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Tucson","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/retrotucson/then-and-now-around-tucson/collection_042ea8ea-8588-11e4-8b48-d32f82f6da4d.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/retrotucson/then-and-now-around-tucson/collection_042ea8ea-8588-11e4-8b48-d32f82f6da4d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Buildings, streets and landmarks around Tucson from decades gone by, with same viewpoint today.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["advice","ask amy","relationships","cheating","lying","long distance"],"internalKeywords":["#mobile","#askamy"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"229dee52-63d1-5a21-896c-0e029600282d","description":"THEN: The Amphi Plaza Shopping Center, at North First Avenue and East Fort Lowell Road, was a vibrant, bustling shopping center featuring a Jarrold Drug store, Goldwyn\u2019s, Goodman\u2019s, McLellans, Wilson\u2019s 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Dear Amy: My husband and I have two boys, ages 7 and 4.

The 7-year-old is a great traveler, but the last time we flew on a plane, when he was 5, our older son completely freaked out. I think the sound of the engine and the motion of the takeoff and landing scared him.

He was fine once we were in the air, but to this day he says that he never wants to fly on a plane. He also had a big fear of bounce houses, also because of the sound of the air being blown into them, but after a couple years of avoiding bounce houses he actually had a lot of fun on one. It was a small miracle.

My question is about travel. We have been avoiding trips that would involve flying, but we would like to try to take a nice family vacation somewhere farther away again.

Do we just plan something and hope he won't freak out again? Do we try to prepare him for it, or just don't mention anything ahead of time to avoid anxiety about the plane ride? I was thinking of buying noise-cancelling headphones. Please let me know what you would do.

\u2014 Ready to Travel Again

Dear Ready to Travel: I am a former freak-out flier. And I cured myself using \"controlled exposure,\" which is basically the commonsense experience of tackling a fear in stages, while learning about the source of what was causing it. This could work for your son. My fear was triggered by noises (engines accelerating, flaps moving up and down), as well as bumps and shimmying. This is a common experience for less-seasoned fliers.

On one particularly bumpy flight, panicked, I sought out a flight attendant. He described how the bumps on a plane are like driving down a bumpy road. The vehicle is made for it, and it is nothing to worry about. Reassurance! That helped a lot.

Your son might be particularly sensitive to loud noises (it might be good to have him assessed for a mild sensory disorder), but his experience conquering the bouncy house shows that he can bravely face and tolerate some discomfort. Good for him.

Now that he is older, you can show him how planes work, preparing him for some of the sensations of being onboard an aircraft.

The actor and literacy advocate LeVar Burton has a wonderful short film (available on YouTube), where he takes a fearful boy about your son's age on an airplane flight (\"A Child's First Time Flying Story\"). Watch this with your son. There are also flight-simulation games designed for children. Check them out.

The message to your son should be, \"In order to go to fun and faraway places, we're going to fly in a plane. This was scary when you were younger and didn't understand how planes work. But we know you can do this, and we'll help you because we'll be with you the whole time.\"

Noise-cancelling headphones, deep-breathing techniques and a reassuring adult hand holding onto his will also help.

Dear Amy: My husband posts photos of our children on social media, but he never posts pictures of me. He doesn't even say that he is married to me on social media.

What do you think about this?

\u2014 Worried

Dear Worried: I think it's time for you two to have a conversation.

Many people choose to leave their relationship status vague on social media. There can be legitimate reasons to do this, but your husband is including some immediate family members and excluding you.

His behavior on social media is a denial of a pretty basic fact about his life, and you should challenge him to explain it.

If there aren't any recent pictures of the two of you that he likes (he may use this as an excuse), dig into the archives and find a fun one from the early days.

Dear Amy: Responding to the letter from \"Mom,\" whose manipulative and chronically underachieving daughter was \"miraculously\" admitted to her expensive dream college:

That mom has an \"amazing\" kid? I teach high school. I know plenty of amazing kids, and I'm not just talking grades. Community service. Outside work programs. Music and acting talents.

The problem is not just the kid here. Bravo for your answer.

\u2014 Steve

Dear Steve: And bravo to you. \"Amazing kids\" get that way through the efforts of good parents and great teachers.

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BEIRUT (AP) \u2014 Every Sunday, the gymnasium along Beirut's airport highway echoes with the shouting and laughter of dozens of Syrian children enjoying a rare escape from a grim and confined life in exile.

