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Salvage workers are slowly pulling up the huge, corroded South Korean ferry above the sea surface Thursday, March 23, 2017, about three years after it sank on its routine voyage to a resort island, killing more than 300 people, mostly high school students. (South Korea Coast Guard/Yonhap via AP, File)","byline":"SUB","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"352","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/33/a3348242-9c71-5e74-81ba-52c202fcacdd/58d341c1d9632.image.jpg?resize=512%2C352"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/33/a3348242-9c71-5e74-81ba-52c202fcacdd/58d341c1d9632.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"206","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/33/a3348242-9c71-5e74-81ba-52c202fcacdd/58d341c1d9632.image.jpg?resize=300%2C206"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"704","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/33/a3348242-9c71-5e74-81ba-52c202fcacdd/58d341c1d9632.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"cd34a522-acd3-52c6-bacb-9be5e4bea936","description":"FILE - In this April 16, 2014 file photo, South Korean rescue helicopters fly over South Korean ferry Sewol, trying to rescue passengers from the ship in waters off Jindo, South Korea. Salvage workers are slowly pulling up the huge, corroded South Korean ferry above the sea surface Thursday, March 23, 2017, about three years after it sank on its routine voyage to a resort island, killing more than 300 people, mostly high school students. (Yonhap via AP, File)","byline":"SUB","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"389","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d3/cd34a522-acd3-52c6-bacb-9be5e4bea936/58d341c197144.image.jpg?resize=512%2C389"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"76","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d3/cd34a522-acd3-52c6-bacb-9be5e4bea936/58d341c197144.image.jpg?resize=100%2C76"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"228","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d3/cd34a522-acd3-52c6-bacb-9be5e4bea936/58d341c197144.image.jpg?resize=300%2C228"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"778","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d3/cd34a522-acd3-52c6-bacb-9be5e4bea936/58d341c197144.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"524096a4-59da-5de8-b982-8115e3a81b1d","description":"Workers try to raise the sunken Sewol ferry between two barges during the salvage operation in waters off Jindo, South Korea, Thursday, March 23, 2017. 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(Choi Young-su/Yonhap via AP)","byline":"Choi Young-su","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"345","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/24/524096a4-59da-5de8-b982-8115e3a81b1d/58d3a3e78efb6.image.jpg?resize=512%2C345"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/24/524096a4-59da-5de8-b982-8115e3a81b1d/58d3a3e78efb6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/24/524096a4-59da-5de8-b982-8115e3a81b1d/58d3a3e78efb6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"690","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/24/524096a4-59da-5de8-b982-8115e3a81b1d/58d3a3e78efb6.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"d6157511-81da-5186-85a7-f71f9c10dd47","description":"Workers try to raise the sunken Sewol ferry, center, between two barges during the salvage operation in waters off Jindo, South Korea, Thursday, March 23, 2017. 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(Gang Jong-min/Newsis via AP)","byline":"Gang Jong-min","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/61/d6157511-81da-5186-85a7-f71f9c10dd47/58d46d4370597.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/61/d6157511-81da-5186-85a7-f71f9c10dd47/58d46d4370597.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/61/d6157511-81da-5186-85a7-f71f9c10dd47/58d46d4370597.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/61/d6157511-81da-5186-85a7-f71f9c10dd47/58d46d4370597.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"8b27b431-5701-57cf-937e-fe8870ad3aa4","description":"Relatives of missing passengers of the sunken Sewol ferry on a boat, front, watch its salvage operation in waters off Jindo, South Korea, Thursday, March 23, 2017. South Korean workers on Thursday slowly pulled up the 6,800-ton ferry from the water, nearly three years after it capsized and sank into the violent seas off South Korea's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for a country that continues to search for closure to one of its deadliest disasters ever.(Kyodo News via AP)","byline":"SUB","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"302","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b2/8b27b431-5701-57cf-937e-fe8870ad3aa4/58d46d4394b9c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C302"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"59","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b2/8b27b431-5701-57cf-937e-fe8870ad3aa4/58d46d4394b9c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C59"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"177","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b2/8b27b431-5701-57cf-937e-fe8870ad3aa4/58d46d4394b9c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C177"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"604","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b2/8b27b431-5701-57cf-937e-fe8870ad3aa4/58d46d4394b9c.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"7922306f-a995-52f5-880e-836adf7833e3","body":"

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) \u2014 South Korean efforts to bring a sunken, 6,800-ton ferry back to land cleared an obstacle on Friday after divers cut off a vehicle ramp that had been dangling from the ship and hindering efforts to raise it.

Removing the ramp will allow workers to raise the ferry to a height where it can be loaded onto a semi-submersible transport vessel for transportation to a port.

More than 300 people \u2014 most of whom were students on a high school trip \u2014 died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures. Public outrage over what was seen as a botched rescue job by the government contributed to the recent ouster of Park Geun-hye as president.

Salvage crews plan to raise the Sewol until its upper side is about 13 meters (42 feet) above the water's surface so that it can be loaded onto the transport vessel about a mile away. It was just short of that height early Friday, according to the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries.

It would not have been possible to fit the ferry into the transport vessel with the ramp hanging down, and a government official says removing it should give workers enough time to load the ferry by midnight Friday.

The waters where the ferry sank are notorious for dangerous currents. The sea is relatively calm now, but currents are forecast to strengthen on Saturday.

Workers on two barges began the salvaging operation Wednesday night, rolling up 66 cables connected to a frame of metal beams divers spent months placing beneath the ferry.

The bodies of 295 passengers were recovered after the sinking, but nine are still missing. Relatives, some of whom were watching from two fishing boats just outside the operation area, hope those remains will be found inside the ferry. Some cried as they watched the emerging wreckage with telescopes.

\"I shouted in joy when we heard that the ship surfaced at dawn. I thought we finally can find the missing nine,\" Lee Geum-hee, the mother of a missing school girl, told a television crew.

\"But when I actually saw the ship coming up, I was devastated. All this time my poor child was in that cold, dirty place. It was heart wrenching.\"

Once the Sewol is loaded onto the transport vessel, it will take days to empty the ferry of water and fuel, and another two weeks for it to reach a port 90 kilometers (55 miles) away in the city of Mokpo.

Workers will then begin clearing mud and debris and search for the remains of the missing victims. An investigation committee will also search for clues that could further explain the cause of the sinking, which has been blamed on overloaded cargo, improper storage and other negligence.

The ferry's captain survived and is serving a life sentence after a court found him guilty of committing homicide through \"willful negligence\" because he fled the ship without issuing an evacuation order.

Ousted President Park was forced to defend herself against accusations that she was out of contact for several hours on the day of the sinking. The allegations were included in an impeachment bill lawmakers passed against Park in December, amid broader corruption suspicions.

Park was formally removed from office by the Constitutional Court earlier this month. She is now under criminal investigation over suspicions that she conspired with a confidante to extort money and favors from companies and allow the friend to secretly interfere with state affairs.

Salvaging the huge, corroded ferry from a channel notorious for dangerous currents has been a difficult and expensive job. South Korea agreed in 2015 to an 85.1 billion won ($76 million) deal with a consortium led by China's state-run Shanghai Salvage Co. to do it.

While many large shipwrecks around the world have first been cut into sections to be raised, this was never an option for Sewol because there are hopes of finding the remains of the missing victims inside the wreckage.

"}, {"id":"3694eca4-c059-5b58-b6cd-d05500ee3c35","type":"article","starttime":"1490316137","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-23T17:42:17-07:00","lastupdated":"1490316610","priority":0,"sections":[{"travel":"travel"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Student stranded for 5 days near Grand Canyon grew desperate","url":"http://tucson.com/travel/article_3694eca4-c059-5b58-b6cd-d05500ee3c35.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/travel/student-stranded-for-days-near-grand-canyon-grew-desperate/article_3694eca4-c059-5b58-b6cd-d05500ee3c35.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-Texas-college-student-stranded-for-five-days-near-the-Grand-Canyon-says-she-was-making-farewell-videos-for-her-family-as-she-grew-desperate-for-help/id-b713e5e24e574505b1de897cfbacd36c","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) \u2014 A Texas college student stranded for five days near the Grand Canyon says she was making farewell videos for her family as she grew desperate for help.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","travel","canyons","environment and nature"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"3694eca4-c059-5b58-b6cd-d05500ee3c35","body":"

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) \u2014 A Texas college student stranded for five days near the Grand Canyon says she was making farewell videos for her family as she grew desperate for help.

Arizona authorities say 24-year-old Amber VanHecke was well-equipped and did everything right after getting lost in a remote area during a solo road trip.

VanHecke said in a Facebook post that she was heading to a hiking trail but was led astray by her maps app and wound up in the middle of nowhere with an empty gas tank.

She told ABC's Good Morning America that she even tried to chase down a truck to no avail.

\"I was panicking and crying and sobbing. I was a mess,\" VanHecke told the show.

VanHecke said nobody had reported her missing because of a miscommunication with her family.

VanHecke didn't have cell phone access. She made large help signs and even tried to start a signal fire, but couldn't.

She eventually hiked for miles to a spot where she had a signal, although the call dropped before Arizona authorities could trace her location.

Still, rescuers had an idea about where she might be, the Arizona Department of Public Safety said. Rescuers were able to spot her abandoned car using a search helicopter.

VanHecke had left signs on the car detailing where she was headed in search of cell phone signal, and rescuers eventually found her.

VanHecke was treated at a Flagstaff hospital for exposure but is now back in Texas, where she is a student at the University of North Texas.

\"Five days ago I thought I was gonna die in the desert and now I'm trying to go to class,\" she said.

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DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) \u2014 Rahim AlHaj cried every time he read the letters of eight Iraqis sharing personal, harrowing tales of love, loss and hope in wartime since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion. Rather than retreat, the Iraqi-American composer and musician immersed himself in the stories and emerged with a collection of songs to illustrate them.

AlHaj is touring the United States in support of the resulting album, \"Letters from Iraq,\" which is set to be officially released next month on the Smithsonian Folkways label.

\"I felt obligated to make these stories,\" he told The Associated Press during a phone interview from the Detroit suburb of Dearborn, where he will perform Friday at the Arab American National Museum. \"It has to be heard \u2014 it has to be seen. ... This is what the Iraqi people went through during that time period.\"

For AlHaj, who plays a stringed instrument with ancient Iraqi roots called the oud, the tears still fall when he recounts the stories behind the music. One is about a teenage boy who was returning home when a car bomb exploded and leveled his home, sending his homing pigeons skyward with nowhere to land and destroying the alibi that allowed him to see his girlfriend while he cared for his birds and she hung laundry. Another is of a man who returns to Baghdad after living in exile \u2014 and finding a place that no longer feels like home.

Then, there is the letter written by AlHaj's nephew, Fuad, who inspired and encouraged the musical project. Then a teenager, Fuad was getting a haircut at a barbershop when a bomb went off nearby and militants opened fire. Fuad, who could not run because his legs never fully developed, detailed the horror and carnage around him. He ends by writing, paradoxically, what a beautiful day it had been.

AlHaj said Fuad led him to his friend Riyadh, the teen with the pigeons. From there, the composer collected more correspondences while visiting his homeland, and realized he had to share these stories that might otherwise never be heard by the larger world.

AlHaj said he initially envisioned reading the letters in lectures, but felt they deserved a broader audience and a more lasting, artistic treatment. He began writing instrumental music for the oud, violin, viola, cello, bass and percussion that \"translates\" the tales, he said.

\"It's really challenging because it's abstract \u2014 it's not words \u2014 but people understand it,\" AlHaj said. He added that the songs brought many people to tears at a recent Seattle performance, including a woman who approached him afterward.

\"She took her shawl and put it around my neck,\" he said. \"She gave me a hug and said, 'Thank you for healing me.'\"

AlHaj graduated from Baghdad's prestigious and competitive Conservatory of Music, but was later imprisoned after refusing to join Saddam Hussein's Ba'ath party and supporting his regime. He fled in 1991 and eventually made his way to Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he now lives, and became a U.S. citizen in 2008.

He has since performed across the globe, released nine albums and received two Grammy nominations along with other awards and fellowships. Still, he said, it was important for his story and accomplishments to take a backseat with \"Letters from Iraq.\"

\"Musicians have ridiculous egos,\" he said, laughing. \"I put my ego aside to just breathe and cry with these letters. ... I didn't want to show my virtuosity \u2014 I didn't give a damn about that. It's about supporting the voices of those letters.\"

___

Follow Jeff Karoub on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jeffkaroub . His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/author/jeff-karoub .

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HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the criminal trial of former Penn State University president Graham Spanier (all times local):

8:25 p.m.

The jury in former Penn State University president Graham Spanier's (SPAN'-yurz) criminal trial is going home after more than six hours of deliberations without reaching a verdict.

Spanier's defense rested on Thursday without calling any witnesses. It says there's no evidence against him.

Spanier is accused of conspiracy and child endangerment for how he handled sex abuse complaints about former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky more than 15 years ago.

Jurors twice returned to the courtroom with questions but gave no indication how long it may take to produce a verdict.

Sandusky was convicted of abusing several boys and is in prison. But he says he's innocent and is appealing.

___

8:15 p.m.

A judge is getting more questions from jurors in the criminal trial of former Penn State University president Graham Spanier (SPAN'-yur).

Spanier is accused of mishandling complaints former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky molested boys. Spanier argues there's \"no evidence.\" Sandusky says he's innocent.

Jurors late Thursday asked the judge to define what \"supervision\" means in the child endangerment law under which Spanier is charged.

The judge says that means someone other than a parent who provides care, education, training or control of a child.

The jury also wants clarity about the conspiracy charge Spanier faces. The judge says to be guilty of conspiracy a defendant must have agreed to commit a crime.

