[ {"id":"e954893c-7c45-5edc-b5fe-19ea295e13c6","type":"article","starttime":"1490461893","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-25T10:11:33-07:00","lastupdated":"1490463918","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"travel":"travel"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Poker tables keep decreasing on Nevada casino floors","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_e954893c-7c45-5edc-b5fe-19ea295e13c6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/poker-tables-keep-decreasing-on-nevada-casino-floors/article_e954893c-7c45-5edc-b5fe-19ea295e13c6.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/When-the-Monte-Carlo-closes-its-eight-table-poker-room-in-about-a-month-as-part-of-a-450-million-overhaul-the-Las-Vegas-Strip-will-have-lost-nearly-a-quarter-of-the-tables-it-had-a-dec/id-e2d34379724c490ead4363016284eb64","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By REGINA GARCIA CANO\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LAS VEGAS (AP) \u2014 When the Monte Carlo casino closes its eight-table poker room in about a month as part of a $450 million overhaul, the Las Vegas Strip will be down nearly a quarter of the tables it had a decade ago.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","travel","recreational poker","card games","games","recreation and leisure","lifestyle","casinos","gambling"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"7bcf6a02-9616-5f2c-9d12-4d286234d71d","description":"FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2013 file photo, dealer Han Kim, center, gathers up chips after a hand of Texas Hold 'em at a poker room in Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas. Unlike the 2000s when casinos competed to lure fans of the game, poker's appeal has been weakening during this decade. Strip casinos had 405 tables and made $97 million in 2007. In contrast, the game only netted casinos $78 million last year after the number of tables decreased to 320. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)","byline":"Julie Jacobson","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/bc/7bcf6a02-9616-5f2c-9d12-4d286234d71d/58d6acae1704f.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/bc/7bcf6a02-9616-5f2c-9d12-4d286234d71d/58d6acae1704f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/bc/7bcf6a02-9616-5f2c-9d12-4d286234d71d/58d6acae1704f.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/bc/7bcf6a02-9616-5f2c-9d12-4d286234d71d/58d6acae1704f.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"e954893c-7c45-5edc-b5fe-19ea295e13c6","body":"

LAS VEGAS (AP) \u2014 When the Monte Carlo casino closes its eight-table poker room in about a month as part of a $450 million overhaul, the Las Vegas Strip will be down nearly a quarter of the tables it had a decade ago.

Casinos constantly adjust their floors to meet customer demand. And unlike the boom years when they competed for card fans after everyman Chris Moneymaker won the World Series of Poker's main event in 2003, poker's appeal in Sin City has been weakening this decade.

Some casinos have made their poker rooms smaller. Others have eliminated them entirely.

\"Casinos added more tables in response to popularity, and once it became less popular, they took away the tables,\" said David Schwartz, director of the Center for Gaming Research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The peak of the poker room was 2007.

In 2002, before fans of Texas Hold 'Em began to rush to the Strip, casinos had 144 tables and made $30 million from the game. Five years later, casinos had more than tripled their poker revenue to $97 million with 405 tables. Last year, the game netted them only $78 million after the number of tables decreased to 320.

The situation is similar across the state. Casinos had 907 tables and made $168 million in 2007. Last year, they took in $118 million from 661 tables.

Even the game's proponents understand poker has never been a big moneymaker for casinos. That's because instead of gambling against the stacked odds of the house as they do in blackjack or slots, players wager against one another and the casinos take a portion as a fee for hosting the games.

Casinos were willing to do that to keep players in their establishments while the game's popularity soared. The boost was fueled by the rise of internet gambling and a watershed moment in 2003 when Moneymaker, as an amateur, won $2.5 million as people watched on TV.

The landscape drastically changed in 2011, when the federal government cracked down on internet poker and blacked out major sites \u2014 a moment poker enthusiasts refer to as \"Black Friday.\"

MGM Resorts International, the owner of the Monte Carlo, attributes its decision to close the property's poker room to an overhaul that includes a full rebranding with the launch of a new luxury hotel named Park MGM and a version of the widely acclaimed NoMad Hotel. The company's nearby Aria and Bellagio properties have poker rooms.

The Hard Rock Casino Hotel east of the Las Vegas Strip closed its poker room earlier this month. Other Vegas casinos that have shed their poker room since 2010 include Ellis Island, Palms and Tropicana.

Property officials carefully choose games for their valued space and are always looking to maximize their revenue per square foot. Meanwhile, floors are generally smaller overall as casinos have morphed into full-service resorts with nightclubs, shopping areas, restaurants and other amenities.

\"Gaming has become a smaller portion of the overall revenue mix and things like poker rooms are candidates for further evaluation as to whether they make sense or not at a casino property,\" said Brian Gordon, a principal at the Las Vegas-based research firm Applied Analysis.

Caesars Palace, owned by the company that owns the World Series of Poker, relocated and downsized its poker room by two-thirds in 2015. But the revenue it now generates is much higher per square foot, said Seth Palansky, the tournament's spokesman.

\"We recognized the room was bigger than it needed to be,\" Palansky said. \"You can make a lot more money per square foot with a nightclub-dayclub these days than you can with a poker table.\"

___

Follow Regina Garcia Cano on Twitter at https://twitter.com/reginagarciakNO / More of her work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/ReginaGarciaCano

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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) \u2014 At the halfway point of the 2017 session, the Republican-led Missouri Legislature has made some progress toward a pledged pro-business agenda, but it still has work to do on many of its priorities.

Before the session's May 12 end, lawmakers are hoping to pass more laws favored by business leaders now that, for the first time in almost 10 years, GOP majorities in both houses have the backing of a Republican in the governor's office.

The first bill to pass was a long-sought \"right-to-work\" law banning mandatory union fees, which Gov. Eric Greitens signed in early February. Both chambers also have passed bills setting up stricter requirements for vetting expert witnesses in jury trials and toughening penalties for people who damage other farmers' crops by using illegal herbicides. Those proposals have yet to be signed by the governor.

A long list of legislation regarding labor, lawsuits and education remains. Here's where key issues stand:

LABOR

Proposals in both chambers would eliminate prevailing minimum wages, the minimum allowable pay for construction workers on government jobs. They are calculated for each trade on a county-by-county basis. Republicans who want to end prevailing wages say the policy drives up government construction costs, while Democrats have argued it leads to higher worker wages.

The House passed and the Senate is still debating a measure to require yearly authorization for union fees to be withdrawn from government employees' paychecks. The bill also would require written consent from employees to use dues for political purposes. Proposed Senate amendments would impose further regulations on unions in regard to electing bargaining representatives and keeping certain meetings and records open.

LAWSUITS

Fueled by court rulings seen as unfavorable to businesses, some Republican lawmakers and Greitens are pushing to limit lawsuits dealing with torts, or wrongdoings. That can cover sales of lemon cars, deceptive marketing of food or other products, and medical malpractice.

Efforts include a bill on Greitens' desk to change vetting standards for expert witnesses in jury trials \u2014 a move opponents argue will unnecessarily slow down legal proceedings and increase attorney fees.

Other pending bills would set restrictions on medical malpractice lawsuits, block many class-action lawsuits and other lawsuits in which plaintiffs join together to sue, and create higher standards for employees to sue for workplace discrimination.

Bipartisan legislative opponents and critics such as the Missouri Association of Trial Attorneys say restrictions on lawsuits will make it more difficult for plaintiffs to seek justice following wrongdoing.

EDUCATION

A few education bills have passed the House, and Senate leaders say education will be a priority after lawmakers return Monday.

The House passed a bill to expand online class offerings for K-12 schools. It requires the student's home school district to pay for classes if a course is not offered or the student has scheduling conflicts. If a student is too frail or sick to attend a brick-and-mortar school, the district must pay for online classes.

The House also voted to allow charter schools to open in districts where at least one school meets less than 60 percent of state standards. Under current law, charters can only open in urban school districts.

BUDGET

The Legislature has until May 5 to pass a budget for the fiscal year beginning in July.

Greitens recommended funding cuts for in-home and nursing home care through Medicaid, though he later backtracked because the state received extra money from a settlement with tobacco companies. He also proposed cutting nearly 10 percent of higher education funding and slashing funding for public school busing. He suggested more basic aid for K-12 public schools, but not enough to fully fund the amount called for under state law.

House Budget Committee Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick wants to end tax credits for elderly and disabled renters to avoid long-term cuts to in-home care rather than relying on the one-time tobacco money. Basic aid for K-12 schools would be fully funded under Fitzpatrick's plan, and he's recommending smaller cuts to colleges and universities.

OTHER BILLS

The clock is ticking for Missouri to offer driver's licenses compliant with a 2005 federal Real ID law. If the state doesn't offer compliant licenses by January 2018, Missouri residents won't be able to board commercial flights or enter military bases using state-issued identification. Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard and House Speaker Todd Richardson said proposals to give residents the option of compliant or noncompliant licenses will be debated after the break.

Lawmakers still are split over proposals to create a prescription drug monitoring database aimed at combatting opioid abuse by tracking scripts for addictive painkillers and other drugs. Dueling bills, including one by a senator who has previously blocked measures for a database, are pending.

The House has passed and the Senate is debating statewide regulations for ridesharing companies such as Uber and Lyft.

__

Associated Press reporter Summer Ballentine contributed to this report.

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As the political drama over health care legislation in Washington fades, the rest of the country faces a more immediate concern: Getting insurance for next year.

The Republican health plan designed to replace the Obama-era health law known as the Affordable Care Act would not have taken full effect for a few years anyway \u2014 and now it's dead.

\"We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future,\" House Speaker Paul Ryan said Friday.

That means millions of Americans will have to navigate a current federal health care system that, while not \"imploding\" as President Donald J. Trump has said, is at least in flux.

Mary Vavrik, a 57-year-old freelance deposition court reporter from Anchorage, Alaska said she was relieved that the current health law will remain because she's happy with the coverage she gets through her exchange \u2014 even as she acknowledged that reforms are needed.

\"It's not a perfect plan but I'm really grateful to have what I do have,\" she said.

Prices for insurance plans offered on the public insurance exchanges set up by the health care law have soared in many markets, and choices for customers have dwindled. That's because insurers have faced sizable financial losses on the exchanges in recent years, and have responded by either hiking prices or pulling out of certain markets altogether.

Now, attention will turn to administrative changes underway in Washington designed to stabilize the exchanges by preventing more insurer defections.

The open enrollment period to sign up for insurance for 2018 is slated to start this fall, but insurers are making decisions now about whether to participate. What kinds of plans will be available and how much they will cost will depend on a few key decisions by insurers and regulators in the coming weeks.

WILL I HAVE PLANS TO CHOOSE FROM?

It depends on where you live. Choices are dwindling, but chances are at least one insurer will sell in your market. That company may offer several plans.

Generally, big cities will have more choices than rural areas where there may not be enough customers to attract insurers.

As of now, there are 16 counties in a region of Tennessee around Knoxville that have no insurers committed to sell coverage on the exchange next year. About a third of the nation's 3,100 counties are down to just one insurer.

Insurers have been pulling back, and more are expected to leave, but health care researchers are not predicting mass defections.

\"For most consumers, (2018) will look a lot like '17,\" said Dan Mendelson, president of the consulting firm Avalere.

Customers can try to find coverage outside their exchange, but then they won't be able to use tax credits to help pay the bills, which may be particularly painful since many markets have seen prices soar.

ARE THERE FIXES IN STORE?

Last month, the Health and Human Services Department, which runs exchanges in many states, proposed some adjustments to try to stabilize these marketplaces.

For example, insurers want greater scrutiny of people who sign up for coverage outside of the open enrollment period. Customers are supposed to be allowed to do so only if they have a life-changing event like the birth of a child, a marriage, or the loss of a job that provided coverage, but insurers have found that people are just waiting to sign up when they need care.

Another proposed adjustment would let insurers design cheaper plans tailored to younger people who may not need lots of health care but want to be protected in the event of a big injury or sickness. That could be very helpful, because insurers say they have struggled to attract younger and healthier customers to the marketplaces to balance out the claims they pay from those who use their coverage.

Those changes are expected to be finalized in the next month or so.

WHEN WILL INSURERS MAKE THEIR DECISIONS ON 2018?

Some have said they want to see the final version of the proposed federal adjustments before deciding where and what kinds of coverage they will offer.

But insurers generally have to decide by this spring whether they will participate in order to leave enough time for regulatory approvals and marketing before enrollment starts next fall.

Aetna, the nation's third largest insurer, has set an April 1 deadline for deciding on 2018. The company has already pared its marketplace participation down to 4 states this year from 15 because of heavy financial losses.

Customers won't know for certain who is selling on their exchanges until early next fall. While insurers have to apply to sell coverage on their exchanges generally by late spring or early summer, they can drop out later.

IS THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT \"IMPLODING\" AS PRESIDENT TRUMP HAS SAID ON TWITTER?

No. The marketplaces are not expected to dissolve next year, even though choices have dwindled.

While there's debate over the law's tax burdens and its impact on government budgets, the federal plan has covered more than 20 million people.

About 11 million are covered through an expansion of Medicaid, the health program designed to help poor Americans. Another 12 million buy private insurance through the law's marketplaces, most with help from subsidies based on income.

___

Associated Press reporter Mark Thiessen contributed from Anchorage.

Follow Tom Murphy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thpmurphy .

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 House Republicans' failure to repeal Barack Obama's health care law deals a serious blow to another big part of President Donald Trump's agenda: tax reform.

Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., say they will soon turn their attention to the first major re-write of the tax code in more than 30 years. But they will have to do it without the momentum of victory on health care.

Just as important, the loss on health care will deprive Republicans of $1 trillion in tax cuts.

The GOP health plan would have repealed nearly $1 trillion in taxes enacted under Obama's Affordable Care Act. The bill coupled the tax cuts with spending cuts for Medicaid, so it wouldn't add to the budget deficit.

Without the spending cuts, it will be much harder for Republicans to cut taxes without adding to the federal government's red ink.

\"Yes this does make tax reform more difficult,\" said Ryan. \"But it does not in any way make it impossible.\"

\"That just means the Obamacare taxes stay with Obamacare. We're going to go fix the rest of the tax code,\" he added.

House Republicans couldn't round up enough votes Friday to repeal and replace a law they despise, raising questions about their ability to tackle other tough issues.

\"Doing big things is hard,\" Ryan conceded as he vowed to press on.

Rep. Jodey Arrington, R-Texas, acknowledged that Friday's turn of events made him doubtful about the Republicans' ability to tackle major legislation.

\"This was my first big vote and our first big initiative in the line of things to come like tax reform,\" said the freshman. \"I think this would have given us tremendous momentum and I think this hurts that momentum.\"

Rep. Mike Kelly, R-Pa., said, \"You always build on your last accomplishment.\"

Nevertheless, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Friday the administration plans to turn quickly to tax reform with the goal of getting an overhaul approved by Congress by August.

\"Health care is a very complicated issue,\" Mnuchin said. \"In a way, tax reform is a lot simpler.\"

Don't tell that to House Republicans who have been struggling with the issue for years.

The general goal for Republicans is to lower income tax rates for individuals and corporations, and make up the lost revenue by reducing exemptions, deductions and credits.

Overhauling the tax code is hard because every tax break has a constituency. And the biggest tax breaks are among the most popular.

For example, nearly 34 million families claimed the mortgage interest deduction in 2016, reducing their tax bills by $65 billion.

Also, more than 43 million families deducted their state and local income, sales and personal property taxes from their federal taxable income last year. The deduction reduced their federal tax bills by nearly $70 billion.

Mnuchin said he had been overseeing work on the administration's tax bill for the past two months. He said it would be introduced soon.

Mnuchin said the White House plan would cut individual and corporate tax rates, though he didn't offer specifics.

House Republicans have released a blueprint that outlines their goals for a tax overhaul. It would lower the top individual income tax rate from 39.6 percent to 33 percent, and reduce the number of tax brackets from seven to three.

The House plan retains the mortgage interest deduction but repeals the deduction for state and local taxes.

On the corporate side, the plan would repeal the 35 percent corporate income tax and replace it with a 20 percent tax on profits from selling imports and domestically produced goods and services consumed in the U.S.

Exports would be exempt from the new tax, called a border adjustment tax.

