[ {"id":"5c309688-0a71-58fc-acfd-10d2a45226a3","type":"article","starttime":"1475044104","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T23:28:24-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Libyan general in east rejects UN-backed government","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_5c309688-0a71-58fc-acfd-10d2a45226a3.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/libyan-general-in-east-rejects-un-backed-government/article_5c309688-0a71-58fc-acfd-10d2a45226a3.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/libyan-general-in-east-rejects-un-backed-government/article_6fe894bc-4f8f-5cb0-b6b0-ce1f23c275c8.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By RAMI MUSA and BRIAN ROHAN\nAssociated Press","prologue":"BENGHAZI, Libya (AP) \u2014 A powerful Libyan general whose forces recently captured several key oil facilities has rejected a U.N.-brokered government and said the country would be better served by a leader with \"high-level military experience.\"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","diplomacy","oil and gas industry","legislature","government and politics","militant groups","international relations","energy industry","business","religious issues","religion","social affairs","social issues","war and unrest"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"1ad25d1a-8a6d-542b-82b4-5e4e34a4a293","description":"FILE -- In this March 18, 2015 photo file photo, Gen. Khalifa Hifter speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, in al-Marj, Libya. Hifter, a powerful Libyan general whose forces recently captured several key oil facilities has rejected a U.N.-brokered government and said the country would be better served by a leader with \u201chigh-level military experience.\u201d In a series of written responses to questions from The Associated Press this week, Hifter said his army only recognizes the authority of the Libyan parliament based in the east, which has also rejected the U.N.-backed government in the capital, Tripoli. (AP Photo/Mohammed El-Sheikhy, File)","byline":"Mohammed El-Sheikhy","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/ad/1ad25d1a-8a6d-542b-82b4-5e4e34a4a293/57eb675b20aeb.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/ad/1ad25d1a-8a6d-542b-82b4-5e4e34a4a293/57eb675b20aeb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/ad/1ad25d1a-8a6d-542b-82b4-5e4e34a4a293/57eb675b20aeb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/ad/1ad25d1a-8a6d-542b-82b4-5e4e34a4a293/57eb675b20aeb.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"7842d88a-14a5-5bbc-99c1-bf819c28c042","description":"FILE -- In this March 18, 2015 file photo, Gen. Khalifa Hifter speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in al-Marj, Libya. Hifter, a powerful Libyan general whose forces recently captured several key oil facilities has rejected a U.N.-brokered government and said the country would be better served by a leader with \u201chigh-level military experience.\u201d In a series of written responses to questions from The Associated Press this week, Hifter said his army only recognizes the authority of the Libyan parliament based in the east, which has also rejected the U.N.-backed government in the capital, Tripoli. (AP Photo/Mohammed El-Sheikhy, File)","byline":"Mohammed El-Sheikhy","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"356","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/84/7842d88a-14a5-5bbc-99c1-bf819c28c042/57eb675b56f4f.image.jpg?resize=512%2C356"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/84/7842d88a-14a5-5bbc-99c1-bf819c28c042/57eb675b56f4f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"209","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/84/7842d88a-14a5-5bbc-99c1-bf819c28c042/57eb675b56f4f.image.jpg?resize=300%2C209"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"712","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/84/7842d88a-14a5-5bbc-99c1-bf819c28c042/57eb675b56f4f.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"5c309688-0a71-58fc-acfd-10d2a45226a3","body":"

BENGHAZI, Libya (AP) \u2014 A powerful Libyan general whose forces recently captured several key oil facilities has rejected a U.N.-brokered government and said the country would be better served by a leader with \"high-level military experience.\"

In a series of written responses to questions from The Associated Press this week, Field Marshal Khalifa Hifter said his army only recognizes the authority of the Libyan parliament based in the east, which has also rejected the U.N.-backed government in the capital, Tripoli.

Libya was plunged into chaos by the 2011 uprising that toppled and killed longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi, and for the last two years has been split by rival authorities based in the far east and in Tripoli, in the west.

The two sides are deeply divided on Hifter's future role in the country. In the east, he is seen as the kind of strong, experienced military leader who can defeat Islamic extremists and restore order to the oil-rich North African country. In the west, where powerful Islamist militias hold sway, he is seen as remnant of the Gadhafi government \u2014 which he once served \u2014 and an aspiring strongman.

Hifter said little to put such fears to rest.

He cited generals who went on to lead Western nations, as well as President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi in neighboring Egypt, who led the military ouster of an elected Islamist president in 2013 and has presided over a sweeping crackdown on dissent.

\"Military people who were elected to lead their country achieved remarkable success,\" Hifter said.

Asked if he intended to seek the highest office, Hifter demurred, saying the country first needed security, political and social stability, and that he would not answer the question until that was achieved.

The U.N.-backed government is led by a presidential council headed by Fayez Serraj, an independent technocrat. It was supposed to present a new Cabinet to parliament for approval after lawmakers rejected the last one in August, but has yet to do so.

Egypt has backed Hifter who, like el-Sissi, blames much of his country's problems on the Muslim Brotherhood group. He says Tripoli has been \"hijacked\" by armed gangs, blaming disorder there and the expansion of rogue militias on Islamist factions.

Hifter has also lashed out at U.N. envoy Martin Kobler, accusing him of \"meddling\" in Libyan affairs after he allegedly sought to set up a meeting between Hifter and Serraj to discuss the makeup of the Libyan army.

Both Hifter's troops and forces loyal to the U.N.-backed government are battling the Islamic State group and other extremists. Militias from the city of Misrata, in the west, have driven IS militants out of most of their last urban stronghold, Sirte, with the help of U.S. airstrikes.

But there are concerns that victory against IS could bring renewed conflict between east and west.

Earlier this month, Hifter's forces accused a militia from Misrata of carrying out an airstrike that killed at least six women and a child near Sirte. The Misratans denied the allegations.

Hifter's forces also recently seized three key oil terminals \u2014 at Ras Lanuf, al-Sidra and Zueitina \u2014 from a militia allied with the U.N.-backed government, drawing international condemnation. The U.S., France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Britain called on his forces to withdraw from the terminals, saying the Tripoli government is the \"sole steward\" of the resources and warning against \"illicit oil exports.\"

Exports from the Ras Lanuf terminal have resumed, and Hifter said in the interview that he had returned them to the authority of the National Oil Corporation. Oil revenues are channeled to the central bank, which is under the authority of Tripoli. He also said he has no plans to withdraw from the area.

\"The Libyan National Army's priorities are to protect the oil fields and ports of export,\" he said.

He also called on the U.N. to lift an embargo on weapons sales to Libya, and help it remove mines left in \"huge quantities\" by IS fighters in residential neighborhoods they have been driven from. He blamed authorities in the west for the rampant smuggling of migrants bound for Europe, which he blamed on the militias and the \"absence of state authority.\"

Hifter returned to Libya after decades in exile during the 2011 uprising against Gadhafi. Hifter had played a key role in the 1969 coup that brought Gadhafi to power and eventually became his top general. He was captured during the 1980s war with Chad. After the war ended in 1987, he defected and eventually fled to the United States.

While living in exile in Virginia, he became commander of the armed wing of the Libyan National Salvation Front and orchestrated a couple of failed coup attempts against Gadhafi before breaking with the opposition group. In interviews with Arab media in the 1990s, he described himself as building an armed force with U.S. assistance to topple Gadhafi and his associates. A 1996 Congressional Research Service report suggested that the United States provided money and training to the National Salvation Front.

Hifter has long denied ever working for the CIA, but now he says he has proof.

\"If I was working for U.S. intelligence they would be my first supporters with weapons and money,\" he said.

___

Rohan reported from Cairo.

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PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) \u2014 North Korea's capital is still a pretty quiet place compared to most urban centers around the world, but it gets its start early \u2014 and orderly.

Rush hour generally hits its peak at about 7 a.m. Pedestrians hustle along the sidewalks or peddle along on the city's bike lanes, usually narrow strips of sidewalk painted green that started to appear about a year ago, while workers and students who can't walk or bike to where they need to go load onto the subways and fill the city's buses and electric streetcars.

By about 6:30, long lines of men in neckties or olive-colored work clothes and university students in their uniforms \u2014 white shirts or blouses, and dark trousers or skirts accentuated by red ties or scarves \u2014 can be seen waiting for their cross-town rides, which are usually standing-room-only. Retirees pack up their folding chairs and head out to the Potonggang and Taedonggang rivers to begin fishing shortly after sunrise.

Cleaning crews, often made up of elderly people or elementary school kids, are also out early to trim grass and pick up litter, a big part of which is inevitably cigarette butts, since North Korea is one of the most smoker-friendly countries in the world.

Work for most in North Korea's capital starts at about 9 a.m. and schools an hour earlier.

With North Korea now on one of its \"loyalty drives\" stints, when the citizens are called on to show special devotion to leader Kim Jong Un and often put in extra hours to boost productivity, Women's League units are out in force in front of subway entrances and other strategic locations to dance and wave red flags as loud patriotic music blares from boom boxes.

Sometimes they are joined by middle school brass bands in their morning ritual, which is intended to encourage workers to start their day off with more vigor. For good measure, there are often small vans around with loudspeakers blasting propaganda.

The current loyalty drive is in about the 80th day of its full 200-day duration.

It was called shortly after a big meeting of the country's ruling party that was held in May to rally the people behind Kim's newly announced political and economic policies, or, basically, to just rally them behind Kim and his ruling regime. But its focus has recently been shifted to making a patriotic show of support for victims of major flooding that hit the country's northern-most province after an unusually strong typhoon hit late last month.

Along with the big red billboards that say \"200 Day Battle\" that are now all over the city, loyalty drive countdown signs are also posted outside of businesses and government offices.

Other billboards exhort citizens to work with \"Mallima Speed,\" the country's latest catch-phrase. It's a reference to a mythical Pegasus-type horse that could travel tremendous distances at great speed.

A similar phrase was used back in the days of national founder Kim Il Sung, Kim Jong Un's grandfather, but in today's North Korea the speed has been multiplied by 10.

Sometimes the countdown signs aren't always in sync, with one poster giving a different countdown than another just a few blocks away.

But the message is the same \u2014 now is the time for all good North Koreans to show their mettle.

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BOSTON (AP) \u2014 Bostonians are embracing the painted pianos that have popped up across the city and neighboring Cambridge in recent days.

Celebrity Series of Boston placed 60 upright pianos decorated by local artists late last week. Each instrument bears a simple message: \"Play Me, I'm Yours.\"

And play residents and visitors have.

At historic Faneuil Hall's Quincy Market food hall on Tuesday, a group of high school students from Boston took turns singing and playing Adele's \"Hello\" and other pop tunes while the tourist-heavy, lunchtime crowd largely went about their day.

A few short blocks away, near a carousel along a grassy linear park, Somerville resident Zo\u00eb Madonna found a bit more solitude to play Joni Mitchell's \"River\" and later \"Your Hand in Mine\" by the Texas band Explosions in the Sky.

\"It sounds pretty good,\" said the 23-year old accordionist for a local band playing contra dance music. \"There are a few sticky keys and you can't really get a lot of sound out of it, but it's not as out of tune as it's going to be in a few days.\"

The pianos, which will be available until Oct. 10, are part of a public art project by British artist Luke Jerram that's been installed in 50 cities worldwide, including London, Hong Kong, Sao Paulo, Munich, New York and Los Angeles.

The installation last came to Boston in 2013, and more than 500,000 people used them that year, organizers said.

Gary Dunning, president of Celebrity Series Boston, hopes the installation helps spread the \"joy of live performance\" and shows people that \"the arts are for everyone and that all people should have the opportunity to participate.\"

The pianos have been placed in all of Boston's 23 neighborhoods and around some of the region's most recognizable landmarks, from Harvard Square to the Boston Library and the gold-domed Massachusetts State House. At Fenway Park, a portrait of retiring Red Sox slugger David Ortiz graces a green-painted piano.

Locations for the pianos, as well as videos and photos people have shared from their performances are on the web at http://streetpianos.com/boston2016/.

Among the video clips is Chinese piano virtuoso Lang Lang doing a rendition of George Gershwin's Prelude No. 3 by the reflecting pool of the Christian Science church on Friday.

Members of the Boston Ballet also played music from their season opener\u2014 Le Corsaire_on Tuesday afternoon near the city's famed Common.