Jurors have twice asked the judge questions.

___

5:20 p.m.

Jurors in the criminal trial of Penn State's former president are asking a judge to clarify the legal elements of the conspiracy charge and to define what reckless means.

The panel of seven women and five men asked several questions of Judge John Boccabella on Thursday after about three hours of deliberations.

The judge told them they must take into account the companion charge of endangering the welfare of children when evaluating the conspiracy charge.

He said conduct is reckless when someone consciously disregards a substantial and unjustified risk, far beyond what a reasonable person would do.

Graham Spanier is accused of mishandling complaints that former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was molesting boys. He's charged with child endangerment and conspiracy.

___

3:05 p.m.

A jury has begun deliberations in the criminal trial of Penn State's former president.

Graham Spanier (SPAN'-yur) is accused of mishandling complaints that former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was molesting boys.

He's charged with two felony counts of child endangerment and one felony count of conspiracy.

A prosecutor said Thursday during closing arguments that Spanier gambled with the welfare of children by not reporting a 2001 complaint against Sandusky to state child welfare authorities.

The defense said there was no evidence Spanier committed a crime.

Spanier was forced out as president in 2011, after Sandusky was arrested. He remains a tenured faculty member.

Sandusky is in prison on child molestation convictions.

____

12:15 p.m.

The defense in the criminal trial of Penn State's former president has rested without calling any witnesses.

Graham Spanier (SPAN'-yur) is accused of mishandling complaints that former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was molesting boys.

He's charged with two felony counts of child endangerment and one felony count of conspiracy.

Defense attorney Sam Silver says the state has no evidence Spanier committed the crimes.

After the defense rested Thursday, jurors were sent to lunch. They could begin deliberations in the afternoon.

Former athletic director Tim Curley and former vice president Gary Schultz previously pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of child endangerment.

Spanier was forced out as president in 2011, after Sandusky was charged. He remains a tenured faculty member.

Sandusky is in prison on child molestation convictions.

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PHOENIX (AP) \u2014 Child-welfare officials investigated an Arizona couple accused of murder in their 9-year-old son's shooting death after she gave birth to a child who had been exposed to methadone and heroin.

The couple's children were eventually put in foster care for a year, but the family was reunited after the parents worked on their struggles with substance abuse and underwent parental training, according to the state Department of Child Safety, which conducted the investigation that began in 2014.

Wendy and Kansas Lavarnia were booked on suspicion of first-degree murder in a shooting at their Phoenix home this week that led to the death of their son Landen. The mother told police that her 2-year-old son found a gun left on a bed and accidentally shot his older brother in the head. They have not been charged yet.

Police began to become suspicious of the mother's story when they found inconsistencies in her account and when the boy's father showed up at the home with a crudely bandaged gunshot wound on his upper arm. The wound looked to have been punctured multiple times, possibly with a screwdriver, to camouflage the injury.

Investigators declined Thursday to say who they believe is responsible for shooting the boy and his father.

Authorities said the parents delayed calling 911 for medical care for their son so they could clean up evidence in the house. Police declined to say whether they believe the boy would be alive had authorities been alerted sooner.

Investigators said the lack of visible blood and the extent of blood residue implied that a significant amount of time passed before the mother called 911. Police say they found evidence of blood in the trunk of the vehicle that Kansas Lavarnia drove to the house.

It's unclear whether the couple is represented by lawyers who can speak on their behalf.

Both parents struggled with drugs over the years. Kansas Lavarnia, 30, blamed his three 2009 convictions for theft and possession of burglary tools on his longstanding addiction to pain medications, saying he started taking the drugs after he broke his back in an ATV accident when he was 15, according to court records.

The child-welfare agency started investigating in 2014 after authorities were told that Wendy Lavarnia had given birth to a child who had been exposed to methadone and heroin. The child in question was a younger sibling of the 9-year-old boy, Landen. The couple had four children.

The children remained in the home while the parents worked with child-welfare officials to address their parenting skills and substance abuse struggles. But the children were put into foster care after the mother tested positive again for drugs and failed to provide adequate housing, the Department of Child Safety said.

The parents then worked toward addressing their substance abuse problems and domestic violence issues and successfully completed their parental training, the agency said.

The children reunited with their parents in November 2015, and 10 days later, Wendy Lavarnia gave birth to a child who was exposed to methadone. But she had been prescribed the drug by a doctor as part of her treatment plan, the agency said.

Greg McKay, director of Arizona Department of Child Safety, told Phoenix radio station KTAR-FM that agency employees are devastated by the boy's death.

\"An organization is damned if you do and damned if you don't. In this particular situation, they went above and beyond to make these children safe,\" McKay said.

His department was created in 2014 after years of scandal in the former child-welfare agency that culminated with the discovery of thousands of child-abuse hotline calls that had not been investigated.

It has since worked to increase transparency, resolve a huge backlog of abuse and neglect cases, and cut the number of children in state protective care.

Neighbors of the Lavarnias said the children could sometimes be seen outside wearing only a diaper.

Maria Mosley, who lives next door, said the surviving children, now in the care of the agency, were walking around barefoot when the parents were arrested.

\"They were walking on the hot sidewalk, and you know that has to hurt their feet,\" Mosley said.

___

Associated Press writers Clarice Silber and Bob Christie contributed to this report.

___

Follow Jacques Billeaud at twitter.com/jacquesbilleaud. His work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/jacques%20billeaud .

___

This story has been corrected to show that the child-welfare agency investigated the couple once, not twice.

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Life is a box of chocolates, a highway and, alas, a mediocre science-fiction thriller.

In Daniel Espinosa's \"Life,\" an international space station orbiting the Earth intercepts an automated capsule returning from Mars with samples: rocks, dust and, as it turns out, a tiny monocellular organism that proves the existence of life on another planet. The thing, though, about those monocellular organisms from Mars is that they grow up.

When Dr. Hugh Derry (Arioyon Bakare) injects the cell with glucose, it begins rapidly growing bigger, beyond its petri dish. (Yes, \"Life\" is, above all, a lesson in the dangers of too much sugar.) The crew \u2014 including Jake Gyllenhaal's troubled veteran, Ryan Reynolds' cocky engineer, Rebecca Ferguson's microbiologist and Hiroyuki Sanada's new father \u2014 celebrate their remarkable discovery and observe its development. \"You're going to be a daddy,\" Reynolds' astronaut tells the proud Derry.

Derry, the biological expert of the bunch, hopes the organism \u2014 dubbed \"Calvin\" \u2014 will teach the scientists about the origin, the nature \"and maybe even the meaning of life.\" Such glories, however, aren't in store. The harsh revelation that Calvin brings is that life \u2014 violently striving for survival \u2014 finds a way.

Unfortunately, \"Life,\" the movie, doesn't. Once the alien lifeform strengthens and gets loose, \"Life\" surrenders to a tiresome chase away from not just its ravenous creature but from the movies \"Life\" so obviously takes it cues from. \"Life\" certainly can't come anywhere near the well-earned horrors of \"Alien,\" nor does it boast anything like the silky splendor of \"Gravity.\"

Espinosa (\"Safe House,\" ''Child 44\") claustrophobically encloses the drama in a fairly realistic space station that, lacking sufficiently cinematic production design, doesn't allow for much movement. Unlike Hollywood's recent, more ambitious sojourns into space, \"Life\" is a grittier, clunkier B-movie monster movie in zero gravity. An extraterrestrial Frankenstein is hunted with implausible dimwittedness by a bickering human crew.

Calvin (sadly there is no Hobbes in sight) grows in size and shape, but he mostly looks like a super-powerful, fearfully smart starfish. As he slithers this way and that, he almost resembles the alien cousin of Hank, the equally resourceful octopus of last year's \"Finding Dory.\"

Penned by Rheet Reese and Paul Wernick (\"Deadpool,\" ''Zombieland\"), \"Life\" doesn't have much of the sarcastic wit the screenwriters have shown before. Instead, it's merely a terse, prickly cheap-thrill. Not until the film's final moments \u2014 finally free of the space station \u2014 does the movie find its own bite.

\"Life,\" a Columbia Pictures release, is rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America for \"language throughout, some sci-fi violence and terror.\" Running time: 102 minutes. Two stars out of four.

___

MPAA Definition of R: Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian

___

Follow AP Film Writer on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) \u2014 Utah's governor signed legislation Thursday giving the predominantly Mormon state the strictest drunken driving threshold in the country, a change that restaurant groups and representatives of the ski and snowboard industry say will hurt tourism.

Republican Gov. Gary Herbert said lowering the blood alcohol limit for most drivers to 0.05 percent from 0.08 percent will save lives.

The change means a 150-pound man would be over the 0.05 limit after two beers, while a 120-pound woman could exceed it after a single drink, though that can be affected by a number of factors, including how much food a person has eaten, according to the American Beverage Institute, a national restaurant group.

Opponents, including the group, had urged Herbert to veto the bill , saying it would punish responsible drinkers and burnish Utah's reputation as a Mormon-centric place unfriendly to those who drink alcohol.

\"People are going to try to say this is a religious issue. And that is just absolutely false. This is a public safety issue,\" the governor, who is Mormon, said at a news conference.

Restaurant groups said they don't support drunken driving but a 0.05 percent limit won't catch drivers who are actually impaired. Plus, the law is \"a total attack on the state's hospitality industry, customers and the tourism industry,\" American Beverage Institute executive director Sarah Longwell said.

The group took out full-page ads Thursday in Salt Lake City's two daily newspapers and USA Today, featuring a fake mugshot under a large headline reading, \"Utah: Come for vacation, leave on probation.\"

But proponents say the law will send a resounding message that people should not drink and drive \u2014 no matter how little somebody has consumed. The Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety applauded the change, saying it's a \"sensible solution\" to deter drunken driving.

If drivers are not impaired, they won't violate the law, said Rep. Norm Thurston, the bill's sponsor. The Republican says police won't measure someone's blood alcohol level until they have seen visible signs of impairment and the person fails a field sobriety test.

He also said Utah became the first state to lower its blood alcohol limit to 0.08 percent in 1983, and since then tourism has flourished.

Utah's Tourism Office said it's not concerned about the law discouraging visitors, noting that a number of foreign countries such as France, Australia and Italy have similar laws and don't have a problem attracting tourists.

\"There's not many Mormons in Rome, and they're doing it there,\" Herbert quipped Thursday.

In the United States, the blood alcohol limit for most drivers is 0.08 percent, but limits vary among states for commercial drivers or motorists with a conviction of driving under the influence.

The National Transportation Safety Board has encouraged states to drop their blood alcohol levels to 0.05 percent or even lower, but it's met resistance from the hospitality industry.

Lawmakers in Washington and Hawaii had considered lowering their limits to 0.05 percent this year but both measures appear dead.

In Utah, the new law would take effect on Dec. 30, 2018, just before New Year's Eve.

In the meantime, Herbert said he plans to call lawmakers into a special legislative session this summer to improve the law. He said he wants legislators to consider a tiered punishment system with less stringent penalties for those convicted of driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.05 to 0.07 percent.

Utah has some of the lowest rates of fatal DUI accidents in the country, and though the population has boomed over the past decade, the DUI arrest rate has dropped.

Mothers Against Drunk Driving has taken a neutral position on the measure.

J.T. Griffin, a government affairs officer for the group, said in a statement that MADD is focusing on \"countermeasures that work, such as ignition interlock laws for all drunk driving offenders and sobriety checkpoints.\"

___

Associated Press reporters Cathy Bussewitz in Honolulu and Alexis Myers in Olympia, Washington contributed to this report.

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WEST BOUNTIFUL, Utah (AP) \u2014 A Utah couple was enjoying the final day of their European trip to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary when they were among the crowd of people on London's Westminster Bridge who were struck by an SUV.

Kurt W. Cochran was one of four victims killed and his wife, Melissa Cochran, was among dozens who were injured, according to a statement issued Thursday by the family through a Mormon church spokesman. The couple was visiting Melissa Cochran's parents who were serving a church mission in London.

Authorities on Thursday identified a 52-year-old British man as the person who mowed down the Cochrans and other pedestrians and stabbed a policeman to death outside Parliament, saying he had a long criminal record and once was investigated for extremism \u2014 but was not currently on a terrorism watch list.

Pictures on Kurt Cochran's Facebook page show the couple enjoying their sightseeing travels through Europe prior to the tragic events. In one post, there are pictures of German architecture beneath a caption, \"Trier Germany. Another WOW!\" In another, he is shown smiling and holding a German beer under the caption, \"After a long day of sightseeing.\"

Steve Hatch, 46, said he just talked with Kurt Cochran online about how much fun the couple was having on the trip.

Family and friends said they're heartbroken over the loss of a loving husband and father who loved music.

For the last decade, the couple ran a recording studio in their basement where he helped musicians develop their talents. The couple lives in a middle class neighborhood with small, older homes arranged on both sides of a quiet road in a bedroom community just outside Salt Lake City.

Bret Layton started crying while talking about his longtime friend and business associate outside Cochran's house where he went Thursday to check on things. Layton said he ran the recording studio with Kurt Cochran.

\"He's one of those guys: You just know you want him to be your friend within five minutes... He was just an overall good guy to everybody,\" Layton said.

Melissa Cochran's brother, Clint Payne, said through a verified GoFundMe account webpage that the couple was among the first hit by a vehicle on the Westminster Bridge.

\"Kurt was a good man and a loving husband to our sister and daughter, Melissa,\" the statement said.

Melissa Cochran is still hospitalized. She suffered a broken leg, broken rib and a cut and bruises, said friend Mike Murphy.

