[ {"id":"125ed9df-6c41-5afa-8b68-1d8c3a312887","type":"article","starttime":"1475088164","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-28T11:42:44-07:00","lastupdated":"1475090342","priority":0,"sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Author of books on prefab housing turns focus on small homes","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_125ed9df-6c41-5afa-8b68-1d8c3a312887.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/author-of-books-on-prefab-housing-turns-focus-on-small/article_125ed9df-6c41-5afa-8b68-1d8c3a312887.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/author-of-books-on-prefab-housing-turns-focus-on-small/article_ba8fcbfa-5120-5528-b4bc-d6fde07d4571.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By KATHERINE ROTH\nAssociated Press","prologue":"Author Sheri Koones believes that prefab houses (or \"prefabulous,\" as she calls them) are the homes of the future. 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Author Sheri Koones believes that prefab houses (or \"prefabulous,\" as she calls them) are the homes of the future. She's written five books about them.

In the new \"Prefabulous Small Houses\" (The Taunton Press), Koones focuses on modestly sized homes and cottages, between 350 and 2,500 square feet.

\"It is definitely possible to live large but on a small footprint without cramping your style or budget,\" she said in an interview.

Compared to the basic modular homes of a decade ago, Koones says, these prefab residences are more elegant, eco-friendly and economical. Unlike traditional, on-site home building, they can be put up in a matter of days or weeks.

The book profiles 32 homes across the country, and explains some of the latest technologies. In a foreword, Robert Redford extols the ecological virtues of going prefab.

Excerpts from Koones' interview with The Associated Press:

___

AP: How did this book come about?

KOONES: I've been writing about prefab construction for a long time. If you're going to write about energy-efficient, sustainable homes, it really has to be prefab. The technology has come so incredibly far in recent years. And the more I traveled and looked around, the more I saw that there was a trend toward living smaller, and focusing on travel and other things instead of pouring all your time and resources into your home. Today, almost anything that can be built on-site can be built prefab. In Japan, most of the houses are prefabricated, and in Australia many of them are. We're slowly going in that direction, too.

AP: The homes featured in your book look very expensive. How economical are small, prefab homes?

KOONES: Prefab houses can cost from 5 percent to 15 percent less than an on-site built house. And we know that building prefab saves time and energy both in the construction process and also in terms of maintenance. You wouldn't want someone to dump a bunch of car parts in your driveway and build a car there, so why would you want a home built that way? It's so wasteful.

AP: What design elements do these homes use to help them feel comfortable and roomy despite their diminutive size?

KOONES: High ceilings, limited hallways and rooms used for multiple purposes are elements shared by many of the homes featured in this book. The emphasis is on living well as opposed to living big.

AP: Could you talk a little about the new technologies that are becoming available?

KOONES: I am wowed by the houses created by students for the Solar Decathlon, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy every two years. These are really the architects, builders and manufacturers of the future. Three of the amazing homes in the book feature important Solar Decathlon innovations. The SU+RE House, built by a team at Stevens Institute of Technology, is designed to withstand the next hurricane on the New Jersey shore, and because it uses marine technology instead of stilts, it's easier to access for a wider range of people. And the DesertSol House, built by students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, finds creative ways to save water and use it for cooling.

AP: What are the biggest misperceptions about prefab housing?

KOONES: People still think of it as cheap and boxy. But if I were building a house today, it's the only kind I would consider.. All of the elegant houses in this book were custom-built and are anything but plain. Each is clearly unique and special.

__

This story has been corrected to show the title of the book is \"Prefabulous Small Houses,\" not \"Prefabulous Small Homes.\"

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BERLIN (AP) \u2014 A German court has ruled in favor of a 78-year-old chain-smoker who faced eviction from his apartment, a case that was closely watched around a country where most people live in rented accommodations.

The Duesseldorf regional court ruled Wednesday there was insufficient evidence that Friedhelm Adolfs had exposed other tenants to secondhand smoke by failing to air his apartment properly, the grounds cited for his eviction.

German news agency dpa reported that Adolfs flashed a victory sign and a big cigar at the end of his 3-year legal odyssey.

Asked whether he planned to smoke less now, Adolfs told reporters: \"For God's sake, no way.\"

Tenant rights laws are traditionally strong in Germany.

