[ {"id":"0c694d1b-e194-55b6-b8d4-a77e89d62fce","type":"article","starttime":"1493287200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-27T03:00:00-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"},{"shopping":"shopping"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Health Tip: Choose the Right Shoes","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_0c694d1b-e194-55b6-b8d4-a77e89d62fce.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/health-tip-choose-the-right-shoes/article_0c694d1b-e194-55b6-b8d4-a77e89d62fce.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/health-tip-choose-the-right-shoes/article_0db75b46-253b-11e7-b7a6-97a9d15fdcef.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(HealthDay News) -- Shoes that provides a sturdy base can improve balance, especially among seniors prone to falling.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["health","medicine","fitness","aging: misc.","safety & public health: misc.","shoes","seniors"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":1,"commentID":"0c694d1b-e194-55b6-b8d4-a77e89d62fce","body":"

(HealthDay News) -- Shoes that provides a sturdy base can improve balance, especially among seniors prone to falling.

The American Podiatric Medical Association recommends:

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Terry Branstad, left, and Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey, attends a federalism event before signing the Education Federalism Executive Order, Wednesday, April 26, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. 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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday that aims to reduce the federal government's role in K-12 education.

Trump is giving Education Secretary Betsy DeVos just short of a year \u2014 300 days \u2014 to identify areas where Washington has overstepped its legal authority in education, and modify and repeal regulations and guidance from her department, if necessary. A report will be returned to the White House and eventually made public, officials said.

Trump complained that the government over the years has forced states and schools to comply with \"federal whims.\" He said the order will help restore local control over education.

\"We know that local communities do it best and know it best,\" Trump said, surrounded by governors, members of Congress and teachers. \"The time has come to empower parents and teachers to make the decisions that help their students achieve success.\"

Republicans have long chafed at federal government involvement in education, asserting that states and local governments, school boards and parents are best positioned to decide what students learn. Antipathy toward the Education Department ramped up under Trump's predecessor, President Barack Obama, who offered states billions of dollars of federal money to help improve their schools in exchange for adopting certain academic standards.

DeVos said time has shown that \"one-size fits all policies and mandates from Washington simply don't work.\"

But Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, the nation's second-largest teachers' union, said the review was unnecessary because a bipartisan education law enacted in late 2015 had already shifted power from the federal government to states.

\"This is a case of been there, done that,\" Weingarten said. She stressed that the law also contains key civil rights provisions that the federal government is obligated to uphold.

The Center for Education Reform, which advocates for charter schools, said Trump's executive order will promote innovation and freedom.

\"Conducting such a review is part and parcel of ensuring that education innovation and opportunity are able to take root throughout our various education sectors,\" the organization said in a statement. \"The connection between freedom and excellence is no secret.\"

Later Wednesday, Trump honored teachers as he welcomed the National Teacher of the Year and state-level winners to the Oval Office.

\"There is nothing more important than being a teacher,\" he said.

Trump promised during the campaign to give state and local governments more control over education.

The executive order is one of several the president is signing this week as he seeks to notch accomplishments by Saturday, his 100th day in office.

___

Associated Press writer Maria Danilova contributed to this report.

___

Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap

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HEALTH AND WELLNESS EVENTS

All events are free unless otherwise noted.\u00a0

Today

Widowed to Widowed \u2014 The Fountains at La Cholla, 2001 W. Rudasill Road. Group discussion and support. 10-11 a.m. Mondays. 797-2001.

Tuesday

Healthy Living with Chronic Pain \u2014 Desert Harmony Hospice of Tucson, 1200 N. El Dorado Place. Six-week interactive workshop for individuals living with chronic pain and their caregivers. Ages 18 and up. 1-3:30 p.m. Tuesdays. May 2-June 6. $35. 305-3410.

Taekwondo Wellness \u2014 Intuition Wellness Center, 5675 N. Oracle Road Suite 3101. Learn traditional Taekwondo, philosophy and core principles, self-care, stress management, coping skills, social skills and mindfulness meditation. 4:15 p.m class for ages 7-12; 5:15 p.m. for ages 12 and up. 4:15-5:15 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. May 2-Dec 21. Excluding Nov. 23; 5:15-6:15 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. May 2-Dec. 21. $20. 333-3320.

Wednesday

Get Out \u2014 Stray Dogs, 78 W. River Road. Sponsored by the Parkinson and Movement Disorder Alliance. Providing information and services to people with Parkinson Disease focusing on making each day the best possible day. 4-6 p.m. May 3. 977-0537.