Murphy, owner of Murphy's Guitars in Bountiful, said Kurt Cochran would come into his shop regularly to buy recording equipment for his basement studio where he tried to help young bands get started by charging only a small fee for them to use the studio.

\"He loved music,\" Murphy said. \"He was always around when there were music things going on.\"

Emma Dugal, executive director of Bountiful Davis Art Center, said the couple has been volunteering at the organization's annual summer arts festival for years. Calling what happened devastating, she said they both are very warm, friendly people and as a couple were inseparable.

She said Cochran's death will have a huge impact on the music community, especially for young musicians.

\"I know of musicians who lacked confidence and who weren't sure how they wanted to present their talent, but Kurt encouraged them and got them out into performing, and has just made a huge difference in so many people's lives,\" Dugal said.

Kurt Cochran was a good dad and likable guy who will be missed dearly by his two adult sons, said Danny Wiley, the step-father to Cochran's sons. Wiley said he and Cochran always got along well. He says Cochran loved skateboarding and playing basketball with his sons.

\"It's devastating,\" Wiley said. \"He was a good guy, everybody liked him. He always had a smile on his face.\"

The London attack comes exactly one year after four Mormon missionaries \u2014 three from Utah \u2014 were seriously injured in a Brussels airport bombing on March 22, 2016.

On Thursday, President Donald Trump and Utah leaders expressed their sympathies and pointed to terrorism.

President Trump Tweeted: \"A great American, Kurt Cochran, was killed in the London terror attack. My prayers and condolences are with his family and friends.\"

___

Associated Press writers Michelle L. Price and Brady McCombs contributed to this story from Salt Lake City. Ho reported from Las Vegas.

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament (all times Eastern):

8:15 p.m.

Gonzaga's Johnathan Williams is one of the only players to find his stroke in the first half of the Bulldogs' Sweet 16 matchup against West Virginia.

Williams has made all four shots from the field, including a 3-pointer that put Gonzaga up 21-16 with just under 8 minutes left in the first half.

His teammates have made just 4 of 14 shots from the field and the Mountaineers are doing even worse, shooting 5 for 18. They missed their first four from long range before Jevon Carter hit a 3 just before Williams answered.

\u2014 Josh Dubow from San Jose, California

___

8 p.m.

Tyler Dorsey has scored 12 points, Jordan Bell has eight points, six rebounds and two blocked shots, and No. 3 seed Oregon leads No. 7 Michigan 35-33 at halftime in a Midwest Regional semifinal.

Derrick Walton Jr. has 11 points and seven assists for the Wolverines.

There were eight ties and eight lead changes the first 20 minutes as both teams struggled with their shooting.

Oregon finished the half at 41.4 percent after making its last four shots. Michigan hit its last three and is shooting 39.3 percent.

Moe Wagner, who scored a career-high 26 points against Louisville on Sunday, has struggled mightily. He's just 2 of 8 for four points.

\u2014 Eric Olson reporting from Kansas City, Missouri.

7:55 p.m.

There is a lot of Big Ten love inside the Sprint Center for the Midwest Regional semifinals.

As fans of No. 4 seed Purdue wait for their game against top-seeded Kansas to begin, the black-and-gold contingent has been decidedly backing Michigan in the early game. The seventh-seeded Wolverines are in a nip-and-tuck game with No. 3 seed Oregon for the right to advance to the Elite Eight.

No doubt, Purdue fans hope the Michigan fans return the favor.

Even with a large crowd of Oregon fans behind its bench, and the two brotherly Big Ten fan bases, the vast majority of the 19,000 fans are wearing blue and red in support of the Jayhawks.

\u2014 Dave Skretta reporting from Kansas City, Missouri.

___

7:50 p.m.

Gonzaga has managed to handle West Virginia's relentless press at the start of this Sweet 16 matchup.

The Bulldogs haven't turned the ball over against the full-court press in the opening minutes and have a plus-two turnover margin against the team that led the nation with a plus-7.8 coming into the game.

With Gonzaga's defense holding the Mountaineers to 1-for-6 shooting, the top-seeded Bulldogs have taken an early 10-6 lead as they seek their third trip in school history to the regional final.

\u2014 Josh Dubow in San Jose, California.

___

7:40 p.m.

Michigan, the nation's best team at avoiding turnovers, has coughed up the ball five times in the first 13 minutes of its Midwest Regional semifinal against Oregon. That's quite a change; the Wolverines had a combined 10 turnovers in 80 minutes against Oklahoma State and Louisville in the first two rounds of the NCAA Tournament.

The No. 7-seeded Wolverines lead the Ducks 18-16. The teams were a combined 10 for 33 (30 percent).

___

7:30 p.m.

No. 7 Michigan and No. 3 Oregon are having a hard time getting shots to fall early in their Midwest Regional semifinal.

Each team started 4 for 10 through the first eight minutes, and the score is tied 11-11.

Moe Wagner, who scored a career-high 26 points in the Wolverines' upset of Louisville on Sunday, has missed his first three shots. Wagner was short with his left hand inside, was off target with another shot down low and had one blocked by Jordan Bell.

___

6:50 p.m.

Las Vegas casinos are favoring North Carolina as the NCAA Tournament resets to a 16-team field.

Futures odds compiled by Pregame.com on Thursday show the Tar Heels as a 5-1 favorite, followed by Kansas at 6-1 and Gonzaga and Arizona each at 7-1.

Sin City had trouble deciding on favorites for the tournament after Selection Sunday, with some initially listing No. 2 seed Duke as the top team and others picking Kansas and North Carolina.

But the odds now reflect each team's new path toward the title \u2014 four wins \u2014 plus wagers placed to this point.

Arizona is the biggest favorite to win on Thursday night, facing Xavier. Arizona is favored by 7 1/2 points, but bettors are backing Xavier according to wagering totals released by William Hill US.

___

6:30 p.m.

Top seeds Gonzaga and Kansas are among the teams preparing to play in Thursday's Sweet 16 games of the NCAA Tournament.

The Jayhawks are the No. 1 seed in the Midwest Region, which holds its semifinals in Kansas City, Missouri. The Jayhawks will face fourth-seeded Purdue, while No. 3 seed Oregon meets surging 7-seed Michigan in the region's other game.

Gonzaga tops the West bracket and faces No. 4 seed West Virginia in games set for San Jose, California. The other regional semifinal features No. 2 seed Arizona and 11-seed Xavier, the lowest-seeded team left in the field.

The winner of Thursday's games advance to the Elite Eight and will play Saturday for a trip to the Final Four.

___

For more AP college basketball coverage: http://collegebasketball.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25

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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) \u2014 The latest on South Korean efforts to raise a ferry that sank nearly three years ago, killing more than 300 people (all times local):

8:50 a.m.

South Korean officials say divers have cut off a vehicle ramp that had been dangling from a sunken 6,800-ton ferry and hindering efforts to raise ship.

The Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries said divers removed the ramp early Friday from the Sewol , which sank in April 2014 in an accident that killed 304 passengers.

Removing the ramp will allow workers to raise the ferry to a height where it can be loaded onto a semi-submersible transport vessel for transportation to a port.

It was not possible to fit the ferry into the transport vessel with the ramp hanging off its side.

___

10:45 p.m.

South Korean efforts to raise a sunken 6,800-ton ferry may have hit a significant obstacle.

An official from the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Lee Cheoljo, told reporters Thursday night that salvage crews have suspended operations to lift the Sewol after finding that a vehicle ramp is unlocked and dangling from the ship's left side.

Lee said it is not possible to load the ferry onto a vessel that is to carry it to port with the ramp hanging down.

He said divers are trying to cut off the ramp with welding equipment, and that it is vital to finish the job by Friday morning so the crew will have enough time to load the ferry onto the vessel by midnight Friday.

The waters where the ferry sank are notorious for dangerous currents. The sea is relatively calm now, but the currents are forecast to strengthen on Saturday.

Workers had initially planned to finish raising the ferry by Thursday evening.

___

5:50 p.m.

South Korean officials say efforts to raise a 6,800-ton ferry from waters off the country's southwestern coast are going well after an earlier delay.

The ferry Sewol sank in April 2014, killing more than 300 people, including many students on a high school trip.

The Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries said Thursday that the top of the ferry was 8.5 meters (27 feet) above the water's surface at 5 p.m.

Workers are planning to raise the Sewol until its upper side is about 13 meters (42 feet) above the surface. Salvage crews will then start loading the ferry onto a semi-submersible, heavy-lift vessel that will carry it to port.

Workers had initially planned to finish raising the Sewol in the morning, but were forced to stop temporarily when it began rubbing against pulleys and other equipment on the two barges hoisting it with cables. They resumed lifting the ferry after spending hours to better balance it.

___

3 p.m.

South Korean officials say salvage crews have resumed raising a 6,800-ton ferry Sewol off the country's southwestern coast.

Workers had halted the process for several hours after the ferry began rubbing against the pulleys and other equipment on the two barges that are raising it with cables.

An official from the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries said the problem has reduced following operations to better balance on the ferry. He said the top of the ferry is currently six meters (19 feet) above the water surface.

Workers are planning to raise the ferry until its upper side reaches about 13 meters (42 feet) above the surface. Salvage crews will then start loading the ferry onto a semi-submersible, heavy-lift vessel that will carry it to port.

___

1:25 p.m.

South Korea's acting head of state has urged government officials to do their best to ensure a successful job salvaging the Sewol ferry.

Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn in meeting with Cabinet ministers on Thursday also called for the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries and other agencies to plan a thorough and quick investigation into the ship once it reaches a port.

The bodies of 295 passengers were recovered after the sinking on April 16, 2014, but nine are still missing. Relatives are hoping those remains will be found inside the ferry.

An investigation committee will also be formed to search for clues that could further explain the cause of the sinking, which has been blamed on overloaded cargo, improper storage and other negligence.

Hwang has been the government caretaker since South Korean lawmakers passed an impeachment motion against former President Park Geun-hye in December over a corruption scandal. The country's Constitutional Court formally removed Park from office earlier this month, triggering a presidential by-election that was set for May 9.

___

11:50 a.m.

A South Korean group representing the families of ferry disaster victims has issued a statement thanking salvaging crews for lifting the 6,800-ton Sewol from the waters, nearly three years after it sank off the country's southwestern coast in an accident that killed 304 passengers.

The group called for the government to come up with more detailed plans to reduce damage to the wreckage during the salvage operation to preserve the remains of the missing passengers that might be inside.

The group demanded that it be part of a committee that will further investigate the cause of the sinking, which was blamed on overloaded cargo, improper storage and other negligence.

The bodies of 295 passengers were recovered after the sinking, but nine are still missing. Relatives are hoping that those remains will be found inside the ferry.

___

11 a.m.

A South Korean government official says salvage crews will need until the late afternoon or evening Thursday to raise a sunken ferry to a point where they could start the process of loading it onto a vessel that will carry it to a mainland port.

Lee Cheoljo, an official from the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, said that workers have temporarily stopped raising the 6,800-ton Sewol after it began rubbing against pulleys and other equipment on the two barges that are raising it with cables. Lee said workers are conducting balancing operations that could take several hours.

Workers had hoped to finish raising the ferry by morning. Lee said the ferry has so far been lifted 24 meters (79 feet) from the seafloor, but needs to be elevated 11 meters (36 feet) further so its upper side reaches about 13 meters (42 feet) above the surface. Salvage crews will then begin loading the ferry onto a semi-submersible, heavy-lift vessel that will carry it to a port.

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Police said they found four people dead in a Sacramento home early Thursday, and the mayor's office said at least two are children.

A suspect likely known to the victims was being held in San Francisco, said Sacramento police spokesman Sgt. Bryce Heinlein.

The four victims were found when police broke into the home after a relative reported that something might be wrong. Police were not immediately identifying the victims, including their genders and ages, Heinlein said.

Kelly Fong Rivas, a deputy chief of staff for Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg, said police told officials that two were children but had not provided other details.

Steinberg called the crime horrifying and extremely tragic in a statement praising police for quickly making an arrest.

The single-story beige home with sculpted shrubbery has a basketball hoop set up in a driveway that police blocked off with yellow crime scene tape.

It was unclear when the victims were killed, Heinlein said. Police also weren't saying how they were killed as the investigation continued in the tree-lined residential neighborhood of neatly maintained homes down the street from a church.

Police were able to quickly identify \"a subject of interest,\" Heinlein said, and worked with San Francisco police to have that male suspect detained.

\"Preliminarily this does not appear to be a random act. We believe the suspect is known to the victims,\" Heinlein said.

He would not reveal the relationship of the suspect to the victims and said the suspect had not yet been questioned by investigators.

San Francisco police confirmed they took a suspect into custody about four miles (six kilometers) from the Golden Gate Bridge but would not give other details.

There were no reports of shots fired or other problems until the relative called to report that he was concerned about the welfare of the home's residents, Heinlein said. He said he was not aware that any weapon had been recovered.

A few neighbors looking on curiously as homicide detectives and crime scene investigators made their way in and out of the home south of the state Capitol.

Don Sherrill, whose home shares a back fence with the victims' house, recalled talking to a man and his two children \u2014 a boy and a girl \u2014 several years ago. He and his wife, Joanne Sherrill, said they often heard the children playing in the back yard or using an inflatable pool.

\"The young kids really enjoyed the backyard and swimming in the summer time,\" Joanne Sherrill told The Sacramento Bee. Neither heard anything unusual before the victims were discovered.

Police were interviewing potential witnesses and searching for surveillance cameras as part of what was expected to be part of a daylong investigation that shut down at least one road, Heinlein said.

____

AP photographer Rich Pedroncelli and AP writer Paul Elias contributed. Elias contributed from San Francisco.