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PARIS (AP) \u2014 A huge crane in the colors of the French flag hoisted up a giant neon YSL logo above a construction site in the French capital, literally setting expectations high for this year's YSL show at Paris Fashion Week.

The decor announced that the grand debut from Saint Laurent's new designer Anthony Vaccarello on Tuesday night aimed to dramatically reconstruct the YSL aesthetic following the departure of Hedi Slimane.

French singer Jane Birkin and her two actress daughters Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lou Doillon stared up expectantly alongside myriad iPhone-snapping fashionistas to marvel at the radiant 50-meter (164-foot) crane \u2014 a real machine being used to rebuild the house's Paris Left Bank headquarters.

\"The derelict aspect sets a nice metaphor,\" said Gainsbourg, speaking from the show's front row.

\"Anthony has completely understood the house codes,\" Doillon said ahead of the show.

As the designer's revealing looks filed by, the metaphor of reconstruction and renewal of the Saint Laurent image was heard loud and clear but the high expectations set by the decor were dashed.

This \"new\" image was largely a rehash of the Glamazon, uber-sexy, ultra-mini styles that have come to be synonymous with the 34-year-old Italian-Belgian designer's own brand and his work at Donatella Versace's flesh-baring Versus house.

To his credit, Vaccarello's debut featured a check-list of YSL archive references, with iconic YSL pieces fused alongside the sex aesthetic. A sultry leather variation on the voluminous sleeves of the Flamenco Dress shimmered with cool '80s micro-mini. Yves Saint Laurent's 1968 transparent looks, which once shocked the fashion establishment, made a comeback and Vaccarello gave a nod to the textured materials of the famed 1976 Ballets Russes collection.

There was also, at times, a marked return to elegance, which had eluded his predecessor Slimane. Those touches turned up in revamped archive YSL tuxedos and lashings of black.

It was certainly not a groundbreaking collection, but many of the styles could prove highly appealing to the younger clients the house has courted in recent years.

___

Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamsonAP

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DEAR AMY: I am a professional woman with two teenage children. I am divorced, and the survivor of an abusive alcoholic mother.

I have been through years of counseling and have struggled with anxiety my entire life. My relationship with my mother has always been my burden.

As my children have gotten older, my mom\u2019s health has deteriorated. She doesn\u2019t call or attend birthday parties or sporting events, and tries to put the burden on me. I have not had a mother for most of my life and she doesn\u2019t seem to care.

Now that she is sick from her chosen lifestyle, she wants again to pull us toward her because she needs us, not because she wants to make amends or apologize.

People view me as cold-hearted, but I let her abuse me until I had children and only then was I able to pull away. All I ever wanted was for her to love me.

She has broken my heart so many times and affected all of my relationships because when the only person on earth who is supposed to love you abuses and rejects you, you\u2019re afraid to love.

I\u2019m going to a psychiatrist and a counselor and they say to protect myself and to go with my heart. I\u2019m so conflicted. I really don\u2019t like her, but she is my mother. I\u2019ve spent 46 years of my life trying to please her, and she just disappoints me.

What do you think? Do I keep trying, or just move on with my life?

\u2014 Angry in Iowa

Dear Angry: Moving on starts with acceptance. You need to accept your bad luck at growing up in the household of an alcoholic parent. You deserved better, everyone does, but you didn\u2019t get the parent you deserved to have (but your own children did, lucky them!).

Please don\u2019t let your childhood define you for the rest of your life. Being a good parent and a good person should define you now.

After acceptance, you work on detachment. You can\u2019t fix your mother, and you can\u2019t change her. You cannot rewrite the past, you can\u2019t rewire your mother\u2019s brain, and you can\u2019t cure her disease.

You should attempt to have the relationship YOU want to have, and that includes no relationship.

Your desire to fix things, while wrestling with conflicted feelings, is common for adult children of alcoholics. In addition to your therapy, you should research and seek support from others who understand your challenges, through Al-anon or another support group.

Read \u201cAfter the Tears: Helping Adult Children of Alcoholics Heal Their Childhood Trauma,\u201d by Jane Middelton-Moz and Lorie Dwinell.

