[ {"id":"e3ed50dd-0d93-5faf-9686-25e45a071cf3","type":"article","starttime":"1487991600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T20:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"commentary":"ap/commentary"},{"column":"news/opinion/column"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Opinion: Why keeping immigrants out will hurt America","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/article_e3ed50dd-0d93-5faf-9686-25e45a071cf3.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/opinion-why-keeping-immigrants-out-will-hurt-america/article_e3ed50dd-0d93-5faf-9686-25e45a071cf3.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/opinion-why-keeping-immigrants-out-will-hurt-america/article_e3ed50dd-0d93-5faf-9686-25e45a071cf3.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Jennifer Dabbs Sciubba\nLos Angeles Times","prologue":"Trump's economic growth needs immigrants as consumers, workers.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["demographics","social affairs","economy","business","hiring and recruitment","personnel","labor economy","population aging","immigration","social issues"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"57b2f163-2f4c-51d1-b944-c6b88a0a42b4","description":"President Donald Trump gestures as he speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, in Oxon Hill, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)","byline":"The Associated Press","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"324","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7b/57b2f163-2f4c-51d1-b944-c6b88a0a42b4/58b076c4ce237.image.jpg?resize=512%2C324"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7b/57b2f163-2f4c-51d1-b944-c6b88a0a42b4/58b076c4ce237.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C18&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7b/57b2f163-2f4c-51d1-b944-c6b88a0a42b4/58b076c4ce237.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C18&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7b/57b2f163-2f4c-51d1-b944-c6b88a0a42b4/58b076c4ce237.image.jpg?crop=512%2C288%2C0%2C18"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"e3ed50dd-0d93-5faf-9686-25e45a071cf3","body":"

President Trump keeps reiterating his pledge to build a border wall between the United States and Mexico. He and his supporters have in mind a barrier that will keep Mexican immigrants out of the country. They should be thinking instead of a wall that will keep them in.

Since 2008, more Mexicans have left the U.S. than have come here \u2014 a net loss of 140,000 migrants, according to calculations by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center through 2014. Even without new immigration restrictions and border crackdowns, demographic and economic trends clearly show that America will continue to lose more Mexican immigrants than it gains. To deliver the economic growth Trump has promised, the U.S. will need producers and consumers, and there won\u2019t be enough of them without immigration.

People move among countries for all kinds of reasons. Large-scale, or macro, factors include where there is a strong economy and plentiful jobs or laws that prohibit or allow migrants. At the micro level, relocation is personal, for reasons such as family reunification. Changing forces at work on both of these levels help explain why more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming, and why that pattern is likely to continue \u2014 with or without a border wall.

Economists theorize that migration is primarily a function of labor supply and demand. People move from low-wage to high-wage countries. And wages, too, are dependent on the supply and demand for workers.

During the past few decades, Mexico\u2019s labor supply has been large relative to the U.S., especially for jobs Americans didn\u2019t much want to do, such as agricultural field work and some kinds of construction. Labor has been cheaper in Mexico than here, so a border-crosser could earn more money for the same work in the U.S. than at home.

In the 1990s, it\u2019s estimated that 3 million Mexicans migrated to the U.S., pushed and pulled mostly by these economic forces. But since the 2008 economic recession, neither the push nor the pull has been nearly as strong as it once was.

In 2007 and in 2015, the Pew Center asked Mexicans who returned home from the U.S. why they made the move. At the micro level, fewer reported having family or friends in the U.S. with whom they kept in regular contact. In the Pew survey, 61 percent said reuniting with family in Mexico was the primary reason for their return. As for the macro level, the survey found that one-third of the respondents believed that the standard of living was no different in Mexico than in the U.S. In 2015, that figure was up 10 percent compared with 2007.

Part of the reason for that perception is the fact that the supply of labor in Mexico is dwindling and wages are rising there. We can expect both trends to continue over the next few decades.

Mexican women now are barely having enough babies to replace their country\u2019s population, and their fertility rates are declining. As Mexico\u2019s economy has developed, the number of babies born to each woman on average has been dropping rapidly, from 6.5 children per woman in 1975 to 2.2 by 2010 \u2014 nearly on a par with the U.S. \u2014 according to data compiled by the United Nations. Now, labor shortages and, consequently, higher wages are on the horizon.