\"Every time I see these things out, I'm amazed at the condition they're in,\" said Boston resident Cliff Sawyer, as he casually tapped out a melody on a piano in the busy retail district of Downtown Crossing. \"Hate to say it, but some people just like to destroy stuff. It's just the way it is.\"

___

Follow Philip Marcelo at twitter.com/philmarcelo. His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/journalist/philip-marcelo

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(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)","byline":"Pablo Martinez Monsivais","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"312","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/35/935b19c8-b064-5105-a39b-5fabd86b6053/57eb412f759fe.image.jpg?resize=512%2C312"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"61","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/35/935b19c8-b064-5105-a39b-5fabd86b6053/57eb412f759fe.image.jpg?resize=100%2C61"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"183","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/35/935b19c8-b064-5105-a39b-5fabd86b6053/57eb412f759fe.image.jpg?resize=300%2C183"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"624","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/35/935b19c8-b064-5105-a39b-5fabd86b6053/57eb412f759fe.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"138fa5be-c304-56ba-9f15-3efad7a29445","description":"FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2001, file photo, Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, right, and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat shake hands during their meeting at the Gaza International Airport. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. 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Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser, File)","byline":"Nasser Nasser","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"365","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/a7/4a74db5d-da67-5f51-be86-72a4bd1d615a/57eb412d4188c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C365"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/a7/4a74db5d-da67-5f51-be86-72a4bd1d615a/57eb412d4188c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"214","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/a7/4a74db5d-da67-5f51-be86-72a4bd1d615a/57eb412d4188c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C214"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"730","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/a7/4a74db5d-da67-5f51-be86-72a4bd1d615a/57eb412d4188c.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"23ef06cc-aff7-59bb-b12a-518ae89ef127","description":"FILE - In this Sunday, April 30, 1995, file photo, President Bill Clinton, left, listens to Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres at the American Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, at the Paramount Theater in New York's Madison Square Garden. Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Joe Tabacca, File)","byline":"JOE TABACCA","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"380","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/3e/23ef06cc-aff7-59bb-b12a-518ae89ef127/57eb412d6814c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C380"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"74","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/3e/23ef06cc-aff7-59bb-b12a-518ae89ef127/57eb412d6814c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C74"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"223","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/3e/23ef06cc-aff7-59bb-b12a-518ae89ef127/57eb412d6814c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C223"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/3e/23ef06cc-aff7-59bb-b12a-518ae89ef127/57eb412d6814c.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"9b943e71-c391-5d3d-8b91-032547a9922b","description":"FILE - In this Saturday, Feb. 18, 1995, file photo, Shimon Peres, right, pours water into a glass and hands it to Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat as the men attended a symposium on the Middle East at the UNESCO in Paris. Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Michel Lipchitz, File)","byline":"Michel Lipchitz","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"354","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b9/9b943e71-c391-5d3d-8b91-032547a9922b/57eb412d89eb2.image.jpg?resize=512%2C354"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b9/9b943e71-c391-5d3d-8b91-032547a9922b/57eb412d89eb2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"207","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b9/9b943e71-c391-5d3d-8b91-032547a9922b/57eb412d89eb2.image.jpg?resize=300%2C207"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"708","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b9/9b943e71-c391-5d3d-8b91-032547a9922b/57eb412d89eb2.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"890d2e4b-9313-5965-ba40-7b6f22c94afa","description":"FILE - In this Aug. 22, 1984, file photo, Prime Minister designate Shimon Peres and former defense minister Ezer Weizman sign an agreement between their two parties in Tel Aviv. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Anat Givon, File)","byline":"Anat Givon","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"330","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/90/890d2e4b-9313-5965-ba40-7b6f22c94afa/57eb412dac237.image.jpg?resize=512%2C330"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/90/890d2e4b-9313-5965-ba40-7b6f22c94afa/57eb412dac237.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"193","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/90/890d2e4b-9313-5965-ba40-7b6f22c94afa/57eb412dac237.image.jpg?resize=300%2C193"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"660","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/90/890d2e4b-9313-5965-ba40-7b6f22c94afa/57eb412dac237.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"4690bed4-df09-5333-bcea-ff56f05fd945","description":"FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2008, file photo, Israeli President Shimon Peres speaks during the 10th anniversary celebration of the Peres Center for Peace in Tel Aviv, Israel. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit, File)","byline":"Ariel Schalit","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/69/4690bed4-df09-5333-bcea-ff56f05fd945/57eb412dd2b2a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/69/4690bed4-df09-5333-bcea-ff56f05fd945/57eb412dd2b2a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/69/4690bed4-df09-5333-bcea-ff56f05fd945/57eb412dd2b2a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/69/4690bed4-df09-5333-bcea-ff56f05fd945/57eb412dd2b2a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"e830012f-d2b1-5984-bcb5-4c949f0f3b50","description":"FILE - In this March 31, 2014, file photo, Austrian President Heinz Fischer, right, talks to Israel's President Shimon Peres, left, during a welcoming ceremony in front of the Hofburg palace in Vienna, Austria. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)","byline":"Ronald Zak","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"425","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/83/e830012f-d2b1-5984-bcb5-4c949f0f3b50/57eb412e01c98.image.jpg?resize=512%2C425"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"83","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/83/e830012f-d2b1-5984-bcb5-4c949f0f3b50/57eb412e01c98.image.jpg?resize=100%2C83"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"249","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/83/e830012f-d2b1-5984-bcb5-4c949f0f3b50/57eb412e01c98.image.jpg?resize=300%2C249"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"850","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/83/e830012f-d2b1-5984-bcb5-4c949f0f3b50/57eb412e01c98.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"8fd07532-dce1-5ad2-b5ea-5a3b645526e7","description":"FILE - In this Sept. 12, 1986, file photo, Israeli Premier Minister Shimon Peres, left, discusses with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak results of a two-day summit meeting in Alexandria, Egypt. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Paola Crociani, File)","byline":"Paola Crociani","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"368","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/fd/8fd07532-dce1-5ad2-b5ea-5a3b645526e7/57eb412e2f70b.image.jpg?resize=368%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"139","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/fd/8fd07532-dce1-5ad2-b5ea-5a3b645526e7/57eb412e2f70b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C139"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"417","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/fd/8fd07532-dce1-5ad2-b5ea-5a3b645526e7/57eb412e2f70b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C417"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1425","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/fd/8fd07532-dce1-5ad2-b5ea-5a3b645526e7/57eb412e2f70b.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"0a417e5b-3b85-5f7c-bd8e-dae36e6bb71b","description":"FILE - In this Sunday, Jan. 28, 2001, file photo, Shimon Peres, Minister of Regional Cooperation of Israel, left, applauds Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, right, as it is announced that Arafat is about to speak at the Davos World Economic Forum. Both took part in the forum on \"From Peacemaking to Peacebuilding.\" Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Herbert Knosowski, File)","byline":"HERBERT KNOSOWSKI","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"354","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a4/0a417e5b-3b85-5f7c-bd8e-dae36e6bb71b/57eb412e76c0a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C354"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a4/0a417e5b-3b85-5f7c-bd8e-dae36e6bb71b/57eb412e76c0a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"207","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a4/0a417e5b-3b85-5f7c-bd8e-dae36e6bb71b/57eb412e76c0a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C207"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"708","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/a4/0a417e5b-3b85-5f7c-bd8e-dae36e6bb71b/57eb412e76c0a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"b6b2a6a9-edf9-56b7-8c3c-c6d8af30a542","description":"FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2001, file photo, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, right, shakes hands with Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres after their meeting at Gaza International Airport, southern Gaza Strip. Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Laurent Rebours, File)","byline":"LAURENT REBOURS","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"389","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/6b/b6b2a6a9-edf9-56b7-8c3c-c6d8af30a542/57eb4b3ccca7a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C389"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"76","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/6b/b6b2a6a9-edf9-56b7-8c3c-c6d8af30a542/57eb4b3ccca7a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C76"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"228","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/6b/b6b2a6a9-edf9-56b7-8c3c-c6d8af30a542/57eb4b3ccca7a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C228"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"778","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/6b/b6b2a6a9-edf9-56b7-8c3c-c6d8af30a542/57eb4b3ccca7a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"82643ee0-2e0e-5ecc-bb41-e79a0fa662be","description":"FILE - In this March 28, 2005, file photo, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, left, talks with Vice Premier Shimon Peres during speeches prior to a vote in the Knesset, Israel's Parliament, in Jerusalem. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer, File)","byline":"KEVIN FRAYER","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"353","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/26/82643ee0-2e0e-5ecc-bb41-e79a0fa662be/57eb412ed5279.image.jpg?resize=512%2C353"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/26/82643ee0-2e0e-5ecc-bb41-e79a0fa662be/57eb412ed5279.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"207","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/26/82643ee0-2e0e-5ecc-bb41-e79a0fa662be/57eb412ed5279.image.jpg?resize=300%2C207"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"706","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/26/82643ee0-2e0e-5ecc-bb41-e79a0fa662be/57eb412ed5279.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"fe3c1be5-aa54-5ef5-b82b-844986ed1ac3","description":"FILE - In this March 18, 2008, file photo, Israel's President Shimon Peres, left, welcomes Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel with a kiss for talks at his residence in Jerusalem. 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JERUSALEM (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the death of former Israeli President and Prime Minister Shimon Peres (all times local):

8:15 a.m.

A former aide to Shimon Peres says his body will lie in state at the Knesset, or Israeli parliament, on Thursday before a state funeral at the country's national cemetery in Jerusalem on Friday.

Yona Bartal, his former aide, told Israel's Channel 10 TV that the plans were in line with Peres' wishes.

Peres died early Wednesday, two weeks after suffering a stroke.

___

7:45 a.m.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will hold a special Cabinet meeting at 10 a.m. Wednesday following the death of former President Shimon Peres.

After the Cabinet meeting, a special committee was to begin preparing funeral arrangements. Many international dignitaries and world leaders are expected to attend.

___

7:30 a.m.

The son-in-law of late Israeli President Shimon Peres says his family had an emotional conversation with President Barack Obama.

Dr. Rafi Walden told reporters early Wednesday the family was \"very moved.\" Obama was a good friend of Peres and awarded the Israeli leader the presidential medal of freedom in 2012.

Walden, who was also Peres' personal physician, says Peres died overnight \"without suffering.\"

The former Israeli leader died in the hospital where he had been treated after a major stroke two weeks ago

___

7:20 a.m.

Former President Bill Clinton says he and his wife, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, lost a \"treasured friend\" in Shimon Peres. The former Israeli president and prime minister died early Wednesday at age 93.

Bill Clinton said in a statement that \"Israel has lost a leader who championed its security, prosperity, and limitless possibilities from its birth to his last day on earth. The Middle East has lost a fervent advocate for peace and reconciliation and for a future where all the children of Abraham build a better tomorrow together. And Hillary and I have lost a true and treasured friend.\"

He called Peres a \"genius with a big heart who used his gifts to imagine a future of reconciliation not conflict, economic and social empowerment not anger and frustration, and a nation, a region, and a world enhanced by caring and sharing, not torn asunder by the illusions of permanent dominance and perfect truth.

\"His critics called him a dreamer,\" Clinton said. \"That he was \u2014 a lucid, eloquent dreamer until the very end. Thank goodness.\"

___

7:10 a.m.

The family of former Israeli President Shimon Peres has confirmed he died Wednesday morning.

His son, Chemi, made the announcement to reporters gathered at the hospital where Peres has been treated for the past two weeks.

\"Today with deep sorrow we bid farewell to our beloved father, the 9th president of Israel,\" he said.

\"Our father's legacy has always been to look to tomorrow. We were privileged to be part of his private family, but today we sense that the entire nation of Israel and the global community share this great loss. We share this pain together.\"

___

6:50 a.m.

Former President George H.W. Bush says Shimon Peres inspired the world and helped pave a path to peace. The former Israeli president and prime minister died early Wednesday at age 93.

Bush issued a statement saying he and his wife, Barbara, \"join Shimon Peres' countless admirers around the world in saluting his singular life of service \u2014 to the universal cause of freedom, to the timeless cause of Israel, to the noblest cause of peace.

He says Peres \"time and again helped guide his beloved country through the crucible of mortal challenge. But it was by his innate humanity, his decency, that Shimon inspired the world over and helped pave a path to peace broad enough that future generations will walk it one day, side-by side.\"

___

6:40 a.m.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has issued a statement of mourning for former President and Prime Minister Shimon Peres, who died early Wednesday.

\"Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife Sara express deep personal sorrow over the passing of the nation's beloved former president, Shimon Peres,\" the statement read. \"The prime minister will deliver a special address this morning and convene the cabinet for a mourning session.\"

___

6:30 a.m.

President Barack Obama is praising former Israeli President and Prime Minister Shimon Peres as a statesman whose commitment to Israel's security and the pursuit of peace \"was rooted in his own unshakeable moral foundation and unflagging optimism.\"

Peres died early Wednesday, two weeks after suffering a stroke.

In a statement from the White House, Obama says Peres looked to the future, \"guided by a vision of the human dignity and progress that he knew people of goodwill could advance together.\"

Obama calls Peres \"the essence of Israel itself,\" noting Peres had fought for Israel's independence, worked its land and served Israel in virtually every government position.

Obama says that with the death of Peres, \"a light has gone out, but the hope he gave us will burn forever.\"