DEAR AMY: I am currently living with my daughter, her hubby and their children. I came here because when my husband passed away, I was unable to get an apartment.

My daughter and her husband graciously offered a room to me; it was a good feeling to know I wasn\u2019t alone at this time.

I feel that the time has come for me to move on. Unfortunately, this brings up the problem of finances.

I have been living on Social Security, and now with the upcoming presidential election, there is a lot of talk about this program and others being cut back, or worse, cut completely.

I\u2019m so confused. I don\u2019t want to make a bigger mistake by moving out. This is not a decision that I can just jump into. What do you think I should do?

\u2014 Running in Circles

Dear Running: You should enlist your daughter\u2019s help to research housing options in your area. Where I live, you can apply for subsidized housing specifically intended for low-income seniors.

It is sensible to try to anticipate possible changes in your benefits, but I don\u2019t think Social Security is going to go away anytime soon.

Regardless, you should do your research and apply soon, the process might take several months.

Moving into a community of elders could be a positive life change for you, and I hope you\u2019ll bravely try to make this happen.

DEAR AMY: \u201cWorried\u201d is an 11-year-old girl whose father recently died. The letter and your compassionate response moved me.

In addition to your recommendations, readers should know that hospices often offer grief groups for children. I hope her mother looks into this for her.

\u2014 Touched

Dear Touched: Thank you for the reminder of how important and helpful hospice programs are before and after a loved one\u2019s death.

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In 2010, Bassam Mahmood fled Iraq with his wife and son.

As an interpreter, translator and cultural advisor working with the U.S. military, Mahmood became a target for Al-Qaeda. His family came to Tucson through the Special Immigrant Visa program.\u00a0

He knows what it feels like to leave behind a life.

This week, Mahmood is far from home \u2014 not Iraq, but Tucson. \u00a0

He joined refugee delegates from all 50 states and Washington, D.C. in the nation's capitol for the Refugee Congress, an advocacy organization dedicated to giving refugees and asylum-seekers a voice.\u00a0

This is the third Refugee Congress.\u00a0

Since Monday, the delegates have shared their ideas and experiences as refugees, asylum-seekers and people with no state. Some of the topics have included the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the U.S. and the one-year filing deadline for asylum-seekers, Mahmood said.\u00a0

The three-day gathering concludes today when delegates meet with senators and representatives from their respective states, said Christopher Boian, a spokesman for the UN Refugee Agency, or UNHCR, a supporter of the independent Refugee Congress.\u00a0

Of meeting an Arizona legislator, Mahmood said, laughing, \"You're gonna meet the big guys.\"\u00a0

Delegate goals include supporting legislation that aids refugees, immigrants and asylum-seekers, Mahmood said.\u00a0

\u201cOur goal is also to explain who are immigrants and refugees and asylum-seekers,\u201d he added. \u201cIn my opinion, this is the most important thing, to clarify the picture and idea of who we are.\u201d

Mahmood, 40, is a father of three. His eldest is 9, his daughter \u2014 his \"princess\" \u2014 is 5, and the youngest is almost 1.

Mahmood also works with kids through his job as a community liaison at Secrist Middle School. \u00a0Soon, he will begin teaching Arabic at Doolen Middle School.\u00a0

The refugee students he interacts with \u201chave wonderful ideas about America ... but the thing is we have to train them and try to guide them how to mingle and blend with the new society because they have a different cultural background,\u201d he said.

Since coming to Tucson, he has continued his work as a translator and interpreter, often working with local resettlement agencies to help new-to-Tucson refugees adjust.\u00a0

Mahmood came to Tucson with a bachelor's degree in English literature and dreamed of a master's degree.\u00a0

He did it, earning a degree in business administration from the University of Phoenix.\u00a0

His is also an American citizen.

Now he speaks for families like his own.\u00a0

\"It's vitally important that people ranging from policy makers in Washington to educators to all of the people who work in refugee assistance to the general public hear from refugees themselves,\" Boian said. \"Hear their experience. Hear their gratitude.\"\u00a0

Helping others transition has become a personal mission for Mahmood \u2014 and a passion that unites him with others at Refugee Congress whose own stories hail from around the world.\u00a0

\u201cI am here in the United States, and praise God for the freedom and liberty and the freedom of speech and the educated people and the good-hearted people and how they treat each other,\u201d Mahmood said. \u201cThis is something like a gift for me.\u201d

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For about 75 years, the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration have called the monastery at 800 N. Country Club Road home.