The new tax has drawn opposition from Republicans in the Senate. Mnuchin would not reveal whether the administration will include the border adjustment tax in the White House proposal. He was speaking at a public interview event with the news site Axios.

Republicans often complained that they couldn't do a tax overhaul when Obama was president. Now, Republicans control the House, the Senate and the White House, and they see a great opportunity.

They plan to use a complicated Senate rule that would prevent Democrats from blocking the bill. But there's a catch: Under the rule, the package cannot add to long-term budget deficits.

That means every tax cut has to be offset by a similar tax increase or a spending cut. That's why the loss on health care was so damaging to the effort to overhaul taxes.

Ryan made this case to fellow House Republicans in his failed effort to gain support for the health plan.

\"That was part of the calculation of why we had to take care of health care first,\" said Rep. Tom Reed, R-N.Y.

___

Associated Press writers Kevin Freking and Martin Crutsinger contributed to this report.

___

Follow Stephen Ohlemacher on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/stephenatap

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TORONTO (AP) \u2014 Canada's natural resource minister said Saturday his government is happy the Keystone XL pipeline has finally been approved by the White House, but he noted that obstacles remain and said Canada remains determined to diversify its oil exports beyond the United States.

The minister, Jim Carr, told The Associated Press that President Donald Trump's approval of the pipeline is \"good news.\" But he said there are other important projects like the recently approved TransMountain pipeline that will allow for exports to Asia. Ninety-eight percent of Canada's oil exports now go to the U.S.

\"We want to ensure we have access to Asian markets,\" Carr said in a telephone interview. \"We want to ensure we have more than one customer, as much as we love Americans.\"

Canada needs infrastructure to export its growing oil sands production. Alberta has the third-largest oil reserves in the world and is America's largest supplier of foreign oil.

Keystone XL would carry more than one-fifth of the oil Canada exports to the United States. The pipeline owned by TransCanada received a presidential permit Friday, but Carr said he expects protests and noted it still needs a permit from the state of Nebraska. He's heard the Nebraska process could take eight months.

\"Canadians aren't going to go down there and tell state legislators what to do. They have their own process. We'll respect that,\" he said.

Carr will, however, meet with U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry in Washington on Thursday.

\"The objective is to make the point that the energy economies are integrated,\" he said. \"So much of the Canadian interest is aligned with the American interest. Keystone XL is a good example of that.\"

The 1,700-mile (2,735-kilometer) pipeline would carry roughly 800,000 barrels of oil a day from Alberta to refineries along the Texas Gulf Coast, passing through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma. The presidential permit comes nearly a decade after Calgary, Alberta-based TransCanada applied to build the $8 billion pipeline. Keystone would strengthen U.S. energy security by increasing access to Canada's \"dependable supply of crude oil,\" said the State Department.

The decision follows a long scientific and political fight over the project, which became a proxy battle in the larger fight over global warming.

Without the pipeline, Carr said the oil would move by the more dangerous method of rail. A 2013 derailment killed 47 people when a runaway oil train from North Dakota jumped the tracks and exploded in Lac-Megantic, Quebec.

\"The more pipeline capacity there is, the higher proportion of the oil will be moved by a safer method of transport,\" Carr said.

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 House Republicans passed roughly 60 bills over the past six years dismembering President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. Other than minor tweaks, they knew the measures would go nowhere because the Democrat still lived in the White House.

With a bill that counted Friday, they choked. It was an epic, damaging, self-inflicted collapse that smothered the GOP effort.

\"We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future,\" a flustered Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., told reporters after abruptly yanking the legislation off the House floor to avert a certain defeat. \"I don't know how long it's going to take us to repeal this law.\"

The measure would have erased much of Obama's 2010 law, eliminating its unpopular requirement that people buy coverage, ending its Medicaid expansion and trimming federal assistance to people to help pay medical bills. It represented the culmination of seven years of unsuccessful GOP attempts to craft a replacement bill the party could rally behind \u2014 a unity that ended up eluding them.

President Donald Trump responded to the failure by repeating his dire predictions for Obama's law. He followed up Saturday, adding a more optimistic twist: \"ObamaCare will explode and we will all get together and piece together a great healthcare plan for THE PEOPLE. Do not worry!\" the president tweeted.

While some parts of the Affordable Care Act have obvious problems, others are working well and have brought the country's rate of uninsured people to a record low.

With Trump serving alongside a Congress controlled by the GOP, the bill was the party's first genuine opportunity to repeal Obama's statute. Ryan shelved it amid defections from centrist Republicans who thought it went too far and conservatives who considered it too weak, plus solid Democratic opposition.

Its rejection was fueled by nonpartisan congressional analysts concluding it would cause 24 million people to lose coverage in a decade and drive up costs for poorer and older people. There was also opposition from doctors, hospitals, consumer groups and AARP.

One problem facing the GOP is repercussions from the party's voters. For nearly a decade, they've heard countless Republican congressional candidates promise to repeal Obama's statute, a pledge that became a centerpiece of Trump's presidential campaign.

\"It's a really good question,\" Ryan said, asked how Republicans could face constituents after failing to deliver on years of promises. \"I wish I had a better answer for you.\"

Democrats, loyal defenders of Obama's law, were literally jumping for joy. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., removed her shoes and took a victory leap while meeting activists outside the Capitol.

Obama's statute has spread coverage to 20 million people and required insurers to cover numerous services and barred them from refusing policies to the very sick.

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., said that \"at some point\" lawmakers have to address the costs and availability of health care and said he was willing to work with the administration and both parties to do that. He issued the statement, he said, after a Friday night conversation with Trump.

But top congressional Republicans mostly conceded the measure's demise meant it was time to move onto other issues.

Among them was Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who has spoken repeatedly about how unraveling Obama's law was a top priority for his chamber. In a statement, he expressed only gloom about the effort's future.

\"Obamacare is failing the American people and I deeply appreciate the efforts of the speaker and the president to keep our promise to repeal and replace it, \"McConnell said. \"I share their disappointment that this effort came up short.\"

Two chief House authors expressed no taste for diving back into the issue.

\"D-O-N-E done. This bill is dead,\" said Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., who heads the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, said Republicans \"are moving full speed ahead with President Trump on the first pro-growth tax reform in a generation.\"

But there was no easy path ahead. Retooling America's health care system \u2014 it comprises one-sixth of the nation's economy \u2014 is a multi-tiered puzzle.

On the economic side, it involves refashioning how providers, patients and federal programs should interact. And a political balance must be struck between conservatives eager to erase Obama's law and push the system toward a free-market approach, and GOP moderates wary that would strip coverage from some voters and drive up out-of-pocket costs for others.

Earlier this month, Ryan thought he would find that balance.

\"We'll have 218 (votes) when this thing comes to the floor, I can guarantee you that,\" he said, referring to the House majority usually needed to pass legislation.

Ironically, the outcome hewed more closely to a prediction by Ryan's predecessor, former Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Boehner was forced out of office in 2015 largely by the hard-right House Freedom Caucus, the same group whose opposition was largely responsible for the crumpling of the GOP bill on Friday.

Boehner said last month that while Republicans would fix some problems of Obama's law, a repeal and replacement is \"not going to happen.\"

He added, \"Republicans never ever agree on health care.\"

"}, {"id":"d63d7452-3773-5210-9ddc-06cc13f266b8","type":"article","starttime":"1490450666","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-25T07:04:26-07:00","lastupdated":"1490453154","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Fight over big-box store taxes back in Michigan Legislature","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_d63d7452-3773-5210-9ddc-06cc13f266b8.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/fight-over-big-box-store-taxes-back-in-michigan-legislature/article_d63d7452-3773-5210-9ddc-06cc13f266b8.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Municipalities-that-are-collecting-substantially-lower-property-taxes-than-they-used-to-from-big-box-stores-must-overcome-opposition-from-business-interests-in-the-Legislature-to-tilt-th/id-5ed879d792bc442db7becb3be93bd899","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DAVID EGGERT\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 Municipalities that are collecting substantially lower property taxes than they used to from big-box stores must overcome opposition from business interests and their allies in the Legislature to tilt the tax assessing system back in favor of local governments.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government and politics","property taxes","government taxation and revenue","government finance","government business and finance","personal taxes","personal finance","bills","legislation","legislature","local taxes","local governments","retail industry","retail and wholesale","consumer services","consumer products and services","state legislature","state governments","municipal governments"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"d63d7452-3773-5210-9ddc-06cc13f266b8","body":"

LANSING, Mich. (AP) \u2014 Municipalities that are collecting substantially lower property taxes than they used to from big-box stores must overcome opposition from business interests and their allies in the Legislature to tilt the tax assessing system back in favor of local governments.

The retailers have been successfully reducing their tax bills in the Michigan Tax Tribunal since 2010, when the administrative court began agreeing that the real estate should be compared to \"dark,\" or vacant, structures for tax purposes. Bipartisan House legislation reintroduced in the past week would restore fairness to the property tax appeals system, according to supporters who contend that the problem has reached crisis proportions especially in smaller communities unable to afford legal fights.

\"Most of these stores, if they're assessed $2 million less than what they should be, they're saving a hundred grand a year,\" the sponsor, Republican Rep. David Maturen of Vicksburg, said after helping to unveil the bill at the Michigan Municipal League's conference in Lansing. \"Multiply $100,000 times every big-box store in this state and all of a sudden there's some major money out there. ... That should be going to police and fire and schools and every other service that's provided.\"

He cited examples in Kalamazoo County, where he said Costco spent $17.5 million to open a new store but argued it was worth $4 million and Menards spent $16.5 million for a store while contending it was worth $5.6 million.

The bill won overwhelmingly approval in the GOP-led House last year, 97-11, only to die in the Republican-controlled Senate. It would not necessarily have increased taxable values from existing levels, but it could have potentially prevented large reductions in future appeals, according to the nonpartisan House Fiscal Agency.

Municipal groups are leaning on lawmakers to address the \"dark store\" issue, but opponents include the powerful Michigan Chamber of Commerce and groups representing retailers, grocers and manufacturers.

Amy Drumm, vice president of government affairs at the Michigan Retailers Association, said the measure is unconstitutional and would slant the tax appeals process toward assessors. Big-box owners discovered after the Great Recession that their stores had been \"dramatically overvalued\" by local assessors in Michigan and across the country, she said. She said Michigan property typically is based on the true cash value, which is defined in law as the usual selling price.

\"So we have to look at comparable sales, and most of these properties that are larger retail properties or manufacturing properties sell when they're vacant because that's when they go up for sale. You don't sell a thriving business typically,\" she said.

But Rep. John Kivela, a Marquette Democrat, said the retailers \u2014 which he characterized as \"large out-of-state corporations\" \u2014 are exploiting a loophole while smaller Main Street competitor businesses still must pay higher taxes.

\"This is touching every corner of the state,\" he said, seeking to debunk a perception that the tax appeals primarily affect Upper Peninsula communities. He said it is \"wrong\" that businesses such as Wal-Mart, Menards and Home Depot are paying way less in taxes in Michigan than in the states where they are headquartered.

The bill's critics question if such comparisons to other states are apples to apples.

The renewed debate in Michigan, where the dark store strategy took hold before spreading elsewhere, comes as Wisconsin Republicans aim to close the so-called loophole. Indiana last year enacted a law to curb the tactic.

But with the legislation likely to stall in the Senate Finance Committee if it clears the House again, municipalities' hopes may hinge on the Michigan Supreme Court.

Justices in February ordered arguments in a dispute between Escanaba and Menards. The state appeals court in 2016 ruled for the city and reversed the Tax Tribunal's decision to use sales comparisons in a tax reassessment case instead of the cost of construction less depreciation, noting how deed restrictions prevent the reuse of many big-box store properties as retail space.

Maturen's bill would limit the extent to which other similar properties could be used for comparison if they have deed restrictions. Deena Bosworth, director of governmental affairs for the Michigan Association of Counties, said the restrictions \"artificially drive down demand for the property, thereby lowering the value.\"

___

Online:

House Bill 4397: http://bit.ly/2odNUnA

___

Follow David Eggert on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DavidEggert00. His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/author/david-eggert

"}, {"id":"8ecbd7fb-cb51-5964-b364-5f0cbc9ebe94","type":"article","starttime":"1490440675","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-25T04:17:55-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"EU transport chief calls for European car toll system","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_8ecbd7fb-cb51-5964-b364-5f0cbc9ebe94.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/eu-transport-chief-calls-for-european-car-toll-system/article_8ecbd7fb-cb51-5964-b364-5f0cbc9ebe94.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-European-Union-s-transport-commissioner-is-calling-for-a-continentwide-car-toll-system-that-would-enable-motorists-to-use-all-European-roads-without-having-to-stop-at-borders/id-fe7d40a44e944615b82ab6f7505b8678","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"BERLIN (AP) \u2014 The European Union's transport commissioner is calling for a continentwide car toll system that would enable motorists to use all European roads without having to stop at borders.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","government and politics","traffic","transportation"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"8ecbd7fb-cb51-5964-b364-5f0cbc9ebe94","body":"

BERLIN (AP) \u2014 The European Union's transport commissioner is calling for a continentwide car toll system that would enable motorists to use all European roads without having to stop at borders.

Many countries in the 28-nation EU have highway toll systems, but they are separate and work in different ways.

Transport Commissioner Violeta Bulc told Germany's Welt am Sonntag newspaper in comments published Saturday that she will make proposals for a Europe-wide system in May.

Bulc said every country could decide for itself whether it wants a car toll system, but those that do should participate in a standardized electronic system. She said tolls would be collected via a prepaid system or monthly bills, and the proceeds would go to participating nations.

Bulc said that she aims for an agreement by 2019.

"}, {"id":"13f26331-c392-52d5-a636-a7f1eccff575","type":"article","starttime":"1490433401","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-25T02:16:41-07:00","lastupdated":"1490436133","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"India's Reliance Industries penalized for alleged fraud","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_13f26331-c392-52d5-a636-a7f1eccff575.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/india-s-reliance-industries-penalized-for-alleged-fraud/article_13f26331-c392-52d5-a636-a7f1eccff575.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/India-s-markets-regulator-has-barred-Indian-conglomerate-Reliance-Industries-and-12-others-from-trading-in-equity-derivatives-for-a-year-for-allegedly-fraudulent-trades-made-10-years-ago/id-76b302e8ed7e47cfa6ecdf4157b9e683","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW DELHI (AP) \u2014 India's markets regulator has barred Indian conglomerate Reliance Industries and 12 others from trading in equity derivatives for a year for allegedly fraudulent trades made 10 years ago.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","securities regulation","financial industry regulation","industry regulation","government business and finance","government and politics","government regulations","fraud and false statements","crime","general news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"13f26331-c392-52d5-a636-a7f1eccff575","body":"

NEW DELHI (AP) \u2014 India's markets regulator has barred Indian conglomerate Reliance Industries and 12 others from trading in equity derivatives for a year for allegedly fraudulent trades made 10 years ago.

The multibillion-dollar Reliance Industries rejected the ruling by the Securities and Exchange Board of India and said it would appeal the order.

In its ruling late Friday, the securities regulator said that the fraud is related to the 2007 sale of a 5 percent stake in subsidiary Reliance Petroleum when it was a separately listed company. The company used unlawful trade practices to profit from that sale, the ruling said.

The regulator said Reliance made about 5 billion rupees ($76 million) in profits from that and has asked it to give up nearly 4.5 billion rupees along with 12 percent interest within 45 days.

According to the Press Trust of India, SEBI official G. Mahalingam said that that he passed the order \"in order to protect the interest of the investors\" and make them trust the regulatory system.

\"The noticees may, however, square off or close out their existing open positions,\" the order said.

"}, {"id":"2fb2d8ed-2565-5527-a667-3aa903c6ad65","type":"article","starttime":"1490425335","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-25T00:02:15-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Woodcraft and art mix to create magic in Oregon workshop","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_2fb2d8ed-2565-5527-a667-3aa903c6ad65.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/woodcraft-and-art-mix-to-create-magic-in-oregon-workshop/article_2fb2d8ed-2565-5527-a667-3aa903c6ad65.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Danny-Minor-s-woodworking-specialty-is-everything-basically/id-003543ec409e4b689f4b7a50642e17fe","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By NEITA CECIL\nThe Dalles Chronicle","prologue":"THE DALLES, Ore. 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THE DALLES, Ore. (AP) \u2014 Danny Minor's woodworking specialty is everything, basically.