The Healing Power of Sleep ... Chief Nourisher of the Mind, Body and Heart \u2014 Banner - University Medical Center, DuVal Auditorium, 1501 N. Campbell Ave. Sairam Parthasarathy will discuss the nature and importance of sleep and its role in disease prevention and population health. Register by calling or e-mailing livinghealthy@arthritis.arizona.edu. 6-7:15 p.m. May 3. 626-5040.

Tucson Death Cafe \u2014 Ward 6, 3202 E. First St. Relaxed atmosphere for group directed conversation about death and related subjects without agenda or objectives. Tea and cake. Call to RSVP. 5:30-7 p.m. May 3. 261-7003.

Pain Connection Chronic Pain Support Group \u2014 Guild Mortgage Company, 1825 E. River Road. Forum for people with chronic pain to develop coping skills, decision making models, role-playing, assertiveness training, guided imagery, meditation, breathing exercises and relaxation techniques. 1-2:30 p.m. May 3. 1-800-910-0664.

Thursday

Healthy Living with Diabetes \u2014 Freedom Park Center, 5000 E. 29th St. Interactive workshop for individuals with diabetes and their caregivers. 1-3:30 p.m. May 4. $20. 305-3410.

Sunday

Depression: Share your story to help someone else get through it... Call for guests on The Depression Session \u2014 The Depression Session on Downtown Radio, One E. Toole Ave. Share your story of Depression on 99.1 FM Downtown Radio, and help de-stigmatize depression. Prerecorded and edited. Contact: lmilkins@gmail.com. Ages 18 and up. Noon-12:30 p.m. Sundays.\u00a0

"}, {"id":"0bc202ce-70a7-53a9-ad68-e680062bb3f5","type":"article","starttime":"1493222811","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-26T09:06:51-07:00","lastupdated":"1493224381","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"},{"technology":"business/technology"},{"national":"news/national"},{"featured":"video/featured"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"'Plastic bag' womb could help keep premature babies alive","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_0bc202ce-70a7-53a9-ad68-e680062bb3f5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/plastic-bag-womb-could-help-keep-premature-babies-alive/article_0bc202ce-70a7-53a9-ad68-e680062bb3f5.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/plastic-bag-womb-could-help-keep-premature-babies-alive/article_6779fc8a-b536-5206-afef-a2aeb35b5b8f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Meera Senthilingam, CNN","prologue":"An artificial womb resembling a plastic bag has been used to keep premature lambs alive for four weeks outside of their own mother's womb and could one day be applied to premature babies.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["health","medicine","fitness","wire","cnn"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#cnn","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"0bc202ce-70a7-53a9-ad68-e680062bb3f5","body":"

An artificial womb resembling a plastic bag has been used to keep premature lambs alive for four weeks outside of their own mother's womb and could one day be applied to premature babies.

The sealed bag, made of polythene, contains amniotic fluid to provide all the nutrients and protection needed for growth, an interface delivering oxygen just as an umbilical cord would, and exchanging gases just like a placenta.

The system works to mimic the environment of a natural womb and the team hopes to one day adapt the technology for use on premature babies.

\"We've developed a system that, as closely as possible, reproduces the environment of the womb and replaces the function of the placenta,\" said Dr. Alan Flake, a fetal surgeon and director of the Center for Fetal Research in the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) who led the research, published Tuesday.

\"This, in theory, should allow support of premature infants,\" he said, adding that his team's goal is to \"meet the unmet need of extreme prematurity.\"

One in ten US births are premature (younger than 37 weeks gestational age), according to the team. And about 30,000 per year are critically preterm, meaning they are born younger than 26 weeks. The average human gestation period is 40 weeks.

Flake adds this level of extreme prematurity is the leading cause of infant mortality and morbidity in the US, accounting for one-third of all infant deaths and one-half of all cases of cerebral palsy attributed to prematurity.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in the UK also report poor survival of babies born at gestations below 24 weeks, despite great progress in neonatal care.

Globally, more than one in 10 pregnancies will end in preterm birth. In babies born preterm, the chance of survival at less than 23 weeks is almost zero, while at 23 weeks it is 15%, at 24 weeks 55% and at 25 weeks this increases to about 80%, according to UK maternal and fetal research charity, Tommy's.

Flake's team hope their new system may improve survival rates among this group of babies in the future, but acknowledge it will take at least a decade.

How it works

To show the potential of their system, the CHOP team worked with six premature lambs aged 105 to 111 days, as they are developmentally similar to a human fetus at 23 weeks, said Flake. \"We supported these lambs in a very stable fashion for up to four weeks,\" he said.