But no more.

This past weekend, the sisters announced to volunteers, benefactors and other friends that the monastery will shut its doors within the next two years.

\u201cIt was a difficult decision to come to, but it has to do with basically a fewer number of sisters today and the fact that everyone is aging,\u201d said Sister Joan Ridley, superior of the Tucson Monastery. \u201cWe don\u2019t have many newer members, so we want to regroup forces and consolidate sisters in one spot.\u201d

The 16 Tucson sisters are part of a larger congregation based in Clyde, Missouri. Including the Tucson nuns, there are about 65 sisters, Ridley said.

Leadership at both sites has worked toward this decision for about a year with the hope that consolidation will revitalize the aging order.

The decision is still too new for the sisters to say for sure whether all will leave Tucson for Clyde. Some of the nuns have lived here for about 25 years, Ridley said.

Stay or go, they will all have to develop a few new habits. The sisters plan to sell the property, which is about 7 acres between East Speedway and East Fifth Street.

\u201cWe may be in touch with some other national Catholic organizations that purchase property and convert it to senior housing or things like that,\u201d Ridley said. \u201cOur first desire is that it would be used for the good of seniors and stay within the religious tradition.\u201d

The Tucson convent\u2019s history as documented on its website begins in 1935 with an invitation from Diocese of Tucson Bishop Daniel Gercke to the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration. Until the completion of the Tucson Monastery in 1940, the sisters lived in the Steinfeld Mansion , 300 N. Main Ave. Architect Roy Place designed the current monastery.

\u201cThe Benedictine Sisters have been a blessing and gift in our community since 1935,\u201d said Bishop Gerald Kicanas of the Diocese of Tucson in a prepared statement. \u201cThey have held us in prayer and opened their home to us all. \u2026 They cannot imagine the impact they have had on us, not just as Catholics but all in our community.\u201d

Valencia orange and date palm trees dot the property, along with an ancient avocado tree that Ridley suspects is one of the oldest in Tucson.

The sisters sell soaps, salves and lotions and make liturgical vestments, or clothing.

Every day, the monastery holds four services in its chapel, along with Mass on Sunday.

\u201cWe\u2019re very sad,\u201d Ridley said. \u201cIt\u2019s a real loss to the city of Tucson and the people that we have grown to love and who love us.\u201d

"}, {"id":"2fd16c09-4e3a-5619-ab17-1a4a344a8456","type":"article","starttime":"1475017200","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T16:00:00-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Doctors Often Neglect Their Own Mental Health","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_2fd16c09-4e3a-5619-ab17-1a4a344a8456.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/doctors-often-neglect-their-own-mental-health/article_2fd16c09-4e3a-5619-ab17-1a4a344a8456.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/doctors-often-neglect-their-own-mental-health/article_5f4dc259-fe6d-57b1-b224-66786a27a830.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Karen PallaritoHealthDay Reporter","prologue":"TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Wary of the stigma of a mental health diagnosis and its toll on their careers, physicians often avoid getting help for depression and other mental illnesses, a new survey suggests.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["anxiety","depression","doctors","occupational health","psychology / mental health: misc.","therapy & procedures: misc."],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"2905e30a-1340-5489-b7a9-238b4f0b5a6d","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/90/2905e30a-1340-5489-b7a9-238b4f0b5a6d/57eb52956b801.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/90/2905e30a-1340-5489-b7a9-238b4f0b5a6d/57eb52956b801.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/90/2905e30a-1340-5489-b7a9-238b4f0b5a6d/57eb52956b801.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/90/2905e30a-1340-5489-b7a9-238b4f0b5a6d/57eb52956b801.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"2fd16c09-4e3a-5619-ab17-1a4a344a8456","body":"

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Wary of the stigma of a mental health diagnosis and its toll on their careers, physicians often avoid getting help for depression and other mental illnesses, a new survey suggests.