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RICHMOND, Va. (AP) \u2014 Shipping containers full of coal ash from China, Poland and India have come into the U.S. through the Port of Virginia as foreign companies find a market for the same industrial waste that America's utilities are struggling to dispose of.

Critics call it a missed opportunity. Coal ash is treasure as well as trash, useful for projects from roads to concrete to wallboard. They want Virginia to mandate more recycling of the ash that's already here, threatening to contaminate water sources or create an environmental disaster.

\"We have millions of tons of this sitting along our riverbanks,\" said Travis Blankenship, former government affairs manager for the Virginia League of Conservation Voters. \"Why in the world would we be importing it from other states and countries?\"

The nation's shift away from coal for electricity has reduced the supply of fresh coal ash, forcing industries that depend on it to look farther afield. Some turn to companies that have figured out how to reprocess ash discarded years ago in pits and ponds. Others look overseas.

The Port of Virginia handled just one shipping container of coal ash in 2015, from India. Last year, there were about 22, from China and Poland. It all went on to Ohio and Wisconsin, according to a port spokesman who didn't know the final destinations. Meanwhile, more ash has been trucked in from other states for concrete production in Virginia.

Coal ash is an umbrella term. It includes bottom ash, which settles in boilers; fly ash, a powdery material captured in exhaust stacks; and synthetic gypsum, a byproduct of smokestack \"scrubbing.\"

These materials can be had for several dollars a ton if trucked directly from a utility to a factory or job site. They're more expensive to obtain in a useful form after decades underground or underwater. That makes foreign imports economically viable.

Nationally, there are more than 1,100 coal ash dumps, many unlined. In 2014, the Environmental Protection Agency classified coal ash as nonhazardous, partly to avoid a \"stigma\" that might discourage proper containment and recycling, the agency said.

The EPA stressed that this waste, with heavy metals such as arsenic, mercury and lead, must be properly managed to avoid risks to human health.

\"We have two children who have been poisoned by this,\" Dan Marrow, who lives near a coal ash pond in northern Virginia, told lawmakers last month.

Marrow is convinced a power station pond tainted his well and caused his daughters' health problems. Dominion Virginia Power recently agreed to hook residents up to public water lines. Marrow says that's an admission of guilt; Dominion says it's being a good neighbor.

On Thursday, a federal judge ruled that arsenic is flowing out of a separate Dominion coal ash site in violation of the Clean Water Act, but imposed no fines after finding no threat to health or the environment.

Dominion is closing 11 ponds containing around 29 million cubic yards of ash at four Virginia power stations to comply with EPA rules. It's been proceeding largely by treating and releasing the water, consolidating some ponds and capping the remaining dry material. The company insists its process is safe.

Meanwhile, the ash has real value, and technology to reprocess it is already being used.

\"We can ... take the material that would be an environmental liability and transform it into something that has a beneficial use,\" said Jimmy Knowles of The SEFA Group, which partners with utilities in South Carolina and Maryland to recycle both old and new ash.

SEFA competitor Separation Technologies can do the same thing.

\"When I tell friends and family what my company does, they think we would have hundreds of these facilities around the country,\" said Tom Cerullo, of the Boston-based company.

But utilities are slow to embrace change, and recycling lacked a catalyst until recently, Cerullo said.

A 2008 spill in Tennessee drew attention to coal ash storage. In 2014, a pipe ruptured at a Duke Energy plant in North Carolina, polluting the Dan River with miles of sludge.

A federal investigation found Duke allowed coal ash dumps at five power plants to leak toxic waste into water supplies. Duke pleaded guilty, agreeing to pay fines and restitution. North Carolina now requires recycling as ash ponds close.

\"We could do the same thing in Virginia. I think the reason we're not is Dominion's resistance to pursuing what is an emerging industry standard,\" Southern Environmental Law Center attorney Greg Buppert said.

Dominion spokesman Rob Richardson suggested recycling the decades-old stuff would be prohibitively expensive, but said Dominion hasn't fully analyzed the cost.

Recyclers see long-term savings in avoiding landfill maintenance and monitoring. Concrete-makers, meanwhile, can make their product cheaper and more durable by replacing some cement with fly ash.

\"We'd like to use fly ash in every yard we produce,\" said Eric Misenheimer, at Chandler Concrete Co., which operates dozens of North Carolina and Virginia plants.

Virginia mandates fly ash as an additive in transportation department projects, but ash production has been declining since around 2008, according to the American Coal Ash Association. Chandler has turned away foreign providers because of supplies from SEFA, Misenheimer said.

\"Obviously, when we have a shortage, we have a hard time filling those obligations. Last year was pretty tough for us,\" said Morgan Nelson, of S.B. Cox, another Virginia concrete-maker.

After Democratic Sen. Scott Surovell learned about the foreign imports, he proposed requiring Dominion, the state's largest utility and biggest contributor to Virginia politics, to recycle a minimum amount of ash annually. That bill failed, but another measure of his survives and got a boost Wednesday from Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe. It would deny closure permits until after the utility tells regulators more about its ash impoundments, including recycling plans and clean-closure options.

The Republican-controlled Legislature stripped the requirement that permits be contingent upon this information. McAuliffe restored it and returned the amended bill to legislators, saying such information has to be shared before a permit is issued to restore public confidence.

Thirty-one percent of Dominion's freshly burned ash was recycled last year, Richardson said. On average, U.S. utilities recycled 52 percent in 2015, the latest year with available data, according to the ACAA. No one tracks how much ash arrives at ports nationwide, though the ACAA is starting to try.

At least one utility, WE Energies in Wisconsin, recycles 100 percent of its freshly burned waste. Its fly ash was used to build the Milwaukee Art Museum, bottom ash is used for structural fills and road bases, and gypsum is sold as soil additive.

\"We were very good at building landfills and filling them up,\" said Bruce Rammey, of parent company WEC Energy Group. He became convinced in the 1980s that recycling's cheaper in the long run.

WE Energies hasn't completely eliminated its legacy coal ash, however. In 2011, a bluff collapsed near a power plant outside Milwaukee, sending soil, coal ash and other debris into Lake Michigan.

That's one more example of why environmentalists say unlined dumps must be emptied and any unrecycled ash contained in synthetically lined landfills. Recycling \"wouldn't solve the coal ash issue ... but it would definitely make a dent in it,\" Blankenship said.

"}, {"id":"187acb4b-22fc-591f-8484-2f06f99169b8","type":"article","starttime":"1490312613","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-23T16:43:33-07:00","lastupdated":"1490314563","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Dog pulled from California fire revived after 20 minutes","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_187acb4b-22fc-591f-8484-2f06f99169b8.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/dog-pulled-from-california-fire-revived-after-minutes/article_187acb4b-22fc-591f-8484-2f06f99169b8.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/California-firefighters-who-spent-20-minutes-performing-mouth-to-snout-resuscitation-on-a-dog-they-rescued-from-a-burning-apartment-are-being-hailed-as-heroes/id-2e4856e22a5e46178a0d641bf020cb88","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By AMANDA LEE MYERS\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LOS ANGELES (AP) \u2014 California firefighters who spent 20 minutes performing mouth-to-snout resuscitation on a dog they rescued from a burning apartment are being hailed as heroes.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","fires","accidents and disasters","residential fires"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"a7477487-9113-5ce7-9579-e62b1c24db1f","description":"In this photo released by dog owner Crystal Lamirande, Santa Monica Firefighter Andrew Klein holds Nalu in Santa Monica, Calif., on Thursday, March 23, 2017. Klein spent several minutes giving mouth-to-snout resuscitation to the dog, who was pulled from a burning apartment in Santa Monica. (Crystal Lamirande via AP)","byline":"Crystal Lamirande","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"384","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/74/a7477487-9113-5ce7-9579-e62b1c24db1f/58d43898e3c81.image.jpg?resize=384%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/74/a7477487-9113-5ce7-9579-e62b1c24db1f/58d43898e3c81.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/74/a7477487-9113-5ce7-9579-e62b1c24db1f/58d43898e3c81.image.jpg?resize=300%2C400"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1365","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/74/a7477487-9113-5ce7-9579-e62b1c24db1f/58d43898e3c81.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"87d11e07-da93-5c6d-b4f0-9ace60e01879","description":"In this Tuesday, March 21, 2017 photo provided by Crystal Lamirande, Santa Monica firefighter Andrew Klein holding her dog, Nalu, in Santa Monica, Calif. Klein spent minutes giving mouth-to-snout resuscitation to the dog, who was pulled from a burning apartment. The pooch spent the next 24 hours in an oxygen chamber and is doing well. (Courtesy of Crystal Lamirande via AP)","byline":"Crystal Lamirande","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"384","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/7d/87d11e07-da93-5c6d-b4f0-9ace60e01879/58d438991492d.image.jpg?resize=384%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/7d/87d11e07-da93-5c6d-b4f0-9ace60e01879/58d438991492d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/7d/87d11e07-da93-5c6d-b4f0-9ace60e01879/58d438991492d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C400"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1365","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/7d/87d11e07-da93-5c6d-b4f0-9ace60e01879/58d438991492d.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"187acb4b-22fc-591f-8484-2f06f99169b8","body":"

LOS ANGELES (AP) \u2014 California firefighters who spent 20 minutes performing mouth-to-snout resuscitation on a dog they rescued from a burning apartment are being hailed as heroes.

The dog's owner, 35-year-old Crystal Lamirande, had just returned to her Santa Monica apartment Tuesday when a neighbor yelled there was a fire.

Lamirande frantically tried to save her dog, a 10-year-old Bichon Frise/Shih Tzu named Nalu, but the smoke was too thick for her to go inside, she said Thursday.

Moments later firefighters arrived and Lamirande told them her dog was trapped inside.

That's when firefighter Andrew Klein sprang into action, getting on all fours to search the apartment for Nalu as another firefighter sprayed water to keep the flames at bay. Klein found the unconscious dog a few feet from the fire in a bedroom.

\"He was totally lifeless,\" Klein said. \"I picked him up and ran out of the apartment because time is key, especially with a small dog ... Failure was not an option.\"

As Lamirande knelt nearby crying, Klein and his crew spent the next 20 minutes working on reviving the dog using oxygen, CPR and what's known as mouth-to-snout resuscitation.

Video taken by a passerby and posted on Facebook shows Klein and another firefighter patting Nalu's belly as he starts breathing again with the help of oxygen.

\"Alright, bud,\" Klein tells the dog as he continues to rub him and encourage him to walk.

Lamirande, a radiology nurse, said she couldn't believe how much time the firefighters took to save her dog, who she describes as family.

\"His eyes were glazed over and he was not breathing and I assumed he was dead,\" she said. \"The firefighter said 'I'm a positive person. Let's just get him back.'\"

Lamirande said Nalu spent the next 24 hours recovering in an oxygen chamber and was almost back to his normal self again Thursday.

\"He's been coughing but right now he's fine and he's so happy and smiling,\" she said.

Klein, a self-described dog lover with two four-legged friends at home, said he felt proud of the outcome.

\"He was essentially dead, so to see him kissing people and walking around wagging his tail was definitely a good feeling,\" he said. \"He's very happy, and we're very happy, too.\"

___

Follow Amanda Lee Myers on Twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaLeeAP . Her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/amanda-lee-myers

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DENVER (AP) \u2014 Sacramento Kings point guard Ty Lawson has denied that he violated his probation in a Colorado drunken driving case by drinking and failing to complete community service.

Lawson and his attorney Harvey Steinberg made the assertion Thursday during a brief appearance in a Denver courtroom. In addition, Steinberg said Lawson wanted a device that would randomly test him for alcohol consumption so he could prove he's not drinking.

The judge agreed and plans to hold a hearing in May before deciding whether the former Denver Nugget should get a more severe punishment.

Probation officials allege Lawson tested positive for alcohol three times in the past six months.

He was arrested twice on drunken driving charges in 2015, first in Denver and then in Los Angeles.

___

This story has been corrected to say Lawson wants a device to randomly test for alcohol consumption, not an interlock device for his vehicle.

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HONOLULU (AP) \u2014 The FBI says authorities are aware that the federal judge in Hawaii who ruled against President Donald Trump's travel ban has received threatening messages.

FBI spokeswoman Michele Ernst said Thursday the agency is aware of reports of threatening messages against U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson and is prepared to help if necessary.

Watson blocked the federal government from enforcing its ban on new visas for people from six mostly Muslim countries and its suspension of the nation's refugee program. He issued his ruling last week hours before the travel ban was to go into effect.

The U.S. Marshals Service is responsible for protecting federal judicial officials, including judges and prosecutors. The service says marshals don't discuss specific security measures but does provide additional protection when warranted.

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CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 The last straw that convinced Chicago native Marissa Marshall it was time to move away was hearing dangerously close gunfire in the rough neighborhood where she found affordable housing.

The 29-year-old, who's pregnant with her fifth child, relocated about three years ago to a St. Louis suburb where she more easily found jobs and a home where she felt it was safe to send the kids outside.

\"I have boys and I didn't want to raise them in that environment,\" Marshall said. \"It is easier to go outside of Chicago to get help than stay in Chicago.\"

New census data released Thursday shows she's not alone, with the Chicago area losing more residents than any other U.S. metropolitan area.

The continuing decline coincided with other Midwestern areas, including St. Louis and Cleveland, as the South and Southwest regions of the country saw gains. Two Texas metropolitan areas \u2014 Dallas and Houston \u2014 reported the biggest numeric increases between July 2015 and July 2016, adding more than 100,000 residents each.

There are wide-ranging reasons for the shifts, from families' concerns about violence and schools to dwindling immigration and fertility rates. But demographers said Thursday's data also suggest the reanimation of a trend that paused during the recession \u2014 of Americans on the move from the Snow Belt to the suburbs of big cities, and to the Sun Belt.

