-a-Nobel-prize-for-economics-has-died-in-California/id-93e77f99d3074763a995fae05b587c00","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Kenneth J. Arrow, the youngest-ever winner of a Nobel prize for economics, whose theories on risk, innovation and the basic mathematics of markets have influenced thinking on everything from voting to health insurance to high finance, has died. He was 95.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","obituaries","economy","nobel prizes"],"internalKeywords":["#ap","#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"f27b7325-9194-5578-b1ae-ed8010b365ef","description":"FILE - This Feb. 13, 2006 file photo President George W. Bush, right, presents the National Medal of Science to Dr. Kenneth J. Arrow, left, from Stanford University, during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Arrow, the youngest ever winner of a Nobel prize for economics, has died. His son, David, says Arrow died on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, at his home in Palo Alto. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)","byline":"Pablo Martinez Monsivais","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"408","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/27/f27b7325-9194-5578-b1ae-ed8010b365ef/58ae45dddd028.image.jpg?resize=512%2C408"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/27/f27b7325-9194-5578-b1ae-ed8010b365ef/58ae45dddd028.image.jpg?resize=100%2C80"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"239","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/27/f27b7325-9194-5578-b1ae-ed8010b365ef/58ae45dddd028.image.jpg?resize=300%2C239"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"816","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/27/f27b7325-9194-5578-b1ae-ed8010b365ef/58ae45dddd028.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"15514929-3e8a-50e7-958f-73828c23d3cb","body":"

PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Kenneth J. Arrow, the youngest-ever winner of a Nobel prize for economics, whose theories on risk, innovation and the basic mathematics of markets have influenced thinking on everything from voting to health insurance to high finance, has died. He was 95.

Arrow died Tuesday at his home in Palo Alto, in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to his son, David Arrow.

\"He was a very loving, caring father and a very, very humble man. He'd do the dishes every night and cared about people very much,\" David Arrow said. \"I think in his academic career, when people talk about it, it often sounds like numbers and probabilities. But a large focus of his work was how people matter.\"

\"The fact that people often don't behave rationally ... that was one aspect that he often looked at, how it affected the lives of the people,\" he said.

Arrow and British economist Sir John R. Hicks shared the 1972 Nobel memorial prize in economic science for their pioneering mathematical work on general equilibrium theory, which says that there is an overall balance between supply and demand in an economy as a whole. Their mathematical models dealt with the factors involved, such as when and where a product is sold.

Arrow spent most of his career at Stanford University but also taught for 11 years at Harvard University. He also was known as a mentor. Five of his former students went on to become Nobel winners.

Arrow came to prominence in 1951 with a book, \"Social Choice and Individual Values,\" which used mathematical logic to discuss collective decision-making. He put forward a theorem that it was impossible for a majority-rule voting system with three candidates to be free of certain flaws.

\"You can say, 'There's no really good way to run an election,' but it is something else to prove it. .?.?. It's like proving a bicycle cannot be stable,\" a fellow economics laureate, Robert Aumann, told the Washington Post.

Arrow's impossibility theorem \"fundamentally altered economic and political theory and practice,\" Aumann said.

Arrow had a broad intellectual curiosity that covered subjects as diverse as music, Chinese art and even whales.

\"He was interested in everything,\" his son said.

In economics, he looked at how risk aversion, innovation and information affected the economy.

In a 1963 paper, he confronted problems with the economics of medical care and health insurance, arguing that it is not a truly price-competitive situation because among other things the buyer \u2014 the patient \u2014 has much less information than the doctor \u2014 the seller \u2014 about necessary treatment and options. The issue is known in economics as \"asymmetric information.\"

If Arrow's worked seemed dry and abstract, it had real-world applications in many fields.

\"The economics of insurance, medical care, prescription drug testing \u2014 to say nothing of bingo and the stock market \u2014 will never be the same after Arrow,\" Paul A. Samuelson, the first American to win the economics prize, said in 1972 after Arrow won the prize.

Arrow also was awarded the 2004 National Medal of Science \u2014 the nation's highest scientific honor \u2014 by President George W. Bush.

Arrow was born on Aug. 23, 1921 in New York City to Jewish immigrants from Romania. Several other members of the family became economics professors and his nephew, Lawrence Summers, is a former Harvard University economics professor, Harvard president, Treasury secretary under President Clinton and adviser to President Obama.

In addition to his son, Arrow is survived by another son, Andrew; a sister, Anita Summers, and a grandson.