Researchers surveyed more than 2,000 female physicians to assess treatment barriers.

Nearly half of those surveyed thought they met the definition for mental illness at some point in their careers, but didn't seek treatment.

Many survey respondents said they felt they could persevere on their own or didn't have time to seek care.

However, when researchers examined all of the reasons for skipping care, more than two-thirds were stigma-related. Many doctors said getting diagnosed would be embarrassing or shameful, or they believed they would be judged by others, deemed incompetent, or have their privacy and autonomy violated.

\"I have definitely suspected a lot of people were feeling the stigma, but I was really astonished by how high the numbers really were,\" said Dr. Katherine Gold, the study's lead author. She's an assistant professor of family medicine and obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor.

The researchers believe the study is the first to ask doctors about mental health questions that pop up on most state medical licensing applications.

The concern is that some state reporting requirements are so sweeping that they cover prior illnesses that have been resolved, including postpartum depression, or conditions that are well controlled, the study authors noted.

The study involved female physicians, but Gold said stigma and mental health reporting issues apply to both men and women. She suspects that even more male physicians would hesitate to seek mental health care because of stigma-related concerns.

For the study, members of a closed Facebook group of physicians were invited to take the survey. The investigators chose the group because its roughly 57,000 members, who are also mothers, represent a variety of specialties -- not because they were women.

The anonymous survey ran from February to April 2016. The researchers posed 20 quantitative questions and four open-ended questions about mental illness treatment and reporting. More than 2,100 physicians from all 50 states and the District of Columbia responded.

One in three women said she had been diagnosed with a mental health condition at some point since medical school. But only 6 percent of those who were ever diagnosed or treated for a mental condition reported that information to the state, the survey findings showed.

Some doctors even admitted to seeking care in a different city or health system, paying cash for mental health-related prescriptions or writing their own prescriptions for medication.

\"In my own practice, I'll sometimes see physicians who have anxiety and depression, and most of the time they are very worried about my putting that in their record or having that diagnosis appear,\" Gold said.

Three-quarters of the women who had been diagnosed or treated said their condition didn't pose a potential safety risk to patients.

One physician who disclosed her well-controlled depression reported having to meet with a medical board-approved psychiatrist who charged $1,000 for a 15-minute visit at Starbucks.

\"Taking care of one's mental health is the best way to keep practicing safely and competently,\" said Dr. Christine Moutier, chief medical officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

\"But the way medical boards ask questions about doctors' mental health versus physical health are completely misaligned. These broad questions, even about conditions that are well managed, threaten doctors' occupational viability,\" she said.

That leads some doctors to simply avoid care or seek care in dysfunctional ways, Moutier noted.

The study authors pointed out that their results may be limited by the physician sample. These doctors were slightly younger overall than most practicing physicians.

Still, the findings raise ethical concerns about reporting requirements that prompt doctors to forgo needed care, the researchers said.

\"We're really undertreating physicians at the same time we're trying to break the stigma for the general population,\" Gold observed.

And although survey participants didn't say so, questions about mental illnesses that don't impair doctors' ability to function on the job may violate the Americans with Disabilities Act, the study authors added.

Lisa Robin, chief advocacy officer at the Federation of State Medical Boards, said, \"The issue of physician mental health is important.\"

And, she added, \"because it has potential impacts on patient safety, state medical boards are taking steps to raise awareness and seek ways to ensure the licensure system is responsive to it.\"

As an example, Robin cited the federation's recently launched Workgroup on Physician Wellness and Burnout. A key goal is to reduce stigma associated with seeking help for burnout, which may include depression and anxiety.

The study was published online recently in General Hospital Psychiatry.

More information

For information on specific mental health issues, visit the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

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TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among federal employees who review new cancer-drug applications for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, about half who leave to work elsewhere end up working for the industry they once regulated.

That's what researchers at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) concluded after following the career paths of 55 FDA reviewers of new blood and cancer drugs.

The findings raise concerns about regulators' ability to make impartial decisions in the public interest, the researchers suggest.

\"If you left the FDA, 57.7 percent of the time you worked for and consulted for the industry,\" said Dr. Vinay Prasad, a hematologist-oncologist and assistant professor of medicine.