The Chicago area, which includes surrounding communities in Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin, lost more than 19,500 residents in a year's time. Cook County, which encompasses Chicago, also led all counties in population drops, with roughly 21,300 fewer residents. Trailing were Michigan's Wayne County, where Detroit is located, with roughly 7,700 fewer residents; and Baltimore County, which lost more than 6,700 residents.

Meanwhile, Arizona's Maricopa County had the highest annual population increase, gaining over 81,000 residents, followed by Harris County in Texas and Nevada's Clark County.

Families leaving Chicago cite the nearly-broke city school system that's closed over 50 schools since 2013 and a soaring violent crime rate with more than 760 homicides last year, the most in two decades. City demographics experts add in longstanding economic trends like fewer entry level jobs and a sagging industrial core, along with the dismantling of dense neighborhood-based public housing.

Lower immigration rates also have impacted the Chicago region's dwindling population. Immigration, particularly from Mexico, was the key factor behind most of Chicago's population growth in the 1990s.

In Illinois, the population decline has been ripe fodder for political battles.

The predominantly Democratic state's first Republican governor in a decade, Bruce Rauner, has repeatedly blamed historic fiscal mismanagement and a lack of business-friendly laws for the decline, with companies choosing to set up shop in Texas and Florida over Illinois. In return, Democrats in charge have pointed fingers at over two years of state budget gridlock during the Republicans tenure.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office on Thursday called the decline a trend across the Midwest but blamed Illinois politics for exacerbating it and creating fiscal instability.

Demographics experts said one of the drivers behind the population change around the country could be more young people moving than before.

Young people are historically more likely to move around, but the recession put the brakes on the migration. Millenials, roughly 25-to-35-year olds, have moved at lower rates than their predecessors, including Generation-Xers, according to a Pew Research Center analysis last month.

Rolf Pendall of the Urban Institute's Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center called the trend \"a pent-up demand to migrate\" by people in their 20s and 30s and a bump in births \"in places where families want to move anyway.\"

As baby boomers age, U.S. deaths in some regions are expected to rise, which could be contributing to some of the population dips, too.

\"In a lot of the colder northern areas \u2014 St. Louis, Chicago, but also the northern states \u2014 they just don't have as many young people living there as the rest of the country,\" Pendall said.

___

Follow Sophia Tareen on Twitter at https://twitter.com/sophiatareen .

___

Kellman reported from Washington.

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) \u2014 The Latest on a law giving Utah the strictest DUI threshold in the country (all times local):

5:20 p.m.

Utah's governor has signed legislation giving the state the strictest DUI threshold in the country.

Gov. Gary Herbert's office announced Thursday evening that the Republican had approved the measure lowering the blood alcohol limit to 0.05 percent from 0.08 percent. He had told reporters Thursday morning that he intended to sign it because it will save lives.

Groups representing Utah restaurants and the ski and snowboarding industry had urged him to veto the measure, saying it would hurt tourism and punish responsible drinkers.

Conservative groups, auto safety organizations and the National Transportation Safety Board supported the move, saying it would make people think twice about drinking and driving.

Herbert's office said they were inundated with calls about the bill, mostly from people urging him to veto it.

Utah's new threshold would take effect on Dec. 30, 2018.

___

4:20 p.m.

A national auto safety group is applauding Utah's governor for deciding to sign legislation giving the state the strictest DUI threshold in the country.

The Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety says Utah's move to adopt the first 0.05 blood alcohol limit for DUIs is \"a sensible solution\" for addressing drunk driving.

Utah's governor announced Thursday he'll sign the legislation, lowering the limit from its current threshold at 0.08, despite objections from the hospitality industry.

The auto safety group notes that more than 100 countries have already adopted a 0.05 limit. They say it won't discourage alcohol consumption but it will deter drinking and driving.

The Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety represents public health, safety and insurance groups and tracks safety laws.

___

1:50 p.m.

A national hospitality group says Utah's restaurant and tourism industry will be crippled by the governor's decision to sign legislation giving the state the strictest DUI threshold in the country.

The American Beverage Institute, which represents restaurants, said in a statement Thursday that lowering Utah's blood alcohol limit to 0.05 percent from 0.08 percent could push a 120-pound woman over the legal limit after one drink.

The group says it could lead many people to forgo a drink with dinner, hurting the industry and punishing people who are currently considered responsible drinkers.

The group took out full-page advertisements in Salt Lake City's two daily newspapers and USA Today, featuring a fake mugshot under a large headline reading, \"Utah: Come for vacation, leave on probation.\"

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert says the new limit will save lives.

___

12:20 p.m.

Utah's governor says that while he's signing legislation giving the state the strictest DUI threshold in the country, he will call lawmakers into a special session this summer for \"some areas of improvement\" to the law.

Republican Gov. Gary Herbert told reporters Thursday that he thinks it will save lives to lower Utah's blood alcohol limit to 0.05 percent from 0.08 percent, but he'll ask lawmakers to consider a tiered punishment system. That could mean less stringent penalties for those convicted of driving with a blood alcohol level between 0.05 and 0.07 percent.

The governor says Utah may need to look at punishments for multiple offenders, other distracted driving and unintended consequences that the lower limit will have on matters like auto insurance rates.

Utah's new threshold would take effect on Dec. 30, 2018.

___

10:45 a.m.

Utah's governor has announced he will sign legislation giving the state the strictest DUI threshold in the country.

Republican Gov. Gary Herbert on Thursday said he plans to approve the measure lowering the blood alcohol limit to 0.05 percent from 0.08 percent.

Restaurant groups and representatives of the ski and snowboard industry had urged him to veto the bill, arguing it would hurt Utah's image and punish responsible adults who drink instead of catching drivers who are actually impaired.

Supporters of the legislation argue that impairment begins with the first drink and anyone consuming alcohol should not get behind the wheel.

The National Transportation Safety Board has encouraged states to adopt a .05 percent limit.

Utah's new threshold would take effect on Dec. 30, 2018, just before New Year's Eve.

"}, {"id":"70446991-e490-5eb5-8f82-510b5b424532","type":"article","starttime":"1490310908","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-23T16:15:08-07:00","lastupdated":"1490313861","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"2 dogs survive gas explosion that levels home; no one hurt","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_70446991-e490-5eb5-8f82-510b5b424532.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/dogs-survive-gas-explosion-that-levels-home-no-one-hurt/article_70446991-e490-5eb5-8f82-510b5b424532.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-gas-explosion-has-leveled-a-home-in-the-Pittsburgh-suburbs-but-spared-two-dogs-that-were-inside-at-the-time/id-eb113ee403694b8a8a96c87336629079","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PITTSBURGH (AP) \u2014 And they say cats have nine lives.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","accidents and disasters","oil and gas industry","energy industry","building explosions","explosions","occupational accidents","accidents"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"70446991-e490-5eb5-8f82-510b5b424532","body":"

PITTSBURGH (AP) \u2014 And they say cats have nine lives.

A gas explosion that leveled a home in the Pittsburgh suburbs on Thursday spared two dogs that were inside at the time.

Officials say the homeowner was at work and no one was injured.

One of the dogs suffered an eye injury and burns.

People's Gas spokesman Barry Kukovich says crews are working to determine the cause of the explosion, which destroyed the house.

Workers shut off gas service to the neighborhood in Moon Township and went from home to home to check the lines.

"}, {"id":"6d03f3c4-1dd8-54f3-8f4f-186e724a610a","type":"article","starttime":"1490310536","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-23T16:08:56-07:00","lastupdated":"1490313861","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Ohio paying 2 men declared wrongfully imprisoned $1.45M each","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_6d03f3c4-1dd8-54f3-8f4f-186e724a610a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/ohio-paying-men-declared-wrongfully-imprisoned-m-each/article_6d03f3c4-1dd8-54f3-8f4f-186e724a610a.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Ohio-has-agreed-to-pay-about-1-45-million-each-to-two-men-declared-wrongfully-imprisoned-for-more-than-16-years-in-a-slaying/id-6771ded94000462d9851b9f7c74597e1","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) \u2014 The state has agreed to pay about $1.45 million each to two men declared wrongfully imprisoned for more than 16 years in a woman's slaying, the Court of Claims announced Thursday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","homicide","violent crime","crime"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":6,"commentID":"6d03f3c4-1dd8-54f3-8f4f-186e724a610a","body":"

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) \u2014 The state has agreed to pay about $1.45 million each to two men declared wrongfully imprisoned for more than 16 years in a woman's slaying, the Court of Claims announced Thursday.

The court said in a statement that it approved a settlement between the state and Robert Gondor and Randy Resh this month. The men were 24 years old when a man who pleaded guilty in the 1988 murder of Connie Nardi in Portage County implicated them as accomplices.

A Common Pleas Court jury found Gondor guilty in 1990 of involuntary manslaughter, kidnapping and obstructing justice, and Resh was convicted of murder and attempted rape.

Gondor and Resh continued to argue their innocence and appealed their convictions. Resh was acquitted in a retrial, and the charges against Gondor were dropped. They were freed in 2007.

A Portage County judge's 2014 ruling in a lawsuit brought by the two men found they qualified as wrongfully imprisoned, and that ruling was affirmed by an appeals court.

Gondor and Resh filed for compensation with the Court of Claims and received partial payments in 2015 of more than $420,000 each for lost earnings. The men, who are now in their early 50s, argued in court filings that they deserved additional compensation for being deprived of building families and careers and suffering emotional distress.

An attorney for both said Thursday that the settlement was \"a long time coming.\"

Attorney Mark Marein said the two men are doing remarkably well, considering that they spent years in prison for a \"murder they did not commit.\"

\"But that's in the past, and they are moving forward,\" Marein said.

A spokeswoman for the state attorney general's office declined to comment on the settlement.

Nardi's body was found on Aug. 15, 1988. The Randolph Township woman, who was 31 years old, was strangled, and her body was thrown into a Geauga County pond.

The man who implicated Resh and Gordon as accomplices pleaded guilty to aggravated murder and has remained in prison since 1989.

"}, {"id":"ee1f0919-dec8-55a5-ba73-c29e15529ab6","type":"article","starttime":"1490310377","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-23T16:06:17-07:00","lastupdated":"1490313864","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Israel arrests hacker linked to threats on US Jewish centers","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_ee1f0919-dec8-55a5-ba73-c29e15529ab6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/israel-arrests-hacker-linked-to-threats-on-us-jewish-centers/article_ee1f0919-dec8-55a5-ba73-c29e15529ab6.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Israeli-police-have-arrested-a-19-year-old-hacker-who-they-say-is-the-main-suspect-in-a-wave-of-bomb-threats-against-Jewish-community-centers-in-the-United-States-appearing-to-crack-a-c/id-a6a67fb761304e3cae7497faa32dcdc9","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JOSEF FEDERMAN\nAssociated Press","prologue":"JERUSALEM (AP) \u2014 A 19-year-old American-Israeli Jew was arrested Thursday as the prime suspect in a wave of bomb threats against U.S. Jewish community centers, a startling turn in a case that had stoked fears of rising anti-Semitism in the United States.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","juvenile crime","crime","religious discrimination","religious issues","religion","social affairs","social issues","discrimination","human rights and civil liberties","bomb threats","arrests","law and order"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"7f42cf75-3df3-5774-8f83-4a22903b73fd","description":"A 19-year-old dual U.S.-Israeli citizen covers his face as he is brought to court in Rishon Lezion, Israel, Thursday, March 23, 2017. Israeli police said they have arrested a Jewish Israeli man who is the prime suspect behind a wave of bomb threats against Jewish community centers and other institutions in the United States. The police withheld his identity. (AP Photo/Nir Keidar) ***ISRAEL OUT***","byline":"Nir Keidar","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f4/7f42cf75-3df3-5774-8f83-4a22903b73fd/58d3eb3a37c19.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f4/7f42cf75-3df3-5774-8f83-4a22903b73fd/58d3eb3a37c19.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f4/7f42cf75-3df3-5774-8f83-4a22903b73fd/58d3eb3a37c19.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f4/7f42cf75-3df3-5774-8f83-4a22903b73fd/58d3eb3a37c19.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":21,"commentID":"ee1f0919-dec8-55a5-ba73-c29e15529ab6","body":"

JERUSALEM (AP) \u2014 A 19-year-old American-Israeli Jew was arrested Thursday as the prime suspect in a wave of bomb threats against U.S. Jewish community centers, a startling turn in a case that had stoked fears of rising anti-Semitism in the United States.

The surprising arrest of the man, a hacker who holds dual Israeli and American citizenship, came after a trans-Atlantic investigation with the FBI and other international law enforcement agencies. U.S. Jewish groups welcomed the breakthrough in the case, which drawn condemnation from President Donald Trump.

Israeli police described the suspect as a hacker, but said his motives were still unclear.

\"He's the guy who was behind the JCC threats,\" police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said, referring to the scores of anonymous threats phoned in to Jewish community centers in the U.S. over the past two months.

Police banned publication of his name, but said he was a dual citizen and would remain in custody until at least March 30. During the arrest raid, they said he tried to grab an officer's gun but was stopped by another officer.

The young man appeared briefly in court in the central Israeli city of Rishon Letzion. He wore khaki pants and a blue sweater that he used to cover his face as he walked past reporters. He made no comment.

His lawyer, Galit Bash, said her client had a \"very serious medical condition\" that might have affected his behavior. She said the condition had prevented him from attending elementary school, high school or enlisting in the army, which is compulsory for most Jewish men.