"}, {"id":"78b57921-83d0-5708-bb3b-365f82532c74","type":"article","starttime":"1487814120","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T18:42:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487819832","priority":33,"sections":[{"tucson":"business/tucson"}],"flags":{"editors_pick":"true","top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Construction is underway on a new Fry's grocery store north of Tucson","url":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/article_78b57921-83d0-5708-bb3b-365f82532c74.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/construction-is-underway-on-a-new-fry-s-grocery-store/article_78b57921-83d0-5708-bb3b-365f82532c74.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/construction-is-underway-on-a-new-fry-s-grocery-store/article_78b57921-83d0-5708-bb3b-365f82532c74.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"A new Fry\u2019s Food & Drug store is going up in Catalina as part of a 120,000 square-foot retail plaza. The Pederson Group has begun construction at the intersection of Oracle Road \u2014 State Highway 77 \u2014 and SaddleBrooke Boulevard, just north of the Pima/Pinal county line. Developed in partnership with Tucson-based real estate developer Sears Financial Corporation, the center will include multi-use pads and in-line shop space.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["frys food & drug store","tucson grocery stores","arizona grocery stores","saddlebrooke grocery stores"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#topbiz"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"74157"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"73820e99-a3e3-5828-9d70-b4ac66686b17","description":"The Pederson Group has begun construction on a 120,000 square-foot retail plaza with a Fry\u2019s Food & Drug Store anchor at the intersection of Oracle Road and SaddleBrooke Boulevard, just north of the Pima/Pinal county line in Catalina.","byline":"PHOTOS Courtesy The Pederson Group","hireswidth":1947,"hiresheight":1064,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/73820e99-a3e3-5828-9d70-b4ac66686b17/58ade82eac05f.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"339","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/73820e99-a3e3-5828-9d70-b4ac66686b17/58ade82eaa1c0.image.jpg?resize=620%2C339"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"55","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/73820e99-a3e3-5828-9d70-b4ac66686b17/58ade82eaa1c0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C55"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"164","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/73820e99-a3e3-5828-9d70-b4ac66686b17/58ade82eaa1c0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C164"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"560","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/73820e99-a3e3-5828-9d70-b4ac66686b17/58ade82eaa1c0.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C560"}}},{"id":"97abb80a-7fbe-5630-9b2d-80109f286af8","description":"The Pederson Group has begun construction on a 120,000 square-foot retail plaza with a Fry\u2019s Food & Drug Store anchor at the intersection of Oracle Road (State Highway 77) and SaddleBrooke Boulevard, just north of the Pima/Pinal county line in Catalina.","byline":"Courtesy The Pederson Group","hireswidth":2293,"hiresheight":904,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7a/97abb80a-7fbe-5630-9b2d-80109f286af8/58ade82f374cb.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"244","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7a/97abb80a-7fbe-5630-9b2d-80109f286af8/58ade82f365e9.image.jpg?resize=620%2C244"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"39","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7a/97abb80a-7fbe-5630-9b2d-80109f286af8/58ade82f365e9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C39"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"118","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7a/97abb80a-7fbe-5630-9b2d-80109f286af8/58ade82f365e9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C118"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"404","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/7a/97abb80a-7fbe-5630-9b2d-80109f286af8/58ade82f365e9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C404"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"78b57921-83d0-5708-bb3b-365f82532c74","body":"

A new Fry\u2019s Food & Drug store is going up in Catalina as part of a 120,000 square-foot retail plaza.

The Pederson Group has begun construction at the intersection of Oracle Road \u2014 State Highway 77 \u2014 and SaddleBrooke Boulevard, just north of the Pima/Pinal county line.

Developed in partnership with Tucson-based real estate developer Sears Financial Corporation, the center will include multi-use pads and in-line shop space.

SaddleBrooke Marketplace will serve residents of Oro Valley/Rancho Vistoso, Catalina, Eagle Crest, SaddleBrooke, SaddleBrooke Ranch, Oracle, Mammoth, and San Manuel.

The store will hire 250 employees. Information on when the store will open was not immediately available.

Sears Financial Corporation purchased Eagle Crest Ranch \u2014 including the SaddleBrooke Marketplace site \u2014 in 1985. The Pederson Group, entered a joint partnership on the development of SaddleBrooke Marketplace in 2008.

"}, {"id":"1f814273-0853-587e-b224-ed3f5bb61b8c","type":"article","starttime":"1487813567","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T18:32:47-07:00","lastupdated":"1487815771","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Ivanka Trump visits center for minority-owned businesses","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_1f814273-0853-587e-b224-ed3f5bb61b8c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/ivanka-trump-visits-center-for-minority-owned-businesses/article_1f814273-0853-587e-b224-ed3f5bb61b8c.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Ivanka-Trump-has-broadened-her-research-on-economic-policy-with-a-visit-to-a-Baltimore-center-for-minority-owned-small-businesses/id-6eced00e46da4d8db1f6e2a4f587f073","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By CATHERINE LUCEY\nAssociated Press","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Ivanka Trump expanded her research on economic policy Wednesday with a visit to a program for business owners in Baltimore.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","business","general news","government and politics","economy"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"8d62494b-6bea-5362-a4b5-33f34d0e54a3","description":"Ivanka Trump, daughter of President Donald Trump, and her daughter Arabella Kushner walk down the steps of the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Trump attended the court session at the encouragement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, who extended her an invitation when they met at the inauguration lunch. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)","byline":"Molly Riley","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"337","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d6/8d62494b-6bea-5362-a4b5-33f34d0e54a3/58ae43bdd1aeb.image.jpg?resize=512%2C337"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d6/8d62494b-6bea-5362-a4b5-33f34d0e54a3/58ae43bdd1aeb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"197","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d6/8d62494b-6bea-5362-a4b5-33f34d0e54a3/58ae43bdd1aeb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C197"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"674","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d6/8d62494b-6bea-5362-a4b5-33f34d0e54a3/58ae43bdd1aeb.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"9c3e402f-4db5-52fd-8470-86d02b5fa9d0","description":"Ivanka Trump, daughter of President Donald Trump, and her daughter Arabella Kushner walk down the steps of the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Trump attended the court session at the encouragement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, who extended her an invitation when they met at the inauguration lunch. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)","byline":"Molly Riley","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"338","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c3/9c3e402f-4db5-52fd-8470-86d02b5fa9d0/58ae43be576dc.image.jpg?resize=512%2C338"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c3/9c3e402f-4db5-52fd-8470-86d02b5fa9d0/58ae43be576dc.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"198","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c3/9c3e402f-4db5-52fd-8470-86d02b5fa9d0/58ae43be576dc.image.jpg?resize=300%2C198"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"676","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c3/9c3e402f-4db5-52fd-8470-86d02b5fa9d0/58ae43be576dc.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"1f814273-0853-587e-b224-ed3f5bb61b8c","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Ivanka Trump expanded her research on economic policy Wednesday with a visit to a program for business owners in Baltimore.