If you can describe it, Minor can make it. The magic happens in his shop in The Dalles, Oregon, where he creates blueprints on the computer in his front office, then heads back to the workshop to machine those blueprints into reality.

Back there, he has drills and saws, hammers and sandpaper, old-fashioned jigsaws and newfangled laser equipment.

Scattered around his office are examples of the intricate laser etchings he can put on any surface: wood, metal, glass, or granite. He even makes anodized aluminum business cards.

\"A lady said, can you make a Chinese door? Certainly I can,\" he said. \"They want a round door? I make a round door.\"

He's made trophies that looked like skis for the U.S. ski team, plaques for state troopers, and coasters for the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center. He repairs antiques and makes stackable dresser drawers, a design he created himself.

While he can conjure up anything \u2014 including intricate wood-on-wood-on wood inlays \u2014 lately he's been making wood urns for a local funeral home. They feature his specialty of dovetail joinery, which is an interlocking joint that doesn't require any mechanical fastener, such as nails or dowels, to hold it together. \"It's one of the oldest joineries. It's very precise,\" he said.

It's a bit of a lost art that just isn't done much anymore, he said.

The finished pieces are basically seamless. The joined edges are so perfect and flush that it feels like one smooth piece of wood.

Most of the work he does now is small, but he can do entertainment centers, meeting tables and cabinets. He tries to stay away from chairs because he doesn't have all the needed equipment, but he can make parts for chairs. He has machines to bend wood, punch holes in wood, and etch wood. He has an entire bucket of clamps, and a wall of hand tools. Wood, naturally, is stacked everywhere and everything bears a fine coating of wood dust.

Minor, 68, creates beautiful woodwork, but offers a mundane reason for what led him to his profession: \"It was the only job I could get when I was 18 years old.\"

Then, he admits, \"It's something that allows me to express my own feelings of building stuff and creating stuff.\"

He studied to be a machinist in high school, but found the wages in woodworking better. He started working at BP Johns Furniture, a world class furniture factory in Portland that is now closed, but has a tony section of town - Johns Landing - named after it.

He later worked in sawmills, in trailer factories, and assembling displays for trade shows.

He moved to The Dalles in 2000 to help care for his mom, Cecil Cutshall, who now lives in Baker City.

He opened his shop, Minors International Wood Design, in hopes of employing others as well. He never got busy enough for that to happen, but he does rent out space to two other creative types, Brian LaRoque and John Marvinkite.

Marvinkite is there while Minor is being interviewed, and tells the story of the time Minor took a half-sized mockup of a picnic table to a Bi-Mart in Willamina, on the Oregon Coast, and convinced them to buy an order of 699 picnic tables from him. He took the order to the bank and got a loan to buy the needed 40,000 board feet of lumber.

Minor has been quick to adopt new technology for his business. Now, when he gets a custom order, such as for cabinetry, he can create blueprints on the computer with the design program CorelDraw. What used to take days is now done in hours.

Math is central to what he does, a theme he returns to often. \"Technology is math. Even eating is math. That's what creates everything. Literature is ok, but math is the most important as far as creating.\"

One project is a treasure chest he's fashioned out of reclaimed wood. The lid, as expected for a treasure chest, is curved. \"This here process is called cooper,\" he said of fashioning wood into interlocking parts to form a curvature.

As he discussed making the curved treasure chest, he reiterated, \"templates make all these parts work perfectly. It's all about numbers. Numbers is what creates everything.\"

On the shelf by the treasure chest is a stack of scraps of wood. \"I'm a hoarder of scraps,\" he said. They may come in handy, and if people come in looking for a piece of walnut, he can give them a piece of walnut.

In a corner of the workshop is an area with dovetail jigsaws. Not only does he create intricate, exacting pieces that snug exactly together, but he can also add inlays to the piece.

\"That there is inlay dovetail - very complicated and very hard,\" he said. \"It's like making the box four times\" and it takes 10 hours to make just one.

\"That is one of my top earns, but I quit making it, because things like this happen,\" he said, pointing to a chipped section of wood. \"High-speed tools and wood don't like each other.\"

And after 50 years of woodworking, it is perhaps notable that he still has all his fingers. He's just careful, he said.

Asked if he's a picky, precise person by nature, he said, \"I don't know. If it's not right, it's not right. I guarantee all my work.\"

That said, he notes that the drive for perfection only makes it more elusive. \"There's got to be a little bit of leeway.\" And in fact, tiny imperfections can make a customer even more thrilled with their unique piece.

Even so, he still strives for perfection and aims to give the customer exactly what they want. \"A customer that's happy with what they got? You can't ask for any more.\"

___

Information from: The Dalles Chronicle, http://www.thedalleschronicle.com

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OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) \u2014 Officials in a Kansas City suburb where a fire destroyed a multimillion-dollar apartment building under construction and spread to about two dozen homes estimate the blaze caused between $23 million and $25 million in damage.

The Kansas City Star (http://bit.ly/2nfQji7 ) reports that Overland Park, Kansas, based the estimate on exterior damage and property values, and that a more precise figure would emerge once insurance adjusters finish evaluating the fire's impact.

Fire officials say a welder accidentally ignited wooden building materials on Monday at the CityPlace development.

The blaze destroyed the four-story apartment building, heavily burned a second and rained burning debris onto a nearby neighborhood, damaging at least 22 other homes.

Overland Park says the damage at the CityPlace site accounted for $20 million of the overall estimate.

___

Information from: The Kansas City Star, http://www.kcstar.com

"}, {"id":"f11daa68-c89e-57d2-a9d4-799939800500","type":"article","starttime":"1490406665","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T18:51:05-07:00","lastupdated":"1490409046","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Owner of Silicon Valley staffing firm charged in visa fraud","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_f11daa68-c89e-57d2-a9d4-799939800500.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/owner-of-silicon-valley-staffing-firm-charged-in-visa-fraud/article_f11daa68-c89e-57d2-a9d4-799939800500.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-owner-of-a-staffing-agency-that-supplied-foreign-workers-to-San-Francisco-Bay-Area-technology-companies-is-facing-visa-fraud-charges-after-prosecutors-say-he-filed-fake-documents-to-/id-14223167b31e4ab4a0552f56177ae568","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 The owner of a company that supplied foreign workers to San Francisco Bay Area technology companies is facing visa fraud charges after filing fake documents to bring people to the United States, the U.S Attorney's Office announced Friday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","technology","fraud and false statements","crime","staffing services","professional services","corporate crime","corporate news","employment agencies","careers","corporate legal affairs"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"f11daa68-c89e-57d2-a9d4-799939800500","body":"

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 The owner of a company that supplied foreign workers to San Francisco Bay Area technology companies is facing visa fraud charges after filing fake documents to bring people to the United States, the U.S Attorney's Office announced Friday.

A federal grand jury indicted Jayavel Murugan, CEO of Dynasoft Synergy, Inc., and a second man, Syed Nawaz, on Thursday on charges including conspiracy to commit visa fraud.

The men obtained H-1B visas for more than a dozen people by claiming the workers had jobs at Stanford University, Cisco Systems and Brocade Communications Systems, according to the indictment. No such jobs existed, but Dynasoft could use the fraudulently obtained H1B visas to get the workers to the U.S., where it could place them with other companies and profit, prosecutors said.

Bala Murali, Dynasoft's chief operating officer, said Nawaz was not available.

Murugan said he did not know about the indictment and was \"shocked.\" He said he needed to consult with his attorney and did not immediately have additional comment.

"}, {"id":"9b1387af-6e03-551b-9209-943ae85f2e53","type":"article","starttime":"1490405363","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T18:29:23-07:00","lastupdated":"1490408117","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Western brands respond to report on Bangladesh tanneries","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_9b1387af-6e03-551b-9209-943ae85f2e53.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/western-brands-respond-to-report-on-bangladesh-tanneries/article_9b1387af-6e03-551b-9209-943ae85f2e53.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Handbag-and-shoe-companies-respond-to-nonprofit-group-s-investigation-finding-that-they-have-used-Bangladesh-manufacturers-that-get-some-of-their-leather-from-tanneries-with-labor-and-en/id-d47f1c1345e6475598defa130ed1ee5a","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By The Associated Press","prologue":"Leather made with child labor and under dangerous, polluted conditions in Bangladesh went to factories that produced goods for major U.S. and European shoe and handbag brands and companies, according to a report released Friday by New York-based nonprofit Transparentem. Those named in the report generally said they were concerned about the conditions at the tanneries, but that leather used in their particular products was made elsewhere.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","apparel and accessories retail","retail industry","retail and wholesale","consumer services","consumer products and services","handbags","women's fashion","fashion","beauty and fashion","lifestyle","fashion accessories","materials industry","child labor","labor issues","social issues","social affairs","child welfare","human welfare","pollution","environmental concerns","environment","environment and nature","workers' rights","human rights and civil liberties","clothing accessories manufacturing","textiles, apparel and accessories manufacturing","consumer product manufacturing","footwear manufacturing","labor unions"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"bd4fc04c-d5e1-57e0-9126-2df9a751d636","description":"In this Thursday, March 2, 2017 photo, a Bangladeshi man rides past a bicycle in front of the main entrance of the Apex tannery at the highly polluted Hazaribagh tannery area in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Hazardous, heavily polluting tanneries with workers as young as 14 supplied leather to companies that make shoes and handbags for Western brands, a nonprofit group that investigates supply chains says. (AP Photo/A.M. Ahad)","byline":"A.M. Ahad","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/d4/bd4fc04c-d5e1-57e0-9126-2df9a751d636/58d52a25b50c8.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/d4/bd4fc04c-d5e1-57e0-9126-2df9a751d636/58d52a25b50c8.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/d4/bd4fc04c-d5e1-57e0-9126-2df9a751d636/58d52a25b50c8.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/d4/bd4fc04c-d5e1-57e0-9126-2df9a751d636/58d52a25b50c8.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"9b1387af-6e03-551b-9209-943ae85f2e53","body":"

Leather made with child labor and under dangerous, polluted conditions in Bangladesh went to factories that produced goods for major U.S. and European shoe and handbag brands and companies, according to a report released Friday by New York-based nonprofit Transparentem. Those named in the report generally said they were concerned about the conditions at the tanneries, but that leather used in their particular products was made elsewhere.

Here's a detailed look at their responses:

___

APEX GROUP

The report says leather from Apex Tannery Ltd. went to Apex Footwear Ltd., which made products for several retailers.

Syed Nasim Manzur, managing director of Apex Footwear and a director at the Apex Tannery, calls Hazaribagh \"an environmental disaster\" and said they'll soon be closing their plant there. But he said the report is a \"smear campaign,\" allegations of child labor are unsubstantiated, and leather doesn't move between their Hazaribagh tannery and shoe factory.

He said Transparentem \"continues to make the completely false and unsubstantiated allegation that leather from Hazaribagh enters the supply chain of the shoes that (Western brands) buy from Bangladesh. This is false and this is wrong and this is unsubstantiated. And we challenge the NGO to prove otherwise. We have proven to the satisfaction of our customers the traceability of all the leather that we have used for the shoes that they buy from Bangladesh.\"

Manzur said Apex Footwear and Apex Tannery are separate entities, although they have some owners in common and are associated businesses.

\"Apex Footwear Limited as a responsible corporate citizen of Bangladesh is fully committed to ensuring that we comply with the all the laws of Bangladesh and we encourage dialogue with all stakeholders,\" he said.

___

BAY GROUP

Transparentem also says leather from Bay Tannery Ltd. went to Bay Footwear Ltd.

Rezaur Rahman, technical adviser of Bay Footwear Ltd., told the AP that the report accusing Bay of employing any child workers anywhere is \"absolutely baseless\".

\"Our workers are under an established trade union, which closely works with us. We worked with the International Labor Organization and trade unions. I don't understand how and where they found child workers in the industry,\" Rahman said. \"We don't have any child workers.\"

He said Bay Tannery is moving but a few more months may be needed to shift heavy equipment entirely to an industrial park in Savar with proper sewerage designed for tanneries.

___

C & J CLARK AMERICA, INC.

In a statement, Clarks said that since 2013, the leather for all of its footwear production through Bay Footwear \"has been specified from Clarks nominated tanneries outside of Bangladesh.\"

\"Clarks is only responsible for the sourcing of materials in our own products and cannot control the sourcing of others. Clarks takes responsibility for the social and environmental impacts of our operations and the welfare of those engaged in the production of our products at all levels of the supply chain extremely seriously and we continuously audit our supply chain, including Bay Footwear, to ensure it meets our rigorous standards. We have a history of taking corrective action where necessary.\"

___

WHITE INDUSTRY CO.

Steve Park, sales director at White Industry Co., said the South Korean company stopped accepting raw materials from Bangladesh late last year after the company was informed by U.S. clients such as Coach, Michael Kors and Kate Spade about environmental problems and child labor issues in Bangladesh. White had been selling leather to Simone Accessories that actually manufactured the products for those companies.

\"Because of those problems, we are not using raw materials from Bangladesh and we are using instead (raw materials) from the U.S., Brazil and Pakistan,\" he said by phone. Park said the company used to do businesses with five or six tanneries in Bangladesh. As of this year, it is doing business with none of them.

___

SIMONE ACCESSORIES

Robert Lee, a director at Simone, said the company learned of the environmental and human rights problems in Bangladesh in December and its leather supplier in South Korea stopped purchasing raw materials from Bangladesh starting in January.

___

COACH, INC.

Coach, whose website says its produce is \"handcrafted from the finest American and European hides and textiles,\" sent a statement to Transparentem and AP that said:

\"Coach has no contractual or other direct relationship with White. Furthermore, we have confirmed that no more than 1.5 percent of Coach's annual leather purchase was sourced from Hazaribagh. Nevertheless, based upon the information you have shared with us, it is wholly unacceptable to Coach that any leather product from Hazaribagh be used in manufacturing Coach products \u2014 regardless of how indirectly such products may have found its way into Coach's supply chain, or how minimal the use of such products may be.\"

___

MICHAEL KORS HOLDINGS LTD.

Michael Kors did not respond to AP's request for comment, but told Transparentem in a written statement that it took the allegations seriously. The company said it hadn't knowingly sourced leather from Hazaribagh tanneries, but was several steps away from them in its supply chains. The company said it has told suppliers not to buy leather from Hazaribagh tanneries until they meet the company's code.

___

KATE SPADE & COMPANY

In a statement, Kate Spade said it conducted an inquiry after receiving the Transparentem report and found that Bangladesh tanneries represented an \"immaterial portion\" its total leather purchases in the last three years, most recently falling under 1 percent.

\"Further, we recently concluded that there are no Bangladeshi tanneries that satisfy our current Standards of Engagement or Environmental Policy, and therefore, we have decided to ban any continued sourcing of leather originating or undergoing any processing in Bangladesh.\"

Kate Spade also said it would no longer accept \"any leather sourced directly or indirectly from White, regardless of the country of origin.\"

___

DEICHMANN SE

In a statement, Deichmann said: \"We hereby declare that the Deichmann Group does not entertain any business relationship with that tannery whatsoever \u2014 neither directly nor indirectly.\" It said that while Apex Footwear is a supplier, the leather used does not come from Apex Tannery in Hazaribagh, and that it had informed Transparentem repeatedly.

\"Independent auditors, staff and our own teams pay regular visits to facilities in the Deichmann Group supply chains and confirm if the Code of Conduct and other mutual agreements entered into, are being complied to or not,\" Deichmann said. It added that it reviewed its situation with Apex Footwear after hearing the Transparentem accusations and found \"no irregular practices.\"

___

MACY'S, INC., GENESCO INC. and STEVEN MADDEN, LTD.

The companies collectively hired attorney David N. Kelley, who provided this statement:

\"1) Neither our clients, after substantial digging, nor Transparentem, has established that we have received any product or material from Apex Tannery.

2) The three companies have entered into an aggressive remediation plan with Apex Footwear, and its related company Apex Tannery notwithstanding the lack of direct ties to the Tannery.

3) Genesco and Madden have shut down any relationship with Apex Footwear pending the successful completion of the remediation plans and that Macy's has threatened to do so pending the progress they make on the plans.\"

___

HARBOR FOOTWEAR GROUP, LTD.