The Sport 4 Development program, run by the U.N. children's agency, aims to bring 12,000 children, mostly Syrian refugees, to blacktops and turf pitches this year to teach the basics of soccer and basketball, and to ease the pain of war and displacement.

\"We try to get them out of their stressful environments and the frights that they've lived through,\" said Maher Nakib, 40, the technical director of Hoops Lebanon, the sports association behind the project.

Of the one million Syrian refugees the U.N. says are living in Lebanon, more than half are under 18 years old. Syrians here face legal and other forms of discrimination, and many parents are hesitant to let their children play outside in the crowded alleys of Beirut's poorer neighborhoods, where most of the refugees live.

The monthlong Hoops program provides a safe environment where the children can blow off steam, as well as learn self-confidence and teamwork.

\"They come back home and they're too tired to fight,\" smiles Fatima Tayjan, a refugee from the Syrian city of Aleppo who has enrolled three of her four children in the program. When her family of six returns home to their crowded two-bedroom apartment, the children have \"released all their energy and they are ready to talk to each other,\" she said.

Maram al-Malwa, a 17-year-old paid volunteer who came up in the program, recalls her own feelings of isolation when she and her family fled from Aleppo to Lebanon five years ago. \"It was a new country, even a new accent,\" she said.

But now she is irrepressible, rising on the balls of her feet when she speaks and helping coaches reach through to children in the group activities. She is one of a handful of the children pulled aside for a six-month mentorship on leadership and coaching.

\"You grow, you experience victories, setbacks, you learn to fight for yourself, and you become more confident,\" she said.

When hundreds of thousands of Palestinians fled their homes or were forced into Lebanon during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war, they set to work mending the national fabric through schools, scouts, and athletics, with the support of Arab nationalist groups.

But Syrians have not been able to count on the same sense of solidarity. And as the U.N. and aid groups have struggled to assist the nearly 5 million Syrian refugees scattered across the region, the focus has been on schooling, aid and shelter, with few resources left over for cultural or recreational activities.

\"Children won't necessarily express themselves unless you give them an outlet, and sports are an excellent medium to do so,\" said Nakib, the technical director.

Rania Qadri, who fled from Syria's southern Daraa province, said she saw her oldest daughter change before her eyes.

\"She used to be introverted, she wouldn't speak to anyone,\" she said. \"Now she comes home and tells me, 'I've made friends, we've been playing soccer, we've been playing games and sports.'\"

Staffers are trained to identify struggling children, those who lash out and those who retreat into their shells. Psychologists meet with parents weekly to discuss healthy relationships and domestic violence.

The group sessions often bring to light domestic disputes, learning disabilities or experiences of sexual violence. The children are then referred to specialized non-governmental organizations for further support.

In other cases, children will reveal that they are not enrolled in school, and staffers will direct them to organizations that can help. Two-thirds of Syrian children in Lebanon do not attend school, according to U.N. figures, in part because the country's underfunded public education system has been overwhelmed by the new arrivals.

On a recent Sunday, the children lined up to dribble through cones, shoot layups and learn cheers and stretches.

\"You see a lot of cases of shyness or stubbornness, and you immediately see them change when they're here,\" said al-Malwa, the teenage volunteer. \"I feel like I'm responsible, like I'm in charge of a group.\"

"}, {"id":"d70af830-e41e-5ae3-87b8-5a7ddbadb986","type":"article","starttime":"1487819003","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T20:03:23-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"},{"world":"news/world"},{"national":"news/national"},{"featured":"video/featured"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"A tearful reunion for burned Yazidi toddler and his family","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_d70af830-e41e-5ae3-87b8-5a7ddbadb986.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/a-tearful-reunion-for-burned-yazidi-toddler-and-his-family/article_d70af830-e41e-5ae3-87b8-5a7ddbadb986.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/a-tearful-reunion-for-burned-yazidi-toddler-and-his-family/article_c2d9a6f5-cd1f-5bcb-b467-15ce5e7981bf.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Jacqueline Howard and Ben Tinker, CNN","prologue":"The tears didn't stop, but they were tears of joy.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap","#cnn"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"d70af830-e41e-5ae3-87b8-5a7ddbadb986","body":"

The tears didn't stop, but they were tears of joy.

After almost four months apart, Dilbireen, a 2-year-old Yazidi boy, was reunited with his parents and his newborn brother at the Hilton Boston Logan Airport hotel Monday night.

His parents, Ajeel Muhsin and Flosa Khalaf, couldn't contain their emotion.