Here\u2019s another way to look at the data: Between 2000 and 2015, Mexico needed to create about 800,000 new jobs a year to employ young people who were part of large cohorts born when fertility was still high. But in 2015, fertility declines started to slow \u2014 the number of 15- to 19-year-olds peaked \u2014 meaning less need for new jobs and ultimately less reason for Mexicans to migrate for work.

Those trends aren\u2019t good for the U.S. For decades here, the fertility rate hovered right around replacement level. Now, American mothers have on average fewer than two babies each. That results in an aging population and, without more immigrants, the economy won\u2019t have enough replacement producers and consumers. Forecasters calculate that everything from infrastructure to national defense can be strained by an aging population because spending on entitlements crowds out other budget items.

The United States has always attracted immigrants. Welcoming newcomers from around the world has been to our demographic, economic and social benefit. Building a wall on the border with Mexico will cost us dearly, in dollars spent and much more. If the wall succeeds in keeping migrants out, we won\u2019t have a labor force big enough and young enough to support our economy, let alone to \u201cmake America great again.\u201d

"}, {"id":"027293a2-958f-5110-9b32-63271f16849e","type":"article","starttime":"1487987100","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T18:45:00-07:00","sections":[{"commentary":"ap/commentary"},{"column":"news/opinion/column"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Jonah Goldberg: CPAC\u2019s odd tango with Milo Yiannopoulos","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/article_027293a2-958f-5110-9b32-63271f16849e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/jonah-goldberg-cpac-s-odd-tango-with-milo-yiannopoulos/article_027293a2-958f-5110-9b32-63271f16849e.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/jonah-goldberg-cpac-s-odd-tango-with-milo-yiannopoulos/article_027293a2-958f-5110-9b32-63271f16849e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Tribune News Service","prologue":"There is almost no \"gone too far\" for conservatives.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["anti-semitism","racial and ethnic discrimination","race and ethnicity","social issues","social affairs","discrimination","human rights and civil liberties"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"ecdd235b-d6ea-5a4d-8bc6-d70ea2b17419","description":"Jonah Goldberg","byline":"Glenn Kaupert / Chicago Tribune, 2003","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"255","height":"330","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/cd/ecdd235b-d6ea-5a4d-8bc6-d70ea2b17419/57f2f97b79693.image.jpg?resize=255%2C330"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/cd/ecdd235b-d6ea-5a4d-8bc6-d70ea2b17419/557b6569c9ce4.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"388","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/cd/ecdd235b-d6ea-5a4d-8bc6-d70ea2b17419/5408ff49b4022.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"574","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/cd/ecdd235b-d6ea-5a4d-8bc6-d70ea2b17419/57f2f97b79693.image.jpg?crop=255%2C143%2C0%2C93"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"027293a2-958f-5110-9b32-63271f16849e","body":"

On Saturday, Matt Schlapp, the head of the American Conservative Union, which sponsors the premier conservative confab the Conservative Political Action Conference, wrote on Twitter: \u201cWe think free speech includes hearing Milo\u2019s important perspective.\u201d On Monday, Schlapp announced that Milo Yiannopoulos had been disinvited.

The decision to rescind the invitation was prompted by the surfacing of videos \u2014 long available on the internet \u2014 in which Yiannopoulos praised pederasty, i.e., sex between older men and pubescent boys as young as 13.

From the outset, many on the right who do not consider themselves part of the Cult of Milo opposed his CPAC invitation. The disturbing thing is that, absent these videos, we would have lost the fight.

Even now, Schlapp defends the initial decision to invite Yiannopoulos. On Tuesday\u2019s \u201cMorning Joe,\u201d Schlapp insisted: \u201cThe fact is, he\u2019s got a voice that a lot of young people listen to.\u201d A lot of young conservative people, he should have added, precisely because Yiannopoulos enrages so many young liberals.

And that\u2019s part of the problem. We are in a particularly tribal moment in American politics in which \u201cthe enemy of my enemy is my ally\u201d is the most powerful argument around.

Evolutionary psychologist John Tooby recently wrote that if he could explain one scientific concept to the public, it would be the \u201ccoalitional instinct.\u201d In our natural habitat, to be alone was to be vulnerable. If \u201cyou had no coalition, you were nakedly at the mercy of everyone else, so the instinct to belong to a coalition has urgency, pre-existing and superseding any policy-driven basis for membership,\u201d Tooby wrote on Edge.org. \u201cThis is why group beliefs are free to be so weird.\u201d

We overlook the hypocrisies and shortcomings within our coalition out of a desire to protect ourselves from our enemies.