In a statement, Harbor Footwear said: \"There is no definitive connection between our company and the tannery in question. While we did have a short-term relationship with the factory there has been no suggestion by anyone that the tannery supplied any of the materials used in conjunction with fulfilling our order. Furthermore, prior to the findings shared by Transparentem we had decided not to continue to do any further business with that particular factory.

\"As such, we continue to seek out and work with only those factories who look to maintain full compliance with regard to worker's rights and environmental protection.\"

___

SEARS HOLDINGS CORPORATION

Sears declined to comment to AP, saying it had not received the full report from Transparentem.

In letters to Transparentem, Sears officials said they were disappointed with the findings and quickly paid an unannounced visit at the tannery. The auditor did not find children at work, but did identify pollution, health and safety problems.

Sears said the tannery is not providing any leather for its products but because the tannery and shoe manufacturer shares a common owner, it was extending its human rights requirements over the entire group, starting with an onsite labor, health, safety and environmental review.

___

VF CORPORATION, owner of TIMBERLAND brand

In a statement, Timberland and its parent company VF Corporation said they take \"responsible sourcing\" very seriously.

\"We've been working with Transparentem for the past several months, responding to their questions and reinforcing, through our reported sourcing practices as well as back-up documentation, that we do not source from any tanneries in Bangladesh. All leather used for Timberland footwear made in Bangladesh (or anywhere, for that matter) is imported from tanneries outside Bangladesh.\"

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DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) \u2014 Hazardous, heavily polluting tanneries, with workers as young as 14, supplied leather to companies that make shoes and handbags for a host of Western brands, a nonprofit group that investigates supply chains says.

The report by New York-based Transparentem, released to The Associated Press on Friday, didn't say leather from the tanneries ends up in American and European companies' products, only that the manufacturers of some of those goods receive it.

Some companies say they're certain the leather used to make their products was imported from outside Bangladesh, and the manufacturers concur. Still, in response to the report most brands had switched factories, banned Bangladesh leather or demanded improvements and audits.

The abuses alleged have long plagued Hazaribagh, a Dhaka neighborhood that's the hub of Bangladesh's leather industry with more than 150 tanneries. The air is noxious with an eye-stinging rotten-egg odor, and children play on small hills of rotting hide trimmings. The Buriganga River, a source of drinking water for 180,000 people, shimmers with poisons from tannery chemical runoff, as well as other human and industrial waste.

The $1 billion-a-year industry was ordered to shut down and move more than 15 years ago, but deadlines have passed without consequence and fines go unpaid. Last week, Bangladesh's High Court told authorities to stop supplying gas, water and electricity to the tanneries. Rawhide supplies have also been ordered halted.

And yet they're still in business, fueled by consumer demand for ever-more-stylish but low-priced wallets and boots.

Transparentem uses investigative journalism practices to tackle labor and environmental abuses, producing detailed reports that are privately shared with companies involved. The group gives companies time to respond before sharing its findings with investors, regulators, advocacy organizations or journalists.

Its confidential Hazaribagh report and accompanying video, shared late last year with about a dozen U.S. and European brands and companies, showed workers at five different tanneries bent double under the weight of soaking wet cow hides, shuffling past heavy machinery delivering heavy loads. Workers are seen whipping handheld razors through leather, tossing off loose trimmings. Barrels of chemicals lean against walls. The floor is wet, and some workers are barefoot.

Bangladesh law prohibits workers under 18, but some appeared to be teenagers. The report says that in 2015, a mother confirmed her child working in a tannery was 14. Footage from 2016 showed the child was still working there. On the video, a 17-year-old told the videographer his age. And there's 2016 footage of two workers agreeing that 15-year-olds are onsite.

Transparentem is not publishing its findings but showed the video to an AP reporter before sharing the report. It said the discretion was needed to protect its investigators and the workers, and that the research is ongoing.

The nonprofit said its Hazaribagh team tracked leather first-hand and with corporate reports from two tanneries, Apex Tannery Ltd. and Bay Tannery Ltd., to Bangladesh shoemakers Apex Footwear and Bay Footwear. Apex Tannery also sent leather to South Korean leather dealer White Industries, said the report. From White, Transparentem tracked leather to Simone Accessories, a South Korean handbag maker.

Using customs records and business documents, they found those factories make shoes and purses for Clarks, Coach, Kate Spade, Macy's, Michael Kors, Sears, Steven Madden and Timberland. Also included were Germany-based Deichmann, a shoe and sportswear chain, and two U.S. firms \u2014 Harbor Footwear Group and Genesco \u2014 which design and market shoes in even more brands.

No one followed a piece of leather produced by a child to a particular purse or shoe.

E. Benjamin Skinner, founder and principal of Transparentem, said the group investigates endemic problems within an industry, and looked into Apex and Bay because they are among the largest.

\"We tell brands and retailers what they may not, but should, know about those with whom they do business. This gives them the opportunity to use their influence with their suppliers to address questionable activity and advance positive action,\" Skinner said.

The American and European brands that responded to queries from the AP stated their commitments to prevent labor abuse in manufacturing. But some brands, the Bangladeshi companies involved and industry officials disputed the report's findings.

\"That NGO went to our buyers too,\" said Shahin Ahmed, chairman of the Bangladesh Tanners' Association. \"They showed them some video clips of child workers who are engaged in manufacturing some byproducts. ... They are no way part of the main industry, I can challenge anybody.\"

Syed Nasim Manzur, managing director of Apex Footwear and a director at the Apex Tannery, calls Hazaribagh \"an environmental disaster\" and said they'll soon close their plant there. But he said the report is a \"smear campaign,\" allegations of child labor are unsubstantiated, and Hazaribagh leather doesn't end up in exported products.

Manzur said Apex Footwear and Apex Tannery are separate entities, although they have some owners in common and are associated businesses. He said Apex Footwear has two separate shoe-making factories, one for local markets and another, across the street, for exports. The Hazaribagh leather goes only to the local factory, he said.

Bay Footwear technical adviser Rezaur Rahman, speaking for Bay Group, which includes their tannery, called Transparentem's findings \"absolutely baseless.\"

\"We worked with the International Labor Organization and trade unions. I don't understand how and where they found child workers in the industry,\" Rahman said. \"We don't have any child workers.\"

Coach \u2014 whose website says their produce is \"handcrafted from the finest American and European hides and textiles\" \u2014 said they get no more than 1.5 percent of their leather from Hazaribagh and Kate Spade said they get just 1 percent. Both said they're stopping any purchases from Hazaribagh.

Michael Kors and Harbor Footwear said they were a few steps removed from the Hazaribagh tanneries, hadn't knowingly sourced leather there, and would make sure not to.

Clarks and Deichmann said they are certain no Hazaribagh leather ended up in their products.

Deichmann said Apex Footwear only makes their shoes with imported leather or hides processed at Apex Gazipur tannery that they've audited.

A Clarks spokesman said the company \"is only responsible for the sourcing of materials in our own products and cannot control the sourcing of others.\"

Sears, Timberland, Macy's, Genesco and Steven Madden all said that while they weren't getting leather from the tanneries, they saw an opportunity to use their companies' leverage at the related factories to bring improvements, with some using threats, others offering auditors and support.

Attorneys representing Apex Footwear and Macy's, Steven Madden and Genesco signed an agreement last month that says Apex will verify that all tannery workers are adults using protective gear, and that independent auditors would oversee longer-term improvements.

Steve Park, sales director at White Industry Co., said the South Korean company stopped using raw materials from Bangladesh late last year after U.S. clients such as Coach, Michael Kors and Kate Spade informed them about environmental problems and child labor issues. Now they use American, Brazilian and Pakistani suppliers, he said.

Scott Nova at the Worker Rights Consortium in Washington, D.C., said a brand or retailer that is serious about protecting worker rights, and about honoring its public commitments to do so, would not do business with a factory that sources from suppliers that engage in dangerous and abusive practices.

\"This principle applies, whether or not leather from the tanneries in question is being used in a brand's products,\" he said.

Global brands are drawn to manufacturing in Bangladesh by low wages, and leather shoes, belts and purses are top exports. But many Bangladeshi manufacturers depend on domestic tanneries for their leather, and 90 percent of those tanneries are in Hazaribagh.

Conditions in the neighborhood are deplorable. Chemicals and defecation run milky-white through open sewers, pouring untreated into the river, more of a waste pond than a waterway. Metal tarnishes quickly; electronics corrode.

Tannery workers live in small, hot, steel-walled rooms perched on precarious stilts above creeks of raw sewage and mounds of stinking scraps.

AP journalists were not allowed inside Apex and Bay's Hazaribagh tanneries, but workers walking out said no children were employed there now.

Reporters did find children working in smaller Hazaribagh tanneries not mentioned by Transparentem. The work is hazardous, with large equipment and little to none of the protective clothing, splash aprons, safety goggles and respirators mandatory at North American and European tanneries.

The AP team watched as a man tasted liquid from a drum that processes leather to test for salt levels.

\"We would hope to avoid the harm that can be caused by the liquid when the body and the limbs are exposed to it,\" said another Hazaribagh leather tanner, Mohammed Harun, 52. \"There are some powders and chemicals that infect us when inhaled.\"

He said they need boots, gloves and masks.

\"If the owners provide us with these things, it will improve the situation,\" he said.

A British Medical Journal study published this week found that Bangladeshi tannery workers as young as 8 frequently have untreated rashes and infections, as well as asthma and other lung problems. Pure Earth \u2014 a nongovernmental organization that addresses industrial pollution \u2014 has put Hazaribagh on its Top 10 list of polluted places, along with Chernobyl. Similar problems exist at tannery clusters in the Philippines and India.

Human Rights Watch advocate Richard Pearhouse, who has reported on pollution and child labor at Hazaribagh tanneries, said none comply with national environmental laws or repeated court orders to move.

American shoppers can make a difference, he said.

\"Consumers should be asking plenty of sharp questions on the shop floor about what retailers are doing to guarantee they are not sourcing leather from Hazaribagh's toxic tanneries,\" he said.

___

Mendoza reported from Bangkok. AP reporter Youkyung Lee in Seoul, South Korea, contributed to this story.

"}, {"id":"4e46280d-c4c3-5447-a2b3-a06edae4a068","type":"article","starttime":"1490404200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T18:10:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1490406548","priority":34,"sections":[{"tucson":"business/tucson"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Military families win big at Davis-Monthan Base Exchange","url":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/article_4e46280d-c4c3-5447-a2b3-a06edae4a068.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/military-families-win-big-at-davis-monthan-base-exchange/article_4e46280d-c4c3-5447-a2b3-a06edae4a068.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/tucson/military-families-win-big-at-davis-monthan-base-exchange/article_4e46280d-c4c3-5447-a2b3-a06edae4a068.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Ron Medvescek / Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Helene Gonzalez, 95-year-old widow of a Vietnam Veteran, is all smiles after placing third in the Your Holiday Bill is On Us Sweepstakes, winning a $500 statement credit during a ceremony at the Davis-Monthan Base Exchange on Friday. Army Staff Sgt. Joshua Graser, second from right, was one of three grand prize winners worldwide and will have his Military Star card account \u2014 an exclusive line of credit for the military and their families to use at the Exchange \u2014 paid in full, and receive a credit of nearly $800, for a total prize worth $2,500. There were 38 winners worldwide.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["davis-monthan air force base","military star","military"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"75113"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"c71ae351-1a17-5934-b7fb-e73a4c448381","description":"Helene Gonzalez, 95-year-old widow of a Vietnam Veteran, is all smiles after placing third in the Your Holiday Bill is On Us Sweepstakes, winning a $500 statement credit during a ceremony at the Davis-Monthan AFB Base Exchange on Friday, March 24, 2017. Army Staff Sgt. Joshua Graser, second from right, was one of three grand prize winners worldwide and will have his MILITARY STAR card account paid in full and receive a credit of nearly $800, for a total prize worth $2,500. There were 38 winners worldwide. Graser\u2019s and Gonzalez\u2019 winning sweepstakes entries were selected out of 4.7 million worldwide. All users who swiped their cards from November and December of last year were automatically entered in the sweepstakes. The MILITARY STAR card is an exclusive line of credit for the military and their families to use at the Exchange, no matter where military members serve.","byline":"Ron Medvescek / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":2000,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/71/c71ae351-1a17-5934-b7fb-e73a4c448381/58d5a6dab057e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1140","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/71/c71ae351-1a17-5934-b7fb-e73a4c448381/58d5a6da59977.image.jpg?resize=1140%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/71/c71ae351-1a17-5934-b7fb-e73a4c448381/58d5a6da59977.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/71/c71ae351-1a17-5934-b7fb-e73a4c448381/58d5a6da59977.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/71/c71ae351-1a17-5934-b7fb-e73a4c448381/58d5a6da59977.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"4e46280d-c4c3-5447-a2b3-a06edae4a068","body":"

Helene Gonzalez, 95-year-old widow of a Vietnam Veteran, is all smiles after placing third in the Your Holiday Bill is On Us Sweepstakes, winning a $500 statement credit during a ceremony at the Davis-Monthan Base Exchange on Friday. Army Staff Sgt. Joshua Graser, second from right, was one of three grand prize winners worldwide and will have his Military Star card account \u2014 an exclusive line of credit for the military and their families to use at the Exchange \u2014 paid in full, and receive a credit of nearly $800, for a total prize worth $2,500. There were 38 winners worldwide.

"}, {"id":"3bc0323a-5823-5a4e-9436-2e0e4df6ef2c","type":"article","starttime":"1490401712","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T17:28:32-07:00","lastupdated":"1490403870","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Effort to stop right to work dealt blow in Missouri court","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_3bc0323a-5823-5a4e-9436-2e0e4df6ef2c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/effort-to-stop-right-to-work-dealt-blow-in-missouri/article_3bc0323a-5823-5a4e-9436-2e0e4df6ef2c.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-Missouri-judge-ruled-that-the-wording-of-a-summary-for-a-proposed-ballot-measure-to-overturn-right-to-work-is-not-accurate/id-959dfdfde4c24c839b6d7989d278ca00","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By SUMMER BALLENTINE\nAssociated Press","prologue":"JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) \u2014 A Missouri judge ruled that the wording of a summary for a proposed ballot measure to overturn right to work is not accurate and he rewrote the measure to ask voters if they want to force employees to make payments to labor unions as a condition of employment.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government and politics","legal proceedings","law and order","general news","state governments","voting rights","human rights and civil liberties","social issues","social affairs"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":6,"commentID":"3bc0323a-5823-5a4e-9436-2e0e4df6ef2c","body":"

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) \u2014 A Missouri judge ruled that the wording of a summary for a proposed ballot measure to overturn right to work is not accurate and he rewrote the measure to ask voters if they want to force employees to make payments to labor unions as a condition of employment.

At issue are a series of initiative petitions by state AFL-CIO President Mike Louis, who wants to put the policy to a public vote.

Former Democratic Secretary of State Jason Kander approved summaries of the initiatives on his last day in office in January before the new Republican secretary of state took over.

Since then, the new Republican governor has signed right to work. It's set to take effect Aug. 28.

Republican Cole County Circuit Judge Jon Beetem in his ruling dated Thursday said summaries approved by Kander might have been sufficient at that time. But he said the main effect of the measures now would be to repeal the right-to-work law, and the petitions as written lacked context to show what effect they would have.

\"Because the summary statements here do not provide this essential context, they are unfair and insufficient,\" Beetem said.

Requests for comment from The Associated Press to Louis and a state spokeswoman for the AFL-CIO were not immediately returned Friday.

Efforts to get the measures on the ballot can move forward, but with revised summaries written by Beetem.

Under Kander's version, one petition summary would ask voters if the Missouri Constitution should be amended to \"prohibit impairing, restricting or limiting the ability of employees to negotiate, enter into and enforce certain collectively bargained agreements with an employer.\"

Following Beetem's rewrite, the same petition asks if residents want to amend the Constitution \"to remove the right to choose whether or not to join a union (\"right-to-work\") and allow union representatives to force an employee to make payments to the union as a condition of employment.\"

National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation President Mark Mix in a Friday statement praised the ruling, which he said is an \"important step\" in protecting right to work.

\"Show Me State citizens overwhelmingly oppose giving union officials the power to have a worker fired solely for refusing to pay union dues or fees, which is why Big Labor is trying to be intentionally deceptive about their efforts to overturn the state's new Right to Work law,\" Mix said.

