[ {"id":"78a00fed-52f7-5394-ae31-673784fd3d22","type":"article","starttime":"1484946667","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T14:11:07-07:00","lastupdated":"1484947948","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Markets Right Now: Dow industrials break 5-day losing streak","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_78a00fed-52f7-5394-ae31-673784fd3d22.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/markets-right-now-dow-industrials-break--day-losing-streak/article_78a00fed-52f7-5394-ae31-673784fd3d22.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/markets-right-now-dow-industrials-break--day-losing-streak/article_a13914c6-9ab2-58f7-8784-c18068a50d9e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local):","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","consumer product manufacturing","stock markets","financial markets","leading economic indicators","economy","consumer products and services","2017 united states presidential inauguration","materials industry","united states presidential inauguration","events","inaugurations","government and politics","executive branch"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"78a00fed-52f7-5394-ae31-673784fd3d22","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local):

4:00 p.m.

Stocks are ending higher, recouping much of the market's loss from a day earlier and breaking a 5-day losing streak for the Dow Jones industrial average.

Traders were keeping a close eye on the inauguration of Donald Trump as U.S. president and on corporate earnings.

Materials and phone companies led the gainers, while health care stocks fell.

Procter & Gamble rose after releasing a strong growth forecast, while General Electric fell after the conglomerate reported fourth-quarter revenue that fell short of analysts' estimates.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 7 points, or 0.3 percent, to 2,271.

The Dow climbed 94 points, or 0.5 percent, to 19,827. The Nasdaq composite gained 15 points, or 0.3 percent, to 5,555.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury held steady at 2.47 percent.

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) \u2014 As the stars and movie enthusiasts flock to Park City for the Sundance Film Festival that kicks into high gear this weekend, sales at Utah's state-run liquor sales in the area have spiked with high demand for some of the pricier cognacs and whiskeys.

Park City store manager Ron DeGraff said this is one of busiest weekends for sales at his store as all price levels of liquor fly off the shelves.

Saturday will likely be the second-biggest day after New Year's Eve with sales expected to reach $150,000, he said. Utah only allows state-run liquor stores, and DeGraff's store is the largest of three in Park City, a ski resort town of 8,000 people just east of Salt Lake City.

\"We see mayhem,\" said DeGraff. \"It's a busy, busy place.\"

The two-week Sundance Film Festival opened Thursday and runs through Jan. 29.

It drew more than 46,000 people last year, and out-of-state attendees spent a total of more than $51 million, according to a study by the University of Utah.

The stars like to buy expensive wines, whiskeys and cognacs such as Remy Martin Louis XIII cognac that goes for $3,300 per bottle and is kept in a glass case. Macallan scotches are big sellers with some people buying a 25-year aged scotch that goes for $1,800 a bottle, DeGraff said. On the lower end, bottles of Cabernet Sauvignon wine that cost $100 or more each sell quickly.

Movies stars are not usually seen in the liquor stores. DeGraff said they usually send assistants, members of their entourage or have management companies where they are staying buy their preferred drinks.

DeGraff, who has worked for the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control for 25 years, said more than a decade ago stars like Shirley Maclaine and Johnny Carson would come buy their own liquor.

\"They're pretty secretive about it now,\" DeGraff said.

Festival attendees who are usually much less wealthy they tend to buy more moderately priced tequilas and whiskeys.

A $30 Bulleit bourbon and a $20 Fireball Cinnamon Whiskey have been selling briskly, he said. California tourists frequently buy tequila.

People planning big corporate parties or events get their liquor from a fourth store in Park City that specializes in selling to clubs.

Those orders are usually placed three to five months in advance so they have what they need in time for the events, DeGraff said.

"}, {"id":"624b0924-50eb-50f7-a58b-7e3c99980a9a","type":"article","starttime":"1484944343","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:32:23-07:00","lastupdated":"1484947967","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Dow industrials edge higher after 5 straight losses","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_624b0924-50eb-50f7-a58b-7e3c99980a9a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/dow-industrials-edge-higher-after-straight-losses/article_624b0924-50eb-50f7-a58b-7e3c99980a9a.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/dow-industrials-edge-higher-after-straight-losses/article_3a83c567-5e78-505a-ab93-0a987f1eff37.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By ALEX VEIGA\nAP Business Writer","prologue":"Stocks edged higher in afternoon trading Friday, on course to recoup most of the market's losses from the day before. The rebound came about as investors weighed Donald Trump's swearing in as the 45th president of the United States and the latest batch of company earnings news. Phone companies led the gainers, while health care stocks were down the most.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","2017 united states presidential inauguration","united states presidential inauguration","inaugurations","oil and gas industry","electronic parts manufacturing","financial markets","leading economic indicators","economy","stock markets","events","government and politics","energy industry","financial performance","corporate news","industrial products and services","commodity markets","executive branch","materials industry","corporate management","personnel"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"becc294a-c99f-5a4b-b155-c7c157ca675e","description":"FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, file photo, the American flag flies above the Wall Street entrance to the New York Stock Exchange. Global shares were steady in cautious trading Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, ahead of the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump. China's report that its economy grew at a 6.8 percent pace in October-December was in line with expectations. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)","byline":"Richard Drew","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/ec/becc294a-c99f-5a4b-b155-c7c157ca675e/588232423c371.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/ec/becc294a-c99f-5a4b-b155-c7c157ca675e/588232423c371.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/ec/becc294a-c99f-5a4b-b155-c7c157ca675e/588232423c371.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/ec/becc294a-c99f-5a4b-b155-c7c157ca675e/588232423c371.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":13,"commentID":"624b0924-50eb-50f7-a58b-7e3c99980a9a","body":"

Stocks edged higher in afternoon trading Friday, on course to recoup most of the market's losses from the day before. The rebound came about as investors weighed Donald Trump's swearing in as the 45th president of the United States and the latest batch of company earnings news. Phone companies led the gainers, while health care stocks were down the most.

KEEPING SCORE: The Dow Jones industrial average rose 61 points, or 0.3 percent, to 19,794 as of 3:25 p.m. Eastern Time. The Dow is coming off five straight losses. The Standard & Poor's 500 index gained 4 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,267. The Nasdaq composite index added 7 points, or 0.1 percent, to 5,547.

THE QUOTE: \"This has been a relatively muted trading session we've seen today,\" said Bill Northey, chief investment officer of the Private Client Group at U.S. Bank. \"As we've gone through the first part of this year, it's been people waiting for the event that occurred today with the inauguration. We're still in a little bit of a lull right now.\"

TRUMP'S INAUGURATION: The major stock indexes pulled back slightly as Trump delivered remarks after taking the oath of office. Stocks have slowed in 2017 after surging for several weeks following Election Day on investor optimism that a Trump administration and Republican congress would usher in business-friendly policies. But the possibility of increased tariffs or trade restrictions could also mean drops in profits for big U.S. companies.

Since 1953, starting with President Dwight D. Eisenhower's inauguration, the S&P 500 has risen an average of 1.6 percent in the first 100 days of a president's first term in office, said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at CFRA Research.

STRONG RESULTS: Skyworks Solutions jumped 12.4 percent after the semiconductor products maker reported better-than-anticipated quarterly results. The stock was the biggest gainer in the S&P 500, adding $9.75 to $88.21.

BRIGHT OUTLOOK: Consumer goods maker Procter & Gamble rose 2.9 percent after releasing a strong growth forecast. The stock added $2.48 to $87.18.

EXCEEDING EXPECTATIONS: Citizens Financial Group gained 2.6 percent after reporting fourth-quarter earnings and revenue that beat analysts' expectations. The stock rose 90 cents to $35.63.

GOOD CALL: AT&T rose 1.2 percent after the phone company reported strong subscriber numbers. The stock added 48 cents to $41.48.

NOT GOOD ENOUGH: General Electric slid 2.6 percent after the conglomerate reported fourth-quarter revenue that fell short of analysts' forecasts. The stock gave up 80 cents to $30.41.

SLOW APPROACH: Bristol-Myers Squibb slumped 11.2 percent after the drugmaker said it won't pursue accelerated regulatory approval for a lung cancer treatment. The stock was the biggest decliner in the S&P 500 index, shedding $6.23 to $49.26.

MARKETS OVERSEAS: Germany's DAX rose 0.3 percent, while France's CAC 40 added 0.2 percent. Britain's FTSE 100 fell 0.1 percent. In Asia, Hong Kong's Hang Seng shed 0.7 percent after the Chinese government said the economy grew at a 6.8 percent annual rate in the last quarter, even as full-year growth increased 6.7 percent, the weakest in three decades. Tokyo's Nikkei 225 index rose 0.3 percent.

ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude rose $1.05, or 2 percent, to close at $52.42 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added $1.33, or 2.5 percent, to close at $55.49 a barrel in London.

In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline gained 3 cents to $1.57 a gallon and heating oil rose 3 cents to $1.65 a gallon. Natural gas slid 16 cents, or 4.9 percent, to $3.20 per 1,000 cubic feet.

BONDS: Bond prices were little changed. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note held steady at 2.47 percent. Yields have been rising as investors expect inflation to increase.

CURRENCIES: The dollar fell to 114.31 yen from Thursday's 114.80 yen. The euro rose to $1.0707 from $1.0659. The British pound edged up to $1.2378 from $1.2337.

METALS: Gold dropped $3.40 to settle at $1,204.90 an ounce, while silver fell 3 cents to $17.03 an ounce. Copper slipped a penny to $2.63 a pound.

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SAO PAULO (AP) \u2014 Brazilian authorities on Friday were investigating a plane crash that killed the Supreme Court justice in charge of a major corruption case just weeks before he was scheduled to issue a ruling that could have revealed accusations against politicians in several Latin American countries.

The death of Justice Teori Zavascki, 68, in Thursday's crash is likely to delay, though not derail, the \"Car Wash\" investigation, the largest corruption investigation in Brazil's history. Investigators allege inflated contracts with state oil giant Petrobras and other state-run companies yielded billions of dollars for bribes and election campaigns.

The small plane went down in heavy rains Thursday just off the coast of Paraty, a colonial town and popular vacation spot about 155 miles (250 kilometers) west of Rio de Janeiro. Rescuers said Friday that they had recovered all five bodies from the crash, including Zavascki, the pilot, a businessman, a woman who worked for the businessman, and her mother.

Although the cause was unclear, many Brazilians voiced fears of foul play since Zavascki held such an important role in the corruption investigation, in which dozens of politicians and businessmen already have been jailed. Transparency International called for a full investigation into the crash, and federal police and the public prosecutor have opened probes alongside those of aviation authorities.

The voice recorder was found Friday and is being sent to an Air Force laboratory, the Brazilian Air Force said in a statement. The wreckage of the plane will be analyzed in Rio de Janeiro state, where the crash occurred.

The prosecutor's office has already asked aviation authorities for documents about the plane's maintenance and the cockpit recordings.

While the \"Car Wash\" probe \u2014 known as \"Lava Jato\" in Brazil \u2014 has been led by a team of prosecutors and Judge Sergio Moro in the southern city of Curitiba, Zavascki handled cases involving politicians. Under Brazilian law, only the Supreme Court can decide to charge or jail federal politicians.

Zavascki had been reviewing dozens of plea bargains of former and current executives of the Odebrecht construction company, which was one of the main players in the kickback scheme that prosecutors say yielded more than $2 billion in bribes over a decade.

The justice was expected to decide which of the Odebrecht plea bargains to validate by February, and his death will likely drag out that timeline. Validation would make them public, potentially implicating dozens of politicians in Brazil and several other countries where Odebrecht did business.

President Michel Temer, who could be one of those implicated in the plea bargains, is supposed to name Zavascki's successor, who would typically take over the deceased justice's caseload.

However, the court itself could also decide to transfer Zavascki's cases to a sitting justice, and the country's bar association encouraged the court to do so.

\"The immediate reassignment of the Lava Jato case ... is imperative,\" Claudio Lamachia, chairman of the bar association, said in a statement.

Analysts expressed confidence the case would continue despite Zavascki's death.

\"The Lava Jato probe will not suffer a material setback,\" Christopher Garman of Eurasia Group wrote in a note. \"And we wouldn't bet on too large of a delay. There will be tremendous pressure within the court, and in public opinion, to keep the investigations alive.\"

In his plea deal testimony, former Odebrecht director Claudio Melo Filho cited Temer 44 times, making accusations of illegal campaign financing. If his allegations are confirmed by Brazil's top electoral court, Temer would be removed from the presidency and Congress would pick a successor. Temer denies any wrongdoing.

About 100 politicians and business executives have already been arrested or are under investigation in Brazil in the probe. In addition to Temer, senior Cabinet members and close aides and allies of the president have been implicated in testimony from some of those arrested.