The first daughter visited the Raymond V. Haysbert Center for Entrepreneurship at the Greater Baltimore Urban League, where she participated in a roundtable discussion with minority business owners, mostly from the Baltimore area.

National Urban League President Marc Morial invited Trump, who has stressed her interest in working on policies to benefit women in business. He said he wanted to show her \"a highly successful program that is supported by the federal government that makes a difference in the success of small entrepreneurs.\"

\"I feel like Ivanka listened very intently and asked some very intelligent questions,\" Morial said, noting that she wanted to understand which programs worked and could be implemented on a larger scale.

During the roundtable, the business owners shared stories about the challenges they had overcome to achieve their business goals \u2014 two said they had previously been homeless \u2014 and discussed the public and private programs that helped them achieve, according to a White House official who requested anonymity to provide details of the event.

Morial said there are about a dozen National Urban League entrepreneurship centers operated by local affiliates around the country. Collectively they serve about 10,000 people a year and are supported by public and private funding.

Also participating in the roundtable were Linda McMahon, who heads the Small Business Administration, and Dina Powell, an assistant to the president and senior counselor for economic initiatives.

Morial, who has been critical of President Donald Trump, said he was happy to reach out to Ivanka Trump over a shared interest in economic development.

\"We will oppose those things that we are duty bound to oppose, but we will keep our doors open to look for areas of commonality,\" he said. \"I call it an intelligent approach.\"

Trump stepped away from leadership roles at the family business and her own lifestyle brand to move her family to Washington. For now, her husband, Jared Kushner, is the only one with an official White House position, but she has been an increasingly visible presence in recent weeks, appearing at meetings and press conferences.

Her most high profile outing to date was a meeting on women's economic issues that came as part of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's visit to the White House. Trudeau's office proposed the joint effort focused on empowering women in the workforce, and the meeting was put together by aides in both countries with input from Ivanka Trump. Female executives from both countries attended, as did the president and Trudeau.

Trump's visit to Baltimore came after she took her daughter to visit the Supreme Court on Wednesday. In a post on Instagram, she wrote: \"Arabella and I visited the Supreme Court this morning and attended a hearing. I'm grateful for the opportunity to teach her about the judicial system in our country firsthand.\"

"}, {"id":"6ae5eb7d-879c-5133-a3ef-11d63632646a","type":"article","starttime":"1487813001","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T18:23:21-07:00","lastupdated":"1487815772","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"The Latest: Judge blocks law on posting actors' ages","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_6ae5eb7d-879c-5133-a3ef-11d63632646a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/the-latest-judge-blocks-law-on-posting-actors-ages/article_6ae5eb7d-879c-5133-a3ef-11d63632646a.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-federal-judge-in-San-Francisco-has-blocked-a-California-law-that-allows-actors-and-other-entertainment-professionals-to-force-a-website-to-remove-their-ages/id-3dc65e10e4a24cf5b8e4390a24e7e753","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 The Latest on a ruling to block a California law that allows entertainment professionals to force a website to remove their ages. (all times local):","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","arts and entertainment","general news","government and politics","technology","celebrity","entertainment","state governments","national courts","courts","judiciary","national governments","discrimination","human rights and civil liberties","social issues","social affairs","age discrimination","politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"6ae5eb7d-879c-5133-a3ef-11d63632646a","body":"

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 The Latest on a ruling to block a California law that allows entertainment professionals to force a website to remove their ages. (all times local):

5:15 p.m.

A federal judge in San Francisco has blocked a California law that allows actors and other entertainment professionals to force a popular industry website to remove their ages.

The law that Gov. Jerry Brown signed in September was intended to prevent age discrimination in Hollywood.

It affected the website IMDb.com, which provides information about movies, television shows and their casts and crews.

U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria said Wednesday that the law raised First Amendment concerns by preventing IMDb from publishing factual information on its public website.