"}, {"id":"dc72c953-ebee-508a-abc1-2ec8435e4fe2","type":"article","starttime":"1490400590","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T17:09:50-07:00","lastupdated":"1490403059","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Judge rules against UPS in untaxed cigarette case","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_dc72c953-ebee-508a-abc1-2ec8435e4fe2.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/judge-rules-against-ups-in-untaxed-cigarette-case/article_dc72c953-ebee-508a-abc1-2ec8435e4fe2.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-federal-judge-has-ruled-that-deliver-giant-UPS-ignored-red-flags-that-its-brown-trucks-were-being-used-to-transport-untaxed-cigarettes-from-Indian-reservations/id-83a8b4feb174496aa23981da7ad63155","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By TOM HAYS\nAssociated Press","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 A federal judge ruled Friday that UPS ignored \"red flags\" that its brown trucks were being used to transport untaxed cigarettes from Indian reservations, but stopped short of imposing a $873 million penalty that regulators sought in the civil case.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","tobacco products manufacturing","food, beverage and tobacco products manufacturing","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services","court decisions","legal proceedings","law and order","national courts","courts","judiciary","government and politics","national governments","corporate legal affairs","corporate news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"2ca91973-2086-51d6-aaf4-0a3d3c5f041c","description":"FILE - In this June 20, 2014, file photo, a United Parcel Service driver starts his truck after making a delivery in Cumming, Ga. On Friday, March 24, 2017, a federal judge ruled that UPS ignored \"red flags\" that its brown trucks were being used to transport untaxed cigarettes from Indian reservations, but stopped short of imposing a $873 million penalty that regulators sought in the civil case. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)","byline":"David Goldman","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"345","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ca/2ca91973-2086-51d6-aaf4-0a3d3c5f041c/58d5ba1b62124.image.jpg?resize=512%2C345"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ca/2ca91973-2086-51d6-aaf4-0a3d3c5f041c/58d5ba1b62124.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ca/2ca91973-2086-51d6-aaf4-0a3d3c5f041c/58d5ba1b62124.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"690","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ca/2ca91973-2086-51d6-aaf4-0a3d3c5f041c/58d5ba1b62124.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"dc72c953-ebee-508a-abc1-2ec8435e4fe2","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 A federal judge ruled Friday that UPS ignored \"red flags\" that its brown trucks were being used to transport untaxed cigarettes from Indian reservations, but stopped short of imposing a $873 million penalty that regulators sought in the civil case.

U.S. District Judge Katherine B. Forrest in Manhattan found Atlanta-based United Parcel Service Inc. liable in a 2015 lawsuit filed by New York City and New York state that accused it of having a corporate culture that favored sales opportunities over a responsibility to following regulations helping New York enforce tax law.

UPS, the nation's largest delivery company, \"knew that certain customers were high risk \u2014 indeed, at times it said so,\" Forrest said in a written decision. \"UPS had the means to monitor and discover regulatory violations, and there were red flags aplenty.\"

The judge called internal UPS documents alone, including employees' emails, expressing unease about the shipments of tobacco, as \"sufficient to support UPS's liability.\" But she went further, finding there was proof of \"a corporate culture that broadly accepted non-compliance.\"

The judge faulted the plaintiff for failing to come up with a convincing damages computation. Further information about the number of cigarette deliveries was needed to determine a penalty, she wrote.

In a statement, New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman called the decision \"a win for New York and a win for public health.\"

UPS spokeswoman Susan Rosenberg said the company was still evaluating the decision, but was \"pleased\" the judge rejected a plaintiff demand to appoint a monitor to oversee its revamped compliance program.

The suit alleged that tobacco retailers located on upstate reservations were given price discounts for shipping in volume, that delivery drivers were allowed to accept iPads and other gifts from shippers and that account executives, whose compensation was tied to keeping big accounts, ignored signs that some customers signing delivery contracts dealt in cigarettes.

One UPS customer, Seneca Promotions, operated from the same single-family home near Lake Erie as a well-known cigarette shipper, Native Wholesale Supply, and was sending tens of thousands of pounds of packages to businesses with names such as Tobaccoville and Tobacco Town, according to records filed in the court case.

UPS argued it followed the rules and can only do so much to police what its 1.6 million daily shippers send in sealed packages. In its legal filings, its lawyers said the city and state have offered no proof it \"knew or consciously avoided knowing that any shipper was shipping cigarettes.\"

The state and city impose some of the highest taxes on cigarettes in the country in an effort to halt tobacco use, which public health officials say kills more than 28,000 New York residents annually and costs taxpayers $10.4 billion in health care-related costs.

Native American reservations upstate have long been one way for smokers and black-market cigarette retailers to evade those taxes.

Despite years of enforcement efforts, some reservation cigarette businesses, which don't collect state tobacco taxes, are still shipping thousands of cartons of untaxed cigarettes annually to consumers.

"}, {"id":"a01538e4-d74a-5929-a2d4-e0c49c7fa9e0","type":"article","starttime":"1490393983","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T15:19:43-07:00","lastupdated":"1490396489","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Shipping season to resume with opening of Great Lakes locks","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_a01538e4-d74a-5929-a2d4-e0c49c7fa9e0.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/shipping-season-to-resume-with-opening-of-great-lakes-locks/article_a01538e4-d74a-5929-a2d4-e0c49c7fa9e0.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-Great-Lakes-commercial-shipping-season-is-set-to-get-underway-with-the-reopening-of-the-navigational-locks-in-Sault-Ste-Marie/id-a63bbd00c7674f4c9d69754b2a3ffd44","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich. (AP) \u2014 The Great Lakes commercial shipping season is set to get underway with the reopening of the navigational locks in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","lakes","environment and nature"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"a01538e4-d74a-5929-a2d4-e0c49c7fa9e0","body":"

SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich. (AP) \u2014 The Great Lakes commercial shipping season is set to get underway with the reopening of the navigational locks in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

The Soo Locks raise and lower ships moving between Lake Superior and Lake Huron. They close for a couple months each winter for repairs and maintenance when ice usually covers substantial portions of the upper lakes.

The locks are scheduled to reopen Saturday.

This year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says the upgrades included replacing gate anchors and completing the switch to a hydraulic operating system on the Poe Lock. The MacArthur Lock underwent sandblasting, structural repairs and painting.

The first ship to pass is expected to be the Stewart J. Cort, which is heading upstream. It will be followed by the down-bound Phillip R. Clarke.

"}, {"id":"62fb0d05-f638-51d4-becd-09cd1c219951","type":"article","starttime":"1490393719","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T15:15:19-07:00","lastupdated":"1490396491","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"More big brands pull ads from YouTube in widening boycott","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_62fb0d05-f638-51d4-becd-09cd1c219951.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/more-big-brands-pull-ads-from-youtube-in-widening-boycott/article_62fb0d05-f638-51d4-becd-09cd1c219951.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/An-advertising-boycott-of-YouTube-is-broadening-in-a-sign-of-the-skepticism-surrounding-Google-s-promise-to-prevent-marketing-campaigns-from-appearing-alongside-repugnant-videos/id-82816fb4d14a487997db32b78d345e81","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By MICHAEL LIEDTKE\nAP Technology Writer","prologue":"SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 An advertising boycott of YouTube is broadening, a sign that big-spending companies doubt Google's ability to prevent marketing campaigns from appearing alongside repugnant videos.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","technology","marketing campaigns","marketing and advertising","corporate news","boycotts","political and civil unrest","general news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"62fb0d05-f638-51d4-becd-09cd1c219951","body":"

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 An advertising boycott of YouTube is broadening, a sign that big-spending companies doubt Google's ability to prevent marketing campaigns from appearing alongside repugnant videos.

PepsiCo, Wal-Mart Stores and Starbucks on Friday confirmed that they have also suspended their advertising on YouTube after the Wall Street Journal found Google's automated programs placed their brands on five videos containing racist content. AT&T, Verizon, Johnson & Johnson, Volkswagen and several other companies pulled ads earlier this week.

The defections are continuing even after Google apologized for tainting brands and outlined steps to ensure ads don't appear alongside unsavory videos.

It's not an easy problem to fix, even for a company with the brainpower that Google has drawn upon to build a search engine that billions trust to find the information they want in a matter of seconds.

Google depends mostly on automated programs to place ads in YouTube videos because the job is too much for humans to handle on their own. About 400 hours of video is now posted on YouTube each minute.

The company has pledged to hire more people to review videos and develop even more sophisticated programs to teach its computers to figure out which clips would be considered to be too despicable for advertising.

Contacted Friday, Google stood by its earlier promise, signaling the company's confidence that it will be able to placate advertisers. As part of that effort, Google intends to block more objectionable videos from ever being posted on YouTube \u2014 an effort that could spur complaints about censorship.

Some outraged advertisers are making it clear that they won't return to YouTube until they are certain Google has the situation under control.

\"The content with which we are being associated is appalling and completely against our company values,\" Wal-Mart said in a Friday statement.

Besides suspending their spending on YouTube, Wal-Mart, PepsiCo and several other companies have said they will stop buying ads that Google places on more than two million other third-party websites.

If Google can't lure back advertisers, it could result in a loss of hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue. Most analysts, though, doubt the ad boycott will seriously hurt Google's corporate parent, Alphabet Inc.

Although they have been growing rapidly, YouTube's ads still only represent a relatively small financial piece of Alphabet, whose revenue totaled $73.5 billion last year after subtracting commissions paid to Google's partners. YouTube accounted for $5.6 billion, or nearly 8 percent, of that total, based on estimates from the research firm eMarketer Inc.

At most, RBC Capital Markets analyst Mark Mahaney said he expects the YouTube ad boycott to trim Alphabet's net revenue by about 2 percent this year.

Moody's Investor Service predicted the backlash won't last long because Google is \"laser-focused\" on cleaning things up on YouTube.

Alphabet's stock price has fallen nearly 4 percent since the boycott began last week after an investigation by The Times in London revealed the ads of major brands were appearing in YouTube videos delving into contentious themes. The shares fell $4.51 to close at $835.14 Friday.

___

AP Technology Writer Mae Anderson in New York contributed to this story.

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___

Trump, GOP leaders pull health care bill in humiliating loss

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 In a humiliating setback, President Donald Trump and GOP leaders pulled their \"Obamacare\" repeal bill off the House floor Friday after it became clear the measure would fail badly. It was a stunning defeat for the new president after he had demanded House Republicans vote on the legislation Friday, threatening to leave \"Obamacare\" in place and move on to other issues if the vote failed.

___

Winners and losers in House Republican health plan

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The old and the poor made out great when House Republicans failed to dismantle Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. The rich and the almost rich didn't do so well. The GOP-led measure would have repealed major parts of Obama's health law, capping future funding for Medicaid and cutting tax increases for high-income families, health insurance companies and drugmakers.

___

Some parts of Obamacare working well, problems with others

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 House Speaker Paul Ryan says the country will be living with \"Obamacare\" for the \"foreseeable future.\" While some parts of Barack Obama's health care law work well, others have problems. The law has helped reduce the number of uninsured Americans, but premiums and other costs are rising faster than expected and some insurers are pulling out of markets.

___

Report examines grim Bangladesh leather trade, links to West

DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) \u2014 Hazardous, heavily polluting tanneries, with workers as young as 14, supplied leather to companies that make shoes and handbags for Western brands, a nonprofit group that investigates supply chains says. The report by New York-based Transparentem, released to The Associated Press, did not say leather from the tanneries ends up in American and European companies' products, only that the manufacturers of some of those goods receive it.

___

Trump and Mnuchin say focus will turn to tax reform

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Now that the effort to overhaul the nation's health care system has collapsed, the Trump administration is turning its attention to tax reform. President Donald Trump and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Friday that the administration will now focus on gaining congressional approval for a sweeping tax overhaul plan.

___

Debate renewed over economic benefits of Keystone pipeline

The Keystone XL pipeline cleared a big hurdle by getting State Department approval. The costs and benefits of the pipeline have been hotly debated, however, and many experts believe it will have only a small impact on the U.S. economy.

___

Trump touts jobs commitment first made in 2015

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 President Donald Trump on Friday praised a plan by cable company Charter Communications to hire 20,000 American call center workers, but the hiring initiative dates back to 2015 as part of the company's successful efforts to merge with Time Warner Cable. It's the latest corporate jobs announcement made at the White House that capitalized on plans made before Trump won the presidency.

___

Geologist for Shell says company hid Nigeria spill dangers

JOHANNESBURG (AP) \u2014 A German geologist says Royal Dutch Shell's Nigeria subsidiary \"fiercely opposed\" environmental testing and is concealing data showing thousands of Nigerians are exposed to health hazards from a stalled cleanup of the worst oil spills in the West African nation's history. Kay Holtzmann says an environmental study found \"astonishingly high\" pollution levels with soil \"literally soaked with hydrocarbons.\"

___

Stocks wobble, finish mixed as GOP pulls plug on health bill

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 U.S. stocks give up an early gain but avoid a sharp loss after Republicans cancel a vote on their health care bill after it became clear it wouldn't pass. That cast some doubt on President Donald Trump's business-friendly agenda. Stocks took their biggest weekly loss since November.

___

More big brands pull ads from YouTube in widening boycott

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 An advertising boycott of YouTube is broadening in a sign of the skepticism surrounding Google's promise to prevent marketing campaigns from appearing alongside repugnant videos. Even though the defections are continuing, most analysts aren't worried yet.

___

The Standard & Poor's 500 index finished down 1.98 points, or 0.1 percent, at 2,343.98. The Dow lost 59.86 points, or 0.3 percent, to 20,596.72 as Goldman Sachs and Boeing sank. Technology companies inched higher and the Nasdaq composite rose 11.04 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,828.74.

U.S. crude oil futures rose 27 cents to $47.97 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added 24 cents to $50.80 a barrel in London.

In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline gained 2 cents to $1.60 a gallon. Heating oil rose 1 cent to $1.50 a gallon. Natural gas added 3 cents to $3.08 per 1,000 cubic feet.

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Video by Doug Kreutz, Arizona Daily Star.","byline":"","video_id":"ohS49UXfTRY"},{"id":"66bb6f55-594d-5dfb-b7c0-f6798f08646c","starttime":"1489513169","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-14T10:39:29-07:00","title":"Catalinas now: Surging streams, wildflowers -- and snow!","description":"On this cusp of the seasons, the Catalina Mountains sport wildflowers in lower elevations while snow and surging streams hang on higher in the range. Video by Doug Kreutz, Arizona Daily Star.","byline":"","video_id":"cEyL3OotEjY"},{"id":"441d3248-e8d0-5b6a-b2ef-9b583fbf05db","starttime":"1489194000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-10T18:00:00-07:00","title":"Watch: Carpets of wildflowers","description":"Gold poppies carpet some patches of desert at Saguaro National Park west of Tucson -- and other wildflowers add to the color show. Video by Doug Kreutz, Arizona Daily Star.","byline":"","video_id":"-vvBhA7Fx5w"}],"revision":9,"commentID":"f5e61b01-3cda-5c1d-9c95-eefa987fc04b","body":"

Palo verde trees are bursting into early bloom around Tucson \u2014 creating splashes of yellow desert beauty but also ushering in a season of sniffles for some allergy sufferers.

\u201cThis year is earlier than usual\u201d for palo verde blooms,\u201d said Dr. George Makol, a physician and allergy specialist with Alvernon Allergy and Asthma in Tucson.

\u201cThere is so much pollen in each tree now, and on a windy day it can blow for several blocks,\u201d Makol said.

Other plants \u2014 from ragweed and rabbitbush to ash, mulberry and olive trees \u2014 are often considered greater problems for allergy sufferers than palo verde trees. But palo verdes are flourishing in current climatic conditions and appear to be causing more allergic reactions than in the past.

\u201cWe\u2019re seeing very lush palo verde trees these days,\u201d Makol said. \u201cThe reason we see palo verdes become so lush is that there is more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. That is what the plants breathe.

\u201cSo the palo verde is becoming a more important allergen.\u201d

BEAUTY WITH A BITE

The palo verde \u2014 with a name that means \u201cgreen stick\u201d in Spanish \u2014 is Arizona\u2019s official state tree.

It\u2019s revered for its beauty, especially during the spring blooming season \u2014 but that beauty comes with a bite for those who are allergic to its pollen.