\"It's astonishingly high,\" added Prasad, a co-author of a letter that addresses the issue and was published Sept. 27 in the BMJ.

Concerns about the \"revolving door\" between government and industry aren't new.

According to Dr. Michael Carome, director of Public Citizen's health research group, \"We've said for years ... that the FDA has grown too cozy with industry.\" Public Citizen is a nonprofit consumer rights advocacy organization.

\"I doubt this is unique to the hematology-oncology division,\" Carome added.

Not that FDA cancer drug reviewers are doing anything illegal by taking industry jobs after leaving the government. As FDA employees, they must adhere to conflict-of-interest rules and violators may be subject to criminal prosecution, Carome noted.

The question, Prasad said, is whether drug reviewers are succumbing to subtle, even subconscious, pressures to approve drugs, thinking someday they might want to work for industry.

The reality is that cancer drug reviewers, whose starting pay at the FDA is \"something like $170,000 to $190,000 a year,\" can earn substantially more in industry, Prasad said.

Perhaps that's so, but the FDA tries to stem that line of thinking, an agency spokesman said.

\"The FDA has a strong set of rules in place to ensure that our employees are working in the public interest, not to the advantage of any company, organization or individual,\" said Jason Young, acting assistant commissioner for media affairs at the FDA.

Federal laws and FDA ethics rules cover a range of issues, including conflicts, disclosures and confidentiality of information they [former employees] worked on while employees, Young said. There's also a \"cooling-off requirement\" for senior employees and other \"rules against switching sides, contacting former employees and contacting agency leaders,\" he said.

Using the FDA drug database, Prasad and co-author Jeffrey Bien, also of OHSU, identified 55 people who reviewed new applications for cancer and blood disease treatments from 2001 to 2010.

Then using publicly available information, they matched those individuals to the jobs they subsequently held.

Roughly half stayed at the FDA and half left, the investigators found. Of the 26 who moved on, 15 landed in jobs working or consulting for the biopharmaceutical industry.

In percentage terms, that means nearly 58 percent of those who left the FDA for another job took industry positions, the findings showed.

Researchers were unable to document the whereabouts of 30 percent of the former FDA employees except to say eight no longer worked for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the FDA.

If anything, the study authors said, the extent of the government-to-industry phenomenon is underestimated since not all reviewers' future careers could be identified.

\"They have a right to leave,\" Carome said. \"I don't think that can ever be banned.\"

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about drug development and approval.

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TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When is a lemon not a lemon? When it's \"lemon flavor\" in a processed food or drink.

The flavorings found in many foods and beverages may come from surprising sources. But, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said you can find out what's really in your foods by checking the ingredients list on product labels.

Just because a label says \"maple\" cereal doesn't mean it contains any maple syrup. It could be made with maple-like flavoring that might come from maple tree sap or bark. It could even come from an herb commonly used in Indian dishes called fenugreek, the FDA said.

The cereal could also have artificial maple flavoring that doesn't come from any natural source, the agency explained.

The only way people can know if they are tasting the real thing -- a natural substitute or an artificial flavor -- is to check the labels and ingredient lists on the foods they buy, the agency FDA advised.

FDA regulations allow companies to use terms like \"maple-flavored\" or \"artificially maple-flavored\" on the labels of foods that do not contain these actual ingredients. The foods just have to contain some type of maple flavoring.

Labels must declare if this flavor comes from an artificial source, according to the FDA.

Not everyone is concerned about artificial flavors as long as the taste is right, Douglas Balentine, director of the FDA's Office of Nutrition and Food Labeling, said in an agency news release.

But people who want to be certain a food is made with a particular ingredient should look for specific mention of this item on the ingredient list, Balentine said.

For example, when buying grapefruit juice look for the words \"grapefruit\" or \"grapefruit juice\" to ensure the juice is actually made with the fruit, the FDA recommended.

Some labels will also advertise that a product is made with certain natural or pure ingredients, such as stating that it contains 100 percent maple syrup.

Felicia Billingslea is director of the FDA's Food Labeling and Standards Staff. She said that \"consumers have long recognized that products like chocolate pudding, cake and cookies may be made with cocoa.\"

Billingslea said if \"cocoa\" is listed in the ingredient list, the name of the food can include the term \"chocolate\" in certain situations.