\"That's why the medical condition can actually affect the investigation,\" she said. \"This is one of the things the judge told the police to check, to talk to his doctors, to get more documents and to investigate him according to his medical situation.\"

Channel 10 TV said the condition was a brain tumor. It also showed images of a large antenna outside the suspect's house in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon. Police said the suspect's father was also detained, apparently because of the equipment. Late Thursday, police said the father's detention had been extended by eight days.

In Washington, the FBI confirmed the arrest of the main suspect.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the Justice Department \"will not tolerate the targeting of any community in the country on the basis of their religious beliefs.\" He called work by the FBI and Israeli police \"outstanding.\"

Since Jan. 9, there have been more than 150 bomb threats against Jewish community centers and day schools in 37 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, according to the Anti-Defamation League, a Jewish group that battles anti-Semitism.

The threats led to evacuations, sent a chill through local Jewish communities and raised fears of rising anti-Semitism. Acts of vandalism on Jewish targets, including cemeteries, have added to those concerns.

As the number of threats grew, Trump was criticized for not speaking out. Then, late last month, he opened a speech to Congress by denouncing anti-Semitism. There was no immediate reaction from the White House to Thursday's arrest.

The ADL, JCC Association of America and Jewish Federations of North America all welcomed news of the arrest.

But Jonathan Greenblatt, chief executive of the ADL, said anti-Semitism in the U.S. remains a \"very serious concern.\"

\"JCCs and other institutions should not relax security measures or become less vigilant,\" he said.

Karen Dombey, whose child attends the David Posnack Jewish Community Center in Davie, Florida, which was evacuated when it received threats Feb. 27 and March 7, said she was surprised that the suspect is an Israeli-American. About 500 students from kindergarten through high school attend classes at the center, where armed guards stood at its entrances on Thursday.

\"I hope it doesn't happen again. I hope it stops. But the fact that it happened raises awareness that we are targeted even when we think we are not,\" Dombey said.

U.S. authorities have also arrested a former journalist from St. Louis, Juan Thompson, for allegedly threatening Jewish organizations and charged him with one count of cyberstalking.

But Israeli police described the local man as the primary suspect in the wave of threats.

Police said he used sophisticated \"camouflage technologies\" to disguise his voice and mask his location. They said a search of the teen's home uncovered antennas and satellite equipment.

\"In sophisticated cyber activity that I cannot detail, we obtained what we obtained and of course exposed him and his equipment,\" national police chief Roni Alsheich told reporters. \"This does not bring honor to the state of Israel of course. But I think it does bring respect to Israel's police.\"

Police said the threats had caused panic, \"significant economic damage\" and disrupted public order at locations around the world.

The man is also suspected of placing threatening phone calls to Australia, New Zealand and within Israel. They also said he had disrupted a Delta Airlines flight at New York's JFK airport in early 2015.

Harel Menashri, a former cyber expert with Israel's Shin Bet internal security agency, said it was not \"too complicated\" for the suspect to do what he did.

He said it appeared the suspect had penetrated neighbors' Wi-Fi systems to create multiple computer addresses.

\"One of the things that helped him evade capture was he apparently took control over additional computers on the way and created a kind of computer chain,\" he said.

Nimrod Vax, a co-founder of the U.S.-Israeli cybersecurity firm BigID, said catching the suspect was a more complicated task.

He said authorities would have had to sift through \"billions, if not trillions\" of pieces of data, including phone records, routing logs and IP connections.

Ron Hosko, a retired FBI assistant director, said such investigations require massive manpower to solve.

Investigating a bomb threat by phone normally means getting a subpoena for a phone company and getting subscriber information to identify the incoming call. But the suspect used computer software, such as Tor, to obfuscate his whereabouts.

The software \"puts you in a cloud of IP addresses\" that link to different computers and make it extremely difficult to trace, he said.

___

Associated Press writers Eric Tucker and Sadie Gurman in Washington, Josh Cornfield in Trenton, New Jersey and Terry Spencer in Davie, Florida contributed to this report.

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( Jack Taylor/Pool via AP)","byline":"Jack Taylor","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/e7/ee713048-b7ee-5216-92f6-32ab136c0a29/58d3a77d56b8b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/e7/ee713048-b7ee-5216-92f6-32ab136c0a29/58d3a77d56b8b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/e7/ee713048-b7ee-5216-92f6-32ab136c0a29/58d3a77d56b8b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/e7/ee713048-b7ee-5216-92f6-32ab136c0a29/58d3a77d56b8b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"15a8ed78-f361-55a0-8806-047a4f26c406","description":"Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May is driven from Downing Street in London, Thursday March 23, 2017 on her way to the House of Parliament. 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LONDON (AP) \u2014 The latest on the attack outside Britain's Parliament (all times local):

11 p.m.

Dozens of French teenagers have returned to their homeland after a traumatic school trip to London during which some of them witnessed the attack on Westminster Bridge.

A plane chartered by their insurance company landed Thursday night at an airport in Quimper, in France's western Brittany region.

Some 90 students from the Saint-Joseph high school in nearby Concarneau were then driven to the town of Tregunc, also in Brittany, where French Education Minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem and her colleague in charge of victims' assistance Juliette Meadel welcomed them back.

Three of their classmates, wounded in the attack outside the British Parliament Wednesday, remained hospitalized at St. Thomas's Hospital in London, where Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian is expected to visit them Friday.

___

9:20 p.m.

London police say a 75-year-old man injured in the attack on Westminster Bridge has died of his wounds.

In a statement late Thursday, police said life support was withdrawn from the man and his family has been notified.

The announcement brings to four the number of victims killed in the attack Wednesday in central London. The man identified as the driver of the car that rampaged across the bridge into pedestrians was also killed by police after he jumped out and stabbed a police officer to death.

___

7:45 p.m.

Several thousand people have gathered in London's Trafalgar Square for a candlelit vigil to honor the victims and their families and to show London's unity in the face of militant attacks.

Dignitaries, police and clergy, including Buddhist monks in brown robes, gathered on the steps leading to the National Gallery. There was a strong sense of solidarity and camaraderie, with Muslims mingling with Jews and people stopping to thank the police for their work. After speeches and a minute's silence \u2014 the crowd was so quiet that Big Ben could be heard chiming in the distance \u2014 the home secretary, mayor and acting police commissioner lit the three oversize candles to applause from the crowd

Sughra Ahmed, a Muslim woman who traveled from northwest England for the vigil, said she'd been reduced to tears on the square by a woman who went out of her way to embrace her.

\"Britain is one,\" she said. \"An attack on one is an attack on us all.\"

___

6:20 p.m.

Lights depicting the British Union flag have been projected onto Berlin's Brandenburg Gate in a show of solidarity after a deadly attack outside London's Parliament on Wednesday.

A night before, the Eiffel Tower in Paris switched its lights off and went dark to honor those killed in the London attack.

Those injured in the rampage included many tourists from around the world, including one from Germany and three French schoolchildren.

___

6:10 p.m.

British police say eight people have been arrested on suspicion of preparing terrorist acts in connection to the Westminster attack.

The arrests had been reported earlier but police did not specify the reason for the arrests until Thursday evening.

Seven were arrested overnight. Police say they included a woman arrested in east London; a man and a woman arrested in Birmingham; and a woman and three men arrested at a different location in Birmingham.

In addition, a man was arrested Thursday morning at a third address in Birmingham.

None have been charged and they have not been identified. Their ages range from 21 to 58.

The Met Police also say there were searches in Brighton and southeast London that have been concluded. Searches ongoing at addresses in Birmingham, east London and in Wales.

___

5:55 p.m.

Jordan's government spokesman says a deadly London attack by the extremist group Islamic State underscores the need for \"coming all together to fight this evil.\"

The group has claimed responsibility for the attack by a man who plowed an SUV into pedestrians and stabbed a police officer to death at Britain's Parliament.

Jordan is part of a U.S.-led military coalition against IS, which controls territory in neighboring Syria and Iraq.

Spokesman Mohammed Momani said Thursday that Jordan \"strongly condemns\" the attack and stands with Britain \"in these difficult days.\"

He said his country is fighting the group militarily and ideologically, and that \"this evil and terrorism will be defeated sooner than later.\"

___

5:05 p.m.

Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson says the fact that victims from the London attack came from 11 countries shows that \"an attack on London is an attack on the world.\"

Johnson, who is in New York to preside over the U.N. Security Council, told reporters Thursday he is confident the extremists will be defeated \"because our values are superior ... freedom, democracy, the equality of human beings under the law.\"

He said countries everywhere are uniting to defeat those responsible and their \"bankrupt and odious ideology.\"

During his meetings in Washington on Wednesday and at the United Nations, Johnson said he has seen countries including from the Islamic world coming together to defeat the Islamic State extremist group \"and I think that will have a big effect.\"

But Johnson said extremists must be defeated \"in the hearts and minds\" of their followers. He said Internet providers and social media companies must take responsibility, and remove sites that are radicalizing people.

___

4:50 p.m.

Iwona Romek, who said she lived for about five months next door to the man identified as the assailant in Wednesday's attack, said he had a wife and young child and appeared like a \"normal family man who liked to take care of his garden.\"

Romek, a former neighbor of 52-year-old Khalid Masood in Birmingham, central England, took one look at a photo of the attacker on a stretcher and said \"That is 100 percent him.\"

The home where Masood lived until he abruptly moved just after Christmas was raided by police late Wednesday.

Romek said Masood would walk the child, around 6 years old, to school in the morning, and that he rarely left in the evening. But one day she saw him packing their belongings in the black van he bought to replace a red Fiat, and then they were gone, months after moving in.

___

4:30 p.m.

Theresa May's spokesman says the British prime minister has visited a London hospital to meet victims of Wednesday's attack.

Spokesman James Slack says May also met hospital staff and thanked them.

He said the 40-minute visit was private and he did not disclose what hospital May visited.

Three people were killed and at least 30 injured in Wednesday's attack on Westminster Bridge and Parliament. The attacker was shot dead.

___

3:45 p.m.

Car rental company Enterprise has confirmed that the car used in the terror attack in London this week was owned by them and rented in Birmingham.

The company said in a statement Thursday that the car \"used in the tragic attack in London yesterday afternoon was one of ours.\"

The company says an employee identified the vehicle after seeing the license plate in an online image. The company checked and immediately contacted authorities.

It says it is cooperating fully.

The company says \"our thoughts are very much with the victims of this terrible tragedy.\"

___

3:40 p.m.

U.S. President Donald Trump is offering prayers and condolences to the family and friends of the Utah man killed in an Islamic State attack in London.

Trump tweeted Thursday that Kurt Cochran was \"a great American,\" adding, \"my prayers and condolences are with his family and friends.\"

Cochran and his wife, Melissa, were on the last day of a special European trip celebrating their 25th wedding anniversary when an attacker plowed an SUV into pedestrians Wednesday on London's Westminster Bridge. The assailant was shot dead by armed officers.

The White House said Wednesday that the president had spoken with U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May and has offered U.S. assistance.

___

3:35 p.m.

British police have identified the person responsible for the terror attack near Parliament as 52-year-old Khalid Masood.

The police say in a statement Thursday that Masood was born in southeastern England and was most recently living in the West Midlands, in central England.

Police say Masood, who had a number of aliases, wasn't the subject of any current investigation and that \"there was no prior intelligence about his intent to mount a terrorist attack.\"

He had been arrested previously for assault, possession of offensive weapons and public order offenses.

His first conviction was in November 1983 for criminal damage and his last was in December 2003 for possession of a knife.

___

3:10 p.m.

Spain's royal family has expressed condolences for the victims of Wednesday's deadly attack in London.

\"Spain feels very close to the United Kingdom in this moment of pain,\" King Felipe VI said in a telegram Thursday to Queen Elizabeth II.

The king expressed \"deep sorrow ... for a despicable act that violates the fundamental values that sustain our democracy and our societies.\"

He added that he wished for \"normality to return to life in London.\"

Felipe and his wife Queen Letizia are scheduled to pay the first Spanish royal visit to Britain in three decades in June.

___

3:05 p.m.

The prime minister of Israel, which has faced a wave of Palestinian assaults on civilians and soldiers since 2015, has condemned \"the murderous terror attack in London.\"

Benjamin Netanyahu said Thursday \"The citizens of Israel were among the first to face the challenge of vehicular ramming and stabbing attacks.\"

In a statement he sent condolences to the victims and wished the wounded a speedy recovery.

\"We must stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the citizens of Britain and the entire civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism,\" he said.

Palestinians have killed 41 Israelis and two visiting Americans in a wave of attacks, mainly stabbings, car ramming and shootings, since September 2015. Israeli forces have killed 238 Palestinians during the same period, most identified by Israel as assailants involved in the attacks.

___

3 p.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's office says the Turkish leader held a telephone conversation with British Prime Minister Theresa May during which he expressed Turkey's solidarity with Britain in the fight against terrorism.

Officials from Erdogan's office said Thursday the Turkish leader also told May that Turkey shared Britain's pain over the attack in London.

The two leaders also reasserted their \"determination\" to jointly combat terrorism and share intelligence, the officials said.

___

2:50 p.m.

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, speaking on behalf of the U.N. Security Council, has strongly condemned the \"cowardly terrorist attack\" in London that killed or seriously injured \"many innocent people.\"

Johnson, who was presiding at a meeting of the U.N.'s most powerful body, opened Thursday's session with the statement on behalf of the council's 15 members. He then asked everyone in the packed chamber to stand in silent tribute to the victims.

The British minister was in Washington at the time of Wednesday's attacks near Parliament that killed two civilians and a policeman, and wounded over 30 others. The attacker was shot dead by police.

Britain currently holds the rotating presidency of the Security Council and Johnson decided to go ahead with plans to travel to New York to preside over meetings on Somalia and later on South Sudan.

___

2:40 p.m.