___

Associated Press writers Peter Prengaman in Rio de Janeiro and Mauricio Savarese in Chapeco contributed this report.

"}, {"id":"006206e5-7dfd-5ade-a9a5-90d26770b685","type":"article","starttime":"1484943578","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:19:38-07:00","lastupdated":"1484947162","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Recalls this week: Baby mobiles, bicycles","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_006206e5-7dfd-5ade-a9a5-90d26770b685.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/recalls-this-week-baby-mobiles-bicycles/article_006206e5-7dfd-5ade-a9a5-90d26770b685.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/recalls-this-week-baby-mobiles-bicycles/article_6bff0258-4886-59a4-9424-f352b3fcf16a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By The Associated Press","prologue":"Baby and child mobiles are being recalled this week because a wheel that can detach. Other recalled consumer products include bicycles with a structural defect.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","lifestyle","personal finance","products and services","corporate news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"006206e5-7dfd-5ade-a9a5-90d26770b685","body":"

Baby and child mobiles are being recalled this week because a wheel that can detach. Other recalled consumer products include bicycles with a structural defect.

Here's a more detailed look:

BABY & CHILD MOBILES

DETAILS: RH Baby & Child vintage race car mobiles. The recalled mobiles are used as decorative items that hang from the ceiling. The mobiles contain six wooden cars in various colors with spinning axles and wooden wheels attached to the axles. They were sold at RH Baby & Child stores nationwide and online at RHBabyandChild.com from October 2014 through October 2016.

WHY: The wheels on the mobile's hanging cars can detach and fall, posing a choking hazard to young children.

INCIDENTS: One report of a wheel detaching from the mobile. No injuries have been reported.

HOW MANY: About 1,000.

FOR MORE: Call RH at 888-728-8419 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday or visit www.RH.com and click on \"Safety Recalls\" at the bottom of the page for more information.

BICYCLES

DETAILS: Model year 2015, 2016 and 2017 Trek model 720 Disc bicycles and Bontrager Approved TLR disc 700C 24H Front and Rear Wheels with silver spokes. \"Trek\" is printed across the bicycle frame. The model number can be found on the down tube. The aftermarket wheels are marked \"Bontrager TLR\" on the rim, and will have 24 silver spokes. The bikes were sold in bicycle stores nationwide from November 2014 through October 2016, and the aftermarket wheels from March 2015 through November 2016.

WHY: The front brake caliper can come into contact with a broken spoke, posing a fall hazard to the rider.

INCIDENTS: 10 incidents where either the wheel spoke contacted the bike's brake caliper or the spokes broke at the hub. There has been one reported injury involving a broken vertebra.

HOW MANY: About 800 bicycles and 300 wheels in the U.S. and about 160 bicycles and 40 wheels in Canada.

FOR MORE: Call Trek at 800-373-4594 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. CT Monday through Friday or visit www.trekbikes.com and click on \"Safety & recalls\" at the bottom of the page for more information.

"}, {"id":"d1fae585-51cd-5d72-8d78-c3babc6383dc","type":"article","starttime":"1484943494","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:18:14-07:00","lastupdated":"1484947162","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"BC-Cash Prices, 1st Ld-Writethru,0342","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_d1fae585-51cd-5d72-8d78-c3babc6383dc.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_d1fae585-51cd-5d72-8d78-c3babc6383dc.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_5712b924-83fe-5058-8dea-d8d153023eea.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","commodity markets","financial markets","business"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"d1fae585-51cd-5d72-8d78-c3babc6383dc","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday.

\u2003 \u2002\u2003Fri.\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003Thu.

F

Foods

\u2003Broilers FOB Ga. ice-packed lb. wtd av \u2002n.a.\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002n.a.\u2002\u2002

\u2003Eggs large white NY Doz. \u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.86\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.85

\u2003Flour hard winter KC cwt \u2002\u200213.65\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u200213.65

\u2003Cheddar Cheese Chi. 40 block per lb. \u20022.3250\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20022.3250

\u2003Coffee parana ex-dock NY per lb. \u20021.4667\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.4667

\u2003Coffee medlin ex-dock NY per lb. \u20021.6596\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.6596

\u2003Cocoa beans Ivory Coast $ metric ton \u2002\u2002\u20022436\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20022556

\u2003Cocoa butter African styl $ met ton \u2002\u2002\u20025300\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20025576

\u2003Hogs Iowa/Minn barrows & gilts wtd av \u2002\u200263.43\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u200263.43

\u2003Feeder cattle 500-550 lb Okl av cwt \u2002144.00\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002144.00

\u2003Pork loins 13-19 lb FOB Omaha av cwt \u2002\u200291.73\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u200291.73

Grains

\u2003Corn No. 2 yellow Chi processor bid \u20023.74\u00be\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20023.71\u00bc

\u2003Soybeans No. 1 yellow 10.55\u00bd\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u200210.58\u00bc

\u2003Soybean Meal Cen Ill 48pct protein-ton 347.20\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002347.20

\u2003Wheat No. 2 Chi soft \u20024.28\u00bc\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20024.23\u00bd

\u2003Wheat N. 1 dk 14pc-pro Mpls. \u20026.60\u00bd\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20026.81\u00bd

\u2003Oats No. 2 heavy or Better \u20022.92\u00be\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u20022.88\u2003

Fats & Oils

\u2003Corn oil crude wet/dry mill Chi. lb. \u2002.38\u00bc\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.38\u00bc

\u2003Soybean oil crude Decatur lb. \u2002.337/8\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2002.337/8

Metals

\u2003Aluminum per lb LME \u2002.8309\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002.8164

\u2003Antimony in warehouse per ton \u2002\u20027450\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20027450

\u2003Copper Cathode full plate 2.5899\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u20022.5947

\u2003Gold Handy & Harman 1200.55\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20031196.05

\u2003Silver Handy & Harman \u200217.010\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u200216.885

\u2003Lead per metric ton LME 2315.00\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20032303.50

\u2003Molybdenum per metric ton LME \u200215,250\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u200215,250

\u2003Platinum per troy oz. Handy & Harman \u2002963.00\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002956.00

\u2003Platinum Merc spot per troy oz. \u2002972.20\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002952.80

\u2003Zinc (HG) delivered per lb. \u20021.2511\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u20021.2367

Textiles, Fibers and Miscellaneous

\u2003Cotton 1-1-16 in. strict low middling \u2002\u200271.46\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u200271.21

Raw Products

\u2003Coal Central Appalachia $ per short ton \u2002\u200246.50\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u200246.50

\u2003Natural Gas Henry Hub, $ per mmbtu \u2002\u20023.21\u2003\u2002\u2002\u2003\u2002\u2002\u20023.21\u2003

b-bid a-asked

n-Nominal

r-revised

n.q.-not quoted

n.a.-not available

"}, {"id":"b69082af-a4e5-5bf9-a92a-dd5309410cab","type":"article","starttime":"1484943494","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:18:14-07:00","lastupdated":"1484947162","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"BC-Cash Prices, 1st Ld-Writethru,0342","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_b69082af-a4e5-5bf9-a92a-dd5309410cab.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_b69082af-a4e5-5bf9-a92a-dd5309410cab.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/bc-cash-prices-st-ld-writethru/article_8c798e49-1d28-5516-8a28-9e8509a97f7d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","commodity markets","financial markets","business"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"b69082af-a4e5-5bf9-a92a-dd5309410cab","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Wholesale cash prices Friday.

Fri. Thu.

F

Foods

Broilers FOB Ga. ice-packed lb. wtd av n.a. n.a.

Eggs large white NY Doz. .86 .85

Flour hard winter KC cwt 13.65 13.65

Cheddar Cheese Chi. 40 block per lb. 2.3250 2.3250

Coffee parana ex-dock NY per lb. 1.4667 1.4667

Coffee medlin ex-dock NY per lb. 1.6596 1.6596

Cocoa beans Ivory Coast $ metric ton 2436 2556

Cocoa butter African styl $ met ton 5300 5576

Hogs Iowa/Minn barrows & gilts wtd av 63.43 63.43

Feeder cattle 500-550 lb Okl av cwt 144.00 144.00

Pork loins 13-19 lb FOB Omaha av cwt 91.73 91.73

Grains

Corn No. 2 yellow Chi processor bid 3.74\u00be 3.71\u00bc

Soybeans No. 1 yellow 10.55\u00bd 10.58\u00bc

Soybean Meal Cen Ill 48pct protein-ton 347.20 347.20

Wheat No. 2 Chi soft 4.28\u00bc 4.23\u00bd

Wheat N. 1 dk 14pc-pro Mpls. 6.60\u00bd 6.81\u00bd

Oats No. 2 heavy or Better 2.92\u00be 2.88

Fats & Oils

Corn oil crude wet/dry mill Chi. lb. .38\u00bc .38\u00bc

Soybean oil crude Decatur lb. .337/8 .337/8

Metals

Aluminum per lb LME .8309 .8164

Antimony in warehouse per ton 7450 7450

Copper Cathode full plate 2.5899 2.5947

Gold Handy & Harman 1200.55 1196.05

Silver Handy & Harman 17.010 16.885

Lead per metric ton LME 2315.00 2303.50

Molybdenum per metric ton LME 15,250 15,250

Platinum per troy oz. Handy & Harman 963.00 956.00

Platinum Merc spot per troy oz. 972.20 952.80

Zinc (HG) delivered per lb. 1.2511 1.2367

Textiles, Fibers and Miscellaneous

Cotton 1-1-16 in. strict low middling 71.46 71.21

Raw Products

Coal Central Appalachia $ per short ton 46.50 46.50

Natural Gas Henry Hub, $ per mmbtu 3.21 3.21

b-bid a-asked

n-Nominal

r-revised

n.q.-not quoted

n.a.-not available

"}, {"id":"c55eaf47-404e-52b6-8309-51e42bf03cfa","type":"article","starttime":"1484943755","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:22:35-07:00","lastupdated":"1484947162","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Weekly Summary Corporate dividends, name changes, new listings","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_c55eaf47-404e-52b6-8309-51e42bf03cfa.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/weekly-summary-corporate-dividends-name-changes-new-listings/article_c55eaf47-404e-52b6-8309-51e42bf03cfa.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/weekly-summary-corporate-dividends-name-changes-new-listings/article_a4eb18fd-899b-57de-9685-5e952d2e6b4a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Changes announced in corporate dividends Jan. 16-Jan. 20","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","corporate news","corporate stock","business","stock markets","financial markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"c55eaf47-404e-52b6-8309-51e42bf03cfa","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Changes announced in corporate dividends Jan. 16-Jan. 20

INCREASED DIVIDENDS

Alexanders Inc 4.25 from 4.00

Bear State Financial .03 from .025

Boston Private Finl .11 from .10

CMS Energy Corp .3325 from .31

Capital Product Partners .08 from .075

Consolidated Edison .69 from .67

EPR Properties .34 from .32

EQT Midstream Prtnr LP .85 from .815

Fastenal Co .32 from .30

First Community Corp .09 from .08

First Financial Bncp OH .17 from .16

First Interstate Bcsystem .24 from .22

HCI Group Inc .35 from .30

Heartland Financial USA .11 from .10

Kaiser Aluminum .50 from .45

Linear Technology .33 from .32

Mercantile Bank .18 from .17

One Gas Inc .42 from .35

Phillips 66 Prtnr .558 from .531

Shell Midstream Prtnr LP .277 from .22

Tesoro Logistics LP .91 from .875

Transmontaigne Prtnrs .71 from .70

Vornado Realty Tr .71 from .63

Washington Federal .15 from .14

Western Gas Equity Ptnrs .4625 from .433

Western Gas Ptnrs .86 from .83

g- Canadian funds

INITIAL DIVIDENDS

Jacobs Engr Group .15

Special Dividends

Melco Crown Ent ADR 1.32

OTHER CORPORATE NEWS AND LISTINGS:

STOCK SPLITS THIS WEEK

First Foundation 2 for 1 split

iSh Core S&P Small-Cap 2 for 1 split

ACQUISITIONS AND MERGERS

MINIMUM VALUE $100 MILLION

Media General Inc - Nexstar Broadcasting Group (4.6B)

NEW STOCK LISTINGS

NYSE

Varex Imaging Corp when issued

NASDAQ GLOBAL AND GLOBAL SELECT MARKETS

Citrix Systems Inc when issued

LogMein Inc when issued

STOCKS REMOVED FROM TRADING

NYSE

Cutwater Select Income Fund

NASDAQ GLOBAL AND GLOBAL SELECT MARKETS

Leap Therapeutics Inc

Varex Imaging Corp when issued

CORPORATE NAME CHANGES

China BAK Battery Inc to

CBAK Energy Technology Inc

Nexstar Broadcasting Group Cl A to

Nexstar Media Group Cl A

"}, {"id":"fd1a5331-24b5-59be-b73b-0e26b56f51a8","type":"article","starttime":"1484942913","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:08:33-07:00","lastupdated":"1484945378","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Initial public offerings scheduled to debut next week","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_fd1a5331-24b5-59be-b73b-0e26b56f51a8.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/initial-public-offerings-scheduled-to-debut-next-week/article_fd1a5331-24b5-59be-b73b-0e26b56f51a8.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/initial-public-offerings-scheduled-to-debut-next-week/article_dc2c5f51-8178-52b4-b8c2-4d83035c9a5c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The following is a list of initial public offerings planned for the coming week. Sources include IPO ETF manager Renaissance Capital, and SEC filings.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","corporate stock","corporate news","business"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"fd1a5331-24b5-59be-b73b-0e26b56f51a8","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The following is a list of initial public offerings planned for the coming week. Sources include IPO ETF manager Renaissance Capital, and SEC filings.