\u201cEye itching and sneezing can be the first symptoms,\u201d Makol said. \u201cThere can also be nasal itching, nasal drip and congestion\u201d with continued exposure.

COPING STRATEGIES

Home treatments such as antihistamines and nasal sprays are available over the counter at stores, Makol said.

\u201cThey can reduce eye symptoms and nasal symptoms,\u201d he said.

For people who experience recurrent symptoms every spring, \u201cthen we look at allergy desensitization, with injections of the protein of the pollens they\u2019re allergic to,\u201d Makol said.

Staying indoors on windy days and taking care not to track plant debris into the house can also help reduce allergic reactions, experts say.

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Now that the effort to overhaul the nation's health care system has collapsed, the Trump administration is turning its attention to tax reform.

President Donald Trump and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Friday that the administration will now focus on gaining congressional approval for a sweeping tax overhaul plan.

Trump's comments came after Republicans were forced to cancel a House vote on their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act because they could not get the support needed for passage.

After Republicans pulled the health measure, Trump told reporters at the White House, \"I would say that we will probably start going very, very strongly for the big tax cuts and tax reform. That will be next.\"

While the GOP decision to pull the health care proposal could be an ominous sign for tax cuts and the rest of Trump's legislative agenda, Trump was more optimistic, saying, \"now we're going to go for tax reform, which I've always liked.\"

Earlier in the day, Mnuchin, the president's chief economic spokesman, suggested that tax reform might be easier to sell in Congress.

\"Health care is a very complicated issue,\" Mnuchin said. \"In a way, tax reform is a lot simpler.\"

During a morning interview, Mnuchin said he had been overseeing work on the administration's bill over the past two months and it would be introduced soon. He said it would be one proposal that would cover both cutting individual and corporate taxes in the same legislation.

\"We are not cutting this up and doing little pieces at a time,\" Mnuchin said.

He said the goal was still to win congressional approval of the tax measure by August. But if the timeline is delayed, he said he expected the proposal to pass by the fall.

At the White House, press secretary Sean Spicer acknowledged the August deadline is an \"ambitious one\" for such a comprehensive and complicated project, but he said it's a goal the administration \"is going to try to stick to.\"

\"Tax reform is something the president is very committed to,\" Spicer told reporters. Mnuchin had lunch at the White House Friday with Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan.

In his earlier appearance, Mnuchin did not reveal whether the administration will include a contentious border adjustment tax that is in a House tax proposal. The measure, which would impose a 20 percent tax on imports, has positive and negative features, Mnuchin said. He also would not reveal exactly what corporate tax rate the administration would propose, other than it will be \"a lot lower\" than the current 35 percent rate.

In a wide-ranging public interview event with the news site Axios, Mnuchin also said Trump's proposal to boost infrastructure spending would probably include $100 billion to $200 billion in federal money and depend on public-private partnerships to boost the total to $1 trillion over the next decade.

Mnuchin was asked whether the administration's tax plan would lower rates at all levels but not include an absolute tax cut for high income individuals because the lower rates for the wealthy would be offset by increases in other areas such as reduced deductions. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Oregon, dubbed this goal the \"Mnuchin rule\" during his confirmation hearing.

Mnuchin did not commit specifically on the goal but said, \"The president's objective is a middle income tax cut. ... Our primary focus in a tax cut for the middle income (earners) and not the top.\"

While Wall Street has staged a huge rally since Trump's surprising election victory, Mnuchin said he believed the market could move still higher as the administration succeeds in implementing its economic program to cut taxes and eliminate burdensome regulations.

He predicted Trump's plan would achieve economic growth of 3 percent to 3.5 percent, up significantly from anemic growth around 2 percent seen in the current recovery, the weakest in the post-World War II period. He said \"this is definitely not all baked in\" to market expectations.

The Treasury secretary, who participated in his first meeting of Group of 20 finance ministers last weekend in Baden-Baden, Germany, called the meeting a success. He said while news coverage focused on the administration's successful push to drop a pledge to oppose trade protectionism, that took only a small portion of the discussion time.

\"On trade, the point I made was that the president wants to have free trade ... but he wants to renegotiate deals\" that are not favorable for American workers, Mnuchin said.

In addition to renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada, Mnuchin said the administration was also planning to focus on stronger enforcement of other trade agreements.

___

AP reporter Darlene Superville contributed to this report.

___

This story has been corrected to show that White House press secretary Sean Spicer said the president is committed to \"tax reform,\" not \"tax refund.\"

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Once again, \"Obamacare\" has survived a near-death experience. It won't be the end of the political debate, but House Speaker Paul Ryan acknowledges, \"We're going to be living with 'Obamacare' for the foreseeable future.\"

Ryan pulled the \"repeal and replace\" bill drafted by House Republican leaders and blessed by President Donald Trump after it failed to muster enough support. It was the latest attempt to undo the Affordable Care Act, which already beat two Supreme Court challenges.

Trump blamed Democrats for the failure and repeated his dire predictions for the Obama-era law. \"It's imploding, and soon will explode, and it's not going to be pretty,\" he said.

While some parts of the law have obvious problems, others are working well and have brought the country's rate of uninsured people to a record low.

The ACA has added coverage in two main ways: a Medicaid expansion to cover more low-income adults, and subsidized private health insurance through online markets such as HealthCare.gov. That's helped push the nation's uninsured rate below 9 percent.

But premiums and other costs are rising faster than expected, and insurers have pulled out of markets in many areas, reducing options for consumers.

A status check on the ACA's major elements, and the outlook for each:

___

MEDICAID

Status: Thirty-one states have expanded Medicaid. The federal-state health program for low-income people now covers about 1 in 5 people in the United States, from newborns to elderly nursing home residents. About half of the expansion states have Republican governors. Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio, says it has allowed his state to offer \"a stable source of care\" for the working poor, the drug-addicted, and the mentally ill. Although Medicaid is a notoriously stingy payer, hospitals have strongly supported the expansion as preferable to treating uninsured patients.

Outlook: The Medicaid expansion, which covers about 11 million people, remains in place. Other states may now want to take advantage of its generous federal payment rate for new enrollees. Rising costs are likely to be a problem both for states and the federal government.

Medicaid also will remain as an open-ended entitlement program, with the federal government matching a share of what each state spends on care for beneficiaries. The national average is about 60 percent.

Overhaul efforts will continue, but state governors will take the lead. Expect the federal Health and Human Services department under Secretary Tom Price to be receptive.

___

INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE

Status: The health law was meant to expand and stabilize the market for individual health insurance, through which roughly 20 million people get coverage. It's been a roller-coaster ride instead. As sicker, costlier customers came into the market, premiums and deductibles shot up. Consumers eligible for the law's income-related subsidies were cushioned, but millions who still pay their own way are in shock. Former President Bill Clinton, in a candid moment, called it a \"crazy system.\" Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini has pronounced the ACA's health insurance markets in a \"death spiral.\"

Outlook: Unclear, with analysts offering different opinions. The \"glass-half-full\" view is that this year's premium increases will help stabilize the market, and 2018 probably won't bring another wild ride. The \"glass-half-empty\" view is that the markets continue to struggle to attract young, healthy customers, and that's going to keep pushing premiums higher, making coverage unattractive.

In the mix is a political wild card. The Trump administration will have to decide whether to continue paying billions in cost-sharing subsidies that help reduce deductibles for more than half of the consumers using markets like HealthCare.gov. The GOP House has challenged the subsidies in court. Insurers say the system would be unworkable without the money.

Finally, no one seems to have an answer for the problems of people who pay the full cost of their individually purchased health insurance policies. They get no help from the government to shield them from rising premiums. And they complain of fewer available low-premium options as a consequence of federal regulation.

Consumers using HealthCare.gov have also found they have fewer choices as some insurers exited the markets. About one-third of counties currently have just one marketplace insurer.

___

COVERAGE PENALTY

Status: As a way to get healthy people into the insurance pool, the ACA imposes tax penalties on uninsured people deemed able to afford coverage. Last year 6.5 million people paid penalties averaging $470, according to the IRS. An additional 12.7 million people claimed exemptions for financial hardship and other reasons. Some young adults in good health decide to pay the fine because they can't squeeze $100 a month for premiums out of their already tight budgets. Experts argue about whether the unpopular requirement has been particularly effective.

Outlook: The penalty remains the law of the land, but the Trump administration isn't likely to make enforcement a priority.

___

OLDER ADULTS

Status: Obama's law limited what insurers could charge their oldest, pre-Medicare customers to no more than three times what they charge young adults.

Outlook: That limitation remains in place for now. Congressional Republicans will keep looking for ways to loosen it, arguing that it would help lower premiums for young adults and help make insurance markets stronger. A budget bill could provide a vehicle for changes.

___

ESSENTIAL HEALTH BENEFITS

Status: The ACA requires insurers to cover \"essential benefits,\" including outpatient care, emergency services, hospitalization, pregnancy, maternity and newborn care, mental health and substance abuse treatment, prescription drugs, rehabilitation, laboratory and diagnostic tests, preventive and wellness services, and pediatric care, including dental and vision services for kids.

The benefits are considered especially important for women, since birth control and other routine services are now covered as preventive care, at no charge.

Outlook: The ACA's benefits requirement remains in place. Republicans say it drives up costs, but convincing consumers of that will be difficult.

___

This story has been corrected to show that consumers have reduced options, not that some consumers have no health care options.

"}, {"id":"49d59ab4-dbe2-51b8-a323-a3f2c2665430","type":"article","starttime":"1490391471","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T14:37:51-07:00","lastupdated":"1490394080","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Stocks wobble, finish mixed as GOP pulls plug on health bill","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_49d59ab4-dbe2-51b8-a323-a3f2c2665430.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/stocks-wobble-finish-mixed-as-gop-pulls-plug-on-health/article_49d59ab4-dbe2-51b8-a323-a3f2c2665430.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/U-S-stocks-give-up-an-early-gain-but-avoid-a-sharp-loss-after-Republicans-cancel-a-vote-on-their-health-care-bill-after-it-became-clear-it-wouldn-t-pass/id-836042fc1af542a18552a7d74e51868c","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By MARLEY JAY\nAP Markets Writer","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 U.S. stocks flirted with sharp losses but managed a mixed finish after Republicans canceled a vote on their health care bill because it became clear the bill would fail. Hospital stocks soared in response, while companies that stand to benefit from other Trump proposals faltered.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","crude oil markets","energy markets","commodity markets","financial markets","currency markets","brent crude markets","amusement and theme parks","recreation and leisure","lifestyle","leisure travel","travel","technology","stock prices","leading economic indicators","economy","stock markets","bills","legislation","legislature","government and politics","stock price movements","stock performance","corporate stock","corporate news","stock indices and averages","japanese yen"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"4a17b4d0-3fd2-530b-90d2-544af1cc56ec","description":"In this Jan. 12, 2017, photo, traders work on the Mizuho Americas trading floor in New York. Stocks are opening higher on Wall Street, on Friday, March 24, 2017, led by gains in technology companies and banks. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)","byline":"Mark Lennihan","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/a1/4a17b4d0-3fd2-530b-90d2-544af1cc56ec/58d535ce1bfd3.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/a1/4a17b4d0-3fd2-530b-90d2-544af1cc56ec/58d535ce1bfd3.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/a1/4a17b4d0-3fd2-530b-90d2-544af1cc56ec/58d535ce1bfd3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/a1/4a17b4d0-3fd2-530b-90d2-544af1cc56ec/58d535ce1bfd3.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":14,"commentID":"49d59ab4-dbe2-51b8-a323-a3f2c2665430","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 U.S. stocks flirted with sharp losses but managed a mixed finish after Republicans canceled a vote on their health care bill because it became clear the bill would fail. Hospital stocks soared in response, while companies that stand to benefit from other Trump proposals faltered.

For the second day in a row, stocks started higher and wilted as it became clear the health care bill was in trouble. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged as much as 126 points in afternoon trading on reports of the bill's impending failure, although Wall Street cut its losses after the vote was canceled. Consumer-focused companies like Nike, Starbucks and clothing company PVH rose.

The health care act became something of a proxy for the rest of the Trump agenda and it dominated the market for most of this week. It was the worst week for stocks since the week before the presidential election. Banks and small-company stocks, which made huge gains after Trump was elected, both suffered their biggest losses in more than a year.

President Trump and other Republican leaders said they were moving on from health care, and Michael Scanlon, a portfolio manager for Manulife Asset Management, said investors will be glad if that happens.

\"You're going to see a very quick pivot to corporate tax reform,\" he said. A corporate tax cut could give stocks a large boost by increasing profits, and it might also raise tax revenue. After the close of trading, House Speaker Paul Ryan said Republicans will proceed with tax reform proposals, but acknowledged the health care debacle will make that task more difficult.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index finished down 1.98 points, or 0.1 percent, at 2,343.98. The Dow lost 59.86 points, or 0.3 percent, to 20,596.72 as Goldman Sachs and Boeing sank. Technology companies inched higher and the Nasdaq composite rose 11.04 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,828.74. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks added 1.22 points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,354.64.

Trading was relatively light as investors waited for answers about the state of President Donald Trump's business-friendly agenda. That may have contributed to the big fluctuations.

Hospitals and insurers that do a lot of business with Medicaid celebrated the demise of the bill. HCA Holdings, the largest U.S. hospital company, climbed $2.87, or 3.5 percent, to $86.04 and Community Health Systems jumped 84 cents, or 9.7 percent, to $9.54. Among Medicaid-focused companies, Centene and Molina Healthcare each gained about 5 percent.

The American Health Care Act would likely have left more Americans uninsured and would make big changes to Medicaid, a joint federal-state health program for low-income Americans. Those stocks fell when the bill was introduced because investors were concerned hospitals would have to take in more patients who lack insurance and that insurers would get less money from Medicaid.

Insurance companies slumped. Cigna fell $3.36, or 2.3 percent, to $142.82 and Anthem shed $2.63, or 1.6 percent, to $126.77.

With Trump and majority Republicans unable to pass the first big item on their agenda, there were some signs of concern that his proposals of tax cuts, infrastructure spending, and regulatory cuts will take longer. Those are aspects of Trump's proposed agenda Wall Street is excited about.

Vulcan Materials, a construction materials maker, sank $2.65, or 2.3 percent, to $112.74. Steel maker Nucor declined $1.50, or 2.4 percent, to $59.76. Construction and machinery companies also stumbled. Engine maker Cummins shed $1.45, or 1 percent, to $150.77 and Boeing sank $1.44 to $175.82.

Scanlon, of Manulife, said investors want Trump and Congress to come up with a real proposal that changes corporate taxes.

\"Something needs to be done with a permanent solution, not just one of these holiday things,\" he said, because \"the goal is to be a stimulus for domestic investment.\"

Bond prices rose slightly. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.41 percent from 2.42 percent.

U.S. crude oil futures rose 27 cents to $47.97 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added 24 cents to $50.80 a barrel in London.

In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline gained 2 cents to $1.60 a gallon. Heating oil rose 1 cent to $1.50 a gallon. Natural gas added 3 cents to $3.08 per 1,000 cubic feet.

The dollar inched down to 110.80 yen from 111.07 yen. The euro edged up to $1.0808 from $1.0786.

Gold rose $1.30 to $1,248.50 an ounce. Silver jumped 16 cents to $17.75 an ounce. Copper lost 1 cent to $2.63 a pound.

In Germany, the DAX added 0.2 percent and the French CAC 40 dropped 0.2 percent and Britain's FTSE 100 index dipped 0.1 percent. Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 index rose 0.9 percent following recent losses. The Kospi of South Korea shed 0.2 percent while Hong Kong's Hang Seng reversed earlier losses to finish 0.1 percent higher.

___

AP Markets Writer Marley Jay can be reached at http://twitter.com/MarleyJayAP His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/journalist/marley-jay

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 President Donald Trump greenlighted the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, declaring it a \"great day for American jobs\" and siding with energy advocates over environmental groups in a heated debate over climate change.

The presidential permit comes nearly a decade after Calgary-based TransCanada applied to build the $8 billion pipeline, which will snake from Canada through the United States. Trump's State Department said the project advances U.S. national interests, in a complete reversal of the conclusion President Barack Obama's administration reached less than a year-and-a-half ago.