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Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. 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Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. 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Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Max Nash, File)","byline":"Max Nash","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"412","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/fb/6fb2c947-d1fb-5c1a-8dfe-767a7c8e4cd9/57eb44376cd57.image.jpg?resize=512%2C412"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/fb/6fb2c947-d1fb-5c1a-8dfe-767a7c8e4cd9/57eb44376cd57.image.jpg?resize=100%2C80"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"241","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/fb/6fb2c947-d1fb-5c1a-8dfe-767a7c8e4cd9/57eb44376cd57.image.jpg?resize=300%2C241"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"824","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/fb/6fb2c947-d1fb-5c1a-8dfe-767a7c8e4cd9/57eb44376cd57.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"5d1b19f9-4917-53ec-8472-f41888a5e90e","description":"FILE - In this May 26, 2014, file photo, Pope Francis and Israeli President Shimon Peres, right, meet in Jerusalem. 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Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)","byline":"LUCA BRUNO","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"418","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/56/c56d89bb-0e18-5297-992c-d53c3661cb5a/57eb4b35e98d7.image.jpg?resize=512%2C418"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"82","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/56/c56d89bb-0e18-5297-992c-d53c3661cb5a/57eb4b35e98d7.image.jpg?resize=100%2C82"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"245","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/56/c56d89bb-0e18-5297-992c-d53c3661cb5a/57eb4b35e98d7.image.jpg?resize=300%2C245"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"836","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/56/c56d89bb-0e18-5297-992c-d53c3661cb5a/57eb4b35e98d7.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"897694c1-d9ef-51da-a80e-336aee86fd96","description":"FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 28, 2002, file photo, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, right, and Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres pause during a ceremony to rename Aravah Terminal, between Jordan and Israel, after late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin near the southern Israeli city of Eilat. Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. 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(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)","byline":"Lefteris Pitarakis","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"387","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/0e/f0e6268f-2d61-56e6-85b1-45dd3ef4bcfd/57eb4b363aaa5.image.jpg?resize=512%2C387"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"76","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/0e/f0e6268f-2d61-56e6-85b1-45dd3ef4bcfd/57eb4b363aaa5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C76"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"227","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/0e/f0e6268f-2d61-56e6-85b1-45dd3ef4bcfd/57eb4b363aaa5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C227"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"774","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/0e/f0e6268f-2d61-56e6-85b1-45dd3ef4bcfd/57eb4b363aaa5.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"48fbb231-cea8-5473-aef1-8bc8787667f4","description":"FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2007, file photo, Presidents Shimon Peres of Israel, left, Abdullah Gul of Turkey, center, and President of the Palestinian Authority Mahmoud Abbas try to reach hands as they pose for cameras after their meeting in Ankara. Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici, File)","byline":"BURHAN OZBILICI","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"359","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/8f/48fbb231-cea8-5473-aef1-8bc8787667f4/57eb412d02db4.image.jpg?resize=512%2C359"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/8f/48fbb231-cea8-5473-aef1-8bc8787667f4/57eb412d02db4.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"210","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/8f/48fbb231-cea8-5473-aef1-8bc8787667f4/57eb412d02db4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C210"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"718","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/8f/48fbb231-cea8-5473-aef1-8bc8787667f4/57eb412d02db4.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"142743d6-d9ff-5952-a2bc-e7ae48a5dcf7","description":"FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2014, file photo, Israel's President Shimon Peres kisses German Chancellor Angela Merkel, right, as she arrives to receive the Presidential Medal ceremony at the President's residence in Jerusalem. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit, File)","byline":"Ariel Schalit","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"357","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/42/142743d6-d9ff-5952-a2bc-e7ae48a5dcf7/57eb4b368798d.image.jpg?resize=512%2C357"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/42/142743d6-d9ff-5952-a2bc-e7ae48a5dcf7/57eb4b368798d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"209","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/42/142743d6-d9ff-5952-a2bc-e7ae48a5dcf7/57eb4b368798d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C209"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"714","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/42/142743d6-d9ff-5952-a2bc-e7ae48a5dcf7/57eb4b368798d.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"b8f77fc3-3a25-5122-9fd0-00832e4a3942","description":"FILE- In this April 8, 2014, file photo, Israeli President Shimon Peres, center, hugs Chinese children during a welcome ceremony held by Chinese president Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, File)","byline":"Alexander F. Yuan","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8f/b8f77fc3-3a25-5122-9fd0-00832e4a3942/57eb4b36a9909.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8f/b8f77fc3-3a25-5122-9fd0-00832e4a3942/57eb4b36a9909.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8f/b8f77fc3-3a25-5122-9fd0-00832e4a3942/57eb4b36a9909.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8f/b8f77fc3-3a25-5122-9fd0-00832e4a3942/57eb4b36a9909.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"a9224fb1-f576-5e89-995a-d5ecfe702569","description":"FILE - In this July 15, 2014, file photo, Israel's President Shimon Peres listens during an interview with The Associated Press, at his residence in Jerusalem. Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. 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JERUSALEM (AP) \u2014 At every corner of Israel's tumultuous history, Shimon Peres was there.

He was a young aide to the nation's founding fathers when the country declared independence in 1948, and he played a key role in turning Israel into a military power. He was part of the negotiations that sealed the first Israeli-Palestinian peace accord, garnering a Nobel Peace Prize. He was welcomed like royalty in world capitals.

But only at the end of a political career stretching more than 60 years did Peres finally win the widespread admiration of his own people that had eluded him for so long. He died at 93 early Wednesday, his son, Chemi, confirmed at the hospital where Shimon Peres had been treated for the past two weeks.

Peres began a new chapter at age 83, assuming the nation's presidency following a scandal that forced his predecessor to step down. The job cemented Peres' transformation from down-and-dirty political operator to elder statesman.

\"After such a long career, let me just say something: My appetite to manage is over. My inclination to dream and to envisage is greater,\" Peres told The Associated Press in an interview on July 15, 2007, moments before he was sworn in as president.

He said he would not allow his age, or the constraints of a largely ceremonial office, to slow him down. \"I'm not in a hurry to pass away,\" Peres said. \"The day will come that I shall not forget to pass away. But until then, I'm not going to waste my life.\"

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a statement mourning the passing of Peres. He said he will convene his Cabinet for a special session later in the day.

Former President Bill Clinton and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton said they had \"lost a true and treasured friend\" with the death of Shimon Peres. Former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush also issued statements of mourning, as did former British Prime Minister Tony Blair.

As president, Peres tirelessly jetted around the world to represent his country at conferences, ceremonies and international gatherings.

He was a fixture at the annual World Economic Forum gathering in Davos, Switzerland, where he was treated like a rock star as the world's rich and powerful listened breathlessly to his every word, on topics ranging from Mideast peace to nanotechnology to the wonders of the human brain.

He also became Israel's moderate face at a time when the nation was led by hardline Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Peres sought to reassure the international community that Israel seeks peace, despite concerns over continued settlement construction in the occupied West Bank and the paralysis of negotiations under Netanyahu. Still, while Peres never tired of speaking of peace, he tended to avoid strident criticism of Netanyahu.

It was his 1994 Nobel Prize that established Peres' man-of-peace image. He proudly displayed the prize \u2014 which he shared with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat \u2014 on the desk of his presidential office.

As foreign minister, Peres secretly brokered the historic Oslo interim peace accords with the Palestinians, signed at the White House on Sept. 13, 1993.

Accepting the award, he told assembled dignitaries that \"war, as a method of conducting human affairs, is in its death throes, and the time has come to bury it.\"

Despite the assassination of Rabin, the breakdown of peace talks, a second Palestinian uprising in 2000, wars in Lebanon and Gaza, and Netanyahu's continued re-elections, Peres maintained his insistence that peace was right around the corner.

\"I'm sure I shall see peace in my lifetime. Even if I should have to extend my life for a year or two, I won't hesitate,\" he said in a 2013 interview marking his 90th birthday.

Peres was born Shimon Perski on Aug. 2, 1923 in Vishniev, then part of Poland and now in Belarus. He moved to pre-state Palestine in 1934 with his family, where he changed his surname to Peres, or songbird, in Hebrew. Relatives who remained in Poland, including his grandfather, a prominent rabbi, were killed when Nazis set a synagogue on fire during the Holocaust. Peres often spoke lovingly of his grandfather in speeches. The actress Lauren Bacall was a cousin.

Still in his 20s, Peres rose quickly through the ranks of Israel's pre-state leadership, and served as a top aide to David Ben-Gurion, Israel's first prime minister, after independence in 1948. Peres once called Ben-Gurion \"the greatest Jew of our time.\"

At 29, he served as director of Israel's Defense Ministry, and is credited with arming Israel's military almost from scratch. He later worked with the French to develop Israel's nuclear program, which today is widely believed to include a large arsenal of bombs.

Still, he suffered throughout his political career from the fact that he never wore an army uniform or fought in a war.

Peres was elected to the Knesset, Israel's parliament, in 1959, serving in nearly all major Cabinet posts over his long career. As finance minister, he imposed an emergency plan to halt triple-digit inflation in the 1980s. He also was an early supporter of the Jewish settler movement in the West Bank, a position he would later abandon.

But he had trouble breaking into the prime minister's post, the top job in Israeli politics. He was hampered by a reputation among the public and fellow politicians as both a utopian dreamer and a political schemer.

He ran for prime minister in five general elections, losing four and tying one, in 1984, when he shared the job in a rotation with his rival Yitzhak Shamir.

His well-tailored, neck-tied appearance, swept-back gray hair and penchant for artists and intellectuals seemed to separate him from his more informal countrymen. He never lost his Polish accent, making him a target for mimicry.

One of the lowest points of his political career came in 1990, when he led his Labor Party out of a unity government with Shamir's hardline Likud on the strength of promises from small factions to support his bid to replace Shamir.

At the last minute, several members of Parliament changed their minds, approving a Shamir government without Peres and Labor. The incident became known in Israeli political lore as Peres' \"stinking maneuver.\" Rabin scorned him as a \"relentless meddler\" and in 1992 replaced him as party leader.

The two eventually repaired their relationship and worked together on pursuing peace with the Palestinians.

After Rabin's assassination by a Jewish ultranationalist opposed to Israel's peace moves, Peres became acting prime minister.

But he failed to capitalize on the widespread sympathy for the fallen leader and lost a razor-thin election the following year to Netanyahu.

In one famous incident, an angry Peres rhetorically asked a gathering of his Labor Party whether he was a \"loser.\" Resounding calls of \"yes\" rained down on him.

Peres would later blame a wave of suicide bombings for his defeat. He described his visit to the scene of a deadly bus explosion in Jerusalem, where people started screaming \"killer\" and \"murderer\" at him. \"I knew that I lost the election,\" he said.

He suffered another humiliation in 2000 when he ran for the presidency, a largely ceremonial position elected by Parliament. Peres believed he had wrapped up the election, but the ultra-Orthodox Shas Party broke a promise to him and switched its support to Likud candidate Moshe Katsav. Peres was a loser once again.

Even so, he refused to quit. In 2001, he took the post of foreign minister in a unity government led by his rival Ariel Sharon, serving for 20 months before Labor withdrew from the coalition. In Peres' final political defeat, Labor overthrew him as party leader in 2005, choosing instead the little-known Amir Peretz.

Peres subsequently followed Sharon into a new party, Kadima, serving as vice-premier and maintaining that post under Sharon's successor, Ehud Olmert.

He was able to attain the presidency when Katsav was forced to step down weeks before his term ended to face rape charges. Katsav was later convicted and sent to prison.

Seeking to stabilize the cherished institution, Parliament turned to Peres and elected him president.

Peres cultivated an image as a grandfatherly figure, frequently inviting groups of children and teens to the presidential residence. He embraced social media and promoted Israel's high-tech industry in meetings with top officials at Google, Facebook and other major companies.

Peres also launched his \"President's Conference,\" which became an annual high-powered gathering in Jerusalem of artists, thinkers and business leaders from around the world.

Derided by critics as extravagant and unnecessary, the gathering drew some of the world's most powerful personalities. The 2013 conference also became a 90th birthday party, with figures such as Bill Clinton, Barbara Streisand and Robert DeNiro in attendance.

He also exhibited a humorous side. When he left the presidency in 2014, he appeared in a video his granddaughter produced where he jokingly tried out new jobs including a supermarket cashier, gas station attendant and standup comedian \u2014 peppering his comments with puns and visionary slogans.

Asked about his secret to longevity, Peres said he never dwelled on the past.

\"What happened until now is over, unchangeable. I'm not going to spend time on it. So I am really living in the future,\" he said. \"I really think that one should devote his energies to make the world better and not to make the past remembered better.\"

Peres' wife Sonya died in 2011. He leaves a daughter, Tsvia Valdan, a university professor, and two sons, Nehemia, a leading Israeli venture capitalist, and Yonatan, a veterinarian.

Peres represented \"the essence of Israel itself,\" President Barack Obama said.

\"There are few people who we share this world with who change the course of human history, not just through their role in human events, but because they expand our moral imagination and force us to expect more of ourselves. My friend Shimon was one of those people,\" he said. \"A light has gone out, but the hope he gave us will burn forever.\"

___

Aron Heller contributed from Jerusalem.

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Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. 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Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, died early Wednesday, a person close to him confirmed. Peres was 93. 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JERUSALEM (AP) \u2014 Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, died early Wednesday. He was 93.

His son, Chemi, confirmed his death Wednesday morning to reporters gathered at the hospital where Shimon Peres had been treated for the past two weeks.

Peres' condition worsened following a major stroke two weeks ago that led to bleeding in his brain. He was sedated and on a respirator during most of his hospitalization.

\"Today with deep sorrow we bid farewell to our beloved father, the ninth president of Israel,\" Chemi Peres said.

\"Our father's legacy has always been to look to tomorrow. We were privileged to be part of his private family, but today we sense that the entire nation of Israel and the global community share this great loss. We share this pain together.\"

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a statement mourning the passing of Peres. He said he will convene his Cabinet for a special session later in the day. After that, a special committee was to meet to prepare arrangements for a funeral that many international dignitaries and world leaders are expected to attend.

As word of Peres' death spread, reaction started pouring in from Israel and around the globe.

President Barack Obama eulogized him as a man who represented \"the essence of Israel itself.\"

\"There are few people who we share this world with who change the course of human history, not just through their role in human events, but because they expand our moral imagination and force us to expect more of ourselves. My friend Shimon was one of those people,\" he said. \"A light has gone out, but the hope he gave us will burn forever.\"

Shimon Peres son-in-law, Dr. Rafi Walden, said the family was \"very moved\" by a conversation they had with Obama, who awarded Peres the presidential medal of freedom in 2012. Walden, who was also Peres' personal physician, said he died overnight \"without suffering.\"

Former President Bill Clinton and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton said they \"lost a true and treasured friend\" with the death of Shimon Peres.

The Clintons said Israel has lost a leader \"who championed its security, prosperity and limitless possibilities from its birth to his last day on earth.\" They called him \"a genius with a big heart who used his gifts to imagine a future of reconciliation, not conflict.\"

Former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush also issued statements of mourning.

Peres, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, is the elder statesman of Israeli politics, one of the country's most admired leaders and the last surviving link to its founding fathers.

All of Israel's TV and radio stations devoted their programs to Peres' passing, playing sad music and interviewing friends, commentators and former officials who paid tribute to him.

In an unprecedented seven-decade political career, Peres filled nearly every position in Israeli public life and was credited with leading the country through some of its most defining moments, from creating its nuclear arsenal in the 1950s, to disentangling its troops from Lebanon and rescuing its economy from triple-digit inflation in the 1980s, to guiding a skeptical nation into peace talks with the Palestinians in the 1990s.