The system was comprised of a few main factors to support stable development: a circulatory system, a closed fluid environment and use of the fetus' own heart to pump blood around the system -- not an external pump.

It all works together so that blood flows to and from the fetus, through a gas-exchange interface similar to what would occur across a placenta, while the fetus remains in a stable fluid environment.

\"Fluid is very important in terms of fetal lung development,\" said Flake. It also helps insulate and protect a fetus from infection and maintains temperature, pressure and light. \"It continuously exchanges amniotic fluid ... in the same way that amniotic fluid is exchanged in the uterus,\" he said during a press briefing.

And the team's efforts were successful, with the lambs showing normal circulation, blood pressure, metabolic processing, growth, lung development and brain development after four weeks inside the artificial womb.

\"All the parameters that we measured in the fetal lamb system appeared normal. Our intent is to support premature infants in that very early range,\" said Flake, adding \"it may ultimately have other applications as well, relating to fetal transition.\"

Moving forward, slowly

The team at CHOP now plan to refine the system by downsizing it for human infants who are one-third the size of the lambs, as well as develop the ideal amniotic fluid for human use.

But it will take time. Flake hopes it could be used clinically in humans in a decade.

\"This is a really attractive concept, and this study is a very important step forward. There are still huge challenges to refine the technique, to make good results more consistent and eventually to compare outcomes with current neonatal intensive care strategies,\" said Colin Duncan, professor of reproductive medicine and science at the University of Edinburgh, who was not involved in the research.

\"This treatment will not enter the clinic anytime soon,\" Duncan added, citing the example of steroid injections for women at risk of delivering a premature baby now used to help accelerate fetal lung development, which was discovered using sheep models.

\"That treatment took well over 20 years to get into clinical practice,\" he said.

"}, {"id":"89727493-2f45-534f-8ad7-f13979acf951","type":"article","starttime":"1493221500","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-26T08:45:00-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"wire":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Deleware Governor Carney signs bill allowing organ donation for HIV-positive donors and recipients","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_89727493-2f45-534f-8ad7-f13979acf951.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/deleware-governor-carney-signs-bill-allowing-organ-donation-for-hiv/article_89727493-2f45-534f-8ad7-f13979acf951.html","canonical":"http://www.delaware1059.com/news/governor-carney-signs-bill-allowing-organ-donation-for-hiv-positive/article_25c84200-2a76-11e7-aa06-2fe93e4ccb8b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Kelli Steele","prologue":"Governor Carney on Tuesday signed into law Senate Bill\u00a017, which allows HIV-positive Delawareans to donate organs to HIV-positive recipients, and allows organs from HIV-positive donors to be used for clinical research.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["health","medicine","fitness","wire","anatomy","donor","legislation","organ","carney","politics","proclamation","donation","senate","pete schwartzkopf"],"internalKeywords":["#tncx","#tncen","#cen_health","#cen_news"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"8310ef8b-0487-56c8-b322-638ddd14c341","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"199","height":"199","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/31/8310ef8b-0487-56c8-b322-638ddd14c341/5900c1497432a.image.jpg?resize=199%2C199"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/31/8310ef8b-0487-56c8-b322-638ddd14c341/5900c1497432a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"300","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/31/8310ef8b-0487-56c8-b322-638ddd14c341/5900c1497432a.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1024","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/31/8310ef8b-0487-56c8-b322-638ddd14c341/5900c1497432a.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"89727493-2f45-534f-8ad7-f13979acf951","body":"

Governor Carney on Tuesday signed into law Senate Bill 17, which allows HIV-positive Delawareans to donate organs to HIV-positive recipients, and allows organs from HIV-positive donors to be used for clinical research.\u00a0

\"DE
DE State Seal

Governor Carney also signed a proclamation recognizing April 2017 as National Donate Life Month in Delaware.\u00a0

\u201cDelawareans are compassionate people who understand that organ and tissue donation saves lives,\u201d said Governor Carney. \u201cOur state is already a leader in donor registration. I was proud to sign a proclamation recognizing April 2017 as National Donate Life Month in Delaware and to sign Senate Bill 17, which makes common sense changes to allow even more Delawareans to benefit from the compassion of others and live fuller lives.\u201d\u00a0

\u201cWe\u2019ve come a long way since the 1980s,\u201d said Senator Bryan Townsend, D-Newark, who sponsored the legislation. \u201cThis legislation reflects major advances in our scientific and medical understanding of HIV, and it offers an opportunity to substantially improve quality of life and life expectancy for transplant recipients with and without HIV.\u201d\u00a0