Week of Jan. 23:

AnaptysBio - San Diego, Calif., 4 million shares, priced $14-$16, managed by Credit Suisse/Stifel. Proposed Nasdaq symbol ANAB. Business: A biotechnology company developing an antibody product. Focusing on unmet medical needs in inflammation and immuno-oncology.

"}, {"id":"3f272709-3105-5e36-9e42-6752c77c47ff","type":"article","starttime":"1484943083","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:11:23-07:00","lastupdated":"1484945378","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Prosecutor: 'Dance Mom' should be imprisoned for fraud","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_3f272709-3105-5e36-9e42-6752c77c47ff.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/prosecutor-dance-mom-should-be-imprisoned-for-fraud/article_3f272709-3105-5e36-9e42-6752c77c47ff.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/prosecutor-dance-mom-should-be-imprisoned-for-fraud/article_88f3544a-6a86-5d6b-98bd-8b53b249ac17.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JOE MANDAK\nAssociated Press","prologue":"PITTSBURGH (AP) \u2014 A prosecutor on Friday urged a federal judge to sentence \"Dance Moms\" star Abby Lee Miller to prison instead of probation for bankruptcy fraud.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","arts and entertainment","general news","celebrity","entertainment","legal proceedings","fraud and false statements","crime","accounting, tax preparation and payroll services","law and order","television programs","performing arts","professional services","national courts","courts","judiciary","government and politics","national governments","financial performance","corporate news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"8e373e56-fd86-54c0-b139-538f0c2022cc","description":"FILE- In this June 27, 2016, file photo, \"Dance Moms\" star Abby Lee Miller leaves federal court after pleading guilty in Pittsburgh to bankruptcy fraud and failing to report thousands of dollars in Australian currency she brought into the country. Miller is scheduled to appear in federal court in Pittsburgh on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, for the start of her sentencing hearing in her bankruptcy fraud case. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)","byline":"Keith Srakocic","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/e3/8e373e56-fd86-54c0-b139-538f0c2022cc/5881b2a2d830a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/e3/8e373e56-fd86-54c0-b139-538f0c2022cc/5881b2a2d830a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/e3/8e373e56-fd86-54c0-b139-538f0c2022cc/5881b2a2d830a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/e3/8e373e56-fd86-54c0-b139-538f0c2022cc/5881b2a2d830a.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"3f272709-3105-5e36-9e42-6752c77c47ff","body":"

PITTSBURGH (AP) \u2014 A prosecutor on Friday urged a federal judge to sentence \"Dance Moms\" star Abby Lee Miller to prison instead of probation for bankruptcy fraud.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Gregory Melucci called witnesses to buttress his contention that the reality TV show star tried to avoid repaying hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt by hiding about $775,000 in income from a bankruptcy court.

Miller's attorneys will call witnesses when the hearing continues Feb. 24, after which she'll be sentenced. Miller and her attorneys said they won't comment until then.

Melucci faces an uphill battle to convince U.S. District Judge Joy Flowers Conti that Miller deserves two to 2 1/2 years in prison.

That's because the judge filed tentative findings on the eve of Friday's hearing essentially agreeing with the defense argument that Miller deserves probation because no creditors lost money once the bankruptcy fraud was discovered.

But Melucci said the law allows Conti to sentence Miller based on the amount of money she intended to avoid repaying.

He said the only reason for Miller to hide income was to avoid repaying everything she owed. \"No one would rob a bank if he knew it had no money in it,\" Melucci argued.

Miller filed for bankruptcy largely because she had defaulted on a $245,000 mortgage on a Florida condominium and a $96,000 mortgage on her dance studio in Penn Hills, a Pittsburgh suburb. She listed nearly $60,000 in other debts, including unpaid property taxes.

Miller wanted the Chapter 11 bankruptcy court to let her repay only $150,000 of the condominium mortgage at a lower interest rate \u2014 and at one point offered to forfeit the property to avoid repaying anything. She sought to repay her other debts in full, but without interest or at lower rates.

The outraged bankruptcy judge eventually ordered Miller to repay every penny.

Miller pleaded guilty in June to purposely hiding her income in financial disclosure statements filed with the bankruptcy court starting in 2012. People who file Chapter 11 must honestly disclose their assets so the creditors can fairly assess whether to approve any court-approved repayment plan.

\"The entire Chapter 11 system is based on full disclosure, and if there's not full disclosure, the whole system falls apart,\" U.S. Bankruptcy Trustee Larry Wahlchrist testified.

But Miller repeatedly hid her true income \u2014 as well as contracts for future income from her TV shows \u2014 until her channel-surfing bankruptcy judge saw her on TV and concluded Miller must be making far more than the $8,899 in monthly income she initially declared.

Wahlchrist testified Miller earned $8,000 to $25,000 per episode as her popularity exploded, and deposited money in nonapproved bank accounts to hide assets.

Miller eventually coughed up $288,000 in TV income she'd received. Federal investigators later determined she had hidden nearly $550,000 more from personal appearances, dance sessions and merchandise sales.

Miller made a major concession on an unrelated charge that she also pleaded guilty to in June, sneaking $120,000 in foreign currency into the country from Australia in 2014.

Miller agreed to forfeit that money, which she previously sought to avoid. In return, prosecutors won't ask the judge to enhance Miller's sentence for using children to help in that scheme.

Prosecutors can't comment on that and haven't named the children. They have said in court documents that Miller divvied up money and hid it in the luggage of others in her party to avoid a federal law requiring people to report bringing more than $10,000 in foreign currency into the country.

"}, {"id":"72240651-cf23-5a35-a469-89e5669977d5","type":"article","starttime":"1484942723","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:05:23-07:00","lastupdated":"1484945378","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"US rig count jumps 35 this week to 694; Texas up 17","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_72240651-cf23-5a35-a469-89e5669977d5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/us-rig-count-jumps-this-week-to-texas-up/article_72240651-cf23-5a35-a469-89e5669977d5.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/us-rig-count-jumps-this-week-to-texas-up/article_9907051b-b144-546f-bc81-ba43f88463c0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"HOUSTON (AP) \u2014 The number of rigs exploring for oil and natural gas in the U.S. leaped by 35 this week to 694.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","oil and gas industry","energy industry"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"72240651-cf23-5a35-a469-89e5669977d5","body":"

HOUSTON (AP) \u2014 The number of rigs exploring for oil and natural gas in the U.S. leaped by 35 this week to 694.

A year ago, 637 rigs were active.

Houston oilfield services company Baker Hughes Inc. said Friday that 551 rigs sought oil and 142 explored for natural gas this week. One was listed as miscellaneous.

Texas jumped by 17 rigs, Oklahoma increased by seven, North Dakota was up three and Ohio two. New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Utah and West Virginia increased one apiece.

Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana and Wyoming were all unchanged.

The U.S. rig count peaked at 4,530 in 1981. It bottomed out in May at 404.

"}, {"id":"42f2a64a-bdf2-5ea7-8939-101f288371af","type":"article","starttime":"1484942433","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T13:00:33-07:00","lastupdated":"1484944297","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"BC-Cotton Bale","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_42f2a64a-bdf2-5ea7-8939-101f288371af.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/bc-cotton-bale/article_42f2a64a-bdf2-5ea7-8939-101f288371af.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/bc-cotton-bale/article_54d6cbb0-3077-5723-98c1-05faa012bfb4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Cotton futures No. 2 closed 5 cents a bale lower to $2.20 higher Friday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","commodity markets","financial markets","business"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"42f2a64a-bdf2-5ea7-8939-101f288371af","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Cotton futures No. 2 closed 5 cents a bale lower to $2.20 higher Friday.

The average for strict low middling 1 & 1-16 inch spot cotton advanced 25 cents to 71.46 cents per pound Friday the seven markets, according to the Market News Branch, Memphis USDA.

"}, {"id":"6fbe71bc-8ffd-5821-9828-db791c7a5aca","type":"article","starttime":"1484942374","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T12:59:34-07:00","lastupdated":"1484944298","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Nebraska keno operator accused of hundreds of violations","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_6fbe71bc-8ffd-5821-9828-db791c7a5aca.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/nebraska-keno-operator-accused-of-hundreds-of-violations/article_6fbe71bc-8ffd-5821-9828-db791c7a5aca.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/nebraska-keno-operator-accused-of-hundreds-of-violations/article_8d70addb-9b6c-52fc-a36e-8059c2cd42ab.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) \u2014 A southeastern Nebraska keno operator is accused of concealing $1.28 million in illegal bets and committing more than 260 violations of state regulations.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","illegal gambling","crime"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"6fbe71bc-8ffd-5821-9828-db791c7a5aca","body":"

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) \u2014 A southeastern Nebraska keno operator is accused of concealing $1.28 million in illegal bets and committing more than 260 violations of state regulations.

The state Department of Revenue's Division of Charitable Gaming wants to fine Zeilinger Keno $263,000 and revoke its lottery operator and worker licenses, The Lincoln Journal Star reported (http://bit.ly/2jfAeq5 ). Zeilinger Keno provides 30 area communities with keno.

Todd Zeilinger denied any wrongdoing and said he leaves day-to-day operations to bar operators where the games are played. He told the newspaper he's going to work with regulators and \"make sure it doesn't happen again.\"

Regulators say Zeilinger covered for people who placed illegal bets and say he made more than $179,000 in commissions off the wagers. They also said Zeilinger knowingly concealed money missing from the Sutton American Legion keno account and failed to report short and missing deposits to the city of Sutton and the Gaming Division as required by law.

A special prosecutor has been appointed to review the Sutton American Legion case.

Revenue department documents say the owner of the now-closed Rough Reins bar, Jadeen Strauss, was accused of placing $933, 500 in wagers on credit between Jan. 1 and June 4 last year. Placing bets on credit is illegal. Strauss pleaded no contest Tuesday to running a fraudulent lottery scheme, and is scheduled to be sentenced in March.

Zeilinger said that after he was informed of the illegal bets by officials, he shut down operations at the former Rough Reins bar in Utica and at the American Legion in Sutton until the management could be changed.

___

Information from: Lincoln Journal Star, http://www.journalstar.com

"}, {"id":"3cb6b58e-f59a-57ea-825c-64d17773c3ab","type":"article","starttime":"1484940122","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T12:22:02-07:00","lastupdated":"1484943434","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"How student loan servicers affect tens of millions of people","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_3cb6b58e-f59a-57ea-825c-64d17773c3ab.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/how-student-loan-servicers-affect-tens-of-millions-of-people/article_3cb6b58e-f59a-57ea-825c-64d17773c3ab.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/how-student-loan-servicers-affect-tens-of-millions-of-people/article_74760ce9-4ff7-5779-94e9-2144f79672b6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By MARCY GORDON\nAP Business Writer","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 They aren't well-known. Their names are odd. And what they do \u2014 well, it's complicated.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","education costs","education","social affairs","industry regulation","government business and finance","government and politics","government regulations","consumer protection and advocacy","consumer affairs"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"089cf7a2-2794-5513-b408-8d3adf86e613","description":"This Wednesday, April 2, 2014, photo, shows the headquarters of student loan debt collector Navient Corporation, in Wilmington, Del. Student loan servicers play a key role in the lives of the 44 million Americans who, combined, have run up $1.4 trillion in student debt. In January 2016, regulators filed a lawsuit against the largest of them, Navient, accusing it of making it harder for borrowers to repay loans by giving them flawed information, processing payments incorrectly and failing to act on complaints. (William Bretzger/The Wilmington News-Journal via AP)","byline":"William Bretzger","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"348","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/89/089cf7a2-2794-5513-b408-8d3adf86e613/5882704ab102d.image.jpg?resize=512%2C348"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/89/089cf7a2-2794-5513-b408-8d3adf86e613/5882704ab102d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/89/089cf7a2-2794-5513-b408-8d3adf86e613/5882704ab102d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C204"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"696","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/89/089cf7a2-2794-5513-b408-8d3adf86e613/5882704ab102d.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"3cb6b58e-f59a-57ea-825c-64d17773c3ab","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 They aren't well-known. Their names are odd. And what they do \u2014 well, it's complicated.