A protege of Israel's founding father David Ben-Gurion, he led the Defense Ministry in his 20s and spearheaded the development of Israel's nuclear program. He was first elected to parliament in 1959 and later held every major Cabinet post \u2014 including defense, finance and foreign affairs \u2014 and served three brief stints as prime minister. His key role in the first Israeli-Palestinian peace accord earned him a Nobel Peace Prize and revered status as Israel's then most recognizable figure abroad.

And yet, for much of his political career he could not parlay his international prestige into success in Israeli politics, where he was branded by many as both a utopian dreamer and political schemer. His well-tailored, necktied appearance and swept-back gray hair seemed to separate him from his more informal countrymen. He suffered a string of electoral defeats: competing in five general elections seeking the prime minister's spot, he lost four and tied one.

He finally secured the public adoration that had long eluded him when he has chosen by parliament to a seven-year term as Israel's ceremonial president in 2007, taking the role of elder statesman.

Peres was celebrated by doves and vilified by hawks for advocating far-reaching Israeli compromises for peace even before he negotiated the first interim accord with the Palestinians in 1993 that set into motion a partition plan that gave them limited self-rule. That was followed by a peace accord with neighboring Jordan. But after a fateful six-month period in 1995-96 that included Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin's assassination, a spate of Palestinian suicide bombings and Peres' own election loss to the more conservative Benjamin Netanyahu, the prospects for peace began to evaporate.

Relegated to the political wilderness, he created his non-governmental Peres Center for Peace that raised funds for cooperation and development projects involving Israel, the Palestinians and Arab nations. He returned to it at age 91 when he completed his term as president.

Shimon Perski was born on Aug. 2, 1923, in Vishneva, then part of Poland. He moved to pre-state Palestine in 1934 with his immediate family. Her grandfather and other relatives stayed behind and perished in the Holocaust. Rising quickly through Labor Party ranks, he became a top aide to Ben-Gurion, Israel's first prime minister and a man Peres once called \"the greatest Jew of our time.\"

At 29, he was the youngest person to serve as director of Israel's Defense Ministry, and is credited with arming Israel's military almost from scratch. Yet throughout his political career, he suffered from the fact that he never wore an army uniform or fought in a war.

Of his 10 books, several amplified his vision of a \"new Middle East\" where there was peaceful economic and cultural cooperation among all the nations of the region.

Despite continued waves of violence that pushed the Israeli political map to the right, the concept of a Palestinian state next to Israel became mainstream Israeli policy many years after Peres advocated it.

Shunted aside during the 1999 election campaign, won by party colleague Ehud Barak, Peres rejected advice to retire, assuming the newly created and loosely defined Cabinet post of Minister for Regional Cooperation.

In 2000, Peres absorbed another resounding political slap, losing an election in the parliament for the largely ceremonial post of president to Likud Party backbencher Moshe Katsav, who was later convicted and imprisoned for rape.

Even so, Peres refused to quit. In 2001, at age 77, he took the post of foreign minister in the government of national unity set up by Ariel Sharon, serving for 20 months before Labor withdrew from the coalition.

Then he followed Sharon into a new party, Kadima, serving as vice-premier under Sharon and his successor, Ehud Olmert, before assuming the presidency.

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BEIJING (AP) \u2014 A massive typhoon left one person dead in eastern China on Wednesday, a day after killing four and injuring 260 in Taiwan.

Typhoon Megi weakened to a tropical storm after hitting the coastal city of Quanzhou in Fujian province before dawn, packing winds of up to 118 kilometers (74 miles) per-hour, China's National Meteorological Center said.

One person died after several structures collapsed in Quanzhou, state-approved news media reported. In Fuzhou, Fujian's provincial capital, people were shown on state television walking through knee-deep waters that had swamped major roads. Schools were closed and dozens of flights were canceled.

The storm was forecast to move northwest Wednesday and fade gradually.

In Taiwan on Tuesday, the typhoon's bands of heavy rain and sustained winds of 162 kilometers (100 miles) per-hour blanketed the island by midafternoon as the eye of the storm made landfall on the east coast. Authorities had raised alert levels for Taiwan, which is prone to landslides and flooding, said National Fire Agency Director-General Chen Wen-lung.

The 268 injured included eight Japanese tourists traveling in a tour bus that turned on its side in central Taiwan. Three people suffered fatal falls and a fourth person died in a truck crash, said Lee Wei-sen, a spokesman for Taiwan's Central Emergency Operations Center. Many of the injuries were from falling and wind-blown objects.

Megi was 500 kilometers (310 miles) in diameter at its largets, and rainfall had topped 300 millimeters (12 inches) in the south and eastern mountains of Taiwan.

More than 8,000 people were evacuated, mostly from mountainous areas at risk of landslides or floods. About 2,800 went to shelters, Chen said. Approximately 2.9 million households lost power overnight.

The weather delayed more than 121 flights and forced the cancellation of 253 more at Taiwan's Taoyuan International Airport, while another seven were diverted to other Taiwanese airports. Authorities had closed schools, offices and most of Taiwan's railway system.

Megi is the fourth typhoon of the year to hit Taiwan and third in the last two weeks.

On the Chinese coast, about 160 kilometers (100 miles) from Taiwan at its nearest point, fishing boats were ordered back to port, China's official Xinhua News Agency said.

___

Associated Press writer Ralph Jennings contributed to this report from Taipei, Taiwan.

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JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) \u2014 Indonesian authorities have evacuated more than 1,100 tourists after Mount Barujari on Lombok island spewed a massive column of ash into the atmosphere and are searching for several hundred others possibly still in the area.

The volcano, also known as the Child of Rinjani because it sits within the Mount Rinjani caldera, erupted without warning Tuesday, delaying flights from airports in Lombok and nearby Bali. The ash column reached 2,000 meters (6,560 feet).

Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said Wednesday that nearly 400 foreign and local tourists had been registered since Sunday to climb the mountain, leaving from Sembalun monitoring post, about 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the crater.

There have been no reports of injuries from the eruption.

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CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) \u2014 President Nicolas Maduro said a top U.S. State Department official would soon visit Venezuela in a bid to ease tensions between the two nations.

Maduro's announcement Tuesday night came a day after he met with Secretary of State John Kerry on the sidelines of a peace ceremony in Colombia.

It would be the second visit this year by Under Secretary of State Tom Shannon after a trip in June on a similar mission that has yet to produce any apparent breakthrough.

Maduro said he also invited Kerry and that the U.S. official said he would come if the effort at dialogue advances.

The State Department earlier said Kerry in his meeting with Maduro expressed concern for growing economic and political tensions in Venezuela.

"}, {"id":"da89a7cb-3829-5e74-8c78-a1682dad7505","type":"article","starttime":"1475037054","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T21:30:54-07:00","lastupdated":"1475039905","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Suspect in Dallas-area shooting rampage arrested","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_da89a7cb-3829-5e74-8c78-a1682dad7505.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/suspect-in-dallas-area-shooting-rampage-arrested/article_da89a7cb-3829-5e74-8c78-a1682dad7505.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/suspect-in-dallas-area-shooting-rampage-arrested/article_5ca27f1d-c1dd-5f28-8dd7-7466f0c4ca7b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"GEORGETOWN, Texas (AP) \u2014 A man suspected in a pair of Dallas-area killings was arrested Tuesday at an apartment about 150 miles to the south near Austin, police said.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","violent crime","arrests","crime","law and order"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"3d038ee8-4d0c-5f5b-bd44-d087a6fcd6c1","description":"This undated photo provided by the Dallas Police Department shows Silvestre Franco-Luviano. Franco-Luviano, who is a suspect in a pair of Dallas-area killings was arrested Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, at an apartment about 150 miles to the south near Austin, police said. He had been sought in the shooting deaths late Sunday of Ruben Moreno in his car in southeastern Dallas and of Welton Betts at a gas station in the Dallas suburb of Cedar Hill. (Dallas Police Department via AP)","byline":"HOGP","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"422","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d0/3d038ee8-4d0c-5f5b-bd44-d087a6fcd6c1/57eb50263a003.image.jpg?resize=422%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"121","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d0/3d038ee8-4d0c-5f5b-bd44-d087a6fcd6c1/57eb50263a003.image.jpg?resize=100%2C121"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"364","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d0/3d038ee8-4d0c-5f5b-bd44-d087a6fcd6c1/57eb50263a003.image.jpg?resize=300%2C364"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1242","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d0/3d038ee8-4d0c-5f5b-bd44-d087a6fcd6c1/57eb50263a003.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"da89a7cb-3829-5e74-8c78-a1682dad7505","body":"

GEORGETOWN, Texas (AP) \u2014 A man suspected in a pair of Dallas-area killings was arrested Tuesday at an apartment about 150 miles to the south near Austin, police said.

Silvestre Franco-Luviano was arrested about 7:30 p.m. Tuesday after a standoff at an apartment in Georgetown, about 25 miles north of Austin, said Georgetown Police Chief Wayne Nero.

He had been sought in the shooting deaths late Sunday of Ruben Moreno in his car in southeastern Dallas and of Welton Betts at a gas station in the Dallas suburb of Cedar Hill. Dallas police had issued a murder warrant for Franco-Luviano in the Moreno killing, and Dallas police spokeswoman Melinda Gutierrez said he was suspected in the Betts death.

A friend of Betts tells The Dallas Morning News that he was killed while returning from attending a Dallas Cowboys game.

Police also suspected Franco-Luviano in the abduction and robbery of a man doing landscaping work in Georgetown on Monday.

A tip led Georgetown police about 5 p.m. Tuesday to an apartment where relatives of Franco-Luviano live, Nero said. As tactical squad officers surrounded the apartment and nearby units were evacuated, a small fire broke out inside that officers believe the suspect set. Franco-Luviano also broke down a wall to slip into an adjacent, evacuated apartment, Nero said. He then tried to escape on foot, unarmed, but he was tackled and subdued by tactical squad officers, the chief said.

Franco-Luviano was unarmed when he was captured but a weapon was found inside the apartment, Nero said.

"}, {"id":"66bea5e0-9166-5b0e-8b60-444ca0c2aa4c","type":"article","starttime":"1475036004","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T21:13:24-07:00","lastupdated":"1475044397","priority":0,"sections":[{"sports":"sports"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Fan drops ring during televised Yankee Stadium engagement","url":"http://tucson.com/sports/article_66bea5e0-9166-5b0e-8b60-444ca0c2aa4c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/sports/fan-drops-ring-during-televised-yankee-stadium-engagement/article_66bea5e0-9166-5b0e-8b60-444ca0c2aa4c.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/sports/fan-drops-ring-during-televised-yankee-stadium-engagement/article_aef9a818-07a2-5bfd-84ca-c8015976895e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By SCOTT ORGERA\nAssociated Press","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 In the end, Andrew Fox wasn't charged with an error.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","sports","professional baseball","baseball","men's sports"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"bd844e39-f15f-5e6e-8913-1eb1099154af","description":"Andrew Fox, left, and Heather Terwilliger sit in the stands at Yankee Stadium on Tuesday night, Sept. 27, 2016, in New York. 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Fox's first attempt went awry when he opened the box and the engagement ring was missing. Eventually the ring was located in the cuff of Terwilliger's pants. The second time was the charm. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)","byline":"Kathy Willens","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"369","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/17/f17fe367-1ee7-525d-894c-65bc07990ace/57eb600324536.image.jpg?resize=512%2C369"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"72","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/17/f17fe367-1ee7-525d-894c-65bc07990ace/57eb600324536.image.jpg?resize=100%2C72"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"216","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/17/f17fe367-1ee7-525d-894c-65bc07990ace/57eb600324536.image.jpg?resize=300%2C216"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"738","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/17/f17fe367-1ee7-525d-894c-65bc07990ace/57eb600324536.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"4bdc7440-6f62-5353-b592-64dc1cf71aea","description":"Andrew Fox and Heather Terwilliger embrace after getting engaged during a baseball game between the New York Yankees and the Boston Red Sox in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. 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As Fox knelt to propose to Terwilliger, he pulled an engagement ring from his pocket - and it fell to the ground. The ring was found after a few minutes. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)","byline":"Kathy Willens","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"366","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e4/ae43eff9-0d63-5baa-ae0f-513c7c4fa1bd/57eb60038ce80.image.jpg?resize=512%2C366"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e4/ae43eff9-0d63-5baa-ae0f-513c7c4fa1bd/57eb60038ce80.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"214","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e4/ae43eff9-0d63-5baa-ae0f-513c7c4fa1bd/57eb60038ce80.image.jpg?resize=300%2C214"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"732","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e4/ae43eff9-0d63-5baa-ae0f-513c7c4fa1bd/57eb60038ce80.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"66bea5e0-9166-5b0e-8b60-444ca0c2aa4c","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 In the end, Andrew Fox wasn't charged with an error.

The 29-year-old had everything he needed to make one of life's biggest decisions on Tuesday night: the engagement ring, the perfect woman and a beautiful early autumn night at Yankee Stadium, which focused a camera on the couple and broadcast the big moment on the center field video board.

What the New Castle, Pennsylvania, resident didn't have was steady hands.

When Fox pulled the precious item from his pocket and dropped to one knee before 29-year-old girlfriend Heather Terwilliger to propose during the middle of the fifth inning, the ring fell to the ground in the second row of section 228 in the ballpark's second deck.

The crowd gasped and then jeered the fumble. Fox and Terwilliger scrambled to find the jewelry, the search televised between pitches by the Yankees' YES Network. The hunt under the chairs went on for nearly five tense minutes as Fox began to cry, fearing the ring was lost. Several other fans joined the search, rooting around on the ground, some using lights on their mobile phones.

\"I opened the ring box and got on my knee, and as soon as I opened it just fell, and we couldn't find it for the longest time,\" Fox said.

Finally, Terwilliger looked down and saw something shiny in the cuff of her pants leg \u2014 earning a save. The crowd of 35,161 roared.

\"Everyone was trying to help us find it, and it ended up being in her pants leg, like the bottom of it,\" Fox said.