\"They both burst into tears,\" said Sally Becker, founder of the UK-based charity Road to Peace, which facilitated Dilbireen's reunion with his family.

Dilbireen, who traveled to the United States with his father and Becker in October to undergo medical treatment and surgeries for severe burns, simply smiled and gazed at his parents and the baby brother he had never met, until now. CNN was there exclusively to capture the reunion.

\"Thank God we're all together again,\" Muhsin said in comments translated from Kurdish.

\"I want to thank everyone involved in this, to help us come here to do his surgeries,\" Muhsin said. \"It's really hard to stay away from your child even when they're healthy, let alone he was burned and he was here alone.\"

The only one who wasn't crying during the reunion was Dilbireen, noted Becker. She accompanied the family on their flight from Iraq to the US on Monday.

\"It's been a long time, but he completely accepted them, and it's as if they've never been away now,\" Becker said of Dilbireen's reaction to his family. \"And he seems to love his little brother. That's terrific, but it's been a very long road, this road to peace. A lot of false starts.\"

Overcoming bumps along the road

Dilbireen's parents have been desperately waiting to be by their son's side since their visas were revoked in early January and a passport application for Dilbireen's brother was denied.

Later that month, President Donald Trump signed an executive order to keep most citizens of seven predominately Muslim nations from entering the US for at least 90 days from when the order was signed.

Iraq, the family's homeland, was among the nations affected, leaving Dilbireen's parents even more concerned that they would not be able to visit their son in the United States and bring him home.

While the family was in limbo, Dilbireen was left in the care of Adlay Kejjan, director of the Yazidi American Women Organization. The next round of surgeries he needed were put on hold until his parents and newborn brother could enter the United States.

Last week, desperation turned into joy for Dilbireen's family, all of whom had been issued new US visas to accompany Dilbireen as he continues his treatments at Shriners Hospitals for Children in Boston.

\"Dilbireen requires intensive surgery, and the aftercare is extensive. Having both his mother and father here to provide that care will make an enormous difference in his recovery both physically and emotionally,\" said Scott LaStaiti, a Los Angeles-based film producer and philanthropist who was involved in finding Dilbireen medical care.

\"In terms of his overall well-being, he's a 2-year-old child who has been without his parents for several months now. I do not think I can begin to quantify the benefits of being reunited with his family again, including his baby brother,\" LaStaiti said.

A family seeking solace from terror

Dilbireen, whose name means \"wounded heart\" in Kurdish, was born January 4, 2015, at a camp for internally displaced persons. His family, who are Yazidis, fled to the camp to escape the carnage being committed by ISIS near their home.

The United States declared last year that ISIS committed genocide against the Yazidis, a minority group in Iraq living around Mount Sinjar.

Then, on Dilbireen's first birthday, the family experienced more heartbreak.

Dilbireen was severely burned on his face and feet when a gas heater malfunctioned and set his crib ablaze inside a prefabricated hut at the camp. Khalaf, Dilbireen's mother, was baking bread outside when the fire erupted.

Doctors in Iraq tended to Dilbireen's burns but advised that his parents seek treatment outside the country, said Dilbireen's father, Muhsin.

LaStaiti and Becker, founder of Road to Peace, made arrangements for Dilbireen and other injured refugee children to receive medical treatment at Shriners Hospitals for Children at no cost. Road to Peace works with groups around the world to help build alliances between communities in conflict and facilitate specialized medical care for refugee children.

\"Born in a camp where his parents have been living since fleeing their home on Sinjar mountain, this amazing and resilient little boy is a symbol of the suffering of the Yazidis and other religious minorities in the region,\" Becker said last week.

\"The Yazidis have been victims of many genocides over the centuries, and there are only around 800,000 left in the world,\" she said. \"So this mission isn't just about helping Dilbireen; it's about highlighting the plight of his people.\"

What's next for Dilbireen and his care

Dilbireen underwent the first round of surgeries to restore the appearance and function of his face in October. Muhsin was by his side during the procedure but returned to Iraq in November to be with Khalaf as she gave birth to Dilbireen's brother.

\"America is helping us to do surgery on our boy,\" Muhsin said in an interview this month. \"We want to show our appreciation to America for what they are doing for our boy.\"

The couple named Dilbireen's brother Trump. He was born the day after the US presidential election.

As the family made attempts to travel to the United States to accompany Dilbireen during his next round of surgeries and to introduce him to his brother, Trump, they were both confused and disheartened by the resistance they faced.