Yet student loan servicers \u2014 with names like AES-PHEAA and Nelnet \u2014 play a key role in the lives of the 44 million Americans who, combined, have amassed a $1.4 trillion mountain of student debt.

And this week, regulators accused the largest of them, Navient, of making it harder for borrowers to repay loans by giving them flawed information, processing payments incorrectly and failing to act on complaints.

In its lawsuit, the government's Consumer Financial Protection Bureau demands restitution for affected borrowers and financial penalties from Navient, which manages $300 billion in loans. Navient disputes the allegations.

Here's a look at student loan servicers and what they do.

___

Q: What function do these loan servicers provide?

A: Think of them as a liaison between a borrower and the bank or institution that extended a student loan, such as the U.S. Education Department. They manage borrowers' loan accounts, and they process monthly payments.

The servicers communicate with borrowers and provide information to them. And they handle any complications that arise. Say a borrower loses her job or encounters some other financial hardship. She would contact her loan servicer to seek an alternative repayment plan \u2014 one that might be based on the borrower's income \u2014 or request a deferral of payments or modification of the loan terms.

Student loans can be complex, and servicers manage those complications. Many borrowers juggle multiple loans, with different interest rates that can change periodically.

___

Q: From the standpoint of student borrowers, how have the servicer companies performed?

A: A report that the CFPB issued in September 2015 outlined widespread servicing failures reported by borrowers with both federal and private-market student loans. The report cited troubles with payment processing, paperwork, resolution of account errors and access to alternative repayment plans.

The result was that borrowers faced the possibility of being hit with higher interest rates, \"payment shock,\" damage to their credit records and even default, the report says.

____

Q: How widespread are these troubles?

A: Consider this: Every 28 seconds, someone defaults on a student loan in this country. That figure comes from Rohit Chopra, a former CFPB assistant director and student loan ombudsman, who based it on Education Department data.

The CFPB estimates that one in four student loan borrowers are delinquent and struggling to repay or already in default \u2014 a problem the agency says might be fueled by failures of the loan servicers.

Borrowers normally can't choose which loan servicer manages their loan. If you're unhappy with the service in a restaurant, you just don't return there, notes Chopra, now a senior fellow at Consumer Federation of America.

\"But when it comes to servicing student loans, borrowers cannot fire them; they're stuck with them,\" he says.

Employees in call centers operated by servicer companies often rush borrowers off the phone without giving them the appropriate remedies, Chopra says.

___

Q: Is there a broader impact on Americans?

A: The roughly $1.4 trillion in student debt carried by 44 million people causes delays in home ownership and limits how much people can save. One of the results can be a decline in college savings for the borrower's children, thereby creating a multigenerational debt cycle.

What's more, among the 44 million student-debt holders, 8 million are in default on loans totaling about $130 billion, the CFPB has found.

___

Q: What options for repayment plans exist for struggling borrowers?

A: Most borrowers with federal student loans \u2014 in contrast to private-market loans \u2014 are entitled by law to make payments based on how much they earn through so-called income-driven repayment plans. For the first three years after enrollment, the government may pay part of the interest if the borrower can't keep up. After 20 or 25 years of monthly payments, borrowers in the plans may be eligible for loan forgiveness.

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The four men and two women moved into their new simulated space home Thursday afternoon, as part of a human-behavior study that could help NASA as it draws up plans for sending astronauts on long missions to Mars. (University of Hawaii via AP)","byline":"HOGP","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"384","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/41/941fa3a2-4d01-59dc-b0b2-72d44131a20c/5882232ea6958.image.jpg?resize=512%2C384"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/41/941fa3a2-4d01-59dc-b0b2-72d44131a20c/5882232ea6958.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/41/941fa3a2-4d01-59dc-b0b2-72d44131a20c/5882232ea6958.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/41/941fa3a2-4d01-59dc-b0b2-72d44131a20c/5882232ea6958.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"cddaa483-e390-5ebc-a134-f98454b083e2","body":"

HONOLULU (AP) \u2014 Crammed into a dome with one bathroom, six scientists will spend eight months munching on mostly freeze-dried foods \u2014 with a rare treat of Spam \u2014 and have only their small sleeping quarters to retreat to for solace.

The simulated stay on Mars with a carefully selected crew of researchers embarked on a mission Thursday to gain insight into the psychological toll a similar real-life voyage would have on astronauts. It's part of a NASA-funded human-behavior experiment that could help the space agency send humans to the red planet in the next 20 years.

The man-made dome that the four men and two women call home is outfitted with futuristic white walls and an elevated sleeping platform on the world's largest active volcano in Hawaii. The vinyl-covered shelter spans 1,200 square feet, or about the size of a small, two-bedroom house.

A video released by the group shows the six scientists in matching red polo shirts arriving and entering the dome to farewell handshakes from program associates.

Except for the presence of the white van that brought the group, the scene was reminiscent of the red planet \u2014 the dome set in a barren, rock-strewn and reddish landscape with distant hills giving the feel of a wind-swept and forbidding environment.

\"I'm looking forward to building relationships with my crew,\" said mission commander James Bevington, a space scientist. \"I fully anticipate coming out with five new best friends.\"

They will have no physical contact with people in the outside world and will work with a 20-minute delay in communications with their support crew \u2014 the time it would take for an email to reach Earth from Mars.

The project will study the psychological difficulties with living in isolated, confined conditions for an extended period.

NASA hopes to send humans to an asteroid in the 2020s and Mars by the 2030s.

\"We're hoping to figure out how best to select individual astronauts, how to compose a crew and how to support that crew on long-duration space missions,\" said principal investigator Kim Binsted, a University of Hawaii science professor.

The team members include engineers, a computer scientist, a doctoral candidate and a biomedical expert. They were selected from 700 applicants subjected to personality tests, background checks and extensive interviews.

\"When I started, my biggest fear was that we were going to be that crew that turned out like Biosphere 2, which wasn't a very pretty picture,\" Bevington said.

The experimental greenhouse-like habitat in Arizona became a debacle in the 1990s. It housed different ecosystems and a crew of eight to try to understand what would be needed for humans to live on other planets. The participants were supposed to grow their own food and recycle their air inside the sealed glass space.

But the experiment soon spiraled out of control, with the carbon dioxide level rising dangerously and plants and animals dying. The crew members grew hungry and squabbled so badly that by the time they emerged two years later, some of them weren't speaking to each other.

The University of Hawaii operates the dome, called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or HI-SEAS, and NASA has dedicated more than $2 million to the various stages of the project.

Scientists previously lived in the dome for two other long-term NASA-funded stays \u2014 one of them lasting a year, the other eight months \u2014 to study food requirements and crew cohesion.

A number of other Mars simulation projects exist around the world, but one of the chief advantages of the Hawaii experiment is the rugged, Mars-like landscape, on a rocky, red plain below the summit of the world's largest active volcano, the Big Island's Mauna Loa.

The dome has a kitchen, laboratory and bathroom, plus small sleeping quarters for each member. Unlike Biosphere 2, it won't be airtight.

To maintain the crew's sense of isolation, bundles of food, including some canned goods and snacks, will be dropped off a distance from the dome, and the team members will send a robot to retrieve them.

The participants will not be confined but will wear spacesuits whenever they step outside for geological expeditions, mapping studies or other tasks.

They will wear instruments measuring their moods and proximity to other team members and use virtual reality devices to simulate familiar and comforting surroundings.

___

Follow Hawaii correspondent Caleb Jones on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CalebAP . See more of his work here: https://apnews.com/search/Caleb%20Jones%20Hawaii .

___

This version corrects that NASA has funded over $2 million for the entire project, not for this stage.

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BOSTON (AP) \u2014 Hollywood films about the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings shot on location last year to bring the story to the silver screen, but not all the for-profit productions have been forthcoming about the taxpayer-funded benefits they're seeking or have already received for filming in Massachusetts.

\"Patriots Day,\" the $40 million film starring Mark Wahlberg that opened nationwide Jan. 13, sought state film tax credits, but production officials declined to provide more details when asked by The Associated Press.

\"Other locations would have been less expensive for us to film, but everyone involved in our production felt it was important to make 'Patriots Day' in Boston,\" spokeswoman Mariellen Burns said in an emailed statement. \"This was Boston's story.\"

Representatives for \"Stronger,\" an upcoming film starring Jake Gyllenhaal as a bombing survivor, declined to comment.

And \"Marathon: The Patriots Day Bombing,\" a documentary focused on bombing survivors that aired Nov. 21, did not apply for credits because it didn't meet program requirements, said HBO Films spokeswoman Lana Iny.

The Massachusetts Film Office provided the AP with emails and other documents exchanged between the productions and the agency as part of a public records request, but nothing that hinted at how much the films sought or received in credits.

The state Department of Revenue, which administers the tax credits, denied the AP's request, saying it's not obligated to disclose specific information about the productions at this time because they're still considered private taxpayer records.

Roger Randall, a department lawyer, said in a letter that Massachusetts law permits disclosure of this \"otherwise confidential information\" only through an annual report listing tax credits issued during the previous calendar year.

That means the amount of subsidies awarded to \"Patriots Day,\" ''Stronger\" or other productions that filmed in 2016 won't become public until the end of 2017 at the earliest \u2014 unless the productions themselves choose to disclose the information sooner.

\"In short, you are seeking tax credit information in a form different from or ahead of the time that the legislature has expressly determined it should be disclosed,\" Randall wrote.

State Sen. Jamie Eldridge, a Democrat who has proposed ways to curtail the program and improve its transparency, said the films have an obligation to be more forthcoming, even if state law doesn't require it.

\"Any film production or company that receives any public subsidy should be discussing that,\" he said. \"It's taxpayer dollars. It's public money.\"

Massachusetts and other states included confidentiality provisions in their laws at the industry's request, said John Bails, executive vice president at Film Production Capital, a Shreveport, Louisiana-based film tax credit consulting firm.

While Massachusetts and others have become somewhat more transparent by adding annual reporting requirements, some states remain stubbornly opaque, he said. Georgia, for example, does not provide information about what specific productions received, only annual totals for the program.

\"All of these states are competing against each other for productions, and productions don't necessarily want people to know sizes of budget or exactly what their stars are getting paid,\" Bails said.

But the lack of disclosure is starting to give way as policymakers in a number of the 36 states that currently offer some form of film incentive take a harder look at their costs and benefits, he said. Louisiana, which in 1992 became the first state to create such a benefit, now provides a searchable database of productions seeking or receiving credits.

At least one film production touching on the marathon bombings was willing to address its tax credits.

\"Boston,\" an upcoming documentary tracing the marathon's history, received $126,695 in credits in 2015, the latest report from the state, released last month, shows.

Producer Megan Williams said the credits helped offset production expenses, including filming of the April 2014 race \u2014 the first running of the marathon following the bombings that killed three people and injured hundreds more.

She declined to speculate on why the other productions were refusing to say how much they sought or received in credits, which are transferable tax discounts worth up to 25 percent of a qualified film's payroll and production expenses in Massachusetts.

\"I can't really judge,\" Williams said. \"Ultimately, it will be known information in the public record.\"

___

Follow Philip Marcelo at twitter.com/philmarcelo. His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/journalist/philip-marcelo.

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PITTSBURGH (AP) \u2014 The Latest on a two-day sentencing hearing for \"Dance Moms\" star Abby Lee Miller (all times local):

1:45 p.m.

The bankruptcy fraud sentencing hearing for \"Dance Moms\" reality TV star Abby Lee Miller has begun before a federal judge in Pittsburgh.

Miller has already made a major concession on an unrelated charge that she sneaked $120,000 in foreign currency into the country from Australia in 2014. Miller has agreed to forfeit that money.

What remains at issue is whether Miller should serve prison or merely probation for hiding about $775,000 from a bankruptcy court after filing for Chapter 11.

Miller's attorneys are essentially arguing \"no harm, no foul\" and saying she shouldn't be imprisoned because those she owed money were repaid. But federal prosecutors say Miller tried to subvert the bankruptcy process and deserves prison.

Prosecution witnesses are testifying Friday. Defense witnesses will testify when the hearing concludes with her sentencing Feb. 24.

___

1:15 a.m.

\"Dance Moms\" reality TV star Abby Lee Miller is scheduled to appear in Pittsburgh federal court Friday for the start of her sentencing hearing in her bankruptcy fraud case.