Fox sank to a knee again to present the ring. Terwilliger, who is from Fredonia, New York, said yes, then gave him a long kiss and a hug.

Yankee Stadium public address announcer Paul Olden informed the crowd the ring had been found.

Fox took Terwilliger to the game as a belated present for her Sept. 21 birthday and bought Yankees jerseys as an extra gift. He wore a Mariano Rivera No. 42 and Terwilliger sported Derek Jeter's No. 2.

\"I wanted to get two great players,\" Fox said.

The couple, which had its first date Feb. 1, planned to maybe go to Times Square after the game \u2014 Terwilliger has never seen it at night.

A still photo of the couple was shown on the video board during the seventh-inning stretch, recognizing them as fans of the game.

\"I'm shocked, but I'm feeling in love,\" an elated Terwilliger said.

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DENVER (AP) \u2014 Police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons that have nothing to do with daily police work, an Associated Press investigation has found.

Criminal-history and driver databases give officers critical information about people they encounter on the job. But the AP's review shows how those systems also can be exploited by officers who, motivated by romantic quarrels, personal conflicts or voyeuristic curiosity, sidestep policies and sometimes the law by snooping. In the most egregious cases, officers have used information to stalk or harass, or have tampered with or sold records they obtained.

No single agency tracks how often the abuse happens nationwide, and record-keeping inconsistencies make it impossible to know how many violations occur.

But the AP, through records requests to state agencies and big-city police departments, found law enforcement officers and employees who misused databases were fired, suspended or resigned more than 325 times between 2013 and 2015. They received reprimands, counseling or lesser discipline in more than 250 instances, the review found.

Unspecified discipline was imposed in more than 90 instances reviewed by AP. In many other cases, it wasn't clear from the records if punishment was given at all. The number of violations was surely far higher since records provided were spotty at best, and many cases go unnoticed.

Among those punished: an Ohio officer who pleaded guilty to stalking an ex-girlfriend and who looked up information on her; a Michigan officer who looked up home addresses of women he found attractive; and two Miami-Dade officers who ran checks on a journalist after he aired unflattering stories about the department.

\"It's personal. It's your address. It's all your information, it's your Social Security number, it's everything about you,\" said Alexis Dekany, the Ohio woman whose ex-boyfriend, a former Akron officer, pleaded guilty last year to stalking her. \"And when they use it for ill purposes to commit crimes against you \u2014 to stalk you, to follow you, to harass you ... it just becomes so dangerous.\"

The misuse represents only a tiny fraction of the millions of daily database queries run legitimately during traffic stops, criminal investigations and routine police encounters. But the worst violations profoundly abuses systems that supply vital information on criminal suspects and law-abiding citizens alike. The unauthorized searches demonstrate how even old-fashioned policing tools are ripe for abuse, at a time when privacy concerns about law enforcement have focused mostly on more modern electronic technologies. And incomplete, inconsistent tracking of the problem frustrates efforts to document its pervasiveness.

The AP tally, based on records requested from 50 states and about three dozen of the nation's largest police departments, is unquestionably an undercount.

Some departments produced no records at all. Some states refused to disclose the information, said they don't comprehensively track misuse or produced records too incomplete or unclear to be counted. Florida reported hundreds of misuse cases of its driver database, but didn't say how often officers were disciplined.

And some cases go undetected, officials say, because there aren't clear red flags to automatically distinguish questionable searches from legitimate ones.

\"If we know the officers in a particular agency have made 10,000 queries in a month, we just have no way to (know) they were for an inappropriate reason unless there's some consequence where someone might complain to us,\" said Carol Gibbs, database administrator with the Illinois State Police.

The AP's requests encompassed state and local databases and the FBI-administered National Crime and Information Center, a searchable clearinghouse that processes an average of 14 million daily transactions.

The NCIC catalogs information that officers enter on sex offenders, immigration violators, suspected gang members, people with outstanding warrants and individuals reported missing, among others. Police use the system to locate fugitives, identify missing people and determine if a motorist they've stopped is driving a stolen car or is wanted elsewhere.

Other statewide databases offer access to criminal histories and motor vehicle records, birth dates and photos.

Officers are instructed that those systems, which together contain data far more substantial than an internet search would yield, may be used only for legitimate law enforcement purposes. They're warned that their searches are subject to being audited and that unauthorized access could cost them their jobs or result in criminal charges.

Yet misuse persists.

____

'SENSE OF BEING VULNERABLE'

Violations frequently arise from romantic pursuits or domestic entanglements, including when a Denver officer became acquainted with a hospital employee during a sex-assault investigation, then searched out her phone number and called her at home. A Mancos, Colorado, marshal asked co-workers to run license plate checks for every white pickup truck they saw because his girlfriend was seeing a man who drove a white pickup, an investigative report shows.

In Florida, a Polk County sheriff's deputy investigating a battery complaint ran driver's license information of a woman he met and then messaged her unsolicited through Facebook.

Officers have sought information for purely personal purposes, including criminal records checks of co-workers at private businesses. A Phoenix officer ran searches on a neighbor during the course of a longstanding dispute. A North Olmsted, Ohio, officer pleaded guilty this year to searching for a female friend's landlord and showing up in the middle of the night to demand the return of money he said was owed her.

The officer, Brian Bielozer, told the AP he legitimately sought the landlord's information as a safety precaution to determine if she had outstanding warrants or a weapons permit. But he promised as part of a plea agreement never to seek a job again in law enforcement. He said he entered the plea to avoid mounting legal fees.

Some database misuse occurred in the course of other misbehavior, including a Phoenix officer who gave a woman involved in a drug and gun-trafficking investigation details about stolen cars in exchange for arranging sexual encounters for him. She told an undercover detective about a department source who could \"get any information on anybody,\" a disciplinary report says.

Eric Paull, the Akron police sergeant who pleaded guilty last year to stalking Dekany, also ran searches on her mother, men she'd been close with and students from a course he taught, prosecutors said. A lawyer for Paull, who was sentenced to prison, said Paull has accepted responsibility for his actions.

\"A lot of people have complicated personal lives and very strong passions,\" said Jay Stanley, an American Civil Liberties Union privacy expert. \"There's greed, there's lust, there's all the deadly sins. And often, accessing information is a way for people to act on those human emotions.\"

Other police employees searched for family members, sometimes at relatives' requests, to check what information was stored or to see if they were the subjects of warrants.

Still other searchers were simply curious, including a Miami-Dade officer who admitted checking dozens of officers and celebrities including basketball star LeBron James.

Political motives occasionally surface.

Deb Roschen, a former county commissioner in Minnesota, alleged in a 2013 lawsuit that law enforcement and government employees inappropriately ran repeated queries on her and other politicians over 10 years. The searches were in retaliation for questioning county spending and sheriff's programs, she contended.

She filed an open-records request that revealed her husband and daughter were also researched, sometimes at odd hours. But an appeals court rejected her suit and several similar cases this month, saying the plaintiffs failed to demonstrate the searches were unpermitted.

\"Now there are people who do not like me that have all my private information ... any information that could be used against me. They could steal my identity, they could sell it to someone,\" Roschen said.

\"The sense of being vulnerable,\" she added, \"there's no fix to that.\"

___

BETRAYAL OF TRUST

Violations are committed by patrol officers, dispatchers, civilian employees, court personnel and high-ranking police officials. Some made dozens of improper searches. Some were under investigation for multiple infractions when they were punished, making it unclear whether database misuse was always the sole reason for discipline.

Agencies uncover some violations during audits, or during investigations into other misconduct. Some emerge after a citizen, often the target of a search, finds out or grows suspicious. A Jacksonville, Florida, sheriff's officer was found to have run queries on his ex-girlfriend and her new boyfriend after she raised concerns she was being harassed, an internal affairs report says.

The AP sought to focus on officers who improperly accessed information on others but also counted some cases in which officers divulged information to someone not authorized to receive it, or ran their own names for strictly personal purposes, including to check their car registrations.

The tally also includes some cases in which little is known about the offense because some agencies provided no details \u2014 only that they resulted in discipline.

The AP tried when possible to exclude benign violations, such as new employees who ran only their own names during training or system troubleshooting. But the variability in record-keeping made it impossible to weed out all such violations.

Agencies in California, for instance, reported more than 75 suspensions, resignations and terminations between 2013 and 2015 arising from misuse of the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System, state records show. But because the records didn't identify officers or specify the allegations, it's unclear whether multiple violations were committed by the same person or how egregious the infractions were.

Colorado disclosed about 35 misuse violations without specifying punishment. Indiana listed 12 cases of abuse but revealed nothing about them. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles reported about 400 violations in 2014 and 2015 of its Driver and Vehicle Information Database, or DAVID, but didn't include the allegations or punishment.

The FBI's Criminal Justice Information Services Division offers training to state and local law enforcement agencies on NCIC use, and conducts audits every three years that include a sample of local departments, said spokesman Stephen Fischer.

But it doesn't track how often NCIC information is misused. Violations, which are not required to be reported directly to the FBI, are inconsistently disclosed to the federal government. The FBI relies on local agencies to address violations that are identified, Fischer said.

The AP requested records from large police departments and state agencies tasked with administering NCIC usage within their districts. The responses included cases where officers misused motor vehicle data, including driver's license and registration information, and also more sensitive criminal history records.

Officers are only occasionally prosecuted, and rarely at the federal level.

One recent exception is a former Cumming, Georgia, officer charged in June with accepting a bribe to search a woman's license plate number to see if she was an undercover officer. Another involved Ronald Buell, a retired New York Police Department sergeant who received probation for selling NCIC information to a private investigator for defense attorneys.

At his July sentencing, Buell said he hoped other officers would learn \"to never put themselves in the position I'm in.\"

It's unsettled whether improper database access is necessarily a federal crime and whether it violates a trespass statute that criminalizes using a computer for other than authorized purposes.

A federal appeals court last year reversed the computer-crime conviction of ex-NYPD officer Gilberto Valle, whom tabloids dubbed the \"cannibal cop\" for his online exchanges about kidnapping and eating women and who improperly used a police database to gather information. Valle argued that as an officer, he was legally authorized to access the database. The court deemed the statute ambiguous and said it risked criminalizing a broad array of computer use.

Misuse has occasionally prompted federal lawsuits under a statute meant to protect driver's license data.

A Florida Highway Trooper, Donna Watts, accused dozens of officers of searching her in the state's driver database after she stopped a Miami-Dade officer for speeding in 2011. She alleged in lawsuits that she was harassed with prank calls, threatening posts on law enforcement websites and unfamiliar cars that idled near her home.

Each unlawful access, she said in a court document, \"has either caused or worsened anxiety, depression, insomnia, and other medical/physical/psychological conditions I suffer.\"

Law enforcement officials have taken steps to try to limit abuse, though they say they know of no foolproof safeguard given the volume of inquiries and the need for officers to have information at their fingertips.

\"There's no system that could prohibit you from looking up your ex-wife's new boyfriend, because your ex-wife's new boyfriend could come in contact with the criminal justice system,\" said Peggy Bell, executive director of the Delaware Criminal Justice Information System.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety said it changed the way officers access a state driver database after a 2013 legislative audit found over half of the 11,000 law enforcement personnel who use it made searches that appeared questionable. The audit was conducted after a former state employee was charged with illegally viewing thousands of driver's license records.

In Florida, a memorandum of understanding this year increased the amount of field audits law enforcement agencies must undergo regarding DAVID usage. Troopers in the Florida Highway Patrol sign usage warnings when they access the DAVID system and a criminal sanctions acknowledgment. Users are audited and instructed to select a reason for a search before making inquiries.

Denver's independent monitor, Nicholas Mitchell, argued for strong policies and strict discipline as a safeguard, especially as increasing amounts of information are added to databases. His review found most of the 25 Denver officers punished for misusing databases over 10 years received at most reprimands.

Miami-Dade police cracked down after the Watts scandal and other high-profile cases. The department now does quarterly audits in which officers can be randomly asked to explain searches. A sergeant's duties have been expanded to include daily reviews of proper usage and troubleshooting, said Maj. Christopher Carothers of the professional compliance bureau.

Even if the public is unaware of the amount of available information, Carothers said, \"The idea that police would betray that trust out of curious entertainment or truly bad intent, that's very disturbing and unsettling.\"

____

Eric Tucker reported from Washington. AP writer Tom Hays in New York and AP video journalist Joshua Replogle in Akron, Ohio, contributed to this report.

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DENVER (AP) \u2014 Police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons unrelated to police work, an Associated Press investigation has found.

Criminal-history and driver databases legitimately give officers critical information about people they encounter on the job. But those systems can also be exploited by officers, motivated by romantic quarrels, personal conflicts or voyeuristic curiosity, who sidestep policies and sometimes the law by snooping.

No single agency tracks how often the abuse happens nationwide, and record-keeping inconsistencies make it impossible to know how many violations occur.

But the AP, through records requests to state agencies and big-city police departments, found law enforcement officers and employees who misused databases were fired, suspended or resigned more than 325 times between 2013 and 2015. They received reprimands, counseling and lesser discipline in more than 250 instances, the review found.

Unspecified discipline was imposed in more than 90 instances reviewed by AP. In many other cases, it wasn't clear if punishment was given at all. The number of violations was surely far higher since records provided were spotty at best.

Among those punished: An Ohio officer who pleaded guilty to stalking an ex-girlfriend and who had looked up information on her, a Michigan officer who looked up addresses of women he found attractive, and two Miami-Dade officers who ran checks on a journalist who aired unflattering stories about the department.

\"It's personal. It's your address. It's all your information. It's your Social Security number, it's everything about you,\" said Alexis Dekany, whose ex-boyfriend, an Akron police officer, pleaded guilty to stalking her. \"And when they use it for ill purposes to commit crimes against you \u2014 to stalk you, to follow you, to harass you ... it just becomes so dangerous.\"

The officer ran searches on her male friends, students from a course he taught and others, prosecutors said.