Chhabria said the state hadn't shown that the law was necessary to combat age discrimination. He granted IMDb's motion for a preliminary injunction.

The state attorney general's office didn't immediately have comment.

___

4 p.m.

A federal judge in San Francisco has blocked a California law that allows actors and other entertainment professionals to remove their ages from a popular industry website.

The law that Gov. Jerry Brown signed in September was intended to prevent age discrimination in Hollywood. It affected the website IMDb.com, which provides information about movies, television shows and their casts and crews.

U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria said Wednesday that the law raised First Amendment concerns by preventing IMDb from publishing factual information on its public website.

Chhabria said the state hadn't shown that the law was necessary to combat age discrimination. He granted IMDb's motion for a preliminary injunction.

The state attorney general's office didn't immediately have comment.

"}, {"id":"0701c0de-b3c8-5b13-87c4-a444f472fb04","type":"article","starttime":"1487812536","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T18:15:36-07:00","lastupdated":"1487815618","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"UConn moves forward with plans for new athletic fields","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_0701c0de-b3c8-5b13-87c4-a444f472fb04.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/uconn-moves-forward-with-plans-for-new-athletic-fields/article_0701c0de-b3c8-5b13-87c4-a444f472fb04.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/UConn-is-moving-forward-with-plans-to-build-new-athletic-facilities-for-its-soccer-baseball-and-softball-teams/id-0442e48d8cf440bd8f5172ea62d46668","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By PAT EATON-ROBB\nAP Sports Writer","prologue":"STORRS, Conn. (AP) \u2014 The University of Connecticut's Board of Trustees on Wednesday approved spending $4.75 million to design its \"Athletic District,\" which will include new stadiums for soccer, baseball and softball.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","sports","charity fundraising","philanthropy","social affairs","production facilities","corporate news","college soccer","soccer","college sports","sports facility construction","sports business","men's soccer","men's sports","hockey","baseball","softball","women's sports","men's hockey"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"0701c0de-b3c8-5b13-87c4-a444f472fb04","body":"

STORRS, Conn. (AP) \u2014 The University of Connecticut's Board of Trustees on Wednesday approved spending $4.75 million to design its \"Athletic District,\" which will include new stadiums for soccer, baseball and softball.

The project, which school officials have estimated will cost about $46 million, is being paid for through donations and a surcharge on athletic tickets.

The school has so far raised $15 million of a planned $25 million from private donors, with pledges for another $2 million.

The school also hopes to raise about $1.5 million a year for the fields through adding an extra $5 to the cost of a football ticket, $2 for hockey and basketball tickets and $1 for a ticket to soccer matches. UConn officials said that will support the borrowing that will be needed up-front to complete the project.

The school built a $59 million state-of-the art practice facility for its football program in 2006 and opened a $40 million basketball practice facility in 2014.

But the current baseball and softball fields don't have lights, running water or restrooms. Athletic Director David Benedict said the new facilities are needed to bring UConn up to par with rival institutions and attract top athletes.

\"We're not an athletic program that has one sport or two sports,\" he said. \"It's important that nationally we have a brand and that people, when they think about UConn they think about excellence across the board.\"

The new stadiums will be located on the same site or near the current fields on the west side of the campus, which is just down Jim Calhoun Way from the Gampel Pavilion basketball arena.

A recent feasibility study calls for a 5,500-seat soccer stadium, which also would include a practice field and locker rooms. The baseball field would be 1,500 seats and would include a press box, luxury boxes and dugouts with restrooms. The softball field, which would have similar amenities, would include 500 seats.

Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2018. Benedict said it's too early to say when they will open.

The school also plans to either replace or renovate its on-campus hockey rink, a requirement from Hockey East when the men's team became part of that conference in 2014. The men's team currently plays all of its home games at the aging XL Center in Hartford.

The funding from the board of trustees includes site planning to allow for a new rink in the athletic district, but no money for design or construction of that facility.

"}, {"id":"7af0536f-1ed2-51e2-8787-d13f8f7a5380","type":"article","starttime":"1487810742","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T17:45:42-07:00","lastupdated":"1487813594","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Spirit Airlines CEO dismisses new, cheaper fares by rivals","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_7af0536f-1ed2-51e2-8787-d13f8f7a5380.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/spirit-airlines-ceo-dismisses-new-cheaper-fares-by-rivals/article_7af0536f-1ed2-51e2-8787-d13f8f7a5380.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-CEO-of-Spirit-Airlines-which-features-low-fares-but-lots-of-fees-dismisses-so-called-basic-economy-fares/id-40c078d7c7e943bbb88a45b21fcc8d4f","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DAVID KOENIG\nAP Airlines Writer","prologue":"DALLAS (AP) \u2014 The CEO of discount carrier Spirit Airlines says he isn't worried about competing against new, cheaper fares from American and United.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","travel","passenger airlines","airlines","transportation and shipping","industrial products and services","low cost airlines","air travel","lifestyle","budget travel","economy"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"7af0536f-1ed2-51e2-8787-d13f8f7a5380","body":"

DALLAS (AP) \u2014 The CEO of discount carrier Spirit Airlines says he isn't worried about competing against new, cheaper fares from American and United.