The two-day hearing won't wrap up until Feb. 24. It was scheduled so numerous witnesses could address a key question: Did Miller intend to cheat her creditors when she hid $775,000 in income from a bankruptcy court.

Prosecutors say Miller was dishonest and only fessed up to her real income after a bankruptcy judge saw her on TV in 2012 and figured she had to be lying. They're seeking a prison sentence of up to 30 months.

Miller's attorneys say their client simply got caught up in her fame and fortune, but always intended to repay her debts. They're seeking probation.

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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 A mysterious Skittles spill on a rural highway in Wisconsin is taking another twist, with Mars Inc. saying it doesn't know why the discarded candy might have been headed to become cattle feed.

The case began when a Wisconsin sheriff posted on Facebook this week that \"hundreds of thousands of Skittles\" had been found spilled on a highway. Later, he updated the post to say the candy had fallen off a truck on its way to be cattle feed.

Only red Skittles had spilled out, and Dodge County Sheriff Dale Schmidt joked in the post that it would be difficult to \"Taste the Rainbow\" in its entirety. The incident gained attention after CNN wrote about it, citing a report from a local affiliate.

A variety of food byproducts are commonly used for animal feed, and Skittles maker Mars Inc. says it has procedures for discarding foods for that purpose. However, the company says the Skittles in question came from a factory that doesn't sell unused products for animal feed.

\"We don't know how it ended up as it did and we are investigating,\" Mars said.

Company spokeswoman Denise Young said the Skittles were supposed to be destroyed because a power outage prevented the signature \"S'' from being placed on the candies. She said Mars planned to contact the sheriff's office and the farmer to find out more.

Schmidt said one of his deputies had come across the spill and sent him photos, which he posted on Facebook. He said the Skittles spilled from a box that started to disintegrate in the rain, and about half of them got out. The Skittles on the ground did not have the standard letter \"S'' on them, he said.

The sheriff said he has spoken to the farmer, but did not have his phone number. Schmidt did not respond when asked by email for the farmer's name.

Linda Kurtz, a corporate environmental manager at Mars, said the company sells unused candies and ingredients to processors that incorporate them with other materials to make animal feed. She said Mars does not sell directly to farmers, and its procedures follow Food and Drug Administration regulations.

Kurtz said Mars determined the spilled Skittles came from its plant in Yorkville, Illinois, which does not sell products for animal feed. The other U.S. plant that makes Skittles, in Waco, Texas, sells to a local processor that melts them down into syrup.

Josh Cribbs, a cattle nutritionist and director of commercial development for the American Maine-Anjou Association, which promotes a particular cattle breed, said that the food byproducts that get used for cattle feed vary depending on what's available in the region and particular time of year. In places like Texas, for instance, Cribbs said citrus rinds are common.

Cribbs said a specific product would not be used alone, but be mixed with other ingredients to achieve a particular nutritional profile.

\"You might think, 'Oh my gosh, they might be eating a Skittle.' In reality, that piece of candy is being broken down,\" he said.

___

Follow Candice Choi at www.twitter.com/candicechoi

"}, {"id":"e78b0baa-8f49-57f0-883d-dc793bd0537e","type":"article","starttime":"1484935346","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T11:02:26-07:00","lastupdated":"1484939336","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Taxi companies' lawsuit against Newark over Uber is tossed","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_e78b0baa-8f49-57f0-883d-dc793bd0537e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/taxi-companies-lawsuit-against-newark-over-uber-is-tossed/article_e78b0baa-8f49-57f0-883d-dc793bd0537e.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/taxi-companies-lawsuit-against-newark-over-uber-is-tossed/article_2203f569-0ee4-5544-bf88-6a327063dbec.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DAVID PORTER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"Ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft operate differently from traditional taxi companies and therefore don't have to be subject to the same regulations, a federal judge wrote this week in dismissing a lawsuit against the city of Newark filed by several taxi and limo companies.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","corporate legal affairs","national courts","corporate news","legal proceedings","law and order","consumer services","consumer products and services","national governments","government and politics","courts","judiciary","industry regulation","government business and finance","government regulations"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"e78b0baa-8f49-57f0-883d-dc793bd0537e","body":"

Ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft operate differently from traditional taxi companies and therefore don't have to be subject to the same regulations, a federal judge wrote this week in dismissing a lawsuit against the city of Newark filed by several taxi and limo companies.

U.S. District Judge William Walls' ruling Wednesday is the latest chapter in the dispute between taxi companies and New Jersey's largest city over how the ride-hailing companies are regulated \u2014 or not \u2014 and whether that illegally gives them an advantage.

It's a battle being fought in states and cities around the country as the ride-hailing companies gain a greater foothold among a younger demographic accustomed to using smartphones to meet many of their needs.

The taxi companies sued Newark last year, claiming Uber and Lyft should have to abide by the same rules as they do regarding background checks and insurance requirements.

Taxi drivers must pass a background check, submit to drug testing, pay application fees and obtain special commercial licenses, and have their vehicles inspected every six months, according to the lawsuit. The companies claim those conditions gave them exclusive rights to operate for-hire transportation in Newark.

Last year, Newark announced an agreement with Uber under which the company would pay the city $1 million a year for 10 years and would agree to some regulations including background checks by a third party and a liability insurance requirement. Those regulations didn't meet the regulations required of taxi and limo operators, the lawsuit contended.

Walls wrote that Uber and Lyft differ from traditional taxi companies in three important respects: They can't be hailed on the street; passengers have a pre-existing contractual relationship with the driver via the smartphone app; and the fares are not set by the city.

That eliminates the taxi companies' claim of equal protection violations, he wrote.

The taxi companies also say the value of their individual taxi medallions has dropped more than 50 percent since Uber began serving Newark in 2013. On Thursday, Walls wrote that doesn't constitute a violation.

\"Because Plaintiffs remain in possession of the medallions and there is no property interest in their market value, Plaintiffs' Taking Clause and substantive due process claims fail,\" he wrote. \"Property does not include a right to be free from competition.\"

An attorney representing the taxi companies didn't comment on the ruling when reached Friday.

Last month, New Jersey lawmakers approved a measure to make the ride-hailing services legal and to allow the state attorney general to decide whether the criminal background checks they use are sufficient or whether a different kind of check is needed. The measure still needs to be signed by Republican Gov. Chris Christie.

More than 30 states now have laws allowing for the ride-hailing companies.

"}, {"id":"24db9988-8489-5d72-a248-daf51e62f592","type":"article","starttime":"1484935320","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T11:02:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1484943364","priority":30,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national-and-international":"business/national-and-international"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Social Security and You: Questions About SSI Benefits","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_24db9988-8489-5d72-a248-daf51e62f592.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/social-security-and-you-questions-about-ssi-benefits/article_24db9988-8489-5d72-a248-daf51e62f592.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/social-security-and-you-questions-about-ssi-benefits/article_24db9988-8489-5d72-a248-daf51e62f592.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Supplemental Security Income is a federal welfare program that just happens to be managed by the Social Security Administration. It is NOT a Social Security benefit.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5biz"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"b33e91f0-7172-59ee-91c5-39fd2e42ce6c","description":"Tom Margenau","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"269","height":"323","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b33e91f0-7172-59ee-91c5-39fd2e42ce6c/582f61c9b32b4.image.jpg?crop=269%2C323%2C102%2C33&resize=269%2C323&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b33e91f0-7172-59ee-91c5-39fd2e42ce6c/582f61c9b32b4.image.jpg?crop=507%2C285%2C0%2C73&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"364","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b33e91f0-7172-59ee-91c5-39fd2e42ce6c/582f61c9bddda.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/33/b33e91f0-7172-59ee-91c5-39fd2e42ce6c/582f61c9b32b4.image.jpg?crop=507%2C285%2C0%2C73"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"24db9988-8489-5d72-a248-daf51e62f592","body":"

Q: You've written in past columns that the SSI program is not a Social Security benefit. But my sister is getting SSI. And when she gets letters about her payments, they come from the Social Security office. So how can you say SSI has nothing to do with Social Security?

A: To answer your question, let me give you a little history lesson. Back before 1973, each state, and sometimes even each county, had its own welfare program for low-income elderly and disabled people. Because there were literally hundreds of such programs around the country, there were wildly different eligibility factors and payment levels. It was not uncommon for an indigent senior citizen in one place to be denied welfare benefits, while just over the county or state line, someone who was better off financially was able to qualify for monthly checks from his or her local welfare office.

Congress thought this was unfair. So in 1973 they decided to nationalize the welfare programs for poor folks over age 65 and for people with disabilities who were down on their luck. There would be one set of eligibility rules that would apply to everyone no matter where they lived. There would also be one standard federal payment level -- although they did include provisions that would allow states to add a few bucks to the federal payment if the state wanted to be a little more generous.

Then Congress had to figure out who would run the new federal welfare program. They decided the Social Security Administration was ideally suited for the task. SSA already had a network of field offices around the country. And there was more than a little bit of overlap in the beneficiary pool for both programs. (In other words, Congress figured that a lot of the poorer folks getting Social Security benefits might qualify for some extra help from the new program.)

Congress also had to figure out what to call the new federal welfare program. And they came up with the name \"Supplemental Security Income.\" On the one hand, it was a good name, because the program did just what its moniker implied: it \"supplemented\" someone's \"income\" up to various levels in order to provide them with some form of financial \"security.\"

But on the other hand, it was a poor choice for a name because everyone assumed, especially given the fact that the Social Security Administration ran the program, that it was just a new kind of Social Security benefit. After all, Supplemental Security Income, managed by the Social Security Administration, sure does sound like some kind of supplemental Social Security benefit.

So here we are, almost a half-century later, and people are still confused. If my emails are any indication, I will bet that at least three-fourths of the people in this country think that SSI is a Social Security benefit.

So let me repeat for maybe the one-thousandth time in this column: Supplemental Security Income is a federal welfare program that just happens to be managed by the Social Security Administration. It is NOT a Social Security benefit and it is NOT funded by Social Security taxes. The money to pay the benefits comes out of the government's general funds. And SSA is even reimbursed from the general funds for the administrative time it takes to run the SSI program.

And to reiterate this point, SSI stands for Supplemental Security Income. It does NOT stand for Social Security Income. Every single day, I get emails from readers who tell me, \"I am getting SSI,\" when they really mean they are getting Social Security.

Q: I have a sister who is about to turn 62. She has been disabled for a very long time and is getting SSI disability payments. (She worked for a couple years, but nowhere near long enough to qualify for Social Security disability benefits.) She was married many years ago to a man who is now 67 years old. They were married for about 15 years before getting a divorce. I have several questions. Is my sister eligible for benefits on her ex-husband's record? Assuming she is, must she file for those benefits at 62? Or can she wait until she is 66 to claim a higher amount? How does she go about claiming those benefits? And finally, if she gets those Social Security benefits, won't they just take that money away from her SSI?

A: As explained in my answer to the first question, SSI is welfare. And as with any welfare program, the benefits are supposed to be a payment of last resort. What that means is that she must apply for any other benefits she is due before she can get an SSI check. And she must apply for those other benefits as soon as she is due them.

So she must file for divorced wife's benefits as soon as possible to be effective with the month she turns 62. She would get an amount equal to about one-third of her ex-husband's Social Security benefit. And you guessed right. Whatever she gets from those divorced wife's benefits will just be deducted from her SSI payment.

But because of a little twist in the rules, she will end up $20 ahead. And here is why. The law says that when SSA figures the amount of her SSI check, they can't count the first $20 of outside income she has.

For example, let's say your sister is getting $730 per month in SSI now. After she files for divorced wife's benefits, she starts getting $650 per month from her ex-husband's account. Normally, she would then get $650 from Social Security and $80 from SSI to take her up to the $730 level. But because of the $20 \"disregard\" rule, they only count $630 of her Social Security benefits against her SSI. So she would get $650 from Social Security and $100 from SSI, giving her total benefits of $750 per month. That's why she ends up with an extra $20 when all is said and done.

To file for those benefits, she should just call Social Security at 800-772-1213. She can file over the phone, or make an appointment to visit her local Social Security office.