Today, the right sees the left as enemies \u2014 and, I should say, vice versa. Yiannopoulos is a hero for many because he fights political correctness and is transgressive. Yiannopoulos gives the right an edgy cultural avatar to pit against the left. At a time when entertainment and celebrity matter more than facts and arguments, he is an entertaining celebrity.

Until recently, Yiannopoulos was also a self-described \u201cfellow traveler\u201d of the avowedly racist and anti-Semitic \u201calt-right.\u201d He advanced their worldview primarily from his perch as a senior editor of Breitbart News, the website formerly run by Stephen Bannon, now a senior adviser to President Trump who once said he sought to make Breitbart \u201cthe platform for the alt-right.\u201d (Yiannopoulos resigned from Breitbart on Tuesday .)

Last year, alt-righters got attention for hurling bigotry at Trump-skeptical journalists. For instance, my National Review colleague David French was subjected almost daily to pictures of his adopted black daughter photo-shopped into a gas chamber, with a Nazi uniform-clad Trump poised to push the button.

Yiannopoulos\u2019 defense of all this is that it is funny and rebellious: \u201cJust as the kids of the \u201960s shocked their parents with promiscuity, long hair and rock \u2019n\u2019 roll, so too do the alt-right\u2019s young meme brigades shock older generations\u201d with Holocaust jokes and Klan humor. It was, he and a colleague wrote for Breitbart, \u201cundeniably hysterical.\u201d

Well, I can deny it.

Countless conservatives defend Yiannopoulos (who admits he\u2019s not a conservative) in much the same way Democrats defended the anti-Semitic \u201cradio priest\u201d Charles Coughlin as long as he supported the New Deal as \u201cChrist\u2019s Deal.\u201d Conservatives cling to rationalizations to defend their champion. They say he \u201cdistanced\u201d himself from the alt-right. Yiannopoulos did, cynically, only after Trump was elected. They credit Yiannopoulos\u2019 claim that he can say anti-Semitic things because his grandmother was (supposedly) Jewish, and he can say racist things because he sleeps with black men.

These are the kinds of arguments a coalition accepts when it has lost its moral moorings and cares only about \u201cwinning.\u201d Free expression was never the issue. If it were, he\u2019d be at CPAC (and Breitbart), perhaps restating his case for ephebophilia. Apparently, conservatives still draw the line there, but not at anti-Semitism or racism. The tent, sad to say, is big enough for that.

"}, {"id":"de32318f-913d-5f24-b667-8b225a7ca2c2","type":"article","starttime":"1487980800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: HCR 2029 Citizen crafted laws","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_de32318f-913d-5f24-b667-8b225a7ca2c2.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-hcr-citizen-crafted-laws/article_de32318f-913d-5f24-b667-8b225a7ca2c2.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-hcr-citizen-crafted-laws/article_de32318f-913d-5f24-b667-8b225a7ca2c2.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"While the intent of HCR 2029 is purported to be to prevent big money, (George Soros or Koch brothers), from gathering enough signatures in a single district to advance a bill to a vote, it has the opposite effect. It would effectively block any grass roots movement from advancing a ballot measure, simply for the lack of enough signatures from any one of the 30 state legislative districts.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"de32318f-913d-5f24-b667-8b225a7ca2c2","body":"

While the intent of HCR 2029 is purported to be to prevent big money, (George Soros or Koch brothers), from gathering enough signatures in a single district to advance a bill to a vote, it has the opposite effect. It would effectively block any grass roots movement from advancing a ballot measure, simply for the lack of enough signatures from any one of the 30 state legislative districts.

Imagine for a minute the difficulty of gathering enough signatures in all 30 districts throughout the state to pass something as well intended as Shannon's Law under this proposed bill. HCR 2029 is well intended, but bad legislation.