\u201cOur healthcare laws should be driven by research and medical advances and we should do what we can to erase the fear and stigma of previous policies,\u201d said Representative Dave Bentz, D-Newark. \u201cSenate Bill 17 ultimately will help save lives and I am happy that we have paved the way for more people in Delaware to receive the gift of life.\u201d\u00a0

Governor Carney was joined at the bill signing by Speaker of the Delaware House of Representatives Pete Schwartzkopf, D-Rehoboth Beach, an organ donor; members of the Gift of Life Donor Program, a nonprofit, federally designated organ procurement organization serving the eastern half of Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey and Delaware; and organ and tissue donation advocates.\u00a0Schwartzkopf\u00a0donated his right kidney to his wife's friend in December 2006 and 10-and-a-half-years later, that friend is alive and doing well.

\u201cThe need for organ and tissue donors is extensive and affects people across our community.\u201d said Howard M. Nathan, President and CEO, Gift of Life Donor Program. \u201cWe salute Delaware for its continued advocacy and commitment to our mission.\u201d

"}, {"id":"fa6a8567-6744-5225-a4f2-72c4947504f5","type":"article","starttime":"1493219206","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-26T08:06:46-07:00","lastupdated":"1493248768","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"autos":"autos"},{"autos":"lifestyles/autos"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Old car, new tricks: Adding safety tech to an older car","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_fa6a8567-6744-5225-a4f2-72c4947504f5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/old-car-new-tricks-adding-safety-tech-to-an-older/article_fa6a8567-6744-5225-a4f2-72c4947504f5.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Old-cars-can-learn-new-tricks/id-90ca7c9d147d4ae4b76a1a861f32870b","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DEE-ANN DURBIN\nAP Auto Writer","prologue":"DETROIT (AP) \u2014 Old cars can learn new tricks.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","personal finance","technology","automotive safety technology","automotive technology","industrial technology","road safety","transportation safety","transportation","general news","automobiles","lifestyle"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"00741b61-f57a-538a-a0a1-8705c75bfcd7","description":"FILE - This Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015, file photo shows a Mobileye camera system that can be installed in your car to monitor speed limits and warn drivers of potential collisions, mounted behind the rearview mirror during a demonstration of the system, in Ann Arbor, Mich. For a few hundred dollars, drivers can add new safety technology, like forward collision warning systems or backup cameras, to older cars. Cars are lasting longer than ever thanks to improving quality. The average U.S. vehicle is now 11.6 years old, according to the consulting firm IHS Markit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)","byline":"Carlos Osorio","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"325","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/07/00741b61-f57a-538a-a0a1-8705c75bfcd7/5900bd4948b9d.image.jpg?resize=512%2C325"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"63","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/07/00741b61-f57a-538a-a0a1-8705c75bfcd7/5900bd4948b9d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C63"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"190","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/07/00741b61-f57a-538a-a0a1-8705c75bfcd7/5900bd4948b9d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C190"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"650","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/07/00741b61-f57a-538a-a0a1-8705c75bfcd7/5900bd4948b9d.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"7b4cb06c-4eeb-5f70-890c-5b5632794072","description":"FILE - This Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015, file photo shows a Mobileye camera system that can be installed in your car to monitor speed limits and warn drivers of potential collisions, mounted behind the rearview mirror during a demonstration of the system, in Ann Arbor, Mich. For a few hundred dollars, drivers can add new safety technology, like forward collision warning systems or backup cameras, to older cars. Cars are lasting longer than ever thanks to improving quality. The average U.S. vehicle is now 11.6 years old, according to the consulting firm IHS Markit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)","byline":"Carlos Osorio","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"339","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b4/7b4cb06c-4eeb-5f70-890c-5b5632794072/5900bd4989318.image.jpg?resize=512%2C339"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b4/7b4cb06c-4eeb-5f70-890c-5b5632794072/5900bd4989318.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"199","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b4/7b4cb06c-4eeb-5f70-890c-5b5632794072/5900bd4989318.image.jpg?resize=300%2C199"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"678","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b4/7b4cb06c-4eeb-5f70-890c-5b5632794072/5900bd4989318.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"fa6a8567-6744-5225-a4f2-72c4947504f5","body":"

DETROIT (AP) \u2014 Old cars can learn new tricks.

For a few hundred dollars, drivers can add new safety technology \u2014 like forward collision warning systems or backup cameras \u2014 to older cars.

Cars are lasting longer than ever thanks to improving quality. The average U.S. vehicle is now 11.6 years old, according to the consulting firm IHS Markit.