"}, {"id":"2584d97b-3230-5acb-a405-ecdae6216e77","type":"article","starttime":"1484934627","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T10:50:27-07:00","lastupdated":"1484936916","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Ford expects $2B net income drop due to pension change","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_2584d97b-3230-5acb-a405-ecdae6216e77.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/ford-expects-b-net-income-drop-due-to-pension-change/article_2584d97b-3230-5acb-a405-ecdae6216e77.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/ford-expects-b-net-income-drop-due-to-pension-change/article_54406713-bfe7-577a-8515-09e33702c39e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) \u2014 Ford says that a change in the way it values pension obligations will cut its 2016 net income by $2 billion.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","government pensions and social security","government business and finance","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1eed5a19-ece2-5baf-9bcf-b87cd499a02a","description":"This Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, photo shows a Ford sign at an auto dealership, in Hialeah, Fla. Ford Motor Co. says a change in the way it values pension assets will cut 2016 full-year net income by $2 billion. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)","byline":"Alan Diaz","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"297","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/ee/1eed5a19-ece2-5baf-9bcf-b87cd499a02a/5882298d35992.image.jpg?resize=512%2C297"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"58","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/ee/1eed5a19-ece2-5baf-9bcf-b87cd499a02a/5882298d35992.image.jpg?resize=100%2C58"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"174","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/ee/1eed5a19-ece2-5baf-9bcf-b87cd499a02a/5882298d35992.image.jpg?resize=300%2C174"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"594","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/ee/1eed5a19-ece2-5baf-9bcf-b87cd499a02a/5882298d35992.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"2584d97b-3230-5acb-a405-ecdae6216e77","body":"

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) \u2014 Ford says that a change in the way it values pension obligations will cut its 2016 net income by $2 billion.

According to a regulatory filing, in 2015, Ford changed the way it measures pension gains and losses so they're counted in the year they occur.

Ford will record a pretax pension charge of about $3 billion for the year. It says the loss is a special item so it won't affect adjusted pretax profit. Ford still expects to meet guidance of about $10.2 billion in adjusted pretax profit for last year.

The company says its pension plan was underfunded by $8.9 billion in 2016, compared with $8.2 billion a year earlier.

Ford Motor Co. reports fourth-quarter and full-year earnings on Thursday.

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Dear Jeanne & Leonard:

For a number of years, my friend \"Ted\" has been giving $500 annually to a small local charity (I support it, too). The charity has always acknowledged the donations it receives in its annual report, with larger contributions receiving more attention than smaller ones. And for this organization, Ted's $500 is a very large gift. This year, however, the charity decided to simply list the names of all contributors alphabetically, without grouping them into size-of-gift categories. When Ted saw this, he laughed and said, \"Well, I guess I'll give them 50 bucks next year.\" And he wasn't kidding. Don't you think Ted should be a bigger man and continue to contribute $500, even though now no one else in our community will know the size of his contribution?

\u2014 M.T., San Antonio

Dear M.T.:

Ever wonder why Carnegie Hall, for example, isn't called Anonymous Hall? It's because while donors take pleasure in supporting the work of the charities to which they contribute, they also take pleasure in the recognition they receive. And there's nothing wrong with that. So to answer your question, no, we don't think Ted was small to react the way he did.

Instead of criticizing your generous friend, think about dropping a word in the appropriate ear at the charity you both support. Someone needs to tell them that they made a mistake in lumping $50 gift-givers with $500 gift-givers. Also, if you're concerned about the effect Ted's lowered contribution will have on the charity, you can always add $450 to your next donation.

Dear Jeanne & Leonard:

My elderly mother receives a small Social Security check, plus the rental income from three houses she inherited. Unfortunately, owning these homes prevents her from qualifying for government-subsidized home health services, services that she needs and that are otherwise very expensive. My brother and I are thinking maybe Mom should transfer ownership of the houses to us, thus making her eligible for assistance. What do you think? We'd like to contribute to Mom's care ourselves, but if we owned the houses, we'd need the rental income for taxes, insurance and upkeep.

\u2014Don, Arkansas

Dear Don:

Why doesn't your mother sell one or two of the rental properties and use the money to buy the home health services she needs, rather than look to taxpayers to pick up her tab?

We realize we don't know the whole story, of course. But your mother apparently doesn't need the rent from all three houses to live on, or she wouldn't be considering transferring ownership to you and your brother. Plus, in your last sentence, you say that, after taxes and other expenses, the homes produce no income. So why not sell one or two?

We appreciate your family's desire to preserve these assets for the next generation. But to do so by taking title to your mother's three rental homes so that she can qualify for services intended for the needy would be, to put it bluntly, unethical.

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DETROIT (AP) \u2014 The outgoing head of the government agency charged with keeping highways safe is worried that auto safety won't be a priority for the incoming Trump administration.

Mark Rosekind, who leaves his job leading the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Friday, said during an interview with The Associated Press the agency has taken steps to modernize and change its relationship with automakers so they try to stop problems rather than reacting to deaths and injuries.

Rosekind, a Ph.D. sleep expert drafted from investigating airplane crashes and other mishaps, said the agency has come a long way from the days when failed connect clues about faulty General Motors ignition switches and was too accepting of Takata's explanations for lethal exploding air bags.

By nearly all accounts, Rosekind has accomplished a lot, sometimes cooperating with the industry and sometimes hammering misbehaving automakers with fines.

During his tenure, the agency has changed from being cozy with automakers to more of a \"cop on the beat\" said Sean Kane, a safety researcher and frequent agency critic.

Rosekind, 61, is proud of NHTSA's accomplishments but fears they could be undone. The agency already is preparing for budget cuts. No replacement has been named. Spokeswomen for Trump did not return messages.

Here are five questions for Rosekind, with answers edited for length and clarity:

Q: When you started, NHTSA was under siege for the GM ignition switch deaths and Takata's air bag inflators. It had only a few people monitoring consumer complaints and hadn't had a budget increase in a decade. Would the agency now catch problems like GM sooner?

A: I would hope so. You just highlighted everything that has kept me up for two years and what's going to keep me up when I leave. Two years is not a lot of time to change a culture. Part of the way you do that is to have specific processes and actions in place, and the focus has been on that. Only time will tell. There are risk matrices being done, there's a structure in place. Congress did give us money so we're hiring a bunch of new people. We will have a trend analysis division, that's a connect-the-dots division that's all about the data. We will have our version of a 'go team' to investigate crashes.

Q: What were your biggest accomplishments?

A: The pivot from being reactive to a proactive safety culture. The road-to-zero fatalities initiative and the autonomous vehicle guidelines. We're working toward 100 percent recall completion, better reporting of safety defects, data sharing. Autonomous vehicles can lead to zero fatalities. It really is totally unacceptable that society accepts the carnage on roads. We have to deal with the near-term crisis and have a long-term plan to get us to zero.

Q: Are you worried that the Trump administration could undo those changes?

A: You know my biggest fear is that it doesn't continue. The new administration is going to have its own priorities. Safety is bipartisan. The more effective and successful programs are, anyone who is going to care about saving those lives is going to want to see them solidified or expanded. Everything's vulnerable.

Q: There have been some incidents involving new gear shifters that people don't understand and vehicles in the wrong gear rolling over people. Star Trek actor Anton Yelchin was killed. Should shifters be standardized?

A: For 50 years it's always been reactive. Unfortunately reactive means you've got to wait until somebody gets hurt or killed before you're stepping in, the way the system is now. What you're talking about is premarket approval. This is sometimes where regulation needs to go. It gives you standards, makes it predictable. If you do things opposite of what people expect, then you're just creating vulnerabilities. If you have to train people on it or basically commit to them getting used to it, it's much better for it to be intuitive.

Q: One of your cars back home in Silicon Valley has a Takata air bag inflator that hasn't been replaced due to parts shortages. What will you do about it?

A: It gave me firsthand knowledge of how horrible the situation is. We heard that it will be ready in January. Every time we have a meeting about how it's going, the biggest frustration for me is it's got to go faster. Everybody that has one car and they have to drive it and actually put themselves at risk, that's just horrible.

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DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) \u2014 It's been impossible to escape the shadow of Donald Trump at this year's gathering of the business elites at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Uncertainty over whether Trump's presidency will mark the end of globalization dominated discussions all week at an event synonymous with international business.

Sure, lofty ambitions were discussed, from fighting epidemics to dealing with inequalities across the world. But inevitably all talk turned to Trump, who has promised to rewrite free trade deals and even slap tariffs on China, the world's second-largest economy.

\"Do I really think we're gonna go back to protectionism? I don't really know yet and I can promise you I'm paying a lot of attention to it because trade matters to us,\" said David Cote, chairman and CEO of industrial conglomerate Honeywell. \"It's a little too early to press the panic button; we ought to see what ends up happening here.\"

Roberto Azevedo, director-general of the World Trade Organization, the body that oversees trading rules, reminded delegates of the 1930s, when governments raised tariffs and wiped out two-thirds of global trade in three years.

\"You don't want to see that now. That would be a catastrophe of untold proportions,\" he said.

\"I think we should try not to talk ourselves into a trade war and I think we're seeing a lot of that.\"

___

THE CASE AGAINST GLOBALIZATION

Whether or not world trade goes into reverse, it's evident that globalization \u2014 the commitment to trade internationally and to lower barriers to doing business around the world \u2014is under threat like no other time in decades.

The main allegations are that it has increased inequalities in wealth, eroded job security for middle and lower-income families in developed countries, and kept a lid on wages as businesses seek low-cost workers in poorer countries. The breakneck pace of technological innovation has made many jobs redundant, particularly in industries like manufacturing.

Anti-poverty charity Oxfam illustrated the issue of inequality starkly in a report this week in which it said that eight billionaires own as much wealth as half the world's population, or 3.6 billion people.

There's a perception among many middle- and lower-income households in developed economies like the U.S. and Europe that globalization hasn't worked for them. And it's that unease that many say was behind Trump's victory and Britain's vote to leave the European Union.

___

THE CASE FOR IT

Globalization has helped lift hundreds of millions to escape poverty over the past few decades. Populous countries like China and India have enjoyed phenomenal growth, improved standards of living, life expectancy, literacy and employment rates.

As though to underscore that point, China's leader visited the Davos forum this year for the first time.

Chinese President Xi Jinping cast his country as a champion of free trade and stability. Though China does in fact put big limits on foreign companies in the country, Xi's message was clear: that China wants to take a bigger role on the global stage and keeping business flowing.

\"We must remain committed to promoting free trade and investment through opening up, and say no to protectionism,\" Xi said, without directly referencing Trump. \"Pursuing protectionism is like locking oneself in a dark room. While wind and rain may be kept outside, so are light and air ... No one will emerge as a winner in a trade war.\"

___

THE ROAD AHEAD

The key will be what policies Trump actually puts in motion, and whether other countries follow the temptation to throw up bigger barriers to business.

Britain will this year renegotiate its trade relations with the rest of the EU, the region it does most business with. And populist political movements have risen in countries like the Philippines and are increasingly prominent in rich nations like France, the Netherlands and Italy.

\"We may be at a point where globalization is ending,\" said Ray Dalio, founder of hedge fund Bridgewater Associates.

German finance minister Wolfgang Schaeuble, however, expressed doubt that the West would leave the defense of free trade to Chinese leadership.

Beyond Trump, Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, said the broader international system must change to deal with the growing inequalities evident in the Oxfam report.

Theresa May, Britain's prime minister, sought to convince the Davos elite that Britain was not retreating from the global scene. But she did concede that policymakers have to support those for whom globalization is not working.

\"The forces of liberalism, free trade and globalization that have had, and continue to have, such an overwhelmingly positive impact on our world ... are somehow at risk of being undermined,\" she said.

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PARK CITY, Utah (AP) \u2014 What started as a Sundance celebration turned into a cautionary tale.

No one foresaw the ultimate collapse of Nate Parker's \"Birth of a Nation\" after its stellar reception at the Sundance Film Festival last year, when perfect timing, immense hype and a vigorous bidding war resulted in a record-setting $17.5 million sale. One year later, as Sundance begins again, \"Birth of a Nation\" isn't exactly top of mind for many \u2014 at this point a distant story as its would-be awards run suddenly dried up. But it remains a blemish that could affect how much distributors are willing to spend on a single film.

All agree that the rise and fall of \"Birth of a Nation\" had such a unique set of circumstances that it would be unimaginable that any film could ever recreate its path. One insider called it an \"exception with a caveat.\"

\"It was a film that was received with a once-in-every-10 years kind of reception,\" recalls Tatiana Siegel, a senior film writer for The Hollywood Reporter. \"There was a standing ovation before and after the film.\"

The enthusiasm, abetted by the fact that it debuted right as Hollywood was grappling with a second year of \"OscarsSoWhite,\" and the ambitious money-spending from new distributors like Amazon and Netflix helped bump the sale price up to a Sundance high of $17.5 million. A very confident Fox Searchlight intended to run an awards campaign for their new film.

But that fall, the focus shifted away from the narrative of \"timely passion project\" to Nate Parker's past, which included a 17-year-old rape case in which he was acquitted.

Handicapped by Parker's personal life, and new reviews that seemed less enthusiastic than those born in the mountain air of Sundance, by the time the film actually hit theaters in October, its Oscar chances were slim and audience interest seemed even slimmer. At the end of its run, Fox Searchlight's big bet had grossed only $15.9 million.