Frank Engle

Oro Valley

"}, {"id":"59bd2cee-0c67-5a11-ad2e-7373c4c8d6e9","type":"article","starttime":"1487980800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Recruiters win in TUSD superintendent turmoil","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_59bd2cee-0c67-5a11-ad2e-7373c4c8d6e9.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-recruiters-win-in-tusd-superintendent-turmoil/article_59bd2cee-0c67-5a11-ad2e-7373c4c8d6e9.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-recruiters-win-in-tusd-superintendent-turmoil/article_59bd2cee-0c67-5a11-ad2e-7373c4c8d6e9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"I am not aware of the 'whys' and 'wherefore's' of Tucson Unified Superintendent H.T. Sanchez's job performance, but am aware he can expect phone calls from recruiters searching for administrators for other school districts. Those same recruiters might contact TUSD after Mr. Sanchez is gone to see if they need help finding a replacement.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"59bd2cee-0c67-5a11-ad2e-7373c4c8d6e9","body":"

I am not aware of the 'whys' and 'wherefore's' of Tucson Unified Superintendent H.T. Sanchez's job performance, but am aware he can expect phone calls from recruiters searching for administrators for other school districts. Those same recruiters might contact TUSD after Mr. Sanchez is gone to see if they need help finding a replacement.

Jim Dreis

East side

"}, {"id":"aa11c133-95e7-5230-9e55-7a4140991a15","type":"article","starttime":"1487980800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Don\u2019t limit voter initiatives, says former lawmaker","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_aa11c133-95e7-5230-9e55-7a4140991a15.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-don-t-limit-voter-initiatives-says-former-lawmaker/article_aa11c133-95e7-5230-9e55-7a4140991a15.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-don-t-limit-voter-initiatives-says-former-lawmaker/article_aa11c133-95e7-5230-9e55-7a4140991a15.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Re: the Feb. 19 article \"Why limiting the initiative process can help Arizona\" As a former member of the Arizona Legislature, I object to the word \u201cundermine\u201d to describe the impact of citizen initiatives on representative government. Although sometimes frustrated by the Legislature\u2019s inability to modify an initiative such as the super majority for tax increases, I was more often happy that initiatives resulted in improvements such as the tobacco tax for health services for uninsured people.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"aa11c133-95e7-5230-9e55-7a4140991a15","body":"

Re: the Feb. 19 article \"Why limiting the initiative process can help Arizona\"

As a former member of the Arizona Legislature, I object to the word \u201cundermine\u201d to describe the impact of citizen initiatives on representative government. Although sometimes frustrated by the Legislature\u2019s inability to modify an initiative such as the super majority for tax increases, I was more often happy that initiatives resulted in improvements such as the tobacco tax for health services for uninsured people.

The initiative process can stop bad stuff such as the legislature\u2019s effort to make voting more difficult. Citizen initiatives allow for the people themselves to bypass the inertia of the Legislature.

Writer Joseph Morgan\u2019s statement that the process results in \u201cmore agreement among disparate groups\u201d ignores the fact that many Arizona leaders of the majority party often require that votes for passage of an act must come only from the majority party.

The media coverage and community meetings discussing the minimum wage initiative offered more opportunities \u201cfor each side to present arguments for and against\u201d than most deliberations I witnessed in the legislature.

Phil Lopes

West side

"}, {"id":"f45f359f-7026-52b5-9460-a0fbdab71f35","type":"article","starttime":"1487980800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-24T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Commemorate Jan. 8, 2011 victims with action on mental health, not a structure","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_f45f359f-7026-52b5-9460-a0fbdab71f35.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-commemorate-jan-victims-with-action-on-mental-health-not/article_f45f359f-7026-52b5-9460-a0fbdab71f35.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-commemorate-jan-victims-with-action-on-mental-health-not/article_f45f359f-7026-52b5-9460-a0fbdab71f35.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Re: the Feb. 21 article \"Lawmakers to debate allocating $2.5 million for Jan. 8 memorial\" It's nice that Arizona wants to create a memorial for the January 8 victims. BUT, BUT, BUT, I'd like the legislators to reconsider the amount of money used. I think there is a better way to honor the January 8 victims: scale-down the memorial and instead use the millions to treat the many mentally ill people in Arizona. Such measures could potentially prevent future violence.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"f45f359f-7026-52b5-9460-a0fbdab71f35","body":"

Re: the Feb. 21 article \"Lawmakers to debate allocating $2.5 million for Jan. 8 memorial\"

It's nice that Arizona wants to create a memorial for the January 8 victims. BUT, BUT, BUT, I'd like the legislators to reconsider the amount of money used. I think there is a better way to honor the January 8 victims: scale-down the memorial and instead use the millions to treat the many mentally ill people in Arizona. Such measures could potentially prevent future violence.

And, perhaps adding more counselors to our schools would also have the potential to prevent at least some future violence in our state.

Wouldn't this be a far better way to honor the January 8 victims?