Misuse represents a tiny fraction of the millions of daily database queries run legitimately during police encounters. But the violations abuse systems that supply vital information on criminal suspects and law-abiding citizens alike. And incomplete, inconsistent tracking of the problem frustrates efforts to document its pervasiveness.

\"A lot of people have complicated personal lives and very strong passions,\" said Jay Stanley, an American Civil Liberties Union privacy expert. \"There's greed, there's lust, there's all the deadly sins. And often, accessing information is a way for people to act on those human emotions.\"

The AP tally, from records requested from 50 states and about three dozen of the nation's largest police departments, is unquestionably an undercount. Some departments didn't produce records, refused to disclose information, said they don't track misuse or produced incomplete or unclear data. Some cases go unnoticed because of the difficulty in automatically distinguishing dubious searches from legitimate ones.

The AP's requests encompassed local databases and the FBI-administered National Crime and Information Center, which catalogues records on, among others, sex offenders, gang members, fugitives and people reported missing. Other statewide systems contain motor vehicle records, birth dates and photos.

Violations frequently arise from romantic pursuits or domestic entanglements. A Denver officer searched the phone number of a hospital employee he met during a sex-assault investigation and called her. Misuse sometimes reflects personal squabbles. A North Olmsted, Ohio, officer admitted looking up a friend's landlord and showing up to demand the return of money he said she was owed.

Deb Roschen, a former commissioner in Wabasha County, Minnesota, alleged in a lawsuit that law enforcement and government employees inappropriately ran searches on her and other politicians over 10 years. The searches were retaliatory after she raised questions about county spending and sheriff's programs, she said.

An appeals court dismissed her suit. But, she said, \"Twenty years from now... I'm still going to be thinking about it. The sense of being vulnerable, there's no fix to that.\"

The AP focused on officers who accessed information about others but also counted some cases in which they divulged information without authorization, or ran themselves for personal purposes. The tally also includes some cases where little is known about the offense, because some agencies provided no details about the violations except that they resulted in discipline. It wasn't always clear if database misuse was the sole basis for punishment.

The AP sought to exclude benign violations. But record-keeping variations made that challenging.

California agencies, for instance, reported more than 75 suspensions, resignations and terminations between 2013 and 2015 arising from misuse of the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System. But the records didn't specify the allegations.

Officers are only occasionally prosecuted, though one recent case involved retired New York Police Department sergeant Ronald Buell, who admitted selling NCIC information to a private investigator.

Law enforcement officials have taken steps to try to limit abuse.

The Florida Highway Patrol requires troopers to sign a disclaimer when they access the state's Driver and Vehicle Information Database. Miami-Dade police do quarterly audits in which officers can be randomly asked to explain searches, said Christopher Carothers, major of the professional compliance bureau.

\"The idea that police would betray that trust out of curious entertainment or truly bad intent, that's very disturbing and unsettling,\" Carothers said.

____

Tucker reported from Washington. AP writer Tom Hays in New York and AP video journalist Joshua Replogle in Akron, Ohio, contributed to this report.

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An Associated Press investigation found police officers across the country abuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons totally unrelated to police work. In the worst cases, officers have stalked, harassed and tampered with criminal cases using details obtained through criminal history and motor vehicle databases. Those resources give officers vital information about people they encounter on the job, but they can also be misused.

A look at some of the cases AP found in responses to records requests to 50 state agencies and big city police departments:

'ANY INFORMATION ON ANYBODY'

A Phoenix police officer gave a woman involved in a drug and gun-trafficking investigation details about stolen cars in exchange for arranging sexual encounters for him. The woman told an undercover detective she could get \"any information on anybody\" from her source within the police department and offered to charge the detective $100 for it.

___

PERSONAL VENDETTAS

A former North Olmsted, Ohio, officer pleaded guilty to using a law enforcement database to find information on a female friend's landlord. Dressed in uniform and driving a police cruiser, he showed up in the middle of the night to demand the return of the money he said was owed to his friend, according to court records.

The former officer, Brian Bielozer, told AP he legitimately ran a query on the landlord as a safety precaution to determine if she had outstanding warrants or a weapons permit, as he would in other cases. He promised as part of a plea agreement never to seek a job in law enforcement again. Bielozer said he entered the plea to avoid mounting legal fees.

___

'JUST A LAPSE IN JUDGMENT'

A Miami-Dade police sergeant used Florida's driver database to conduct unauthorized searches on dozens of celebrities, politicians, high-profile newsmakers and fellow officers. Among them: basketball stars LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, New York Jets receiver Brandon Marshall, actor Dwayne \"The Rock\" Johnson, news anchor Alexis Rivera; Florida Gov. Rick Scott and Scott's son.

The officer told investigators it was \"just a lapse in judgment.\"

___

PHONY TICKETS

A Texas highway patrolman used databases to manufacture fake traffic tickets to make it look like he had made more stops than he actually had.

___

INFO FOR SALE

A Michigan State Police dispatcher admitted querying a confidential law enforcement database dozens of times over 15 years and selling personal information to attorneys. The abuse began in the late 1990s and continued until 2008, according to records. The dispatcher retired in January 2013.

___

HIT-AND-RUN HUNT

An Auburn, Washington, police commander searched for a license plate after being contacted by a friend who'd been involved in a hit-and-run incident, then provided that information to his friend and told him to drive by that location to find the suspect.

___

BRIBES FOR INFORMATION

A former Cumming, Georgia, police officer was indicted in June for accepting a $1,000 bribe to search a woman's license plate number to see if she was an undercover officer.

___

PRANKS AND THREATS

Donna Watts, a Florida Highway Patrol trooper, stopped a Miami officer for speeding in 2011. Watts accused more than 88 officers from 25 agencies of later accessing her driver's license information. She alleged in lawsuits that she was threatened on law-enforcement websites and harassed with prank calls and unfamiliar cars idling in her cul-de-sac.

\"Each and every one of the unlawful accesses caused me, and continues to cause me, emotional distress and has either caused or worsened anxiety, depression, insomnia and other medical/physical/psychological conditions I suffer,\" Watts said in a sworn statement as part of the case.

___

'EVERY WHITE PICKUP'

A marshal in Mancos, Colorado, asked his deputies to run license plates of every white pickup truck they saw because his girlfriend was seeing a man who drove a white pickup, according to an investigative report. Once he identified the man, he drove by his house.

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BEIJING (AP) \u2014 Major Asian stock markets were lower Tuesday after investors were reassured by trade-friendly Hillary Clinton's performance in a U.S. presidential debate with rival Donald Trump.

KEEPING SCORE: Tokyo's Nikkei 225 index fell 1.5 percent to 16,426.61 and Hong Kong's Hang Seng lost 0.6 percent to 23,440.18. The Shanghai Composite Index lost 0.2 percent to 2,990.97 and benchmarks in Singapore and Indonesia also declined. Sydney's S&P ASX 200 gained 0.4 percent to 5,497.40 and Seoul's Kospi advanced 0.9 percent to 2,017.94. Bangkok, Manila and New Zealand also gained.

THE TRUMP EFFECT: Investors sold gold and other assets they had bought as hedges against a possible victory by the Republican Trump, who has called for controls on trade and immigration. Markets also have been unnerved by Trump's tax and economic plans. They were reassured by what some commentators saw as his poor showing in a nationally televised debate with the Democrat Clinton, who is seen as more favorable to trade and continuity in U.S. economic policy.

ANALYST'S TAKE: \"The strong performance by Hillary Clinton against Donald Trump in the first presidential debate had a major impact on markets as some of the Trump-related hedges saw a pullback,\" said Angus Nicholson of IG Markets in a report. \"A number of safe haven assets had been bid up during the Trump poll surge as investors worried about what Trump would mean for the global economy, and particularly the global security risks he poses. Gold saw its biggest one-day decline in more than a month losing 0.8 percent as Trump's probability of becoming president was seemingly diminished after his poor showing in the debate.\"

WALL STREET: U.S. stocks rebounded after a Conference Board survey showed consumer confidence is at a nine-year high, a sign Americans will keep spending in the months to come. Technology and consumer stocks made the largest gains. Technology companies jumped, and solid results from cruise line operator Carnival sent travel-related companies higher. Energy companies slumped with oil prices as hopes for an international cut in fuel production faded. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 133.47 points, or 0.7 percent, to 18,228.30. The Standard & Poor's 500 index picked up 13.83 points, or 0.6 percent, to 2,159.93. The Nasdaq composite gained 48.22 points, or 0.9 percent, to 5,305.71.

ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude lost 6 cents to $44.61 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract plunged $1.26 on Tuesday to close at $44.67. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added 10 cents to $46.62 in London. The contract dropped $1.41 the previous session to close at $46.52.

CURRENCY: The dollar gained to 100.56 yen from Tuesday's 100.29 yen. The euro was unchanged at $1.12.

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GUANICA, Puerto Rico (AP) \u2014 Puerto Ricans are buying rice produced on the island for the first time in nearly 30 years. They are also eating locally grown mushrooms, kale and even arugula, along with more traditional crops such as plantains and pineapples.

The U.S. territory is seeing something of an agricultural renaissance as new farms spring up across the island, supplying an increasing number of farmers' markets and restaurants to meet consumer demand for fresher produce.

Farming has become one of the few areas of growth on an island struggling to emerge from a 10-year-old recession and a still-unfolding debt crisis. The most recent statistics from the governor's office show farm income grew 25 percent to more than $900 million in 2012-2014. The amount of acreage under cultivation rose 50 percent over the past four years, generating at least 7,000 jobs.

\"More and more people have noticed that this is one of the only successful ways of living on the island right now,\" said Tara Rodriguez Besosa, a farming advocate and owner of an organic restaurant in San Juan that buys from local farms, including one started by her mother several years ago.

Agriculture is a small part of the economy in Puerto Rico, well behind manufacturing, finance and tourism. But the growth is notable simply because things are so bad overall. Many businesses have closed, tens of thousands of people have decamped to the U.S. mainland, unemployment is at nearly 12 percent and the government is in default. Congress gave the territory some breathing room in June with legislation to enable the restructuring of what the governor has called its \"unpayable\" $70 billion debt, but the effects of that legislation have yet to be felt widely.

The agricultural rebirth can be seen in the aisles of supermarkets, where local rice went on sale in August for the first time since the last producer closed in 1989, and in the shimmering green fields where the grain is grown on the outskirts of the southwestern town of Guanica. The government helped launch Finca Fraternidad, or \"Fraternity Farm,\" by providing 1,350 acres of vacant public land.

The rice venture is one of about 350 farms that the government supported to reduce Puerto Rico's reliance on expensive food imports and spur the growth of a sector that dominated the economy until the 1940s, when the territory began a decades-long transformation into a more urban, developed society where few wanted to work on farms.

\"It's satisfying to change the perspective of an island that once viewed agriculture as a thing of the past, as something for people without education,\" Puerto Rican Agriculture Secretary Myrna Comas said.

It can still be a challenge to find workers, especially for labor-intensive crops like coffee. But 25-year-old Jonathan Rodriguez, who has been working on the harvest at Finca Fraternidad, said the job appeals to him.

\"I like it because it's something that we sow for the island,\" he said on a scorching recent morning. \"And that's why we're here, to make Puerto Rico better.\"

In the west and the south, the government has launched a project to supply the local rum industry with homegrown sugarcane, which dominated the economy in the 19th century but all but disappeared as it became cheaper to produce elsewhere. About 870 acres of cane have been planted so far, and Comas said the plan is to expand to 11,600 acres.

In addition to the many small, independent farms, the island has seen investment in large-scale agriculture.

Bayer, the German medicine and farm-chemical maker, announced this month that it would spend $17 million to develop two agriculture biotech facilities in the U.S. territory. Monsanto, the Missouri-based seed and weed-killer company, has large fields of corn, soy and cotton in Puerto Rico and recently invested $5 million in its projects.

Even pot growers are looking to set up shop.

Following a 2015 executive order legalizing medical marijuana derivatives, GreenVision LLC, a subsidiary of Nevada-based StereoVision Entertainment Inc., announced plans in August to build a 40,000-square-foot (3,700-square-meter) cultivation and manufacturing facility in Puerto Rico.

But it's the small-scale farming that is most visible to consumers.

The number of farmers' markets has tripled in the past four years to more than a dozen across the island, said Mayra Nieves, president of a local nonprofit organic food cooperative. That has quadrupled overall business to some $35 million a year, spurred in large part by interest in organic produce, Comas said.

There are also urban community gardens popping up across the capital that cater to people who want something fresher than the shrink-wrapped imports that have long been standard at stores and restaurants.

\"People are becoming more open-minded,\" Nieves said. \"They no longer see us as 'those hippies.'\"

___

Danica Coto on Twitter: www.twitter.com/danicacoto

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Quotes from around the world after the death of former Israeli President Shimon Peres, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate and elder statesman of Israeli politics, at age 93.

___

\"A light has gone out, but the hope he gave us will burn forever. Shimon Peres was a soldier for Israel, for the Jewish people, for justice, for peace, and for the belief that we can be true to our best selves \u2014 to the very end of our time on Earth, and in the legacy that we leave to others. For the gift of his friendship and the example of his leadership, todah rabah, Shimon.\"? \u2014 President Barack Obama

___

\"With the passing of Shimon Peres, Israel has lost a leader who championed its security, prosperity, and limitless possibilities from its birth to his last day on earth. The Middle East has lost a fervent advocate for peace and reconciliation and for a future where all the children of Abraham build a better tomorrow together. And Hillary and I have lost a true and treasured friend.