Italian Olympic boxer Vincenzo Mangiacapre has demonstrated how an unidentified attacker killed a policeman on the grounds of Parliament in front of the shocked members of his boxing team.

The killer, he said, had a knife in each hand and used them like drumsticks plunging into policeman Keith Palmer.

\"He gave him around 10 stabs in the back, then he left the policeman and came toward us,\" the 2012 Olympic light welterweight bronze medalist said.

Mangiacapre and other members of the Italia Thunder boxing team were touring the grounds of Parliament when the lethal attack unfolded. They are in London preparing for a World Series boxing match against a British team, Lionhearts.

___

2:30 p.m.

A Mormon church official says a Utah man was killed and his wife was seriously wounded in the London attack.

Kurt W. Cochran and his wife, Melissa, were on the last day of a trip celebrating their 25th wedding anniversary on Wednesday when the attacker struck in the heart of London. He plowed an SUV into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, killing two and wounding dozens, then stabbed police officer Keith Palmer to death inside the gates of Parliament.

The assailant was shot dead by armed officers. The woman remains hospitalized.

The church said Thursday the Utah couple was also visiting the woman's parents, who are Mormon missionaries in London.

___

13:35 p.m.

European Union Security Commissioner Julian King is suggesting there could be a link between Wednesday's attack in London and the suicide bombings in Brussels exactly one year ago.

King said Thursday that \"l don't think it was a complete accident that this attack took place on the first anniversary of the Brussels attacks.\"

He did not say whether the link went beyond that both took place on March 22. The attacks on Brussels' airport and subway last year killed 32 people.

King also said that \"the methodology of the London attacker fits into a pattern of behavior which we have seen before\" in vehicle attacks in Berlin and Nice last year.

King, who is from Britain, added that \"the terrorist threat remains extremely high across Europe.\"

___

13:25 p.m.

British police say Westminster Bridge has reopened to traffic less than 24 hours after Wednesday's attack.

The landmark bridge across the River Thames had been shut since an unidentified assailant hit a number of pedestrians with his vehicle. He was later shot to death after rushing onto the Parliament grounds and stabbing a policeman.

The busy bridge is a popular tourist site for visitors seeking selfies near Parliament and the London Eye.

___

13:20 p.m.

Italy's ambassador to Britain says an Italian tourist who was injured when she was hit by the assailant's vehicle in Wednesday's attack is doing better.

The Italian news agency ANSA, reporting from London, quoted Ambassador Pasquale Terracciano, as saying Thursday she told him she had lost consciousness for about 10 minutes after being struck by the car's bumper. The ambassador had visited the woman in the hospital.

The woman, a tourist from Rome, underwent surgery for a compound leg fracture. She also suffered less serious injury to two of her vertebrae near her neck and head trauma.

___

12:55 p.m.

Queen Elizabeth II says her \"thoughts, prayers, and deepest sympathy\" are with those affected by Wednesday's attack in London.

The monarch said: \"I know I speak for everyone in expressing my enduring thanks and admiration for the members of the Metropolitan Police Service and all who work so selflessly to help and protect others.\"

She also sent a message of apology to London's police force after plans to have her preside over the opening of the New Scotland Yard building were cancelled following the attack.

The queen said in the statement Thursday that she looks forward \"to visiting at a later date.\"

___

12:40 p.m.

A British lawmaker has choked back tears as he remembered his friendship with the police officer killed on Wednesday's attack on Parliament.

His voice breaking, Conservative legislator James Cleverly called for Constable Keith Palmer to receive posthumous recognition for his \"gallantry and sacrifice.\"

He said he first met Palmer 25 years ago as \"Gunner Keith Palmer\" when both men served in the Royal Artillery.

Cleverly said the 48-year-old police officer, stabbed to death by an attacker trying to enter Parliament, was \"a strong, professional public servant and it was a delight to meet him again only a few months after being elected.\"

Prime Minister Theresa May said Palmer had \"paid the ultimate sacrifice here at the heart of our democracy\" and that the suggestion of posthumous recognition would be considered.

___

12:35 p.m.

The Islamic State group says the attack outside the British parliament in London was carried out by one of its \"soldiers.\"

The IS-linked Aamaq news agency said Thursday that the person who carried out the \"attack in front of the British parliament in London was a soldier of the Islamic State.\"

It added that the person \"carried out the operation in response to calls for targeting citizens of the coalition.\"

IS has called on its supporters to carry out attacks against citizens of the U.S.-led coalition that has been targeting the group since 2014.

IS, who have been responsible for numerous bloody attacks around the globe, have also previously claimed certain attacks in a show of opportunism. Britain's government has not identified the suspect.

___

12:30 p.m.

Armed police officers were seen outside Sweden's Parliament and the government's headquarters following Wednesday's London attack.

Parliament's head of security told Expressen daily that safety measures had been taken \"in consultation with the police\" and Sweden's domestic intelligence agency \"due to the event in London.\"

The Sapo agency had not changed the threat assessment against Sweden. In neighboring Denmark, the Security and Intelligence Service said Thursday the situation led to no reason to change the assessment of the terror threat against Denmark, \"which remains serious.\" In Copenhagen, Denmark, heavily armed police also were seen outside the Danish Parliament.

___

12:25 p.m.

A Romanian diplomat said a woman who plunged into the Thames when a SUV plowed into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge Wednesday has successfully undergone surgery to remove a blood clot from her brain. She remains in a critical state.

Romania's Ambassador to Britain, Dan Mihalache, told national news agency Agerpres Thursday that the woman had major problems with her lungs.

He said the woman, who has not been named, was transferred early Thursday to another London hospital that is better equipped to deal with her injuries.

Mihalache said her family was traveling to London. The woman and her boyfriend were on vacation in the British capital to celebrate his birthday this week. The boyfriend suffered a foot fracture.

___

12:15 p.m.

Poland's prime minister has suggested a link between the European Union's migration policies and terrorism \u2014 and has used the London attack to make her point, even though the identity of the attacker has not been released.

Beata Szydlo spoke just hours before British Prime Minister Theresa May said police know the identity of the attacker, who was British-born.

Szydlo said on TVN24: \"I often hear in Europe, in the EU: Let's not link the migration policy with terrorism, but it's impossible not to link them.\"

The attack before the British Parliament left four people dead, including the attacker, and 29 hospitalized, including one Pole.

Poland's nationalist government is at odds with the EU on a number of issues including migration.

___

12 p.m.

Pope Francis is sending prayers and solidarity to victims of the London attack.

In a telegram of condolence, Francis said he was \"deeply saddened\" to learn of the \"tragedy\" in central London on Wednesday.

He said he was praying for \"divine strength and peace\" for the families of the injured and dead.

___

11:35 p.m.

The world's largest body of Islamic nations and the Saudi king have condemned the attack in London, saying they reject such acts of terrorism.

Yousef Bin Ahmad Al-Othaimeen, who heads the Saudi-headquartered organization, said acts of terrorism contradict the fundamentals of Islam. The OIC is comprised of 57 Muslim-majority countries from around the world.

Meanwhile the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council, which includes Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain and Oman, described the attack as \"a terrible crime that is incompatible with all values and principles of humanity.\"

The Saudi Press Agency reports that Saudi Arabia's King Salman sent a cable of condolences to British Prime Minister Theresa May in which he says the kingdom \"strongly condemns this terrorist act.\" London is a popular destination for thousands of Saudi and Arab Gulf tourists.

___

11:20 a.m.

Spanish politicians gathered on parliament's steps in Madrid for a minute's silence for the victims of the attack in in London, among them a British national with Spanish ancestry.

At the same hour, officials and residents of the northwestern town of Betanzos stood in silence in memory of 43-year-old Aysha Frade, one of the attack victims and whose mother was born in the town.

In a note on its Facebook page, the town hall said that \"Aysha was the daughter of a Betanzos resident and was linked by family and emotionally to our town.\"

Betanzos declared three days of mourning for the victims.

Flags at the town hall and the parliament building were flown at half-staff.

___

11:15 a.m.

Iran's foreign ministry spokesman has condemned the attack outside Britain's Parliament, according to the official IRNA news agency.

Bahram Ghasemi expressed his sympathy with the bereaved families of the victims.

Ghasemi underlined that Iran invites all countries to form a coalition and foster cooperation aimed at tackling terrorism. He added that terrorism is not limited to geographical boundaries.

___

11:10 a.m.

A 26-year-old Portuguese man was among the injured when a man plowed into pedestrians with an SUV on London's Westminster Bridge.

Francisco Lopes told Portuguese channel TVI that he heard shouts behind him as he walked across the bridge and when he turned around he was struck by the vehicle which had mounted the sidewalk.

He said he lost consciousness and woke up wracked with pain. He sustained cuts on a knee and a hand but was released from Chelsea-Westminster hospital after treatment. \"I was lucky,\" said Lopes, who lives in London with his mother.

___

11 a.m.

Britain's prime minister says people from 11 countries were hospitalized after the attack outside Parliament.

Theresa May said that 12 Britons, 3 French, 2 Romanians, 4 South Koreans, 1 German, 1 Pole, 1 Irish, 1 Chinese, 1 Italian, 1 American and two Greeks required hospital treatment. Police earlier said that seven of the 29 who are hospitalized are in critical condition.

A knife-wielding attacker driving an SUV mowed down pedestrians, killing two on Westminster Bridge before breaching Parliament's grounds and fatally stabbing a police officer. The attacker was then shot dead by police.

___

10:45 a.m.

Prime Minister Theresa May says \"millions of acts of normality\" are the best response to terrorism.

In the House of Commons, May saluted the \"everyday actions\" of \"millions people ... going about their days and getting on with their lives.\"

Though streets around Parliament are cordoned off, the vast majority of London is open and bustling as usual. Parliament resumed sitting Thursday, less than 24 hours after the attack.

May says the resolve of ordinary people shows \"our values will prevail.\"

___

10:40 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May says police know the identity of the British-born man who went on a car and gun rampage at Parliament.

May says he was once investigated for extremist links but was considered a peripheral figure. She didn't disclose his name.

May says police believe the man acted alone and there is no reason to believe \"imminent further attacks\" are planned.

___

10:35 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May has delivered a defiant message after a deadly attack, saying \"we are not afraid.\"

May has told lawmakers in the House of Commons that \"yesterday an act of terrorism tried to silence our democracy, but today we meet as normal.\"

She called the car and knife rampage that killed three victims \"an attack on free people everywhere.\"

___

10:30 a.m.

France's foreign minister says three French teenagers hospitalized after the attack outside London's Parliament are not in life-threatening condition.

Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault, after visiting the victims in London, said democratic nations should not be cowed by this kind of attack.

\"We must say no to those who want to kill our democracy,\" he told reporters. \"We will not put up walls.\"

While no information has been released bout the attackers' identity, Ayrault said authorities should fight against the radicalization of young people and against the Islamic State group in particular. Ayrault was at a meeting in Washington about fighting IS when the London attack hit.

___

10:25 a.m.

London's mayor has paid tribute to a slain police officer who tried to stop a knife-wielding attacker who had entered Parliament's grounds.

Mayor Sadiq Khan says that 48-year-old police officer Keith Palmer \"was doing the job he loved and protecting our city, protecting Parliament, protecting Londoners, unarmed, and he died in the course of his duty. And I pay tribute to him.\"

The attacker, who had earlier mowed down pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, was shot dead by police after stabbing Palmer. Two other people were killed in the attack.

Khan says that there have been \"13 occasions over the last three or four years where attempts to terrorize us, to kill and to maim, have been thwarted.\"

___

10:05 a.m.

Britain's defense secretary has praised the work of police officers after the attack outside Parliament by a knife-wielding man driving an SUV.

Michael Fallon says that a \"very urgent investigation\" had been going on around the clock to determine whether \"anybody else was involved.\"

Earlier, police said they believe the attacker who killed three people, including a police officer, acted alone and was \"inspired by international terrorism.\"

Police have conducted major raids overnight and detained seven people.

___

9:55 a.m.

The Spanish Foreign Ministry says that a British national whose mother is Spanish has been identified as one of the people killed in the London attack.

A spokesman says that Spanish consular officials have made contact with Aysha Frade's relatives in Spain's northwestern region of Galicia when her identity was confirmed. He was unable to give any further details.

The regional Voz de Galicia newspaper said that Frade was 43 years old and was teaching Spanish in London.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity in keeping with ministry regulations.

--By Ciaran Giles in Madrid.

___

9:40 a.m.

The British Parliament has observed a minute of silence to remember those killed in the attack at that heart of the government.

The sitting Thursday is an important act of defiance, showing a commitment to the values at the core of the nation's government.

A man driving an SUV plowed into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge on Wednesday before he fatally stabbed a police officer on Parliament's grounds. Two other people were killed, and police shot dead the attacker.

Parliament was put into lockdown after the attack.

___

9:25 a.m.

French prosecutors have opened a terrorism investigation into the attack outside London's Parliament because three French teens were among those injured.

The Paris prosecutor's office says that its anti-terrorism section has opened an investigation into attempted murder in relation with a terrorist enterprise. The move means French police would likely travel to London to pursue their investigation.

French authorities, whose country has suffered a string of deadly extremist attacks, have offered to work with British authorities on the investigation.

The injured French were part of a group of high school students from Brittany in western France on a school trip to London.

Three people were killed and many injured when a man mowed down pedestrians on Westminster Bridge and stabbed a police officer Wednesday. The attacker was killed by police.

___

9:20 a.m.

Romanian officials say a woman who plunged into the River Thames when a man plowed into pedestrians with an SUV on London's Westminster Bridge was a Romanian tourist in London to celebrate her boyfriend's birthday.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Ionut Valcu said Thursday that the woman fell into the Thames. It wasn't clear if she jumped or was thrown into the water by the SUV.