When it comes to butter, however, there is less guesswork. Products labeled as butter products, such as butter cookies, must be made with 100 percent butter. If they also contain shortening, they must be labeled as \"butter-flavored,\" the FDA said.

The agency tracks what companies put on their food labels and packages to make sure they aren't misleading consumers. The FDA said it can take action or seize products that violate labeling requirements.

\"Ultimately,\" Balentine said, \"we want consumers to be able to make informed choices about their foods, and FDA's job is to make sure consumers know what they're getting.\"

More information

Harvard University has more about artificial flavors.

"}, {"id":"9a299a25-751e-5412-9b36-2eb907cf3189","type":"article","starttime":"1475010000","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T14:00:00-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"application":"editorial","title":"1st Baby Born With DNA From 3 Parents","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_9a299a25-751e-5412-9b36-2eb907cf3189.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/st-baby-born-with-dna-from-parents/article_9a299a25-751e-5412-9b36-2eb907cf3189.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/st-baby-born-with-dna-from-parents/article_8d30328a-4082-52e0-82f6-e27bf2948953.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A now 5-month-old baby boy is the first worldwide to be born using a controversial technique that combines DNA from three people -- two women and a man.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["childbirth","genetic disorders"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"da42314e-a828-514b-bdfe-455df4afcafc","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"465","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/a4/da42314e-a828-514b-bdfe-455df4afcafc/57847dde43979.image.jpg?resize=620%2C465"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/a4/da42314e-a828-514b-bdfe-455df4afcafc/57847dde43979.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/a4/da42314e-a828-514b-bdfe-455df4afcafc/57847dde43979.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/a4/da42314e-a828-514b-bdfe-455df4afcafc/57847dde43979.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"9a299a25-751e-5412-9b36-2eb907cf3189","body":"

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A now 5-month-old baby boy is the first worldwide to be born using a controversial technique that combines DNA from three people -- two women and a man.

As reported Tuesday by New Scientist magazine, the technique is designed to help couples who carry rare genetic mutations have healthy children. It has only been legally approved for use in the United Kingdom.

According to the report, the boy was born to a Jordanian couple in which the woman carries genes for Leigh syndrome, a lethal nervous system disorder. The DNA for the illness resides in the cell's energy source, the mitochondria. Mitochondrial DNA is only passed down to children via mothers.

The woman in this case was herself healthy but had already had two children who later died of Leigh syndrome, New Scientist reported.

So, the couple turned to a team led by Dr. John Zhang at New Hope Fertility Center, in New York City. Zhang had long been working on a \"three-parent\" method of conception called \"spindle nuclear transfer.\" In this method, doctors remove the nucleus from one of the mother's eggs and insert it into a donor egg that has had its own nucleus removed.

This egg -- which now contained DNA from the Jordanian mother, along with mitochondrial DNA from the female egg donor -- was then fertilized using the father's sperm.

According to New Scientist, this method resulted in five embryos, only one of which matured in a normal way. It was this embryo that was implanted into the Jordanian mother, who gave birth nine months later.

The New Scientist pointed out that, in keeping with the Muslim couple's religious beliefs, this technique did not involve the destruction of embryos. Also, a male embryo was used so that the resulting child could not pass on mitochondrial DNA.

Tests conducted on the baby boy's mitochondria has revealed that less than 1 percent carries the Leigh syndrome mutation. This is below the 18 percent threshold that scientists believe is necessary for the syndrome to develop.

The procedure was conducted in Mexico. Because the three-parent technique is still not allowed in the United States, Zhang performed the procedure in Mexico where \"there are no rules.\"

He told New Scientist that he believes this path to conception was the right choice for this couple, because \"to save lives is the ethical thing to do.\"

Still, another expert had some concerns. Bert Smeets is a fertility expert at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. He told New Scientist that while the boy's birth is \"exciting news,\" the child must be monitored going forward to make sure the faulty DNA doesn't multiply and cause problems down the road.

\"We need to wait for more births, and to carefully judge them,\" Smeets said.

The procedure will be described in detail in October at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine's annual meeting, in Salt Lake City.

"} ]