\"I'll never forget how happy he was 23 years ago when he signed the Oslo Accords on the White House lawn, heralding a more hopeful era in Israeli-Palestinian relations. He was a genius with a big heart who used his gifts to imagine a future of reconciliation not conflict, economic and social empowerment not anger and frustration, and a nation, a region, and a world enhanced by caring and sharing, not torn asunder by the illusions of permanent dominance and perfect truth. His critics called him a dreamer. That he was \u2014 a lucid, eloquent dreamer until the very end. Thank goodness. Let those of us who loved him and love his nation keep his dream alive.\" \u2014 Former President Bill Clinton

___

\"Barbara and I join Shimon Peres' countless admirers around the world in saluting his singular life of service \u2014 to the universal cause of freedom, to the timeless cause of Israel, to the noblest cause of peace. By his unyielding determination and principle, Shimon Peres time and again helped guide his beloved country through the crucible of mortal challenge. But it was by his innate humanity, his decency, that Shimon inspired the world over and helped pave a path to peace broad enough that future generations will walk it one day, side-by side.\" \u2014 Former President George H. W. Bush

___

\"Laura and I join the people of Israel and those around the world in mourning the death of Shimon Peres. As a young man, he worked for his country's independence. For the rest of his life, he led it with a deep and abiding concern for his people and a commitment to freedom and peace. The Bush family will miss Shimon Peres and his grace, dignity, and optimism.\" \u2014 Former President George W. Bush

___

\"On behalf of the entire New York Jewish community, we deeply mourn the passing of Shimon Peres, one of the greatest Jewish leaders of our time. President Peres was one of the extraordinary visionaries of our age, a towering Zionist hero of deep courage who devoted his life to serving and defending Israel and the Jewish people.\" \u2014 Eric S. Goldstein, CEO, UJA-Federation of New York.

___

\"The world has lost a true legend and statesman. Shimon Peres was a gift to the country he helped establish and lead, and a persistent voice for the cause of peace. President Peres' countless contributions to the world earned him the Nobel Peace Prize, Congressional Gold Medal, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. While we join the State of Israel and people around the globe in mourning his death, we also give thanks for his incredible life.\" \u2014 U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan

___

\"Shimon Peres' story was the story of modern Israel \u2014 a saga of daring, dynamism and wisdom. With all of his heart, this farmer, fighter, author, Nobel Peace Prize winner, prime minister and president worked to guide his nation into a secure and confident future. I valued his friendship. He was an intellectual resource who personified the unbreakable bond between the United States and Israel.\" \u2014 House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi

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Shimon Peres

JERUSALEM \u2014 Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday. He was 93.

Peres\u2019 condition worsened following a major stroke two weeks ago.

In an unprecedented seven-decade political career, Peres filled nearly every position in Israeli public life and was credited with leading the country through some of its most defining moments, from creating its nuclear arsenal in the 1950s, to disentangling its troops from Lebanon and rescuing its economy from triple-digit inflation in the 1980s, to guiding a skeptical nation into peace talks with the Palestinians in the 1990s.

A protege of Israel\u2019s founding father David Ben-Gurion, he led the Defense Ministry in his 20s and spearheaded the development of Israel\u2019s nuclear program. He was first elected to parliament in 1959 and later held every major Cabinet post \u2014 including defense, finance and foreign affairs \u2014 and served three brief stints as prime minister. His key role in the first Israeli-Palestinian peace accord earned him a Nobel Peace Prize and revered status as Israel\u2019s then most recognizable figure abroad.

And yet, for much of his career he could not parlay his international prestige into success in Israeli politics, where he was branded by many as both a utopian dreamer and political schemer. His well-tailored appearance and swept-back gray hair seemed to separate him from his more informal countrymen. He suffered a string of electoral defeats: competing in five general elections seeking the prime minister\u2019s spot, he lost four and tied one.

He finally secured the public adoration that had long eluded him when he has chosen by parliament to a seven-year term as Israel\u2019s ceremonial president in 2007, taking the role of elder statesman.

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BEIJING (AP) \u2014 Chinese authorities blamed illegal mining activities for a gas explosion at a coal mine that killed 19 people and left one other miner missing, Chinese state media reported Wednesday.

Tuesday morning's explosion occurred at a small coal mine when 20 miners were working underground in the city of Shizuishan in the northwestern region of Ningxia, the official Xinhua News Agency said. State broadcaster CCTV said the blast killed 19 people.

Local officials said at a press conference early Wednesday that representatives of the company that owned the mine, the Linli Coal Mining Co. Ltd., were in police custody, Xinhua said.

Xinhua cited an initial investigation as showing that the blast was caused by illegal mining, but did not provide details. The company could not immediately be reached at its listed phone number, which rang busy.

At the briefing, Wu Yuguo, the city's vice mayor, said an excessive concentration of gas and the destruction of the mine shaft have hindered rescue efforts.

China's mines have long been the world's deadliest, but safety improvements have reduced deaths in recent years.

An officer at the Shizuishan city government confirmed the gas explosion, but said he had no details.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) \u2014 A defensive Donald Trump gave Hillary Clinton plenty of fresh material for the next phase of her presidential campaign on Tuesday, choosing to publicly reopen and relitigate some her most damaging attacks.

The day after his first general election debate, Trump blamed the moderator and a bad microphone and said he was holding back to avoid embarrassing Clinton. Next time, he threatened, he might get more personal and make a bigger political issue of former President Bill Clinton's marital infidelities.

Things are already getting plenty personal. On Monday night, Trump brushed off Clinton's debate claim that he'd once shamed a former Miss Universe winner for her weight. But then he dug deeper the next day \u2014 extending the controversy over what was one of his most negative debate night moments.

\"She gained a massive amount of weight. It was a real problem. We had a real problem,\" Trump told \"Fox and Friends\" about Alicia Machado, the 1996 winner of the pageant he once owned.

The comments were reminiscent of previous times when Trump has attacked private citizens in deeply personal terms. Earlier this month, he was interrupted by the pastor of a traditionally African-American church in Flint, Michigan, after breaking his agreement not to be political in his remarks. Though Trump abided by her wishes, he went after her the next morning on TV saying she was \"a nervous mess\" and that he thought \"something was up.\"

In July, Trump assailed the parents of Humayun Khan, a Muslim U.S. soldier who was killed in Iraq in 2004, after the young man's father spoke out against the Republican at the Democratic National Convention.

\"I watched her very carefully and I was also holding back,\" Trump said of Clinton, reflecting on the debate at an evening rally Tuesday in Melbourne, Florida. \"I didn't want to do anything to embarrass her.\"

It's unclear whether a Trump attack on Bill Clinton's infidelities may help or hurt his appeal.

But Trump's latest comments about Machado were striking in that they came just as he was working to broaden his appeal among minority voters and women \u2014 key demographic groups he's struggling to win.

Clinton aides on Tuesday acknowledged they'd laid a trap for Trump.

\"He seemed unable to handle that big stage,\" said Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta. \"By the end, with kind of snorting and the water gulping and leaning on the lectern that he just seemed really out of gas.\"

Clinton interrupted a discussion of foreign policy in the final moments of the debate to remind viewers that Trump had called Machado \"Miss Piggy\" and \"Miss Housekeeping.\" A video featuring Machado, a Clinton supporter, was released less than two hours after the debate finished.

Aiming to capitalize on Trump's renewed focus on a woman's weight, Clinton's campaign also dispatched Machado to tell reporters how she spent years struggling with eating disorders after being humiliated publicly by Trump.

\"I never imagined then, 20 years later I would be in this position, I would be in this moment, like, watching this guy again doing stupid things and stupid comments,\" Machado said. \"It's really a bad dream for me.\"

Both campaigns knew the first debate, watched by some 80 million people, could mark a turning point six weeks before Election Day with Trump and Clinton locked in an exceedingly close race.

Clinton moved quickly to capitalize on her performance, launching new attacks on Trump's failure to release his tax returns and profiting from the subprime mortgage crisis.

As Trump courted Hispanic voters in Miami, Clinton hammered on an allegation she'd leveled the night before: that he is refusing to release his returns because he goes years without paying any federal taxes. \"That makes me smart,\" was Trump's coy response in the debate, but on Tuesday, Clinton insisted it was nothing to brag about.

\"If not paying taxes makes him smart, what does that make all the rest of us?\"

Trump's campaign aides had worked hard in recent weeks to keep him on message \u2014 and away from personal attacks \u2014 persuading him to use teleprompters and reach out to minority audiences.

Their moderate success in scripting Trump came to a halt Tuesday. Though he insisted he'd done \"very well,\" Trump accused moderator Lester Holt of going harder on him than Clinton. He insisted he had \"no sniffles\" and no allergies despite the #snifflegate speculation that had exploded on social media. He suggested he'd been given a microphone with lower volume than Clinton's.

Her cheerful reaction: \"Anybody who complained about the microphone is not having a good night.\"

The Trump campaign plans to spend $100 million on television advertising before Election Day, spokesman Jason Miller told The Associated Press. Of the $20 million in TV airtime his campaign had already scheduled, $13 million is aimed at Florida voters, according to Kantar Media's political ad tracker.

Clinton's campaign announced Tuesday that she had gained the support of former Virginia Sen. John Warner, a Republican who also served as Navy secretary in the 1970s. Warner is scheduled to appear at an event Wednesday in Northern Virginia with Clinton running mate \u2014 and current Virginia senator \u2014 Tim Kaine.

___

Associated Press writers Julie Bykowicz, Josh Lederman, Jonathan Lemire and Thomas Beaumont contributed to this report.

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Alicia Machado says that when she gained weight after being crowned Miss Universe for 1996, Donald Trump labeled her with a sexist nickname \u2014 \"Miss Piggy\" \u2014 that caused her shame and humiliation.

Two decades later, Machado's dealings with Trump, her one-time beauty pageant boss, are reverberating through the 2016 campaign as the Republican businessman and reality TV star seeks the White House.

Democratic rival Hillary Clinton told Machado's story toward the end of Monday's first presidential debate, scolding Trump for referring to the Venezuelan-born actress as \"Miss Housekeeping,\" as Clinton said, \"because she was Latina.\"

\"Donald, she has a name,\" Clinton said, prompting Trump to ask, \"Where did you find this?\"

Clinton said, \"Her name is Alicia Machado and she has become a U.S. citizen, and you can bet she's going to vote this November.\"

Asked about the exchange during an interview Tuesday with \"Fox and Friends,\" Trump said Machado was \"the worst we ever had,\" adding: \"She gained a massive amount of weight. It was a real problem. We had a real problem.\"

On CNN Tuesday night, Machado said she thinks Trump believes women are \"a second class of people.\"

\"I love this country,\" Machado said. \"I don't want to have some misogynist president.\"

Clinton's embrace of Machado brought comparisons to her campaign's defense of Khizr Khan, whose son was killed while protecting other U.S. soldiers in Iraq. Khan spoke at the Democratic National Convention, holding up a copy of the U.S. Constitution while accusing Trump of smearing the character of Muslims.

Clinton's campaign is trying to mobilize Latinos and women in November's election and has assailed Trump for derogatory comments about women in the past. It quickly released a web video detailing Machado's story, portraying her as a mortified pageant winner whom Trump called \"fat\" or \"ugly\" and blindsided by inviting reporters to watch her work out.

Machado went on a diet in 1997 after saying she gained at least 15 pounds. Trump said during Machado's workout in front of the media that year that \"she likes to eat \u2014 like all of us\" and supported her weight-loss efforts.

She was embroiled in controversy of a different sort one year later, after a judge in Venezuela accused her of threatening to kill him after he indicted her then-boyfriend for attempted murder. The boyfriend, Juan Rafael Rodriguez Regetti, was accused of shooting and wounding his sister's husband, whom he blamed for his sister's suicide. The victim's family accused Machado of driving her boyfriend's getaway car, but she denied any involvement and apparently was never indicted, due to lack of evidence.

Now a U.S. citizen, Machado told reporters Tuesday in a conference call arranged by the Clinton campaign that her experience with Trump could \"open eyes\" in the presidential election. She said she was \"really surprised\" to hear Clinton refer to her story during the debate \u2014 she said she was overcome with emotion and started crying \u2014 but wanted to help Clinton in the election.

After the debate, Machado tweeted her thanks to Clinton, writing in Spanish: \"Thanks Mrs. Hillary Clinton. Your respect for women and our differences makes you great. I'm with you.\"

In June, Machado appeared at a news conference in Virginia held by immigrant advocacy groups to encourage Latino voters to support Clinton.

\"I want to keep working on my campaigns for women's equality, for respect for women and that our physical appearances do not define us productive or intelligent beings,\" Machado told reporters in Spanish. \"We are more than what we look like physically, that's my point.\"

__

Follow Ken Thomas on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/kthomasDC

"}, {"id":"556c72ab-db9c-5cb7-9010-1c7bcff8e125","type":"article","starttime":"1475025962","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T18:26:02-07:00","lastupdated":"1475034331","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"10 Things to Know for Wednesday","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_556c72ab-db9c-5cb7-9010-1c7bcff8e125.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/things-to-know-for-wednesday/article_556c72ab-db9c-5cb7-9010-1c7bcff8e125.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/things-to-know-for-wednesday/article_1c3daca4-401a-55e3-83d5-bb0d3e5daec5.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By The Associated Press","prologue":"Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","2016 united states presidential election","state governments","national elections","elections","government and politics","united states presidential election","events"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"6f3846ae-2641-5d80-ac3f-4eefbcdac20a","description":"This Sept. 25, 2016 photo made available by SpaceX shows a test firing of the company's Raptor engine in McGregor, Texas. 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Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:

1. WHO'S ON THE DEFENSIVE AFTER DEBATE

Donald Trump gives Hillary Clinton plenty of fresh material for the next phase of her presidential campaign, choosing to publicly reopen and relitigate some her most damaging attacks.

2. WHICH CANDIDATE VOTERS THINK IS MOST FIT TO LEAD

An AP-GfK poll shows registered voters are buying into Donald Trump's assertions that he's more physically fit to be president than Hillary Clinton.