Siegel thinks there's no way a film this year will sell for as much. Some say that distributors are now performing background checks on new filmmakers before making a deal, while others say they haven't heard this.

That a Sundance film underperformed in the marketplace is nothing new, however. Just a year earlier, \"Me and Earl and the Dying Girl\" sold for a then-record $12 million, also to Fox Searchlight, and Indian Paintbrush, and went on to make only $9 million worldwide.

\"There's always the film or two that sells for what's perceived to be above market value at the Festival,\" said Arianna Bocco, the executive vice president of acquisitions and production for IFC Films, and an over two-decade Sundance vet. \"You're seeing prices driven up by new distributors like Amazon and Netflix, but that is nothing new. It's very cyclical. In the past any new distributor coming onto the screen will want to make their mark and they know they have to spend money in order to do so.\"

Bocco still thinks that this year's Sundance will see some films sell for a lot, but whether it's to that level remains to be seen.

Sundance filmmakers, too, are inclined to take the case of \"Birth of a Nation\" for the anomaly that it is and know that every year, at every film festival, sale prices can fluctuate.

\"It's a crap shoot,\" said \"Newness\" director Drake Doremus. \"I've been on different sides of different kinds of sales over the years.\"

Doremus said that sometimes movies are sold for the right price, though. He noted \"Manchester by the Sea,\" which Amazon acquired last year for $10 million and has earned $38.4 million to date.

For others, the entire idea that an independent film might sell for that much money is disconcerting.

\"I'm just curious about that as a spectator. People should be nervous to buy movies for that kind of money anyway,\" said \"Golden Exits\" director Alex Ross Perry. \"They could have bought 15 movies for $1 million and put out a movie every three weeks for the entire year. That would have been really interesting. That would have been way more shocking and relevant.\"

___

Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

"}, {"id":"5c8bf10c-dd85-5cb3-8335-d71298487289","type":"article","starttime":"1484931823","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T10:03:43-07:00","lastupdated":"1484936931","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"In time of troubles, Davos organizers send in the clown","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_5c8bf10c-dd85-5cb3-8335-d71298487289.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/in-time-of-troubles-davos-organizers-send-in-the-clown/article_5c8bf10c-dd85-5cb3-8335-d71298487289.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/in-time-of-troubles-davos-organizers-send-in-the-clown/article_bcc4b67d-e833-59b3-8570-61e30c0531e0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) \u2014 With an ear-piercing whistle, a professional clown in the crowd startles to order a conference room full of some of the world's elite thinkers, writers and religious minds.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","world economic forum annual meeting","european mass migration crisis","events","economy","international relations","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"cea07d1e-6693-579f-9966-8f9b1fc0439d","description":"Lebanese artist Sabine Choucair, who was invited to Davos, poses for a photo on the fourth day of the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)","byline":"Michel Euler","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/ea/cea07d1e-6693-579f-9966-8f9b1fc0439d/58824c6795f4c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/ea/cea07d1e-6693-579f-9966-8f9b1fc0439d/58824c6795f4c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/ea/cea07d1e-6693-579f-9966-8f9b1fc0439d/58824c6795f4c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/ea/cea07d1e-6693-579f-9966-8f9b1fc0439d/58824c6795f4c.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"5c8bf10c-dd85-5cb3-8335-d71298487289","body":"

DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) \u2014 With an ear-piercing whistle, a professional clown in the crowd startles to order a conference room full of some of the world's elite thinkers, writers and religious minds.

That's why Sabine Choucair was invited to Davos, quips a quick-witted panel moderator.

The Lebanese-born, curly-haired artist in baggy green trousers and with a frequent raspy laugh made her debut this week at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, a special invitee more accustomed to entertaining refugees than livening up serious thought-fests.

\"They got in touch with me, and I was like 'Whoa, who are these people?'\" said Choucair, on hand from Beirut, with a chuckle. \"I was like, 'Yeah, let me check if I'm available or not.' Then I looked, and I was like 'Oh my God, I have to come!'\"

Choucair, a clown and storyteller, has often worked with refugee children in places like the Greek island of Lesbos. This time, wearing no particular getup or red nose, she was working a different crowd \u2014 joking with world-class cellist Yo-Yo Ma in front of a bunch of well-heeled onlookers in an entrance hall of the Davos Congress Center.

In one event this week, Choucair enlivened a Davos dinner on the theme of \"The Power of Play.\"

\"I gave them one very, very silly game of, like, smiling ridiculously at each other, and talking about their first kiss, or a co-worker they don't like, or how do they like to eat their eggs? Just silly stuff,\" she said on Friday, the closing day of the WEF in Davos this year.

\"People just played because they loved to play,\" she said, assenting that Davos attendees might have been expected to be a bit uptight. \"You know how we all have prejudices about things, but no. I think everybody wants to play.\"

\"It was also an opportunity for me to really tell them about what I'm seeing, because at the end of the day, I'm the one on the ground working with the people,\" she said of the refugees she's seen.

Writer Grenville Byford, who attended the dinner featuring Choucair, said: \"She's quite something.\"

"}, {"id":"b6cbd2c7-59c0-58e0-804b-5f7e6694a574","type":"article","starttime":"1484931508","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T09:58:28-07:00","lastupdated":"1484934247","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"BC-Noon Oil","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_b6cbd2c7-59c0-58e0-804b-5f7e6694a574.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/bc-noon-oil/article_b6cbd2c7-59c0-58e0-804b-5f7e6694a574.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/bc-noon-oil/article_1cf65f23-d6ed-58e1-9874-eb03a3ce9293.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The spot month contract for light sweet crude was $52.61 per barrel at 12 p.m. Friday on the New York Mercantile Exchange.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"b6cbd2c7-59c0-58e0-804b-5f7e6694a574","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The spot month contract for light sweet crude was $52.61 per barrel at 12 p.m. Friday on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

"}, {"id":"65b62cbd-22c9-5f52-b950-16057aa6c675","type":"article","starttime":"1484930989","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T09:49:49-07:00","lastupdated":"1484934252","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"New Mexico targets Takata, auto makers over faulty air bags","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_65b62cbd-22c9-5f52-b950-16057aa6c675.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/new-mexico-targets-takata-auto-makers-over-faulty-air-bags/article_65b62cbd-22c9-5f52-b950-16057aa6c675.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/new-mexico-targets-takata-auto-makers-over-faulty-air-bags/article_040ffe4e-14c1-5695-a48c-3febbac18673.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN\nAssociated Press","prologue":"ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) \u2014 New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas has announced a lawsuit against Japanese manufacturer Takata and a long list of automakers in connection with the sale of cars with dangerous air bag inflators.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","legal proceedings","consumer product manufacturing","consumer products and services","corporate legal affairs","corporate news","law and order","technology"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"74a4a845-3050-514f-a84d-4ff0e580b6b1","description":"FILE - In this May 4, 2016, file photo, visitors walk by a Takata Corp. desk at an automaker's showroom in Tokyo. New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas has announced a lawsuit against Japanese manufacturer Takata and a long list of auto makers in connection with the sale of cars with dangerous air bag inflators. The attorney general\u2019s office argues in a lawsuit being filed Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 that the manufacturers had a duty to ensure their products were safe and that concealment of air bag defects amounted to unfair, deceptive and unconscionable trade practices under New Mexico law. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)","byline":"Shizuo Kambayashi","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"315","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4a/74a4a845-3050-514f-a84d-4ff0e580b6b1/58821f3a5ab78.image.jpg?resize=512%2C315"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"62","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4a/74a4a845-3050-514f-a84d-4ff0e580b6b1/58821f3a5ab78.image.jpg?resize=100%2C62"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"185","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4a/74a4a845-3050-514f-a84d-4ff0e580b6b1/58821f3a5ab78.image.jpg?resize=300%2C185"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"630","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4a/74a4a845-3050-514f-a84d-4ff0e580b6b1/58821f3a5ab78.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"65b62cbd-22c9-5f52-b950-16057aa6c675","body":"

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) \u2014 New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas has announced a lawsuit against Japanese manufacturer Takata and a long list of automakers in connection with the sale of cars with dangerous air bag inflators.

The attorney general's office argues in a lawsuit being filed Friday that the manufacturers had a duty to ensure their products were safe and that concealment of air bag defects amounted to unfair, deceptive and unconscionable trade practices under New Mexico law.

Takata already has agreed to pay $1 billion in fines and restitution as part of plea agreement with the U.S. Justice Department over the yearslong scheme to conceal the deadly defect in its inflators. It also faces class-action lawsuits as well as litigation filed last year by the state of Hawaii.

Jared Levy, a Takata spokesman, declined comment Friday.

Aside from targeting the air bag manufacturer, New Mexico's case also spreads the blame to numerous automakers that used the faulty bags in their vehicles. The complaint lists dozens of models that include some of the most popular vehicles in the U.S.

The state is seeking civil penalties for each defective air bag that entered the New Mexico market and penalties for each day the manufacturers misrepresented the safety of their products. State prosecutors also are demanding a jury trial.

Takata inflators can explode with too much force, spewing shrapnel into drivers and passengers. At least 11 people have been killed in the U.S. and 16 worldwide because of the defect. More than 180 have been injured.

The problem touched off the largest automotive recall in U.S. history covering 42 million vehicles and 69 million inflators. Officials have said it will take years for the recalls to be completed.

Unlike most other air bag makers, Takata's inflators use explosive ammonium nitrate to fill the bags in a crash. But the chemical can deteriorate over time and burn too fast, blowing apart a metal canister.

In its complaint, New Mexico argues that Takata understood the risks from the time the company began investigating ammonium nitrate in the late 1990s.

The lawsuit does not document any deaths or injuries in New Mexico. It does detail some of the deadly cases elsewhere, saying the manufacturers conducted investigations but tried to minimize the incidents and failed to alert safety regulators to the defects.

The attorney general's office is bringing the case against Takata and the car makers with help from Grant and Eisenhofer, a national law firm that handles class-action securities litigation and major consumer protection lawsuits.

Balderas worked with the same firm in filing the state's suit against Volkswagen over the emissions scandal last year.

"}, {"id":"b492179c-7a6c-5719-a070-5de219884f60","type":"article","starttime":"1484927819","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T08:56:59-07:00","lastupdated":"1484932027","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"San Luis Obispo students rebuild robots destroyed by arson","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_b492179c-7a6c-5719-a070-5de219884f60.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/san-luis-obispo-students-rebuild-robots-destroyed-by-arson/article_b492179c-7a6c-5719-a070-5de219884f60.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/san-luis-obispo-students-rebuild-robots-destroyed-by-arson/article_42738c71-4ed1-50d8-a036-f1c15fdd45fd.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Just in time for a weekend competition, Central Coast students have rebuilt robots destroyed in an arson fire last month.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","technology","arson","robotics","crime","computing and information technology"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"b492179c-7a6c-5719-a070-5de219884f60","body":"

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Just in time for a weekend competition, Central Coast students have rebuilt robots destroyed in an arson fire last month.

The Dec. 8 blaze at San Luis Obispo High School destroyed the campus computer room and the work of the school's robotics team.

The Tribune reports (http://bit.ly/2jgl4kb ) a local nonprofit, Softec, raised thousands of dollars to help the team, which is hosting this weekend's robotics competition at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

Three former students have been charged in connection with the fire.

___

Information from: The Tribune, http://www.sanluisobispo.com

"}, {"id":"cc2340f7-58dc-57c6-a1d5-71aceca7b904","type":"article","starttime":"1484926617","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T08:36:57-07:00","lastupdated":"1484929751","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Grain mostly higher, livestock lower","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_cc2340f7-58dc-57c6-a1d5-71aceca7b904.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/grain-mostly-higher-livestock-lower/article_cc2340f7-58dc-57c6-a1d5-71aceca7b904.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/grain-mostly-higher-livestock-lower/article_be0bb170-08dc-53ab-8cb0-5e9f4f029f08.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 Grain futures were mostly higher Friday in early trading on the Chicago Board of Trade.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","financial markets","commodity markets","business"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"cc2340f7-58dc-57c6-a1d5-71aceca7b904","body":"

CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 Grain futures were mostly higher Friday in early trading on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Wheat for March delivery was 2.20 cents higher at $4.2560 a bushel; March corn was up 1.40 cent at $3.6760 a bushel; March oats was up 6 cents at $2.64 a bushel while January soybeans lower 2.60 cents to $10.6740 a bushel.

Beef lower and pork lower on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

February live cattle was .88 cent lower at $1.2015 a pound; January feeder cattle was up .40 cent at $1.3235 pound; February lean hogs gained .20 cent to $.6563 a pound.