The \"basic economy\" fares from American and United are designed to attract the kind of thrifty fliers that have helped Spirit double in revenue in four years.

Spirit has always been known as a low-fare, high-fees carrier \u2014 the fees made it one of the most complained-about airlines in the industry.

At least Spirit passengers know what they're getting for what the airline calls a \"bare fare,\" CEO Robert Fornaro said Wednesday. He said American and United customers are going to be disappointed when they find out they can't upgrade their seat or bring a rolling carry-on bag.

\"These pricing schemes are not new,\" Fornaro said in a phone interview. \"Delta has been doing this for several years. We do fine competing with Delta, and I think we'll do fine competing with these guys.\"

Delta coined the term \"basic economy\" to describe cheap tickets with severe restrictions.

The rules vary by airline \u2014 American and United, which started selling basic-economy tickets on a few routes this week, limit buyers to carrying only a small bag that fits under their seat. Seating restrictions mean families may not be able to sit together.

But compared with a regular economy ticket on the big airlines, the basic-economy fares are generally cheaper by $20 to $40 or more per round trip.

Fornaro said the real purpose of basic economy for Delta, American and United is to entice customers with one fare then nudge them to buy a higher-priced seat instead.

\"They're not kind of being honest about what they're trying to do,\" he said.

When customers try to buy a basic-economy ticket on United's website, they are told about restrictions on the ticket. They must either check and click \"Basic Economy works for me\" or select a higher-priced seat. American takes the same approach, asking customers if they want to \"Accept restrictions\" or \"Move to Main Cabin\" \u2014 a pricier ticket.

\"We will help our customers understand what they're buying with multiple, clear disclosures about how basic economy works,\" starting when they buy their tickets, American Airlines spokesman Joshua Freed said.

United Airlines spokesman Jonathan Guerin said, \"Basic economy lets our customers choose a fare that fits their travel needs.\" He said messages about the ticket's rules are clear during booking and at check-in.

___

David Koenig can be reached at http://twitter.com/airlinewriter

"}, {"id":"e6cf584b-1a3c-5649-a38d-4afa5b154366","type":"article","starttime":"1487809523","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T17:25:23-07:00","lastupdated":"1487811941","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Tesla swings to loss in 4Q, says Model 3 on target","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_e6cf584b-1a3c-5649-a38d-4afa5b154366.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/tesla-swings-to-loss-in-q-says-model-on-target/article_e6cf584b-1a3c-5649-a38d-4afa5b154366.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Unable-to-string-together-profitable-quarters-electric-car-and-solar-cell-maker-Tesla-Inc-is-reporting-a-loss-for-the-last-three-months-of-2016/id-f051754dd7c64f6c8d454f328a5b1831","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By TOM KRISHER\nAP Auto Writer","prologue":"DETROIT (AP) \u2014 Unable to string together profitable quarters, electric car and solar cell maker Tesla Inc. reported a loss for the last three months of 2016.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","solar-powered vehicles","green vehicle technology","green technology","technology","environment","environment and nature","earnings reports","earnings","financial performance","corporate news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"147d08f7-958e-5b87-9a2e-b8ddb619eec2","description":"FILE - In a Sept. 29, 2015, file photo, Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla Motors Inc., talks about the Model X car at the company's headquarters, in Fremont, Calif. Unable to string together profitable quarters, electric car and solar cell maker Tesla Inc. reported a loss for the last three months of 2016. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)","byline":"Marcio Jose Sanchez","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147d08f7-958e-5b87-9a2e-b8ddb619eec2/58ae23bca6434.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147d08f7-958e-5b87-9a2e-b8ddb619eec2/58ae23bca6434.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147d08f7-958e-5b87-9a2e-b8ddb619eec2/58ae23bca6434.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147d08f7-958e-5b87-9a2e-b8ddb619eec2/58ae23bca6434.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"e6cf584b-1a3c-5649-a38d-4afa5b154366","body":"

DETROIT (AP) \u2014 Unable to string together profitable quarters, electric car and solar cell maker Tesla Inc. reported a loss for the last three months of 2016.

Tesla posted its first profit in three years in last year's third quarter and had predicted net income in the fourth quarter. Instead, the company lost $121.3 million, or 78 cents per share, for the quarter. Still, that was less than half the $320.4 million loss from the year-earlier quarter.

Without one-time items, Tesla lost 69 cents per share. Analysts polled by FactSet predicted a loss of 53 cents per share. Revenue rose 88 percent to $2.28 billion, beating estimates of $2.22 billion.

Tesla's shares rose 1.6 percent in after-hours trading Wednesday to $277.90. They have jumped more than 50 percent since early December.

The company, which is based in Palo Alto, California, said Wednesday that it expects to start making its $35,000 Model 3 in July, with higher-volume production by September. That's consistent with previous guidance that Model 3 deliveries would start in the second half of this year.

CEO Elon Musk said the company will produce 5,000 cars per week this year when Model 3 production gets into full swing. The Model 3, he said, is a much simpler car that will be easier to make than Tesla's current models, the S sedan and X SUV.