But that means millions of car owners are missing out on technology that could potentially save their lives. Forward collision warning systems, for example, can reduce the risk of a crash by 27 percent, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Consumers have to do the math to decide whether it's better to add aftermarket systems to an older car or save up for a new one. Balance the cost of new safety \u2014 which can be hefty \u2014 with the increased maintenance older cars usually need. If you don't want an extra camera cluttering up your dashboard, you may want to save up for a new car with built-in systems.

To get blind spot monitoring, forward collision warning and lane departure warning on a new, 2017 Altima SL, you have to spend $28,570 for the car and add $3,000 in options.

For a fraction of that amount \u2014 $500 \u2014 you could add an aftermarket forward collision system, backup camera and blind spot detection monitors to an older car. You could also consider a late-model used car. A 2015 Nissan Altima SL with blind spot monitoring, a rearview camera and lane departure warning can be found for less than $20,000, for example.

Buyers may want to wait on a new car because the cost of safety tech is coming down. Toyota is now offering a $300 package on some vehicles that includes forward collision warning and lane departure warning. Starting with the 2018 model year, all vehicles sold in the U.S. will be required to have backup cameras. And most new cars will have standard automatic emergency braking by 2022.

Shawn Sinclair, an automotive engineer with Consumer Reports magazine, says forward collision warning is the most important feature to consider if you're thinking about adding tech to your car. Even though it won't stop the car from hitting an obstacle \u2014 automatic braking isn't available as an aftermarket option \u2014 it will warn drivers so they can slow down or maneuver away. Blind spot detection and rear cameras are two others she considers critical.

\"But at the same time, you have to say, 'Hey I have this 10-year-old car, maybe it's time to turn it in,'\" she said.

The quality of aftermarket systems varies considerably. Read reviews or ask a trusted mechanic for recommendations.

Here are four safety features to consider:

FORWARD COLLISION WARNING/LANE DEPARTURE WARNING: Sinclair suggests a system from Mobileye, a tech company that also supplies most major automakers. Mobileye's cameras and software can recognize other vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists and even speed limit signs. The system alerts drivers when they leave a lane and when a collision is up to 2.7 seconds away. Sinclair says it costs around $1,000 to buy the system and have it installed by a Mobileye technician.

There are many less expensive and easy-to-install dashboard cameras that double as collision warning systems. Garmin's Dash Cam 35 monitors up to 130 feet in front of the vehicle; if the driver is going 30 mph or faster, it will issue audio and visual alerts of impending collisions. The Dash Cam 35 costs $130 on Amazon.com.

BLIND SPOT DETECTION: Blind spot systems use sensors to monitor the sides of the vehicle and flash an icon to the driver if something is in the way. Sinclair recommends Goshers Blind Spot Detection System, which costs $239. It monitors within 10 feet of the vehicle. Sinclair recommends having a professional install the system; it took her mechanic four hours to do it.

BACKUP CAMERA: According to government statistics, roughly 250 people are killed each year in backover accidents, many of them children. China's Yada brand makes a weather-proof camera with night vision that attaches to the rear of the car. When the car is in reverse, it sends images wirelessly to a 4.3-inch monitor. Pep Boys sells the system for $129. If you don't want a monitor in your car, Auto Vox has one that displays the image in your rear-view mirror. It's $139 on Amazon.com.

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE: Hum, developed by Verizon, works like General Motors' OnStar system. It will automatically call emergency services if the car has been in an accident. It sends alerts to drivers' phones if there's a mechanical problem and lets drivers press a button if they need roadside assistance. Hum works in cars built in 1996 or later. It costs $10 per month; a two-year subscription is required. There are also one-time set-up and activation fees totaling $50.

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EDITOR'S NOTE: This article is part of an ongoing series on infant mortality in Richland County and has been supported by the Solutions Journalism Network, a nonprofit organization dedicated to rigorous and compelling reporting about responses to social problems.

MANSFIELD \u2013 Growing a baby inside the body is no simple task.

Pregnancy brings about a host of changes in a woman\u2019s life, from preparing for the new life they\u2019re incubating to the physical transformation their body will undergo. In addition to the new cocktail of hormones a woman\u2019s body produces, inevitably one of those hormones will be stress.

Stress can come in many forms during pregnancy. A woman may be stressed because of physical discomfort as their body changes, or may be worried about the upcoming labor and birth.

But what if a woman\u2019s stress comes from worrying whether she can feed her family that day? Or not knowing whether her baby will have a house to come home to?

These are real concerns for populations of pregnant women affected by the risk factors identified by Drs. Mark and Sarah Redding in their Community HUB Pathways model. Community health workers address risk factors including primary care, prevention programs, mental and behavioral health facilities, housing, food, clothing, and adult education and employment.