3. WHY CLINTON NEEDS WOMEN TO TURN OUT

They're a crucial voting bloc for the Democrat, and her team believes Trump's aggressiveness and interruptions in the opening debate will help her motivate them.

4. WHAT RECORD WAS BROKEN DURING THE DEBATE

Nielsen says 84 million people watched it on TV, beating the mark that had stood since the Carter-Reagan debate in 1980.

5. SYRIA'S GOVERNMENT AND RUSSIA MOVE ON ALEPPO

They're seizing the moment to recapture Aleppo, unleashing the most destructive bombardment of the past five years, with indiscriminate airstrikes that the U.N. says may amount to a war crime.

6. HOW THREE PEOPLE MADE A BABY

Scientists say the first infant has been born from a controversial new technique that combines DNA from three sources \u2014 the mother, the father and an egg donor.

7. SPACEX CHIEF ENVISIONS 1,000 PASSENGER SHIPS FLYING TO THE RED PLANET

Elon Musk calls it the Mars Colonial fleet, and he says it could become reality within a century.

8. EX-ALLY OF CHRISTIE SAYS HE SEEMED HAPPY ABOUT BRIDGE GRIDLOCK

A former high-ranking state official who pleaded guilty in the George Washington Bridge traffic scandal says the New Jersey governor was told about the gridlock as it was unfolding and seemed happy.

9. COURT DOCUMENT SHOWS BLACK MAN KILLED BY CHARLOTTE COP HAD THREATENED WIFE

Keith Scott had a restraining order filed against him a year ago when he threatened to kill his wife and her son with a gun, according to court documents.

10. FRIEND TEXTED WORRIES ABOUT BOATING WITH MARLINS' FERNANDEZ

A Miami bar and restaurant confirmed that the star pitcher was a patron at the riverside establishment before he and two friends were killed in a boat crash.

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(Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer via AP)","byline":"Jeff Siner","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"334","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/f3/ef3b04b3-a0d9-5ca1-a29d-d129a5a0fafc/57eaf745abeab.image.jpg?resize=512%2C334"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/f3/ef3b04b3-a0d9-5ca1-a29d-d129a5a0fafc/57eaf745abeab.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"196","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/f3/ef3b04b3-a0d9-5ca1-a29d-d129a5a0fafc/57eaf745abeab.image.jpg?resize=300%2C196"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"668","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/f3/ef3b04b3-a0d9-5ca1-a29d-d129a5a0fafc/57eaf745abeab.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"357dee4e-41d0-58e7-9ad2-e22f7287fcc6","description":"Police officers stand outside Bank of America Stadium for an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Carolina Panthers, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. 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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) \u2014 The black man killed by Charlotte police had a restraining order filed against him a year ago when he threatened to kill his wife and her son with a gun, according to court documents obtained Tuesday.

Keith Scott's wife filed the order on Oct. 5, saying that law enforcement officers who encounter him should be aware that he \"carries a 9mm black\" gun. Police have said Scott had a handgun when they approached him at an apartment complex last week. Officers told Scott repeatedly to drop the weapon and he was shot to death when he didn't follow their orders, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police chief has said.

Scott's family has said that he was not armed. Videos released by police and the family are inconclusive, and state authorities are investigating. Over the past week, sometimes violent protests have erupted, and the police headquarters building had to be evacuated Tuesday as a bomb squad checked out a suspicious package.

The package was removed Tuesday night and taken to a remote location to be rendered safe, police said, adding that more testing was needed to determine exactly what the package contained.

In the restraining order last fall, Rakeyia Scott sought to keep her husband away because \"he hit my 8 year old in the head a total of three times with his fist,\" she said in the restraining order document.

\"He kicked me and threaten to kill us last night with his gun,\" she said in the order filed in Gaston County, where the couple then lived. \"He said he is a 'killer' and we should know that.\"

Rakeyia Scott checked boxes on the form informing law officers who would serve the restraining order that her husband had neither a permit issued by a county sheriff to buy a handgun nor a state permit to carry a concealed handgun, which requires a criminal background check. She said he worked as a mall security guard.

When deputies went to serve the restraining order two days after it was filed, Scott had already moved to South Carolina, where he has family. About a week after that, Rakeyia Scott filed a separate court notice voluntarily dismissing the order, saying: \"He is no longer a threat to me and my family.\"

In a video released last week capturing the moments before and after Scott was shot by police, Rakeyia Scott can be heard telling officers: \"Don't shoot him! He has no weapon.\"

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police said they found Scott's DNA and fingerprints on a handgun recovered at the scene, and that he was wearing an ankle holster when he was killed.

Police released a photo of a small, black handgun they said was recovered from the scene of Scott's shooting on Sept. 20. Police have not described the gun in detail, but printing on the side of the barrel said it was a Colt Series 80 Mustang .380 caliber, which shoots a 9mm bullet, according to Steven Howard, a firearms consultant in Lansing, Michigan, who has testified as an expert witness in court cases.

It's not clear if the gun mentioned in the restraining order is the same one police said they recovered.

The gun recovered by police had been stolen and later sold to Scott, a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police source told The Associated Press on Monday. The person insisted on anonymity because the State Bureau of Investigation is looking into the shooting.

State agent Erik Hooks declined comment when asked whether the gun had been stolen.

Scott has a lengthy criminal record, including convictions in Texas, North Carolina and South Carolina. Texas records showed he was convicted of evading arrest with a vehicle in 2005, and several months later, of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

Corine Mack, president of the local NAACP chapter, said Scott's legal history didn't matter because officers didn't know any of it before he was shot and blacks typically are \"demonized\" after being killed by police.

\"I don't want to hear any of that,\" Mack said at a news conference announcing demands that include implementation of police reforms approved last year.

Police Chief Kerr Putney has said officers were looking for another suspect when they spotted Scott with marijuana and a gun in an SUV and decided to engage him.

___

AP reporters Jay Reeves and Tom Foreman Jr. contributed to this report.

___

Follow Emery P. Dalesio at http://twitter.com/emerydalesio. His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/emery-p-dalesio

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SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) \u2014 An Army private and another young man were charged Tuesday with murder in the slayings of a California couple and family friend who were discovered after the couple's 6-year-old daughter called police.

Army Pfc. Joshua Acosta, 21, and Frank Felix, 25, were each charged with three counts of murder, and Acosta also faces possible sentencing enhancements for personal discharge of a firearm causing death, the Orange County district attorney's office said.

Acosta and Felix were friends with the couple's daughter and attended \"furry\" events where some participants dress up in colorful animal costumes, according to friends and their social media pages.

Prosecutors allege that Acosta was the gunman in the killings of Jennifer Yost, 39, her husband, Christopher Yost, 34, and their friend Arthur Boucher, 28.

A district attorney's statement says the killings occurred when Acosta and Felix entered the Yosts' Fullerton home early Saturday.

An arraignment initially set for Tuesday was postponed until Oct. 28. Neither man has been reachable for comment while being held in jail since the weekend.

The district attorney's office made no mention of a 17-year-old girl who was also taken into custody by Fullerton police in the case.

After the bodies were discovered Saturday, police said Jennifer Yost's 17-year-old daughter, Katlynn Goodwill Yost, was missing. When the teen's arrest was announced, police also said the daughter had been located but did not say whether she was the teen in custody.

Police were summoned to the home Saturday by the couple's younger daughter. She was not harmed, nor was her 9-year-old sister.

Melinda Giles said she became friends with Jennifer Yost after meeting her and her daughter last year at a gathering of \"furries.\"

She said she also saw Felix and Acosta at furry events, and had met Felix at the Yost family home.

She said Jennifer Yost told her several weeks ago that she had forbidden Felix from seeing her daughter.

Giles said Jennifer and Christopher Yost were warm and generous and recently helped her move into her new home.

Boucher was staying with the Yosts at the time of the killings.

Goodwill Yost is a high school senior and member of the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps. Her social media pages show she is active in the furry community, where she was known as \"Daydreamer,\" and many photos are posted.

She is seen wearing her military uniform in one, and others show a gray fox-wolf costume.

Felix is from Sun Valley, California.

A wheeled-vehicle mechanic, Acosta has been assigned to Fort Irwin, California, since last October, said Wayne V. Hall, an Army spokesman at the Pentagon. Acosta entered the service in March 2015 and previously was assigned to Fort Lee, Virginia, and Fort Jackson, South Carolina.

Contact information for his family was not immediately available.

"}, {"id":"0f639158-5c62-595b-bd20-92bb5dad5ea5","type":"article","starttime":"1475023945","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-27T17:52:25-07:00","lastupdated":"1475026397","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"The Latest: Council president confident about police probe","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_0f639158-5c62-595b-bd20-92bb5dad5ea5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/the-latest-council-president-confident-about-police-probe/article_0f639158-5c62-595b-bd20-92bb5dad5ea5.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/the-latest-council-president-confident-about-police-probe/article_9311a2df-f171-518b-9f71-bda37025c627.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) \u2014 The Latest on a news conference held by families of two people fatally shot by Columbus police this year (all times local):","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","criminal investigations","police","violent crime","crime","law and order","law enforcement agencies","government and politics","municipal governments","local governments"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"1f60ce81-539f-5e67-8fb0-0550ac91bc96","description":"A funeral service card bearing the likeness of Tyre King, the 13-year-old Ohio boy who was fatally shot by Columbus police, is carried by a mourner, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, outside the First Church of God in Columbus, Ohio. Police say Officer Bryan Mason shot Tyre on Sept. 14 after the boy ran from investigators and pulled out a BB gun that looked like a real firearm. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)","byline":"John Minchillo","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f60ce81-539f-5e67-8fb0-0550ac91bc96/57e6bbd9f1fcf.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f60ce81-539f-5e67-8fb0-0550ac91bc96/57e6bbd9f1fcf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f60ce81-539f-5e67-8fb0-0550ac91bc96/57e6bbd9f1fcf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f60ce81-539f-5e67-8fb0-0550ac91bc96/57e6bbd9f1fcf.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"4d389cbb-d30c-5d13-ba1d-5c6316f64c0e","description":"The casket bearing Tyre King, the 13-year-old Ohio boy who was fatally shot by Columbus police, is delivered to his gravesite, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens in Columbus, Ohio. Police say Officer Bryan Mason shot Tyre on Sept. 14 after the boy ran from investigators and pulled out a BB gun that looked like a real firearm. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)","byline":"John Minchillo","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/d3/4d389cbb-d30c-5d13-ba1d-5c6316f64c0e/57e6bbd9a6739.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/d3/4d389cbb-d30c-5d13-ba1d-5c6316f64c0e/57e6bbd9a6739.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/d3/4d389cbb-d30c-5d13-ba1d-5c6316f64c0e/57e6bbd9a6739.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/d3/4d389cbb-d30c-5d13-ba1d-5c6316f64c0e/57e6bbd9a6739.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"0f639158-5c62-595b-bd20-92bb5dad5ea5","body":"

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) \u2014 The Latest on a news conference held by families of two people fatally shot by Columbus police this year (all times local):

8:45 p.m.

The president of the Columbus, Ohio, city council says he's confident the city's police will conduct a thorough investigation of their recent fatal shootings of two black people.

The families of 13-year-old Tyre (ty-REE') King and 23-year-old Henry Green have renewed their requests for independent investigations into the police actions. The black community has protested.

Democratic Council President Zach Klein says he understands the concerns raised by the community. He says in a statement emailed Tuesday if the U.S. Department of Justice \"wishes to get involved in these investigations\" the council would welcome its participation.

Police say Tyre was shot after he ran from an officer and pulled a BB gun that looked like a real firearm. They say Green was shot after he fired on two plainclothes officers.

A lawyer for their families says witnesses have contradicted police accounts.

___

6 p.m.

A Columbus, Ohio, spokeswoman says Democratic Mayor Andrew Ginther has \"great confidence\" in the police department's ability to thoroughly investigate the fatal police shooting of a 13-year-old boy.

Spokeswoman Robin Davis also said Tuesday if the U.S. Department of Justice chooses to get involved in the review the police department will cooperate.

Teenager Tyre (ty-REE') King's family has called for an independent investigation into his Sept. 14 death.

Police say Tyre ran from an officer investigating a reported armed robbery and pulled a BB gun that looked like a real firearm. But attorneys for his family say witnesses have contradicted authorities' accounts.

Davis says city officials continue to ask Columbus residents to reserve judgment. She says \"a thorough, objective accounting of the facts surrounding this tragic event\" is what's most important.

___

4 p.m.

The families of two people fatally shot by Columbus police are renewing their calls for outside reviews of the cases.

The grandmother of 13-year-old Tyre (ty-REE') King and the mother of 23-year-old Henry Green spoke at a news conference Tuesday. They described the emotional toll the shootings have had on them and their families.

Attorneys representing both families say there are discrepancies between authorities' and witnesses' accounts.

Tyre was shot Sept. 14 after police say he ran from an officer investigating a reported armed robbery and pulled a BB gun that looked like a real firearm.

Green was shot June 6 after officers said he ignored commands to drop his gun and fired on them.

The shootings are under investigation and will be presented for a grand jury to decide whether charges are merited.

___

11:15 a.m.

Attorneys for two families whose relatives were fatally shot by Columbus police are renewing requests for independent investigations.

The families of 13-year-old Tyre (ty-REE') King and 23-year-old Henry Green plan to hold a news conference Tuesday to address what they see as discrepancies between what authorities and witnesses have said.

Tyre was shot Sept. 14 after police say he ran from an officer investigating a reported armed robbery and pulled a BB gun that looked like a real firearm.

Green was shot June 6 after officers said he ignored commands to drop his gun and fired on them.

The families' attorney, Sean Walton, says witnesses have contradicted police in both cases.

The shootings are under investigation and will be presented for a grand jury to decide whether charges are merited.

"} ]