The Model 3 has one touch screen instead of two, less wiring, and it has conventional doors instead of winged doors of the Model X. More of the Model 3's production also will be automated.

\"We also understand manufacturing a lot better than we did in the past,\" Musk said on a conference call.

He conceded that delays are possible, especially if something goes wrong with even a small number of parts suppliers. Analysts have been critical of the company for previous delays.

Barclays analyst Brian Johnson called Model 3 delays \"inevitable.\" He wrote in a note to investors that Tesla \"has had a soft track record in recent years in achieving its full-year delivery guidance.\"

Musk also said it's clear the United Auto Workers are trying to organize workers at the company's assembly plant in Fremont, California. Tesla workers, he said, are the highest-paid in the industry if stock options are included.

\"There are really only disadvantages for someone to want the UAW,\" he said.

Fourth-quarter results included the acquisition of solar panel maker SolarCity from the close of the purchase on Nov. 21, Tesla said. The company reported $131.4 million in revenue during the quarter from its energy generation and storage businesses.

Production of Tesla's two current vehicles, the Model S Sedan and Model X SUV, increased 77 percent during the quarter to 24,882, the company reported. Sales rose 27 percent from a year ago to 22,252.

For the full year, Tesla reported a net loss of just under $675 million, or $4.68 per share. Full-year revenue rose 73 percent just over $7 billion, surpassing estimates of $6.9 billion.

Tesla said it expects to deliver between 47,000 and 50,000 Model S and Model X vehicles in the first half of this year, which would be as much as a 71 percent increase over a year ago.

The company said it increased cash during the quarter by $309 million. It also raised credit capacity by $500 million to $1.8 billion, of which it had drawn $1.36 billion.

Musk said the company is considering actions to raise more capital but it could produce the Model 3 without additional money.

Solar roof production is expected in the second half of the year, and Tesla says it's on track to generate $500 million in cash by 2019 in its energy generation and storage businesses. Tesla said it plans to reduce costs to solar customers by cutting advertising spending, shifting away from leasing solar systems and selling solar cells in Tesla stores.

The company also expects to make $2 billion to $2.5 billion in capital investments before it starts Model 3 production.