Any one of these risk factors may lead to a poor birth outcome, largely because these risk factors cause significant stress in a pregnant woman\u2019s life, and may lead to preterm birth, the leading cause of infant mortality.


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\u201cStress weighs really, really heavy on a pregnant woman,\u201d said community health worker Kimberly Phinnessee. \u201cIt can also cause preterm delivery because if she\u2019s stressed out, then the baby becomes stressed, and it\u2019s a snowball effect.\u201d

There are known medical causes of infant mortality, including preterm birth, unsafe sleep environments and congenital birth defects. However, equally responsible for poor birth outcomes are the root social causes of infant mortality and the chronic stresses and other psychological and environmental barriers associated with these socio-economic conditions.

The effects of stress on infant mortality are documented in the Ohio Commission on Minority Health (OCMH) published a white paper in September 2015 addressing health equity and eliminating infant mortality disparities within racial and ethnic populations.

\u201cOhioans who have untreated hypertension, undiagnosed or uncontrolled diabetes, or are classified as obese have a higher probability of adverse prenatal and postpartum outcomes,\u201d the OCMH paper states.

\u201cMothers who reside in \u2018food deserts\u2019 where fresh nutritional choices are a limited commodity, are also most certainly residing in a community that is lacking in educational, employment, and life enhancing opportunities. These social factors can result in persistent low-level life stressors.\u201d

According to the paper\u2019s medical expert panel, these chronic stressors result in the release of stress hormones that can contribute to the development of chronic disease processes and place fetal development at risk.

\u201cThis is why any solution to the infant mortality problem must be viewed from a \u2018life course\u2019 correction perspective in all females who reside in these \u2018low opportunity deserts,\u2019\u201d the paper reported.

These stressors certainly exist in Richland County. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in the year 2014, 15.9 percent of the population in Richland County was living in poverty. That same year, 13.3 percent of the population had not graduated from high school, and 10.9 percent of the population was without health insurance.

According to stateofobesity.org, Ohio has the eighth highest adult obesity rate in the nation at 32.6 percent. The city of Mansfield also struggles with food insecurity, \"the state of being without reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food.\"

\u201cCensus tract 6 (in Mansfield's north end) is probably the truest food desert in that there is low access to transportation, low income and it fits the criteria for the distance from a supermarket, or some venue with fresh produce,\u201d said Tony Chinni, community development manager with Mansfield\u2019s North End Community Improvement Collaborative.

Related to these statistics is Richland County's infant mortality rate of 7.3 infant deaths per 1,000 infants born. Between the years 2005 and 2015, there were 14,877 live births in Richland County and 108 deaths, according to the Ohio Department of Health.

In the year 2016 alone, the county's infant mortality rate was 10.4 per 1,000 live births. This equates to 12 infant deaths out of 1,157 live births in Richland County in 2016.

The effect of a woman\u2019s environment on her health is defined by Dr. Maya Rockeymoore as \u201csocial determinants of health.\u201d Rockeymoore is the founder of Allies in Reaching Community Health Equity (ARCHE), a network of health and racial justice experts committed to ensuring all Americans have the opportunity to live healthy lives.

\u201cWe created (ARCHE) because we felt like there needed to be an emphasis in public health on health equity,\u201d Rockeymoore said. \u201cWe needed the field to understand the importance of health equity approaches in addressing some of the more outstanding public health challenges of our time.\u201d

ARCHE was created as a project of the Center for Global Policy Solutions, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to driving society toward inclusion, of which Rockeymoore is the president. She discovered that often times, low income populations and rural communities were pockets of stubborn resistance to issues related to typical mainstream policy options.

\u201cThere is a burgeoning amount of evidence and research that shows it\u2019s not just whether or not a person makes a decision to be healthy, it\u2019s a whole host of factors that actually contribute to health outcomes,\u201d Rockeymoore explained. \u201cBecause those host of factors are influenced by broader cultural, social and political structures, we have a whole host of challenges we have to understand beyond the individual.\u201d

Does your job provide health benefits? Do you live in housing detrimental to your health? Does your neighborhood have a grocery store? Do you feel safe going outside to get exercise? Does your neighborhood support your health?

\u201cThese are issues that are cross-cutting and intersectional,\u201d Rockeymoore said. \u201cWhen you have high infant mortality rates, you tend to have higher poverty, weaker social structures, less investment in healthcare and less coordinated care focused on supporting low income populations. You might even have issues of obesity or drug abuse.