\"It's a great day for American jobs and a historic moment for North America and energy independence,\" Trump said, standing alongside TransCanada's CEO in the Oval Office. Keystone will reduce costs and reliance on foreign oil while creating thousands of jobs, he said, adding: \"It's going to be an incredible pipeline.\"

The decision caps the long scientific and political fight over a project that became a proxy battle in the larger fight over global warming. And Friday's decision, while long foreshadowed by Trump's public support for Keystone, represents one of the biggest steps to date by his administration to prioritize economic development over environmental concerns.

TransCanada, Trump said, can now build Keystone \"with efficiency and with speed.\" Though it still faces other major hurdles, including disputes over the route, the president said the federal government was formulating final details \"as we speak.\"

The 1,700-mile (2,735 kilometers) pipeline, as envisioned, would carry oil from tar sands in Alberta, Canada, to refineries along the Texas Gulf Coast, passing through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma. It would move roughly 800,000 barrels of oil per day.

Environmentalists, Native American groups and landowners who've opposed Keystone expressed outrage, and Greenpeace said the U.S. was \"moving backwards\" on climate and energy policy.

\"Keystone was stopped once before, and it will be stopped again,\" vowed Annie Leonard, the group's U.S. director.

Obama in 2015 rejected the pipeline after years of study, saying it would undercut U.S. credibility in the international climate change negotiations that culminated later that year in a global deal in Paris. He echoed the argument of environmental groups that Keystone would encourage use of carbon-heavy tar sands oil, contributing heavily to global warming.

Relying mostly on the same information, the Trump administration reversed Obama's decision Friday.

In a lengthy report, the State Department alluded to the Paris deal as one reason. Because many other countries have pledged to address climate change, it said Keystone can proceed without undermining the overall effort to slow global warming. The Paris agreement compels the U.S. and other countries to cut greenhouse gas emissions in coming decades.

Keystone would strengthen U.S. energy security by increasing access to Canada's \"dependable supply of crude oil,\" said the State Department, which had jurisdiction because the pipeline crosses the U.S.-Canada border.

But the level of those benefits has been the subject of exhaustive debate in recent years.

Obama argued the oil wouldn't stay in the U.S. because it would be exported after being processed in American refineries. TransCanada insisted Keystone \"is not an export pipeline.\" Many energy experts insisted the truth was somewhere in between.

Environmental groups argued Canada's tar sands oil should stay in the ground. But Keystone's backers said that wouldn't happen even if the pipeline wasn't built. Without a pipeline, they said the oil would move by rail or truck, more dangerous methods which themselves contribute greenhouse gas emissions.

How many jobs Keystone will create is also widely disputed.

TransCanada promised as many as 13,000 construction jobs and Trump once predicted it \"could be 42,000 jobs.\" The vast majority would be \"indirect\" jobs other industries gain from the influx of dollars and construction workers. Other estimates predict just a few thousand jobs, lasting only for the few years the pipeline is being built. And after that, only a few dozen workers would be needed to maintain the pipeline.

TransCanada CEO Russ Girling said Friday that thousands of people are \"ready and itching to get to work.\"

Trump boasted as recently as this week that Keystone would be built with American steel, which he has required for new or expanded pipelines. But his administration has already given Keystone a pass. TransCanada has already acquired the steel for the project, and the White House has said it's too difficult to impose Trump's requirement on a project already under construction.

Although portions of Keystone are already built, it still faces obstacles to completion. In Nebraska, for example, the route must still be approved and opponents have repeatedly thwarted TransCanada's attempts to access the necessary land. A commission is expected to review the matter later this year.

Trump, told of the hiccup, pledged his help.

\"Nebraska? I'll call Nebraska,\" he said.

___

Associated Press writers Jill Colvin in Washington, Rob Gillies in Toronto and Grant Schulte in Lincoln, Nebraska, contributed to this report.

___

Reach Josh Lederman on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAP

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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday:

Micron Technology Inc., up $1.96 to $28.43

The chipmaker's second-quarter profit was much bigger than analysts expected.

SeaWorld Entertainment Inc., up 82 cents to $18.13

A Chinese real estate holding company bought a 21 percent stake in the water park company.

GameStop Corp., down $3.26 to $20.70

The video game retailer reported weak sales as consumers wait for new gaming systems to reach the market.

Finish Line Inc., down $3.13 to $12.93

The shoe store chain said it had to cut prices in response to weak sales, and lowered its profit estimate.

HCA Holdings Inc., up $2.87 to $86.04

Hospital operators traded higher ahead of a scheduled vote on the Republican-backed American Health Care Act that was eventually called off.

Mylan Inc., down 64 cents to $40.96

Abbott Laboratories said it sold most of its Mylan stock, cutting its stake from 13 percent to under 5 percent.

Bank of America Corp., up 5 cents to $23.12

While bond yields were little changed, banks continued to edge higher after sharp losing streak.

Philip Morris International Inc., down $1.16 to $111.79

Companies that make and sell household goods lagged the rest of the market on Friday.

"}, {"id":"05f4c526-7757-5577-998e-81125344d81d","type":"article","starttime":"1490389806","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T14:10:06-07:00","lastupdated":"1490392091","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Winners and losers in House Republican health plan","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_05f4c526-7757-5577-998e-81125344d81d.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/winners-and-losers-in-house-republican-health-plan/article_05f4c526-7757-5577-998e-81125344d81d.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-old-and-the-poor-made-out-great-when-House-Republicans-failed-to-dismantle-Barack-Obama-s-Affordable-Care-Act/id-209c1ed479c64f6498865b99ae38c714","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The old and the poor made out great when House Republicans failed Friday to dismantle Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. The rich and the almost rich didn't do so well.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","business","health","government and politics","legislature","pharmaceutical manufacturing","health care industry","tax refunds","government taxation and revenue","government finance","government business and finance","personal health insurance","personal insurance","personal finance","insurance industry","financial services","insurance industry regulation","financial industry regulation","industry regulation","government regulations","medicaid","government-funded health insurance","government programs","health insurance providers"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"6720dfe0-02e6-5240-914c-f324fbe128f4","description":"Graphic shows estimated tax changes under Republican health bill; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76 mm;","byline":"k.vineys","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/72/6720dfe0-02e6-5240-914c-f324fbe128f4/58d3dc2261faf.image.jpg?resize=512%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"89","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/72/6720dfe0-02e6-5240-914c-f324fbe128f4/58d3dc2261faf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C89"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"268","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/72/6720dfe0-02e6-5240-914c-f324fbe128f4/58d3dc2261faf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C268"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"914","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/72/6720dfe0-02e6-5240-914c-f324fbe128f4/58d3dc2261faf.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"de96b885-1e80-5ea8-b4ab-20609a5a4f8f","description":"House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., pauses as he speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, March 24, 2017, after Republican leaders abruptly pulled their troubled health care overhaul bill off the House floor, short of votes and eager to avoid a humiliating defeat for President Donald Trump and GOP leaders. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)","byline":"Cliff Owen","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e9/de96b885-1e80-5ea8-b4ab-20609a5a4f8f/58d591121016a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e9/de96b885-1e80-5ea8-b4ab-20609a5a4f8f/58d591121016a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e9/de96b885-1e80-5ea8-b4ab-20609a5a4f8f/58d591121016a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e9/de96b885-1e80-5ea8-b4ab-20609a5a4f8f/58d591121016a.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":14,"commentID":"05f4c526-7757-5577-998e-81125344d81d","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The old and the poor made out great when House Republicans failed Friday to dismantle Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. The rich and the almost rich didn't do so well.

The measure would have repealed major parts of Obama's health law, capping future funding for Medicaid and cutting tax increases for high-income families, health insurance companies and drugmakers.

The bill would have repealed tax credits that people can use to purchase health insurance and replace them with a new tax credit that would have been less generous for most.

The winners, losers and a few in between:

___

WINNERS

\u2014Some 24 million additional people who would have been without health insurance by 2026. That's the tally according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

\u2014Individuals ages 50 to 64. Under the plan, premiums would have gone up and tax credits for most of these people would have gone down. Premium costs for a 64-year-old making $26,500 a year would have increased by $12,900 for a single year, according to the CBO.

\u2014The poor. The bill would have limited future spending on Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor, reducing their benefits.

\u2014The working poor. The bill would have raised taxes for some low-income families because the new tax credits for buying health insurance were smaller than the credits under Obama's health law.

For example, families making between $20,000 and $30,000 would have received tax increases averaging $200, according to the Tax Policy Center.

\u2014Planned Parenthood. The bill would have eliminated all federal funds for the organization that provides health care to women.

___

LOSERS

\u2014The rich. The GOP health plan included nearly $1 trillion in tax cuts over the next decade, and much of that would have gone to the very wealthy. Families making more than $1 million a year would have received tax cuts averaging more than $51,000, according to an analysis by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center.

\u2014The well-off (but not quite rich). Families making more than $200,000 a year would have received tax cuts averaging $5,680.

Also, people with higher incomes would have been eligible for tax credits under the GOP plan. These tax credits are used to help pay insurance premiums for people who don't have insurance at work or from federal programs like Medicare.

\u2014Medical device makers. The bill would have repealed a tax on medical devices, saving the industry $20 billion over the next decade.

\u2014Drugmakers. The bill would have repealed a tax on prescription drugs, saving the industry $29 billion over the next decade.

\u2014Young adults. The bill would have allowed insurers to charge higher premiums as people age and become more susceptible to health problems. Because of this provision, the CBO estimates that younger patients would have seen their premiums drop.

\u2014Healthy people who choose not to have health insurance. The bill would have repealed penalties for not having health insurance.

\u2014Large companies that don't provide health benefits for employees. The bill would have repealed penalties on these employers.

___

A BIT OF BOTH

\u2014Health insurance companies. The bill would have repealed a tax on health insurance companies, saving them $145 million over the next decade. However, these companies were projected to lose 24 million customers by 2026.

\u2014States. The bill would have limited the future growth of Medicaid spending, pushing the cost to the states. But the bill also would have provided much more flexibility to states on how they spend this money.

___

Follow Stephen Ohlemacher on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/stephenatap

"}, {"id":"b1d17228-c82f-534c-8c99-b67034c665df","type":"article","starttime":"1490389606","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T14:06:46-07:00","lastupdated":"1490392091","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"How major US stock market indexes fared on Friday","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_b1d17228-c82f-534c-8c99-b67034c665df.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/how-major-us-stock-market-indexes-fared-on-friday/article_b1d17228-c82f-534c-8c99-b67034c665df.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/US-stocks-flirted-with-sharp-losses-but-managed-a-mixed-finish-after-Republicans-canceled-a-vote-on-their-health-care-bill-because-it-became-clear-the-bill-would-fail/id-bbd4215975d64c37b21f9ca019366433","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By The Associated Press","prologue":"U.S. stocks flirted with sharp losses but managed a mixed finish after Republicans canceled a vote on their health care bill because it became clear the bill would fail. Investors didn't trade much as they waited for answers about the state of President Donald Trump's business-friendly agenda.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","stock indices and averages","stock markets","financial markets","bills","legislation","legislature","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"b1d17228-c82f-534c-8c99-b67034c665df","body":"

U.S. stocks flirted with sharp losses but managed a mixed finish after Republicans canceled a vote on their health care bill because it became clear the bill would fail. Investors didn't trade much as they waited for answers about the state of President Donald Trump's business-friendly agenda.

On Friday:

The Standard & Poor's 500 index declined 1.98 points, or 0.1 percent, at 2,343.98.

The Dow Jones industrial average dipped 59.86 points, or 0.3 percent, to 20,596.72.

The Nasdaq composite rose 11.04 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,828.74.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks picked up 1.22 points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,354.64.

For the week:

The S&P 500 lost 34.27 points, or 1.4 percent.

The Dow fell 317.90 points, or 1.5 percent.

The Nasdaq gave up 72.26 points, or 1.2 percent.

The Russell 2000 surrendered 36.88 points, or 2.7 percent.

For the year:

The S&P 500 is up 105.15 points, or 4.7 percent.

The Dow is up 834.12 points, or 4.2 percent.

The Nasdaq is up 455.62 points, or 8.3 percent.

The Russell 2000 is down 2.49 points, or 0.2 percent.

"}, {"id":"f4d4ed2e-a7e7-51cf-9c47-af1141c22090","type":"article","starttime":"1490389372","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T14:02:52-07:00","lastupdated":"1490392093","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Trump's Keystone XL decision sets up new fight in Nebraska","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_f4d4ed2e-a7e7-51cf-9c47-af1141c22090.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/trump-s-keystone-xl-decision-sets-up-new-fight-in/article_f4d4ed2e-a7e7-51cf-9c47-af1141c22090.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/President-Donald-Trump-may-have-approved-a-federal-permit-for-the-Keystone-XL-pipeline-but-the-fight-s-far-from-over-in-Nebraska-the-one-state-in-its-path-that-has-yet-to-approve-the-p/id-d29846abd1e3450e922a4e46e819837c","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By GRANT SCHULTE\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) \u2014 President Donald Trump may have approved a federal permit for the Keystone XL pipeline, but the fight is far from over in Nebraska, the one state in its path that has yet to approve the project.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","energy industry","native americans"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"f4d4ed2e-a7e7-51cf-9c47-af1141c22090","body":"

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) \u2014 President Donald Trump may have approved a federal permit for the Keystone XL pipeline, but the fight is far from over in Nebraska, the one state in its path that has yet to approve the project.

The pipeline's fate once again rests with the Nebraska Public Service Commission, an independently elected group of four Republicans and one Democrat. Organized opposition in Nebraska has hindered pipeline developer TransCanada, but leading opponents acknowledge they'll face more of an uphill struggle this time.

Some key things to know about the situation:

WHY NEBRASKA?

Opponents in Nebraska mobilized amid concerns about the Sandhills, an ecologically fragile region of grass-covered sand dunes, and the Ogallala Aquifer, a massive groundwater supply that underlies nearly the entire state. The project's tangled history includes lawsuits, dozens of state and federal hearings, and threats of protests in Nebraska that could resemble the Dakota Access Pipeline showdown in North Dakota.

Nebraska activists say the pipeline could leak and pollute their water supply, and argue that construction would disrupt the state's natural habitat. Company officials have said the project will be among the safest in the nation and point to an existing Keystone pipeline that already runs through eastern Nebraska.

Although TransCanada has secured agreements with roughly 90 percent of the Nebraska landowners along the route, those who oppose it say the Canadian company shouldn't be allowed to use eminent domain to gain access to their property.

The $8 billion pipeline would move oil from Alberta, Canada, across Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, where it would connect with existing pipelines that feed Texas Gulf Coast refineries. South Dakota regulators have approved the project but opponents are asking a judge to reverse the decision.

TransCanada CEO Russ Girling said the company will consult with stakeholders in Nebraska, Montana and South Dakota as Nebraska works its way through the decision process.

___

NEBRASKA'S REVIEW OF THE PROPOSAL

The Nebraska Public Service Commission is expected to review the proposal in a process that takes an average of seven months, although commissioners can postpone a decision for up to a year. If the commission approves the route, TransCanada could then initiate legal proceedings to gain access to the land owned by holdout property owners.

Although the commission is partisan, Nebraska's constitution requires members to serve in a role akin to judges, and they don't take public positions on specific projects before a case is heard. Commissioners must determine whether a project serves the public interest.

Even so, activists will try to pressure members into rejecting the pipeline. Pipeline fighters are considering a campaign challenge against one commission member who represents a left-leaning district, said Jane Kleeb, executive director of the Bold Alliance, a group that opposes the Keystone XL.

___

A STATE DIVIDED

Despite loud opposition in Nebraska, most of the state's top elected officials support the pipeline. Earlier this month, 33 of the Legislature's 49 members \u2014 almost all Republicans \u2014 signed a letter endorsing the project. Republican Gov. Pete Ricketts said the Keystone XL will generate an estimated $11.8 million in property tax revenue in one year for the counties the pipeline would traverse.

\"The presidential permit for the Keystone XL is a welcome step forward to securing improved energy infrastructure in Nebraska and nationally, while also creating jobs and ensuring our energy independence,\" Ricketts said in a statement Friday.

Ricketts said he's confident the Public Service Commission \"will conduct a thorough and fair review\" of TransCanada's application.

Nebraska Democrats are less enthusiastic. Some support the project for the union jobs it will provide, but many have voiced concerns about its environmental impact.