"}, {"id":"18f188b2-413a-5396-a0c2-49c45ef70d7b","type":"article","starttime":"1487809135","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T17:18:55-07:00","lastupdated":"1487811945","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Most oil pipeline opponents leave North Dakota protest camp","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_18f188b2-413a-5396-a0c2-49c45ef70d7b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/most-oil-pipeline-opponents-leave-north-dakota-protest-camp/article_18f188b2-413a-5396-a0c2-49c45ef70d7b.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Most-of-the-Dakota-Access-pipeline-opponents-have-abandoned-their-protest-camp-ahead-of-a-government-deadline-to-get-off-the-federal-land/id-8e2de1ce6c9443a4b94a3b38a386d2a0","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":11,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By BLAKE NICHOLSON and JAMES MacPHERSON\nAssociated Press","prologue":"CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 Most of the Dakota Access pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp Wednesday ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities moved to arrest some who defied the order in a final show of dissent.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","protests and demonstrations","political and civil unrest","oil and gas industry","energy industry","engineering","technology","energy and utilities regulation","industry regulation","government business and finance","government and politics","government regulations","oil and gas transportation","dakota access pipeline protests"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"65191d9c-0820-5f52-bd35-c097f0001fcd","description":"In this Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, photo, debris is piled on the ground awaiting pickup by cleanup crews at the Dakota Access oil pipeline protest camp in southern North Dakota near Cannon Ball. The camp is on federal land, and authorities have told occupants to leave by Wednesday, Feb. 22 in advance of spring flooding. (AP Photo/Blake Nicholson)","byline":"Blake Nicholson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"394","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/65191d9c-0820-5f52-bd35-c097f0001fcd/58ab19ee80def.image.jpg?resize=512%2C394"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"77","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/65191d9c-0820-5f52-bd35-c097f0001fcd/58ab19ee80def.image.jpg?resize=100%2C77"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"231","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/65191d9c-0820-5f52-bd35-c097f0001fcd/58ab19ee80def.image.jpg?resize=300%2C231"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"788","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/65191d9c-0820-5f52-bd35-c097f0001fcd/58ab19ee80def.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"f3ddb98b-5d83-5acd-99aa-6285483042ca","description":"Dakota Access pipeline opponents burn structures in their main protest camp in southern North Dakota near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, as authorities prepare to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)","byline":"James MacPherson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/3d/f3ddb98b-5d83-5acd-99aa-6285483042ca/58adb695544c3.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/3d/f3ddb98b-5d83-5acd-99aa-6285483042ca/58adb695544c3.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/3d/f3ddb98b-5d83-5acd-99aa-6285483042ca/58adb695544c3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/3d/f3ddb98b-5d83-5acd-99aa-6285483042ca/58adb695544c3.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"f11500a1-babe-518f-b894-c7d3111a7e87","description":"Dakota Access pipeline opponents burn structures in their main protest camp in southern North Dakota near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, as authorities prepare to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)","byline":"James MacPherson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/11/f11500a1-babe-518f-b894-c7d3111a7e87/58adb69628cb0.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/11/f11500a1-babe-518f-b894-c7d3111a7e87/58adb69628cb0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/11/f11500a1-babe-518f-b894-c7d3111a7e87/58adb69628cb0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/11/f11500a1-babe-518f-b894-c7d3111a7e87/58adb69628cb0.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"bfb5d36c-222f-5006-82d2-4ef77837c319","description":"Refuse remains in the Dakota Access pipeline opponents' main protest camp as a fire burns in the background in southern North Dakota near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, as authorities prepare to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. (AP Photo/Blake Nicholson)","byline":"Blake Nicholson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/fb/bfb5d36c-222f-5006-82d2-4ef77837c319/58adb696a488a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/fb/bfb5d36c-222f-5006-82d2-4ef77837c319/58adb696a488a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/fb/bfb5d36c-222f-5006-82d2-4ef77837c319/58adb696a488a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/fb/bfb5d36c-222f-5006-82d2-4ef77837c319/58adb696a488a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"2fa7f6fb-0b14-572b-9646-c1831576533a","description":"A structure is seen at the Dakota Access pipeline main protest camp in southern North Dakota near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, as authorities prepare to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)","byline":"James MacPherson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/fa/2fa7f6fb-0b14-572b-9646-c1831576533a/58adb697dce34.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/fa/2fa7f6fb-0b14-572b-9646-c1831576533a/58adb697dce34.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/fa/2fa7f6fb-0b14-572b-9646-c1831576533a/58adb697dce34.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/fa/2fa7f6fb-0b14-572b-9646-c1831576533a/58adb697dce34.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"afd04adb-2f2a-5204-915e-1a7690203407","description":"Dakota Access pipeline opponents burn structures in their main protest camp in southern North Dakota near Cannon Ball on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, as authorities prepare to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. (AP Photo/Blake Nicholson)","byline":"Blake Nicholson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"384","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/fd/afd04adb-2f2a-5204-915e-1a7690203407/58adf9b67880c.image.jpg?resize=384%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/fd/afd04adb-2f2a-5204-915e-1a7690203407/58adf9b67880c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/fd/afd04adb-2f2a-5204-915e-1a7690203407/58adf9b67880c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C400"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1365","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/fd/afd04adb-2f2a-5204-915e-1a7690203407/58adf9b67880c.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"adca8fc4-4edf-5239-92dd-196d81cc6dc0","description":"A couple embraces as opponents of the Dakota Access pipeline leave their main protest camp Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, near Cannon Ball, N.D., as authorities were preparing to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. The Army Corps of Engineers ordered the camp closed at 2 p.m. Wednesday. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)","byline":"James MacPherson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"373","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/dc/adca8fc4-4edf-5239-92dd-196d81cc6dc0/58adf9b6a1c71.image.jpg?resize=512%2C373"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/dc/adca8fc4-4edf-5239-92dd-196d81cc6dc0/58adf9b6a1c71.image.jpg?resize=100%2C73"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"219","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/dc/adca8fc4-4edf-5239-92dd-196d81cc6dc0/58adf9b6a1c71.image.jpg?resize=300%2C219"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"746","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/dc/adca8fc4-4edf-5239-92dd-196d81cc6dc0/58adf9b6a1c71.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"8044e5e2-b3b5-58b8-ba01-1a2eca7dfe03","description":"A fire burns in the background as opponents of the Dakota Access pipeline leave their main protest camp Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, near Cannon Ball, N.D., as authorities were preparing to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. The Army Corps of Engineers ordered the camp closed at 2 p.m. Wednesday. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)","byline":"James MacPherson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"366","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/04/8044e5e2-b3b5-58b8-ba01-1a2eca7dfe03/58adf9b6c9d82.image.jpg?resize=512%2C366"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/04/8044e5e2-b3b5-58b8-ba01-1a2eca7dfe03/58adf9b6c9d82.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"214","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/04/8044e5e2-b3b5-58b8-ba01-1a2eca7dfe03/58adf9b6c9d82.image.jpg?resize=300%2C214"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"732","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/04/8044e5e2-b3b5-58b8-ba01-1a2eca7dfe03/58adf9b6c9d82.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"773279ef-3fd3-5c8b-a5ac-afbcb69c2321","description":"A man who did not want to be identified loads a teepee canvas to his vehicle as he leaves the Dakota Access pipeline opponents' main protest camp Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, near Cannon Ball, N.D. as authorities were preparing to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. The Army Corps of Engineers has ordered the camp closed at 2 p.m. Wednesday. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)","byline":"James MacPherson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/773279ef-3fd3-5c8b-a5ac-afbcb69c2321/58adf9b6ebde8.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/773279ef-3fd3-5c8b-a5ac-afbcb69c2321/58adf9b6ebde8.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/773279ef-3fd3-5c8b-a5ac-afbcb69c2321/58adf9b6ebde8.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/773279ef-3fd3-5c8b-a5ac-afbcb69c2321/58adf9b6ebde8.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"bc5806a3-0ae0-5dd5-a377-d53832204643","description":"People push belongings up a hill at the Dakota Access pipeline opponents' main protest camp in southern North Dakota near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, as authorities prepared to shut down the camp in advance of spring flooding season. (AP Photo/Blake Nicholson)","byline":"Blake Nicholson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c5/bc5806a3-0ae0-5dd5-a377-d53832204643/58adf9b71e704.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c5/bc5806a3-0ae0-5dd5-a377-d53832204643/58adf9b71e704.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c5/bc5806a3-0ae0-5dd5-a377-d53832204643/58adf9b71e704.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c5/bc5806a3-0ae0-5dd5-a377-d53832204643/58adf9b71e704.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"d5df2ef4-fd5c-5e04-bccb-2301652e11fa","description":"Pipeline protesters pray, set fires ahead of camp closing.","byline":"f.duckett","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"423","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/5d/d5df2ef4-fd5c-5e04-bccb-2301652e11fa/58adf9b74ba60.image.jpg?resize=512%2C423"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"83","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/5d/d5df2ef4-fd5c-5e04-bccb-2301652e11fa/58adf9b74ba60.image.jpg?resize=100%2C83"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"248","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/5d/d5df2ef4-fd5c-5e04-bccb-2301652e11fa/58adf9b74ba60.image.jpg?resize=300%2C248"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"846","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/5d/d5df2ef4-fd5c-5e04-bccb-2301652e11fa/58adf9b74ba60.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":23,"commentID":"18f188b2-413a-5396-a0c2-49c45ef70d7b","body":"