\u201cInfant mortality is the canary in the coal mine,\u201d she said. \u201cIf you have higher infant mortality rates, you do have other indicators showing there are challenges and problems in that community.\u201d

For this reason, when it comes to alleviating the stressors surrounding women and pregnancy, it\u2019s important to take a broader view. The OCMH paper specifically mentions the Life-Course Perspective researched by Dr. Michael Lu, associate administrator of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration.

\u201cThe Life- Course Perspective means that birth outcomes are the product of not only nine months during pregnancy but experiences over the lifespan,\u201d the paper states. \u201cChronic and repeated stress over the mother\u2019s lifespan can adversely influence birth outcomes.\u201d

The Life-Course Perspective suggests that many of the risk factors that influence health and wellbeing across a person\u2019s lifespan also play an important role in birth outcomes and in health and quality of life beyond an infant\u2019s initial years.

For Rockeymoore, addressing this problem starts with policy makers. In the meantime, the influence of social and political factors on outcomes is, in her opinion, unacceptable.

\u201cWe know we have challenges in this country still, and what\u2019s so sad about it is we\u2019re the richest and most powerful country in the world, and yet we allow this,\u201d Rockeymoore said.

\u201cI say \u2018allow\u2019 because it\u2019s structural in nature. This could be solved tomorrow if there was the political will to do what\u2019s needed in order to address the circumstances of lower income women who are pregnant and giving birth.\u201d

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BAGAN, Myanmar (AP) \u2014 The moment of takeoff was silent, and mesmerizing.

Within seconds, our hot air balloon was floating above the treetops, gliding toward what Marco Polo called \"one of the finest sights in the world\" when he saw it 700 years ago: the ancient Myanmar city of Bagan.

Below us, the baked brick spires of hundreds of 11th and 12th century Buddhist temples poked skyward through the purple-red horizon of dawn, graceful and serene. When I spotted the giant golden dome of the Dhammayazika Pagoda, glittering like a jewel in the first rays of light, my heart skipped a beat.

I had just spent several days exploring these iconic monuments and pagodas, walking through their dark stone corridors, climbing their steep exterior steps. But peering at them from the edge of a moving basket in the sky was an entirely different experience, at once thrilling and existential.

Our pilot, a Belgian named Bart D'hooge who has flown here for nine years, described Bagan as \"stunning ... even if you see it just from the ground.\"

\"But once you take off in a balloon, you get a completely different perspective,\" he said. \"It really gives you a bit of an idea of the size of the ancient kingdom\" that flourished here a thousand years ago.

The city is home to the largest concentration of Buddhist temples, stupas and monuments in the world. More than 2,200 are spread across a plain adjacent to rice fields and villages along the Irrawaddy River. Only from above can this vastness be fully appreciated.

The temples were built by a series of Burmese kings who ruled the region for roughly 250 years, until city was abruptly abandoned in the late 13th century for reasons that are not entirely clear. Although time and the elements have eroded many of the structures' once ornate exteriors, the buildings themselves are still largely intact.

On Aug. 24, 2016, a magnitude 6.8 earthquake shook central Myanmar, damaging at least 389 of them, according to the country's Department of Archaeology. Some have been closed to the public fully or partially. Others are in various states of repair, covered in elaborate arrays of bamboo and wood scaffolding.

Overall though, the most iconic temples remain accessible to visitors. Local residents still flock here to pray before the colossal Buddha statues, many lit by bright beams of sunlight inside. And foreign tourists still arrive en masse, their numbers having grown steadily since the military, which ruled for half a century, began opening the Southeast Asian nation up to the rest of the world in 2011.

Despite the influx, authorities have capped the number of balloons permitted in the skies here at 21, for safety reasons. With an average a passenger capacity of eight to 16 on each balloon, space is limited and seats can sell out. For that reason, it's best to plan your trip well in advance. Bagan's balloon flight season runs only from October to March, when winds are calmer and the weather is cooler and more predictable.

Cancelled flights are rare, but balloons do get grounded several times a year. On what was supposed to be a clear day in March when I was scheduled to fly, a thick blanket of white fog unexpectedly enveloped the entire city, even shutting down the airport. Fortunately, I was able to get a spot the next day.

Flights are not cheap, averaging $320 to $380 U.S. for a roughly 45-minute ride. But for those willing to pay, it's a once-in-lifetime experience.

Asked if he ever gets tired of flying in Bagan, D'hooge \u2014 who has flown everywhere from Kenya to New Zealand \u2014 shook his head in the negative.