___

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

The main opposition coalition includes landowners, environmental advocates and Native Americans who see the pipeline as harmful to their homeland. Opponents say they plan to focus first on the Nebraska Public Service Commission, but may resort to protests if necessary.

\"Someone needs to stand up for Mother Earth, and the tribes will do that if no one else will,\" said Frank LaMere, a longtime activist and member of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. \"I think we have many allies, Native and non-Native, who will come together for this struggle.\"

Larry Wright, the chairman of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska, said opponents may draw from experiences protesting at North Dakota's Standing Rock Indian Reservation.

\"We'll continue to stand together ... and show the country why this is bad, particularly for us here in Nebraska,\" he said.

"}, {"id":"f9c385f9-23d4-5e5e-8c8e-9bcbc57a0232","type":"article","starttime":"1490386470","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T13:14:30-07:00","lastupdated":"1490388458","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Massachusetts leading Northeast in population growth","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_f9c385f9-23d4-5e5e-8c8e-9bcbc57a0232.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/massachusetts-leading-northeast-in-population-growth/article_f9c385f9-23d4-5e5e-8c8e-9bcbc57a0232.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Massachusetts-is-leading-the-Northeast-in-population-growth-with-some-of-the-biggest-increases-in-Middlesex-and-Suffolk-counties/id-e78473b4d10c4535b9584d8948271a34","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"BOSTON (AP) \u2014 Massachusetts is leading the Northeast in population growth, with some of the biggest increases in Middlesex and Suffolk counties.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","demographics","social affairs","population growth and decline","censuses","government and politics","united states census"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"f9c385f9-23d4-5e5e-8c8e-9bcbc57a0232","body":"

BOSTON (AP) \u2014 Massachusetts is leading the Northeast in population growth, with some of the biggest increases in Middlesex and Suffolk counties.

Secretary of State William Galvin said Friday that U.S. Census Bureau estimates show all but four Massachusetts counties increased in population between July 2015 and July 2016.

Galvin says since the 2010 census, population increased 8.6 percent in Suffolk County, which includes Boston, and 5.8 percent in Middlesex County. The state's total population was 6.8 million in July 2016, a 4 percent increase since 2010.

The only counties that have not seen population increases since 2010 are Barnstable, Berkshire and Franklin.

Galvin said populations in Suffolk and Middlesex counties were boosted by immigration, and the state's international migration rate was almost double that of the country as a whole.

"}, {"id":"43c28590-5dcf-5a68-883d-27a2f25ec789","type":"article","starttime":"1490386620","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T13:17:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1490389466","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Markets Right Now: Stocks recover after health bill pulled","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_43c28590-5dcf-5a68-883d-27a2f25ec789.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/markets-right-now-stocks-recover-after-health-bill-pulled/article_43c28590-5dcf-5a68-883d-27a2f25ec789.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Stocks-erased-much-of-an-afternoon-loss-and-ended-mixed-after-the-Republican-backed-health-care-reform-bill-was-pulled-because-of-a-lack-of-support-in-Congress/id-69f4f76e22cd4ee5b65933cc0f55314a","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By The Associated Press","prologue":"The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local):","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","stock indices and averages","stock markets","financial markets","financial services technology","industrial technology","technology","bills","legislation","legislature","government and politics","stock prices","leading economic indicators","economy","health care reform","health care policy","government policy","political issues"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":5,"commentID":"43c28590-5dcf-5a68-883d-27a2f25ec789","body":"

The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local):

4:00 p.m.

Stocks erased much of an afternoon loss and ended mixed after the Republican-backed health care reform bill was pulled because of a lack of support in Congress.

The market still closed out its worst week since the election Friday.

Several health care companies rose as the bill's prospects worsened throughout the day. Hospital operator Community Health Systems soared 9.7 percent.

The Standard & Poor's 500 slipped 2 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,343.

The Dow Jones industrial average lost 59 points, or 0.3 percent, to 20,596. The Nasdaq gained 11 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,828.

More stocks fell than rose on the New York Stock Exchange.

___

11:45 a.m.

U.S. stocks are higher in midday trading as technology companies and banks climb.

Chipmaker Micron Technology surged 9.3 percent Friday after reporting results that were much better than analysts were expecting. Wells Fargo gained 1.1 percent.

Investors were keeping a close eye on Washington, where a vote was expected later in the day on the Republican-backed health care reform bill.

Stocks are on track for their biggest weekly loss of 2017.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 7 points, or 0.3 percent, to 2,353.

The Dow Jones industrial average gained 25 points, or 0.1 percent, to 20,681. The Nasdaq composite gained 36 points, or 0.6 percent, to 5,853.

Bond prices edged higher. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.41 percent.

___

9:35 a.m.

Stocks are opening slightly higher on Wall Street, led by gains in technology companies and banks.

Chipmaker Micron Technology surged 11 percent in early trading Friday after reporting results that were much better than analysts were expecting.

Investors were keeping a close eye on Washington, where a vote was expected later in the day on the Republican-backed health care reform bill.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 5 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,351.

The Dow Jones industrial average gained 38 points, or 0.2 percent, to 20,695. The Nasdaq composite gained 26 points, or 0.5 percent, to 5,843.

"}, {"id":"8716d142-d3f7-529c-90b7-6a96a72f3351","type":"article","starttime":"1490384088","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T12:34:48-07:00","lastupdated":"1490387525","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Weekly Summary Corporate dividends, name changes, new listings","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_8716d142-d3f7-529c-90b7-6a96a72f3351.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/weekly-summary-corporate-dividends-name-changes-new-listings/article_8716d142-d3f7-529c-90b7-6a96a72f3351.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/weekly-summary-corporate-dividends-name-changes-new-listings/article_88dc4f2f-fcae-5ee3-bf88-9489c6a58fc1.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Changes announced in corporate dividends Mar. 20-Mar. 24.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","corporate news","business","dividends","corporate stock"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"8716d142-d3f7-529c-90b7-6a96a72f3351","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Changes announced in corporate dividends Mar. 20-Mar. 24.

INCREASED DIVIDENDS

8point3 Energy Partners .2565 from .2490

Elbit Systems Ltd .44 from .40

Fulton Financial .11 from .10

Intel Corp .2725 from .26

International Bancshares .33 from .29

SL Green Realty .775 from .72

ServisFirst Bancshares .05 from .04

UDR Inc .31 from .295

Urstadt Biddle Properties .265 from .235

REDUCED DIVIDENDS

Dynex Capital .18 from .21

New York Mortgage Trust .20 from .24

g- Canadian funds

OTHER CORPORATE NEWS AND LISTINGS:

STOCK SPLITS THIS WEEK

Bar Harbor Bankshares 3 for 2

Cleantech Solutions Intl 1 for 4 reverse split

ACQUISITIONS AND MERGERS

MINIMUM VALUE $100 MILLION

Cynosure Inc - Hologic Inc (1.65B)

NEW STOCK LISTINGS

NYSE

Ardaugh Group SA

Deutsche Bank rights

Mulesoft Inc

ProPetro Holding Corp

Two Harbors Investment Corp 8.125pc pfd A

NASDAQ GLOBAL AND GLOBAL SELECT MARKETS

Spark Energy Inc 8.75pc pfd

STOCKS REMOVED FROM TRADING

NYSE

Keycorp 7.75pc pfd G

NASDAQ GLOBAL AND GLOBAL SELECT MARKETS

Gordmans Stores Inc

CORPORATE NAME CHANGES

MFRI Inc to

Perma-Pipe International Holdings Inc

"}, {"id":"d6a48eaf-4ab2-50ee-a4dc-2942abd92840","type":"article","starttime":"1490383270","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T12:21:10-07:00","lastupdated":"1490385922","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"BC-Cash Prices, 1st Ld-Writethru,0342","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_d6a48eaf-4ab2-50ee-a4dc-2942abd92840.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_d6a48eaf-4ab2-50ee-a4dc-2942abd92840.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_be00edbf-cee1-5bac-9490-c83c7eca8049.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","feed meal markets","grain markets","grain and edible oil markets","soft commodity markets","commodity markets","financial markets","business","poultry markets","meat markets","livestock and meat markets","corn markets","coarse grain markets","soybean oil markets","vegetable oil markets","aluminum markets","base metal markets","metal markets","copper markets","soybean markets","cocoa markets","precious metal markets","coffee markets","cotton markets","feeder cattle markets","livestock markets","pig and hog markets","cocoa butter markets","lead markets","wheat markets","pork markets","textile markets","platinum markets","minor metal markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"d6a48eaf-4ab2-50ee-a4dc-2942abd92840","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday

Fri. Thu.

F

Foods

Broilers national comp wtd av .9663 .9663

Eggs large white NY Doz. .92

Flour hard winter KC cwt 12.50 12.50

Cheddar Cheese Chi. 40 block per lb. 1.9750 1.9760

Coffee parana ex-dock NY per lb. 1.4081 1.4081

Coffee medlin ex-dock NY per lb. 1.5969 1.5969

Cocoa beans Ivory Coast $ metric ton 2284 2290

Cocoa butter African styl $ met ton 4985 5000

Hogs Iowa/Minn barrows & gilts wtd av 65.43 65.43

Feeder cattle 500-550 lb Okl av cwt 165.75 165.75

Pork loins 13-19 lb FOB Omaha av cwt 94.90 94.90

Grains

Corn No. 2 yellow Chi processor bid 3.53\u00bc 3.53\u00be

Soybeans No. 1 yellow 9.58\u00be 9.74

Soybean Meal Cen Ill 48pct protein-ton 315.20 315.20

Wheat No. 2 Chi soft 3.99\u00be 3.96

Wheat N. 1 dk 14pc-pro Mpls. 6.30\u00be 6.36\u00be

Oats No. 2 heavy or Better 2.78\u00bc 2.74

Fats & Oils

Corn oil crude wet/dry mill Chi. lb. .37\u00bd .37\u00bd

Soybean oil crude Decatur lb. .31\u00bc .31\u00bc

Metals

Aluminum per lb LME .8676 .8663

Antimony in warehouse per ton 8600 8600

Copper Cathode full plate 2.6264 2.5908

Gold Handy & Harman 1247.50 1247.50

Silver Handy & Harman 17.735 17.610

Lead per metric ton LME 2363.00 2319.00

Molybdenum per metric ton LME 15,250 15,250

Platinum per troy oz. Handy & Harman 964.00 963.00

Platinum Merc spot per troy oz. 967.90 963.80

Zinc (HG) delivered per lb. 1.2772 1.2779

Textiles, Fibers and Miscellaneous

Cotton 1-1-16 in. strict low middling 74.44 74.23

Raw Products

Coal Central Appalachia $ per short ton 51.60 51.60

Natural Gas Henry Hub, $ per mmbtu 2.93 2.93

b-bid a-asked

n-Nominal

r-revised

n.q.-not quoted

n.a.-not available

"}, {"id":"605c3701-a446-5aa4-b71b-74ddd9352c96","type":"article","starttime":"1490383269","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T12:21:09-07:00","lastupdated":"1490385922","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"BC-Cash Prices, 1st Ld-Writethru,0342","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_605c3701-a446-5aa4-b71b-74ddd9352c96.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_605c3701-a446-5aa4-b71b-74ddd9352c96.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_5238b3cc-1130-56a4-9e54-a0e431720ff4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","vegetable oil markets","grain and edible oil markets","soft commodity markets","commodity markets","financial markets","business","soybean oil markets","feed meal markets","grain markets","aluminum markets","base metal markets","metal markets","platinum markets","precious metal markets","lead markets","poultry markets","meat markets","livestock and meat markets","coffee markets","corn markets","soybean markets","textile markets","minor metal markets","feeder cattle markets","livestock markets","cotton markets","cocoa butter markets","pork markets","cocoa markets","wheat markets","pig and hog markets","coarse grain markets","copper markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"605c3701-a446-5aa4-b71b-74ddd9352c96","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday

\u2003 \u2002\u2003Fri.\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003Thu.

F

Foods

\u2003Broilers national comp wtd av \u2002\u2002.9663\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002.9663

\u2003Eggs large white NY Doz. \u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.92\u2002

\u2003Flour hard winter KC cwt \u2002\u200212.50\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u200212.50

\u2003Cheddar Cheese Chi. 40 block per lb. \u20021.9750\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.9760

\u2003Coffee parana ex-dock NY per lb. \u20021.4081\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.4081

\u2003Coffee medlin ex-dock NY per lb. \u20021.5969\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.5969

\u2003Cocoa beans Ivory Coast $ metric ton \u2002\u2002\u20022284\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20022290

\u2003Cocoa butter African styl $ met ton \u2002\u2002\u20024985\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20025000

\u2003Hogs Iowa/Minn barrows & gilts wtd av \u2002\u200265.43\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u200265.43

\u2003Feeder cattle 500-550 lb Okl av cwt \u2002165.75\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002165.75

\u2003Pork loins 13-19 lb FOB Omaha av cwt \u2002\u200294.90\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u200294.90

Grains

\u2003Corn No. 2 yellow Chi processor bid \u20023.53\u00bc\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20023.53\u00be

\u2003Soybeans No. 1 yellow \u20029.58\u00be\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20029.74\u2003

\u2003Soybean Meal Cen Ill 48pct protein-ton 315.20\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002315.20

\u2003Wheat No. 2 Chi soft \u20023.99\u00be\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20023.96\u2003

\u2003Wheat N. 1 dk 14pc-pro Mpls. \u20026.30\u00be\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20026.36\u00be

\u2003Oats No. 2 heavy or Better \u20022.78\u00bc\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20022.74\u2003

Fats & Oils

\u2003Corn oil crude wet/dry mill Chi. lb. \u2002.37\u00bd\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.37\u00bd

\u2003Soybean oil crude Decatur lb. \u2002.31\u00bc\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.31\u00bc

Metals

\u2003Aluminum per lb LME \u2002.8676\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002.8663

\u2003Antimony in warehouse per ton \u2002\u20028600\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20028600

\u2003Copper Cathode full plate 2.6264\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u20022.5908

\u2003Gold Handy & Harman 1247.50\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20031247.50

\u2003Silver Handy & Harman \u200217.735\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u200217.610

\u2003Lead per metric ton LME 2363.00\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20032319.00

\u2003Molybdenum per metric ton LME \u200215,250\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u200215,250

\u2003Platinum per troy oz. Handy & Harman \u2002964.00\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002963.00

\u2003Platinum Merc spot per troy oz. \u2002967.90\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002963.80

\u2003Zinc (HG) delivered per lb. \u20021.2772\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.2779

Textiles, Fibers and Miscellaneous

\u2003Cotton 1-1-16 in. strict low middling \u2002\u200274.44\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u200274.23

Raw Products

\u2003Coal Central Appalachia $ per short ton \u2002\u200251.60\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u200251.60

\u2003Natural Gas Henry Hub, $ per mmbtu \u2002\u20022.93\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20022.93\u2003

b-bid a-asked

n-Nominal

r-revised

n.q.-not quoted

n.a.-not available

"}, {"id":"4794b901-45a8-5deb-9ad3-e64d1538c691","type":"article","starttime":"1490382203","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-24T12:03:23-07:00","lastupdated":"1490384840","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Maine unemployment hits lowest point in more than 16 years","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_4794b901-45a8-5deb-9ad3-e64d1538c691.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/maine-unemployment-hits-lowest-point-in-more-than-years/article_4794b901-45a8-5deb-9ad3-e64d1538c691.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/The-unemployment-rate-in-Maine-fell-in-February-to-3-2-percent-which-was-the-lowest-rate-since-December-2000/id-162ed23b660c40e4886db5086b4640ff","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) \u2014 The unemployment rate in Maine fell in February to 3.2 percent, which was the lowest rate since December 2000.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","employment figures","labor economy","economy","leading economic indicators"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"4794b901-45a8-5deb-9ad3-e64d1538c691","body":"

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) \u2014 The unemployment rate in Maine fell in February to 3.2 percent, which was the lowest rate since December 2000.

The state Department of Labor says the preliminary seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell from 3.5 percent in January and 3.7 percent a year ago.

The state also says the unemployment rate was below 4 percent in 13 of the last 16 months. That has only happened two other times in the last 40 years.

Maine's unemployment rate was below the federal mark of 4.7 percent and the New England rate of 3.7 percent.

"} ]