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 Most of the Dakota Access pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp Wednesday ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities moved to arrest some who defied the order in a final show of dissent.

The camp has been home to demonstrators for nearly a year as they tried to thwart construction of the pipeline. Many of the protesters left peacefully, but police made some arrests two hours after the deadline.

Earlier in the day, some of the last remnants of the camp went up in flames when occupants set fire to makeshift wooden housing as part of a leaving ceremony. Authorities later said about 20 fires were set and two people \u2014 a 7-year-old boy and a 17-year-old girl \u2014 were taken to a Bismarck hospital to be treated for burns. Their conditions weren't given.

After the deadline passed, as many as 75 people outside the camp started taunting officers, who brought five large vans to the scene. Police took about 10 people into custody for failing to heed commands to leave, authorities said.

With darkness falling, Lt. Tom Iverson said police would not enter the camp Wednesday evening, and he offered no timetable for doing so.

Levi Bachmeier, an adviser to Gov. Doug Burgum, said about 50 people remained in the camp at dusk.

Hours before, about 150 people marched arm-in-arm out of the soggy camp, singing and playing drums as they walked down a highway. It was not clear where they were headed. One man carried an American flag hung upside-down.

Authorities sent buses to take protesters to Bismarck, where they were offered fresh clothing, bus fares home and food and hotel vouchers.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers set the deadline, citing the threat of spring flooding.

At the height of the protests, the site known as Oceti Sakowin hosted thousands of people, though its population dwindled to just a couple of hundred as the pipeline battle moved into the courts.

The camp is on federal land in North Dakota between the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and the pipeline route that is being finished by Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners. When complete, the project will carry oil through the Dakotas and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois.

Some of the protesters were focused on moving off federal land and away from the flood plain into other camps, said Phyllis Young, one of the camp leaders.

\"The camps will continue,\" she said. \"Freedom is in our DNA, and we have no choice but to continue the struggle.\"

New camps are popping up on private land, including one the Cheyenne River Sioux set up about a mile from the main camp.

\"A lot of our people want to be here and pray for our future,\" tribal Chairman Harold Frazier said.

Others, including Dom Cross, an Oglala Sioux from Pine Ridge, South Dakota, said he planned to return home after living at the camp since September.

\"There's a lot of sadness right now. We have to leave our second home,\" he said.

Law enforcement officers and first-responders were on hand from several states.

Charles Whalen, 50, an alcohol and drug counselor from Mille Lacs, Minnesota, said he and a group of about 20 people were not going to leave on their own and were willing to get arrested to prove their point.

\"Passive resistance,\" Whalen said. \"We are not going to do anything negative. It's about prayer.\"

Some campers said they were leaving with mixed feelings, both energized by the long protest and saddened to leave new friends. Some people set off fireworks.

Matthew Bishop, of Ketchikan, Alaska, has been in North Dakota since October. He planned to move to another camp.

\"People have been surviving here for hundreds and hundreds of years ... so if I back down, what would I look like?\" Bishop said as he tied his possessions to the top of his car.

Craig Stevens, spokesman for the MAIN Coalition of agriculture, business and labor interests, said the group understands \"the passions that individuals on all sides of the pipeline discussion feel\" and hopes that protesters' voices \"will continue to be heard through other peaceful channels and in court.\"

A massive effort to clean up the camp has been underway for weeks, first by protesters themselves and now with help from the Army Corps in removing debris.

Some vehicles and pedestrians were having trouble getting through the muck created by recent rain and snow, and cleanup efforts were suspended in part because camp officials did not want heavy equipment making conditions worse.

___

Follow Blake Nicholson on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/NicholsonBlake .

"} ]