\"First time they denied our visas, they thought we were coming here to stay. They thought, if our entire family comes here, we would not return,\" Muhsin said. \"Originally when we had visas, my wife was pregnant. If our intention was to stay here, we would have come all together. Our child would have been born here. He would have been a US citizen. But we had no intentions to stay here.\"

Now, the family seems both relieved and content to be together again.

\"My understanding is that this next round of surgeries will focus on the scar tissue around his right eye, but ultimately Shriners will determine what's next for Dilbireen after they see him this week,\" LaStaiti said.

After seeing Dilbireen on Tuesday, doctors at Shriners say that he is doing well and that he will begin his next reconstructive surgery soon. They hope to space out the procedures to improve the form and function of his face.

Meanwhile, Khalaf said she remains grateful that her son can continue his surgeries.

\"As long as his surgeries are done and he gains his health back,\" she said in comments translated from Kurdish. \"We don't want anything else in life.\"

'The most meaningful thing I've known'

While Dilbireen and his family are saying \"hello again,\" the tenacious toddler and his caretaker, Kejjan, will be saying \"goodbye.\"

Kejjan, a paramedic and pilot based in Lansing, Michigan, serves as an advocate for the Yazidi community and cared for Dilbireen at her home in Michigan for the past few months.

Yet she said that not only has she cared for Dilbireen, he has cared for her.

\"He's given us unconditional love. He's such an easy child to take care of. He doesn't ask for much. He's very independent. He just gives love freely and unconditionally. It doesn't matter who it is, whether it's me, my family or a stranger,\" Kejjan said.

\"I'm excited because he's going to see his parents but at the same time sad because I won't have him. He's been the center of my life the last three and a half months,\" she said, adding that she plans to help more children in need of medical care. \"It's been the most meaningful thing of my life, the most meaningful thing I've known.\"

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(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)","byline":"Andrew Harnik","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/f0/8f0fd62f-0e1b-58a9-be71-02f1770a5109/58ae2d283c23b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/f0/8f0fd62f-0e1b-58a9-be71-02f1770a5109/58ae2d283c23b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/f0/8f0fd62f-0e1b-58a9-be71-02f1770a5109/58ae2d283c23b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/f0/8f0fd62f-0e1b-58a9-be71-02f1770a5109/58ae2d283c23b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"0d3a1ac7-b3fa-5af2-8c91-0cef16ffd519","description":"Activists and protesters with the National Center for Transgender Equality rally in front of the White House, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in Washington, after the Department of Education and the Justice Department announce plans to overturn the school guidance on protecting transgender students. 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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Transgender students on Wednesday lost federal protections that allowed them to use school bathrooms and locker rooms matching their gender identities, as the Trump administration stepped into a long-simmering national debate.

The administration came down on the side of states' rights, lifting Obama-era federal guidelines that had been characterized by Republicans as an example of overreach.

Without the Obama directive, it will be up to states and school districts to interpret federal anti-discrimination law and determine whether students should have access to restrooms in accordance with their expressed gender identity and not just their biological sex.

\"This is an issue best solved at the state and local level,\" Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said. \"Schools, communities and families can find \u2014 and in many cases have found \u2014 solutions that protect all students.\"

In a letter to the nation's schools, the Justice and Education departments said the earlier guidance \"has given rise to significant litigation regarding school restrooms and locker rooms.\"

The agencies withdrew the guidance to \"in order to further and more completely consider the legal issues involved.\"

Anti-bullying safeguards would not be affected by the change, according to the letter. \"All schools must ensure that all students, including LGBT students, are able to learn and thrive in a safe environment,\" it said.

It was not clear what immediate impact the change would have on schools, as a federal judge in Texas put a temporary hold on the Obama guidance soon after it was issued \u2014 after 13 states sued.

Even without that hold, the guidance carried no force of law. But transgender rights advocates say it was useful and necessary to protect students from discrimination. Opponents argued it was federal overreach and violated the safety and privacy of other students.

The White House said \"returning power to the states paves the way for an open and inclusive process to take place at the local level with input from parents, students, teachers and administrators.\"

The reversal is a setback for transgender rights groups, which had been urging Trump to keep the guidelines in place. Advocates say federal law will still prohibit discrimination against students based on their gender or sexual orientation.

Still, they say lifting the Obama directive puts children in harm's way.

\"Reversing this guidance tells trans kids that it's OK with the Trump administration and the Department of Education for them to be abused and harassed at school for being trans,\" said American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten.