\"With the sunrise, sometimes when you get the light right, it's just stunning,\" said the pilot, who works for Balloons Over Bagan, which was the first company to pioneer flights here 17 years ago. \"I don't think there are many places in the world that get to this point.\"

___

If You Go...

BALLONING IN BAGAN: Balloons fly only October to March. Seats are limited and often sell out so reserve ahead. Three balloon companies operate in Bagan:

http://www.balloonsoverbagan.com/

http://www.orientalballooning.com/

http://goldeneagleballooning.com/

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Dear Amy: My boyfriend left for a student exchange program in France for six months, there are still more than two months left.

The thing is, after he left I had a breakdown; school was too much, and him being away wasn't helping. I texted him things I deeply regret. I questioned his love many times. I feel like he still loves me, but it's not the same as before.

I have been trying for almost a month to be positive. I'm trying not to doubt him and to be there for him. I even asked him if there was something I could change that would make him happier, but nothing seems to work. Sometimes I feel like I am doing too much and am too intense, but I fear losing him.

I tried talking about our plans for the future but he told me he doesn't like to plan this far ahead because he doesn't even know what he wants to do after his studies. The other day, I told him how many days were left before he came back and he became angry. He told me he didn't like it that I was keeping track.

I just took back control over my life and losing him would put me back where I started. I don't know how to act or what to do anymore.

\u2014 Distressed Boyfriend

Dear Distressed: Long distance is never easy, and on top of that you've gone through something traumatic. I'm very sorry.

An important reminder here: It is much harder to be left than it is to leave. Your job right now is to keep putting yourself back together, and that means cutting yourself (and your boyfriend) some slack. Your insecurity is affecting your relationship. Even at a distance, he feels crowded. Please, give your relationship some space to breathe. It will be good for both of you. If you don't push so hard, you will actually feel more in control.

Your main focus right now should be on getting better, not on altering yourself to make up for things you did when you weren't well. Remember that mental well-being is a process, so try not to let setbacks derail you, and try not to jump to conclusions about your relationship right now.

It is scary to think that your relationship might have changed, but ultimately this experience will teach you about yourself. Living in a foreign country can be a liberating experience, but it can also be very isolating, especially when someone you care about is having a difficult time. If you stop demanding attention, you may receive it more readily.

I hope you're connecting with people closer to home. Family, friends, or a support group may be able to give you perspective on this. Definitely check in with your school's counselor.

Dear Amy: Tonight my husband and I were out to dinner with his sister and her husband.

My husband ran into a friend, and introduced his sister and her husband. A few minutes later he introduced me as his ex-wife.

Amy, he and I have been married for 23 years, and for both of us this is a second marriage.

He indicated it was a joke, but I don't understand the humor. I am still upset about it and he doesn't think he should apologize to me. So, crazy as this is, I am reaching out for an opinion. Should I have laughed or been upset?

\u2014 Still Burning in Boston

Dear Burning: Ouch.

One of the perks to being a person is that you're allowed to have feelings. In this case, your irritation seems appropriate to the occasion. For the record, I'd be pretty mad, too. And embarrassed, for him.

Unfortunately, another irritating aspect of humanity is you can't always get people to see your side. Try to discuss this one more time; maybe throw in a joke of your own like, \"if you ever do that again, I really WILL be your ex-wife.\" See how he takes your hilarity.

Then, you need to let it go. At least now if this ever comes up again, your husband will know how you feel about this particular brand of domestic comedy.

Dear Amy: \"Heartsick\" described how a family friend literally bullied her and her husband into having a honeymoon night at a cheap hotel, instead of at home. How come so many couples turn over their lives to others when they get married?

\u2014 Wondering

Dear Wondering: Getting married is stressful, and couples are vulnerable to being controlled through money, or simply through someone else being more forceful during a time when couples are very concerned about being polite.

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The long-awaited temple for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will open its doors to the public in June, but you\u2019ll need to make reservations.

From Saturday, June 2, to Saturday, June 24, the public can tour the temple from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The temple will be closed Sundays.

After that, when the temple, at 7281 N. Skyline Drive, is dedicated, it will be closed to the public, according to press materials.

This is Arizona\u2019s sixth LDS temple and the nearest for local Mormons, who previously had to trek to Gila Valley or Mesa.

Church leadership in Salt Lake City announced the construction of the Tucson temple in 2012 and broke ground in 2015.

In March, James Michael Moeller of the Tanque Verde Ward, was named president of the temple. The temple will be dedicated Sunday, Aug. 13, with a cultural performance celebrating the dedication on Saturday, Aug. 12. The public will have no access to the dedication and limited access to the cultural celebration.

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