"}, {"id":"85b91c90-314c-52b4-8343-de95ca0fed4f","type":"article","starttime":"1484926411","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T08:33:31-07:00","lastupdated":"1484929756","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Feds declare salmon disaster for Gulf of Alaska fisheries","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_85b91c90-314c-52b4-8343-de95ca0fed4f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/feds-declare-salmon-disaster-for-gulf-of-alaska-fisheries/article_85b91c90-314c-52b4-8343-de95ca0fed4f.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/feds-declare-salmon-disaster-for-gulf-of-alaska-fisheries/article_677c4b2c-36a7-5f30-80aa-2c21fdfbbede.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) \u2014 The federal government has issued a disaster declaration for Alaska's pink salmon fishery and several other salmon and crab fisheries along the West Coast.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","emergency management","commercial fishing and hunting","government and politics","agriculture"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"85b91c90-314c-52b4-8343-de95ca0fed4f","body":"

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) \u2014 The federal government has issued a disaster declaration for Alaska's pink salmon fishery and several other salmon and crab fisheries along the West Coast.

Gov. Bill Walker requested the declaration after last year's pink salmon harvests in Kodiak, Prince William Sound, Chignik and lower Cook Inlet came in far below forecast, the Alaska Journal of Commerce reported (http://bit.ly/2iHXQal ).

The estimated value of Kodiak's catch in 2016 was about $2 million, compared to a five-year average of $14.6 million.

The disaster declaration granted by U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker on Wednesday gives Kodiak and the other Alaska fisheries the ability to seek disaster relief assistance from Congress because of the unexpected large decreases in salmon returns.

Pritzer's declaration also covers eight salmon and crab fisheries in California and Washington state.

In 2012, Alaska received nearly $21 million in federal funds for fishery failures on the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers and in the Cook Inlet region.

___

Information from: (Anchorage) Alaska Journal of Commerce, http://www.alaskajournal.com

"}, {"id":"9b2b9e2b-898d-561a-b267-79475075373b","type":"article","starttime":"1484926156","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T08:29:16-07:00","lastupdated":"1484929757","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Nebraska unemployment rate steady at 3.4 percent in December","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_9b2b9e2b-898d-561a-b267-79475075373b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/nebraska-unemployment-rate-steady-at-percent-in-december/article_9b2b9e2b-898d-561a-b267-79475075373b.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/nebraska-unemployment-rate-steady-at-percent-in-december/article_f1b905ab-c437-5085-8722-9cb17763ec5c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) \u2014 A new report says Nebraska's preliminary unemployment rate remained steady at 3.4 percent in December, matching the November figure.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","labor economy","economy","leading economic indicators"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"9b2b9e2b-898d-561a-b267-79475075373b","body":"

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) \u2014 A new report says Nebraska's preliminary unemployment rate remained steady at 3.4 percent in December, matching the November figure.

The Nebraska Department of Labor said in a news release Friday that the rate was fourth-tenths of a percentage point higher than the December 2015 rate of 3 percent but well below the preliminary December 2016 national rate of 4.7 percent. The national rate rose a tenth of a point from November's 4.6 percent.

Nebraska Labor Commissioner John Albin says December was the 10th consecutive month in which the state's nonfarm employment topped 1 million. The report says nonfarm employment grew by nearly 8,200 over the year.

"}, {"id":"66e83dcf-3fab-5d8f-85e5-efda8cf8321f","type":"article","starttime":"1484923390","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-20T07:43:10-07:00","lastupdated":"1484926241","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"world":"news/world"},{"sports":"sports"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Chinese sportswear brand makes inroads in tennis world","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_66e83dcf-3fab-5d8f-85e5-efda8cf8321f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/chinese-sportswear-brand-makes-inroads-in-tennis-world/article_66e83dcf-3fab-5d8f-85e5-efda8cf8321f.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/chinese-sportswear-brand-makes-inroads-in-tennis-world/article_576c8c89-201b-5feb-b78f-06805de9fdc8.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JUSTIN BERGMAN\nAssociated Press","prologue":"MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) \u2014 Svetlana Kuznetsova has a different look than most tennis players. And it's not just all the tattoos.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","sports","australian open tennis championships","sports sponsorship","sports marketing","sports transactions","women's tennis","tennis","corporate sponsorship","men's basketball","events","sports business","women's sports","corporate news","intellectual property violations","intellectual property","crime","trademarks","men's sports","basketball"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"146b578f-3ffb-560b-8bce-46332f3f933f","description":"Russia's Svetlana Kuznetsova makes a forehand return to Serbia's Jelena Jankovic during their third round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. 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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) \u2014 Svetlana Kuznetsova has a different look than most tennis players. And it's not just all the tattoos.

In a tennis world dominated by the bright colors of Nike and Adidas, as well as new fashion entrants like Uniqlo, Kuznetsova has taken a risk with her clothing sponsor \u2014 a Chinese company called Qiaodan which has been at the center of a high-profile trademark dispute.

As Chinese sportswear companies seek to grow their brands in a crowded domestic marketplace, they've spent years chasing big-name foreign athletes with lucrative sponsorship deals, namely basketball players.

Li Ning started the trend by signing Shaquille O'Neal in 2006 and now has Dwyane Wade of the Chicago Bulls on its roster. The Chinese sportswear brand Anta, meanwhile, has signed Klay Thompson of the Golden State Warriors, and Peak sponsors Dwight Howard of the Atlanta Hawks.

But in tennis, Chinese companies have made fewer inroads, especially among top players. One exception is Kuznetsova's deal with Qiaodan, which began in 2013 when the Russian player's agent received an offer from an unfamiliar brand.

\"I said, 'What's the company'? And he didn't remember the name,\" Kuznetsova said after her third-round win over Jelena Jankovic at the Australian Open on Friday. \"I said, 'OK, let them send me some samples to see.' I cannot sign with somebody who I have no idea, to see what quality, because I want to look good.\"

When the samples arrived, she was impressed the company had made her a special logo \u2014 her initials with a butterfly.

The two-time Grand Slam titlist was coming off an injury-plagued year and her ranking had dipped outside the top 70. And the butterfly was meant to symbolize a rebirth \u2014 Qiaodan's belief that she'd revive her career.

\"I thought it's really special and they will ... treat me special,\" she said.

Kuznetsova may not at the time have heard of Qiaodan, but the company was well known to a certain basketball legend \u2014 Michael Jordan.

In 2012, Jordan filed suit against Qiaodan over a trademark dispute, claiming the company had profited from using the Mandarin transliteration of his name. Jordan has been known by the Chinese characters for \"Qiaodan\" since he gained popularity in the mid-1980s.

In a surprise verdict, China's highest court partially sided with Jordan last month, saying he owns the rights to the Chinese characters for Qiaodan. The company, however, was permitted to use the Romanized spelling of the name.

In a statement after the ruling, the company defended its actions but said it would respect the court's decision.

The case now closed, Qiaodan is refocusing its attention on its domestic business and Kuznetsova, its most high-profile foreign athlete.

One perk of the partnership, Kuznetsova said, is she can collaborate with Qiaodan's designers on the outfits she wears on court.

\"She will tell us she wants some kind of design and also the colors and materials,\" Vivienne Wang, a sports marketing sponsorship supervisor at the company, said by telephone from China. \"We'll also have some special designs \u2014 T-shirts for her fans, coaches and family.\"

Some designs are more successful than others, such as the one she's wearing at the Australian Open, a gray and yellow outfit with rows of small holes cut in the skirt. But to Kuznetsova, what's important is she looks like none of the other players.

\"I love the collection for this year,\" she said.

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DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland (all times local):

3.10 p.m.

Britain's Treasury chief, Philip Hammond, says the former prime minister, Tony Blair, is partly responsible for the country's vote to leave the European Union for failing to introduce measures to limit the flow of people from countries that joined the bloc in 2004.

Hammond said June's vote showed there was a \"strong strand of feeling\" against the uncontrolled movement of people within the EU and he laid the responsibility for that \"squarely at the door\" of Blair.

Blair, who was prime minister from 1997 to 2007 and remains a keen EU advocate, did not impose transitional controls back in 2004, when ten countries, mostly from eastern Europe, joined the EU. Most other EU countries did impose restrictions, meaning that Britain took the \"full force of the tide,\" according to Hammond.

That, Hammond said, created a public perception that \"we still haven't shaken off.\"

Hammond also said the Brexit vote was not a vote against free trade and globalization.

___

2.30 p.m.

Germany's finance minister doubts that the incoming Donald Trump administration in the U.S. will abandon free trade.

Speaking at the World Economic Forum, Wolfgang Schaeuble said he can't imagine \"huge damage\" being done to free trade.

He said he's \"quite optimistic\" that the U.S. and the western world as a whole won't leave the defense of free trade to Chinese leadership.

Earlier this week, in a speech to the business leaders assembled at the WEF, Chinese President Xi Jinping cast his country as a champion of free trade and stability at a time when many are worried that Trump will augur in more protectionist times.

Schaeuble also said that discussions over Britain's exit from the European Union have to be managed in such a way as to \"minimize\" the damage to both the Britain and to Europe. He also said his first reaction to Brexit was to cry and that his second was that it's \"a waking up call for Europe.\"

___

12.00 p.m.

A top Turkish official says his country can no longer insist on any settlement for Syria's long-running war without Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Deputy Prime Minister Mehmet Simsek says the blame for Syria's nearly six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands of people is \"squarely on Assad.\" Turkey has long opposed Assad, and supported rebels fighting his forces.

Speaking in a panel discussion at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Simsek said, however, that Turkey has to be \"realistic\" and \"facts on the ground have changed dramatically\" in Syria.

\"So Turkey can no longer insist on, you know, a settlement without Assad,\" he said.

Simsek also said that Turkey has \"high hopes\" for Syrian peace talks planned next week and hosted by Turkey, Russia and Iran in Astana, Kazakhstan.

___

11.50 a.m.

A Syrian teen refugee and Olympic swimmer, a Malian studying at Stanford, a French coding student \u2014 they're all arguing that their generation needs global mobility to thrive instead of walls and isolationism.

They've got a high-profile audience this week, as they meet global executives and top officials at the World Economic Forum in the Swiss resort of Davos.

Yusra Mardini fled Syria's war on a sinking boat and struggled across multiple borders to a new life in Germany. Last year she competed at the Rio Olympics, and now she's using her experience to urge more openness to refugees.

The 18-year-old told The Associated Press in Davos: \"You can't push anyone to love the refugees.\" She acknowledged concerns that large waves of migrants include some criminals or people abusing rich country hospitality. But most, she said, are in genuine need and \"are just trying to have peace again.\"

Adramane Diabate, 24, considers himself a \"global migrant.\" He abandoned elite military training in his native Mali and went to live in Senegal, South Africa, Panama and now California, and says that countries need open borders to thrive.

Also speaking in Davos, he said, \"We are in a place and time where restricting our movements is not going to help us to create a peaceful and harmonious global society.\"

___

11:20 a.m.

Britain's treasury chief says Donald Trump's accession to the U.S. presidency is likely to create even more uncertainty for Europe than his country's unprecedented departure from the EU.

Philip Hammond, speaking in Switzerland ahead of Trump's inauguration Friday, said \"the change of administration in Washington is a very big issue\" for Britain and the rest of the EU.

After a campaign critical of free trade and Europe's migration and defense policy, Trump \"has probably introduced a bigger uncertainty\" for the EU than the Brexit vote, Hammond said.

Barclays CEO Jes Staley, speaking with Hammond at the World Economic Forum, said the U.S. vote for Trump \"clearly challenged the notion of a global economic union\" and urged the new Trump administration not to attack free trade.

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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Schlumberger NV on Friday reported another loss during its most recent fourth quarter as low energy prices continue to impact revenue.

The world's largest oilfield services company lost 15 cents per share, or $204 million. That's a narrower loss from more than $1 billion in the same quarter a year ago.

Revenue fell 8.2 percent to $7.11 billion.

Still, the results met Wall Street expectations, with the average estimate of 17 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research for earnings of 27 cents per share. Twelve analysts surveyed expected $7.1 billion in revenue.

The company, with bases in Paris, Houston, London and The Hague, Netherlands, is the world's largest oilfield-services provider, helping energy companies explore for and produce oil and gas. The business has sagged with the plunge in oil prices that started in mid-2014.

For the year, the company reported a loss of $1.69 billion, or $1.24 per share, swinging to a loss in the period. Revenue was reported as $27.81 billion.

Schlumberger shares have climbed almost 4 percent since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has climbed 1 percent. The stock has increased 39 percent in the last 12 months.

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Elements of this story were generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on SLB at https://www.zacks.com/ap/SLB

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Keywords: Schlumberger, Earnings Report

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