Activists protested the move Wednesday outside the White House. \"Respect existence or expect resistance,\" read one placard.

Conservatives hailed the change, saying the Obama directives were illegal and violated the rights of fixed-gender students, especially girls who did not feel safe changing clothes or using restrooms next to anatomical males.

\"Our daughters should never be forced to share private, intimate spaces with male classmates, even if those young men are struggling with these issues,\" said Vicki Wilson, a member of Students and Parents for Privacy. \"It violates their right to privacy and harms their dignity.\"

White House spokesman Sean Spicer denied media reports that DeVos, who has been criticized for her stance on LGBT issues, had opposed the change but was overruled by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Spicer said any disagreement was merely over wording and timing.

\"There is no daylight between anybody,\" Spicer said, adding that DeVos was \"100 percent\" on board with the decision.

The Obama administration's guidance was based on its determination that Title IX, the federal law prohibiting sex discrimination in education, also applies to gender identity.

The guidance did not sufficiently explain its interpretation of that law, Sessions said in a statement.

\"Congress, state legislatures and local governments are in a position to adopt appropriate policies or laws addressing this issue,\" he said.

Legal experts said the change in position could impact pending court cases involving the federal sex discrimination law, including a case to be heard by the Supreme Court in March involving Gavin Grimm, a transgender teen who was denied bathroom access in Virginia.

The justices could decide not to hear the case and direct lower courts to decide that issue.

In a phone interview with the AP, Grimm said of the Trump action: \"It's not positive. It has the possibility of hurting transgender students and transgender people. We're going to keep fighting like we have been and keep fighting for the right thing.\"

A patchwork of state laws could continue to emerge as a result of the change. Fifteen states have explicit protections for transgender students in their state laws, and many individual school districts in other states have adopted policies that cover such students on the basis of their gender identity, said Sarah Warbelow, legal director of the Human Rights Campaign. Just one state, North Carolina, has enacted a law restricting access to bathrooms in government-owned buildings to the sex that appears on a person's birth certificate. Lawmakers in more than 10 states are considering similar legislation, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

___

Associated Press writers Ben Finley in Norfolk, Virginia, and Todd Richmond in Madison, Wisconsin, contributed to this report.

"}, {"id":"8496fe7b-2088-52c0-983f-9290f1cc8816","type":"article","starttime":"1487802600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T15:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487802951","priority":0,"sections":[{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"},{"pets":"lifestyles/pets"},{"featured":"video/featured"}],"flags":{"ap":"true","spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Take your dog along for a ride with this custom bicycle sidecar","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_8496fe7b-2088-52c0-983f-9290f1cc8816.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/take-your-dog-along-for-a-ride-with-this-custom/article_8496fe7b-2088-52c0-983f-9290f1cc8816.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/home-and-garden/take-your-dog-along-for-a-ride-with-this-custom/article_15539c14-f941-11e6-a782-bb16903337cf.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":1,"gallery":0},"byline":"Andy Reuter | areuter@madison.com | @andrewreuter","prologue":"This bicycle sidecar is\u00a0kind of like an environmentally-friendly pickup truck.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","lee diy","sweeps","pets","home and garden","makers","bicycles","laura kampf"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","youtube":[{"id":"13ebeea4-f35c-57cb-8eb1-db52659f18e7","starttime":"1487797140","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T13:59:00-07:00","title":"Laura's bicycle sidecar","description":"\"I like to use my bike as much as I can, so I decided to build a sidecar that allows me to transport lumber and bigger cargo with my bike. I\u00a0can also stack these pallet frames on it so i can take Sumdo on the road.\"","byline":"","video_id":"KI52p_XwEXM"}],"revision":2,"commentID":"8496fe7b-2088-52c0-983f-9290f1cc8816","body":"

February has brought warm weather to much of the U.S.

This has put many dog-owning cyclists into a familiar bind: Should they walk their dogs or ride their bikes?

German maker Laura Kampf doesn't have to worry about that decision anymore. She built a side car for her bicycle.

The project actually started as a way to haul wood. Kampf uses a welder to make a structure strong enough for this purpose. A few extra features make it suitable for board and beast alike. It's kind of like an environmentally-friendly pickup truck.

Learn more by watching the video above. Find more of Kampf's work on her YouTube channel.