Romanian Ambassador Dan Mihalache told Realitatea TV that the woman sustained serious head injuries and has badly damaged lungs. Her boyfriend suffered a foot fracture. The pair haven't been named.

Mihalache said: \"They were tourists, unfortunately they were unlucky. They had come to celebrate his birthday.\" He said the pair planned to wed.

___

8:40 a.m.

Russian President Vladimir Putin says the attack outside Parliament in London underlined the need for pooling global efforts against terrorism.

In a letter to British Prime Minister Theresa May released by the Kremlin Thursday, Putin said the \"forces of terror are acting in an increasingly treacherous and cynical way.\"

He emphasized that \"it's necessary to unite efforts of all members of international community to confront the terror threat.\"

Putin offered condolences to the families of the victims and wished a quick recovery to those injured in Wednesday's attack.

___

7:50 a.m.

British police say they believe the attacker who killed three people including a police officer outside Parliament acted alone and was \"inspired by international terrorism.\"

Metropolitan Police counterterrorism chief Mark Rowley says that police have raided six addresses and arrested seven people in connection with Wednesday's attack by a knife-wielding man who also mowed down pedestrians with an SUV. Rowley refused to identify the attacker.

He revised the death toll down to four, including the attacker, a police officer guarding Parliament and two civilians. He said that 29 people required hospitalization and seven of them are in critical condition.

--This item has been corrected to show that death toll, including attacker, has been revised to four.

___

7:25 a.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has condemned the attack outside Britain's Parliament in London.

The rampage occurred hours after Erdogan warned that the safety of Western citizens could be in peril if European nations persist in what he described as their arrogant conduct.

In a series of tweets posted late Wednesday, Erdogan said Turkey shared \"the pain of the United Kingdom.\"

Erdogan tweeted: \"We stand in solidarity with the U.K., our friend and ally, against terrorism, the greatest threat to global peace and security.\"

___

7:15 a.m.

British armed police have carried out a raid on a property in the central city of Birmingham, after an attacker killed four people before being fatally shot by police within Parliament's grounds.

Police refused to say if the raid was linked to the rampage in the heart of Britain's seat of power. But British media including the Press Association on Thursday quoted an unnamed witness saying that the operation was linked to the attack that also injured around 40 people.

A knife-wielding man drove an SUV into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before crashing the vehicle into the gates of Parliament on Wednesday. He scaled the fences and later fatally stabbed a policeman before being gunned down by officers. He hasn't been identified. Three pedestrians were among the dead.

___

4:10 a.m.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang says the attack outside the British Parliament in London was the first subject of discussion when he met with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull of Australia on Thursday morning in Canberra.

Li says that \"together, we send our condolences to the prime minister of the U.K. and together we condemn terrorism and we stand against all forms of terrorism.\"

The Chinese leader says that \"there cannot be continued instability in the world.\"

___

1:35 a.m.

New Zealand's prime minister is condemning the attack outside Britain's Parliament that resulted in five deaths, including the assailant.

Prime Minister Bill English told reporters in Rotorua that he has written to British Prime Minister Theresa May to express support for her government and to offer his country's condolences to the victim's families.

A knife-wielding man went on the deadly rampage in the heart of Britain's seat of power Wednesday, plowing a car into pedestrians on London's Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer to death inside the gates of Parliament. Other officers fatally shot the attacker.

In addition to the dead, 40 people have injuries.

May has condemned the incident as a \"sick and depraved terrorist attack.\"

___

12:15 a.m.

South Korea's Foreign Ministry says five South Koreans in their 50s and 60s were among the 40 people injured in London during the terror attack outside Parliament.

The ministry says the five were hurt when they were caught up in a stampede of people trying to escape the attack.

It says four of the South Koreans suffered broken bones and other injuries and a woman in her late 60s needed an operation to treat a head injury.

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BANKS, Ore. (AP) \u2014 This fall, the football team in the tiny Oregon logging town of Banks will once again take the field as the Braves. But this time, they have the approval of the tribe that originally inhabited the area.

It's one of many changes in the works this spring across Oregon prompted by the nation's long-running uproar over Native American sports mascots. School districts in the state with tribal mascots must do away with them by July 1 or risk punishment that could include the withholding of state funds.

However, the state will make exceptions for districts that get the approval of one of Oregon's nine tribes \u2014 and the Banks School District is one of more than a half-dozen tiny districts trying to take advantage of that provision.

The state Board of Education voted unanimously on Thursday to approve an agreement between the Banks district and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, the first such deal to reach the board.

The current deal, nearly two years in the making, allows the district to keep the name Braves. In exchange, it gives up the \"Indian head\" image \u2014 a Native American man with a partially shaved head, face paint, ear hoop and feathers \u2014 and implements a curriculum developed by the Grand Ronde that teaches the history of its people from a tribal perspective.

The process highlights the dilemma facing small schools across the U.S. as attention has focused on high-profile battles over mascots such as the Washington Redskins.

Minnesota and Wisconsin have banned Native American mascots at school districts for decades, but elsewhere communities have wrestled with the issue for years, said Jennifer Guiliano, a history professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Oregon's statewide approach is unique, and its willingness to allow an exception for districts that collaborate with tribes calls to mind the NCAA's longstanding ban on Native American mascots that don't have tribal buy-in, she said.

But even with collaboration, agreements at the high school and college levels can raise questions about the nature of the long-term relationship once a deal is inked, she said.

State education officials initially did not want to allow any exceptions to the mascot ban but eventually bowed to pressure from lawmakers last year. At the time, some tribal rights groups were angry at the weakening of the policy that had been one of the toughest in the nation.

\"You can have curriculum without exploiting and dehumanizing Native American people,\" said Sam Sachs, founder of No Hate Zone, a racial rights advocacy website. \"I think it's great they're having these conversations, but we only got here because there was a threat of taking away their discriminatory, race-based mascots.\"

The exemption has prompted a state lawmaker to introduce a bill that would ban all Native American mascots, with or without tribal input. Other opponents have threatened lawsuits over racial discrimination in schools.

In Banks, nearly all the residents made it clear they didn't want to give up the name Braves \u2014 and the tribe was willing to listen.

\"It's been the nickname or the mascot for 70-plus years or so and it's a symbol of pride and respect for our community,\" said district Superintendent Jeff Leo, who oversees 1,000 students in the K-12 district 25 miles (40.23 kilometers) west of Portland.

\"We just didn't say, 'Oh, we're going to keep the name. We looked into it, we read things. We didn't take it lightly at all.\"

The district's new mascot, designed by the tribe and district with help from Nike, will now be two capital B's aligned back-to-back and surrounded by a zig-zagging line. Viewed horizontally, the B's look like a mountain range and symbolize the town's location at the crossroads of coastal mountains and a fertile valley.

For the tribe, getting the district to update its curriculum was critical, said Reyn Leno, Grand Ronde tribal chairman.

\"If we can educate people as to what is acceptable and what is not acceptable at a young age, we hope down the road we won't have mascot issues,\" he said. \"And at the end of the day, the derogatory images are off the gym floor.\"

Of the 15 Oregon districts with tribal mascots, eight have either submitted a plan for approval or given notice to state education officials that they are working with a tribe or intend to do so, said Cindy Hunt, manager of the state Education Department's division of government and legal affairs. Four districts opted to change to a non-tribal mascot.

In Banks, the agreement came with a price.

During the next five years, the district anticipates spending up to $95,000 to erase the Indian head from uniforms, scoreboards, trophy cases and even letterhead, Leo said.

The district has already wiped it off the gym floor, he said, and fourth-graders are using the tribe's curriculum. The school also has a new Native Club.

The close collaboration clearly impressed state officials Thursday.

\"I can only imagine the kind of learning that has taken place at that district and at the tribe,\" said board Chairman Charles Martinez Jr. \"It is humbling.\"

For those in Banks, a deal that lets them stay the Braves is worth it. When the \"Star Spangled Banner\" is played at every game, the crowd joins in and tweaks the last stanza \u2014 \"and the home of the Braves\" \u2014 to thunderous applause.

\"I just remember at the end of the national anthem, feeling like they're talking about us. It's time for us to go kick some butt now,\" said Chris Lyda, who played football and wrestled at the high school before graduating in 1991. \"I think it's still going to end that way. It's still going to be that reverberating 'Braves.'\"

_____

Follow Gillian Flaccus on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/gflaccus

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) \u2014 A federal control board overseeing Puerto Rico's finances amid a dire economic crisis announced Thursday that it appointed Ukraine's former finance minister as its executive director.

The board's chairman said Natalie Jaresko served during a critical time in Ukraine's history from 2014 to 2016 as it faced a deep recession.

\"Ukraine's situation three years ago_like Puerto Rico's today_was near catastrophic, but she worked with stakeholders to bring needed reforms that restored confidence, economic vitality and reinvestment in the country and its citizens. That's exactly what Puerto Rico needs today,\" said chairman Jose Carrion.

He said Jaresko was born in Chicago to Ukrainian immigrants and was chosen out of a group more than 300 candidates during a four-month search. She previously worked in various economic positions at the U.S. State Department and also co-founded private equity fund manager Horizon Capital, where she served as CEO. As Ukraine's finance minister, she maintained a strong reputation with Western governments and investors and helped negotiate a deal to restructure the country's $15 billion debt after its economy contract by nearly 18 percent in the first quarter of 2015.

Jaresko said in a statement that she will pursue a decisive and successful recovery for Puerto Rico.

\"I realize this goal may seem daunting if not impossible to many, but I accepted this position because I am optimistic we can achieve it together,\" she said.

Jaresko will be paid $625,000 a year, an amount Carrion acknowledged would likely cause an outcry on an island mired in a decade-long economic slump and seeking to restructure some $70 billion in public debt. He said Jaresko will commute from the Ukraine once a month until June, with all flights and hotel stays to be paid for by Puerto Rico's government.

Carrion said Jaresko will be responsible for ensuring that Puerto Rico achieves a balanced budget within four years and is granted re-entry into the capital market after credit rating agencies downgraded the island's debt to junk status.

\"She dealt with an extremely challenging economic situation that is very, very similar to the situation she's confronting in Puerto Rico,\" Carrion told reporters during a conference call.

He said Jaresko also will make sure that federal funds slated for Puerto Rico are administered correctly: \"We have a credibility problem in Washington,\" he said.

The board was created last year by U.S. Congress and recently approved a 10-year fiscal plan for Puerto Rico that contains numerous austerity measures.

"}, {"id":"d7f14ed1-e2a1-5b1b-a77c-f4a03f1df2d9","type":"article","starttime":"1490308980","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-23T15:43:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1490310964","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Activist who didn't divulge Israel bombings will leave US","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_d7f14ed1-e2a1-5b1b-a77c-f4a03f1df2d9.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/activist-who-didn-t-divulge-israel-bombings-will-leave-us/article_d7f14ed1-e2a1-5b1b-a77c-f4a03f1df2d9.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-Chicago-Palestinian-activist-who-didn-t-disclose-her-time-in-an-Israeli-prison-in-the-1970s-has-agreed-to-plead-guilty-to-an-immigration-crime-and-leave-the-U-S-/id-f869b496db524f4a80afc9d5214e028d","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"DETROIT (AP) \u2014 A Chicago Palestinian activist who didn't disclose her time in an Israeli prison when she got U.S. citizenship has agreed to plead guilty and leave the country.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","political activism","political issues","government and politics","immigration","social issues","social affairs","crime","bombings"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"d7f14ed1-e2a1-5b1b-a77c-f4a03f1df2d9","body":"

DETROIT (AP) \u2014 A Chicago Palestinian activist who didn't disclose her time in an Israeli prison when she got U.S. citizenship has agreed to plead guilty and leave the country.

Rasmea Odeh (OH'-duh) was scheduled to face a second trial in Detroit after winning an appeal of her 2014 conviction. But a member of her legal team, William Goodman, said Thursday she's agreed to plead guilty on April 25 in exchange for no time in prison.

Goodman says Odeh is 69 years old, and another trial would be \"grinding\" for her.

Odeh insists she didn't disclose her past because of post-traumatic stress disorder. She was convicted of two bombings in Israel in 1969 but says she was tortured into confessing. Israel released Odeh in a prisoner exchange in 1979.

"}, {"id":"0696c840-1a3b-5051-bb75-62ec31efaeee","type":"article","starttime":"1490309239","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-23T15:47:19-07:00","lastupdated":"1490311836","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Texas school worker accused of impregnating 13-year-old","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_0696c840-1a3b-5051-bb75-62ec31efaeee.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/texas-school-worker-accused-of-impregnating--year-old/article_0696c840-1a3b-5051-bb75-62ec31efaeee.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-Houston-middle-school-staff-member-is-facing-charges-after-he-was-accused-of-impregnating-a-13-year-old-student/id-6b9ce5d36f4946c4ac71684e35df0ab7","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"HOUSTON (AP) \u2014 A Houston middle school staff member is facing charges after he was accused of impregnating a 13-year-old student.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","crime"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"0696c840-1a3b-5051-bb75-62ec31efaeee","body":"

HOUSTON (AP) \u2014 A Houston middle school staff member is facing charges after he was accused of impregnating a 13-year-old student.

Mauricio Orlando Mendoza was an information technology worker at the school until the accusations surfaced in December. Prosecutors allege that he and the girl had sex on school grounds on multiple occasions. After the girl's parents found out about the alleged misconduct, the teen learned she was pregnant.

The 37-year-old married father was arrested Wednesday and charged with aggravated sexual assault of a child. He was released on $50,000 bond.

His attorney did not return a message seeking comment.

"} ]