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#10. Crenshaw County, AL

\"Rivers

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 128.78 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 18
Population: 13,977

#9. Pipestone County, MN

\"Wikipedia\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 129.3 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 12
Population: 9,281

#8. Attala County, MS

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 130.46 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 25
Population: 19,163

#7. Turner County, SD

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 132.98 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 11
Population: 8,272

#6. Young County, TX

\"Presidencia

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 136.24 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 25
Population: 18,350

"}, {"id":"6988b276-3174-5563-866d-6b92a1cc9d52","type":"article","starttime":"1487792040","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T12:34:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487797588","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"application":"editorial","title":"5-1","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_6988b276-3174-5563-866d-6b92a1cc9d52.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_6988b276-3174-5563-866d-6b92a1cc9d52.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/article_ed8b420a-f935-11e6-92d7-a3e40a008e8d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"#5. Gentry County, MO","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["health","medicine","fitness","wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":4,"commentID":"6988b276-3174-5563-866d-6b92a1cc9d52","body":"

#5. Gentry County, MO

\"Americasroof

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 146.5 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 10
Population: 6,826

#4. McCook County, SD

\"Runner1928

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 177.02 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 10
Population: 5,649

#3. Tripp County, SD

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 181.42 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 10
Population: 5,512

#2. Traill County, ND

\"Andrew

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 185.6 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 15
Population: 8,082

#1. Walworth County, SD

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 272.18 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 15
Population: 5,511

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"}, {"id":"1d0d224d-2345-5c1e-a12c-9e8bd39b959e","type":"article","starttime":"1487791740","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T12:29:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487797588","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"application":"editorial","title":"40-36","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_1d0d224d-2345-5c1e-a12c-9e8bd39b959e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_1d0d224d-2345-5c1e-a12c-9e8bd39b959e.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/article_3330869a-f935-11e6-829f-7f4bf0ad7aa9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"#40. Elk County, PA","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["health","medicine","fitness","wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":4,"commentID":"1d0d224d-2345-5c1e-a12c-9e8bd39b959e","body":"

#40. Elk County, PA

\"Pubdog

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 96.17 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 30
Population: 31,194

#39. Madison County, MO

\"Parker

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 97.02 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 12
Population: 12,368

#38. Otero County, CO

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 97.36 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 18
Population: 18,488

#37. Chester County, TN

\"Ichabod

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 97.82 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 17
Population: 17,379

#36. Marion County, TX

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 98.53 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 10
Population: 10,149

"}, {"id":"eba9bf62-3da4-5e81-912d-77b7e9de821b","type":"article","starttime":"1487791740","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T12:29:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487797588","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"application":"editorial","title":"35-31","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_eba9bf62-3da4-5e81-912d-77b7e9de821b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_eba9bf62-3da4-5e81-912d-77b7e9de821b.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/article_3eda1448-f935-11e6-acd2-3b29df6f4fc6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"#35. Grayson County, VA","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["health","medicine","fitness","wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":4,"commentID":"eba9bf62-3da4-5e81-912d-77b7e9de821b","body":"

#35. Grayson County, VA

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 99.38 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 15
Population: 15,093

#34. Webster County, MS

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 100.28 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 10
Population: 9,972

#33. Alleghany County, NC

\"G

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 101.11 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 11
Population: 10,879

#32. Calhoun County, MS

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 101.73 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 15
Population: 14,745

#31. Itawamba County, MS

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 102.01 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 24
Population: 23,527

"}, {"id":"1fde0448-e228-5240-ab34-07297cd12d01","type":"article","starttime":"1487791740","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-22T12:29:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487797588","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"application":"editorial","title":"30-26","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_1fde0448-e228-5240-ab34-07297cd12d01.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_1fde0448-e228-5240-ab34-07297cd12d01.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/article_4b2fa302-f935-11e6-8931-d3f555857d77.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"#30. Yancey County, NC","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["health","medicine","fitness","wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":4,"commentID":"1fde0448-e228-5240-ab34-07297cd12d01","body":"

#30. Yancey County, NC

\"Shapard

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 102.19 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 18
Population: 17,614

#29. Carroll County, TN

\"NathanReed

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 102.22 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 29
Population: 28,370

#28. Covington County, MS

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 102.87 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 20
Population: 19,442

#27. Butler County, AL

\"Chris

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 103.47 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 21
Population: 20,296

#26. Barbour County, AL

\"Shutterstock\"

Alzheimer's Death Rate (2014): 104.14 per 100K
Deaths to Alzheimer's (2014): 28
Population: 26,887

"} ]