Karen McKee

West side

"}, {"id":"e0752054-0ab6-564d-8931-75c0cc67e30f","type":"article","starttime":"1487894400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: The Friday package can be on the shorter side\u2026. Thanks!","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_e0752054-0ab6-564d-8931-75c0cc67e30f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-the-friday-package-can-be-on-the-shorter-side/article_e0752054-0ab6-564d-8931-75c0cc67e30f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-the-friday-package-can-be-on-the-shorter-side/article_e0752054-0ab6-564d-8931-75c0cc67e30f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Reach out to state lawmakers, too Star columnist Sarah Garrecht Gassen made a great point when she addressed the recent difficulty of expressing one's views with Sen. McCain. I've made a few calls lately myself. I couldn't reach Sen. McCain. I did however get in contact with the office of State Senator Steve Smith of District 11.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"e0752054-0ab6-564d-8931-75c0cc67e30f","body":"

Reach out to state lawmakers, too

Star columnist Sarah Garrecht Gassen made a great point when she addressed the recent difficulty of expressing one's views with Sen. McCain. I've made a few calls lately myself. I couldn't reach Sen. McCain. I did however get in contact with the office of State Senator Steve Smith of District 11.

As a public school teacher, I wanted to express my views on vouchers used for private schools. My concern is for the students who won't be able to afford to move to another school because they can't afford the difference in the tuition that it costs to attend some of these religious-based schools.

The person who answered Senator Smith's phone seemed to be an intern. Rather than jot down my concern and share it with the senator, he proceeded to relate his views with me. \"Uh, could you share my concerns with the good senator?\" I said to the young man.

It\u2019s difficult to share your views, apparently! I'll keep making the calls. Too much is at stake.

Steve Arechiga

Oro Valley

"}, {"id":"5bb74ff0-36bf-5cee-9437-54e0adf281da","type":"article","starttime":"1487894400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Businesses taking advantage of minimum wage boost","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_5bb74ff0-36bf-5cee-9437-54e0adf281da.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-businesses-taking-advantage-of-minimum-wage-boost/article_5bb74ff0-36bf-5cee-9437-54e0adf281da.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-businesses-taking-advantage-of-minimum-wage-boost/article_5bb74ff0-36bf-5cee-9437-54e0adf281da.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"I took some clothes to the dry cleaner recently and they had increased their prices by more than a dollar per item. I asked why and was told the increase in prices were necessary because of the increase in the Arizona minimum wage from $8.05 to $10.00 per hour that took effect on January 1. I refused to pay the increase, went to two other cleaners who also were also using the same excuse to increase prices, before I found one that had not raised prices.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"5bb74ff0-36bf-5cee-9437-54e0adf281da","body":"

I took some clothes to the dry cleaner recently and they had increased their prices by more than a dollar per item. I asked why and was told the increase in prices were necessary because of the increase in the Arizona minimum wage from $8.05 to $10.00 per hour that took effect on January 1.

I refused to pay the increase, went to two other cleaners who also were also using the same excuse to increase prices, before I found one that had not raised prices.

The increase in prices is not restricted to the dry-cleaning business. It seems that prices have been increased by many employers \u2014 far out of proportion to the rise in employee wages. It seems to me that if a business can\u2019t survive paying $10 an hour without raising prices, then perhaps it shouldn\u2019t be in business at all.

Don Benchoff

Northwest side

"}, {"id":"646dcf67-c2a9-5732-bd9f-1512cca3cd5e","type":"article","starttime":"1487894400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Waiting for the Reichstag Fire","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_646dcf67-c2a9-5732-bd9f-1512cca3cd5e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-waiting-for-the-reichstag-fire/article_646dcf67-c2a9-5732-bd9f-1512cca3cd5e.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-waiting-for-the-reichstag-fire/article_646dcf67-c2a9-5732-bd9f-1512cca3cd5e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Throughout history, strongmen used the fear of terrorism to justify breaking societal norms and the rule of law. Such was case with Putin in Chechnya and Hitler with the Reichstag Fire. Security experts agree that it is only a matter of time until there is a terrorist attack in America. President Trump has set up the context for a classic \u201cstrongman\u201d response to such events. His subjective criticisms of our free press, and the judicial and legislative branches have created an atmosphere for setting up the typical strong man response of \u201cI told you so\u201d when an event actually occurs. At such time, strongmen count on the public\u2019s fearful willingness to swap the constitutional protection and rule of law for personal safety \u2014 and in doing so they get neither.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"646dcf67-c2a9-5732-bd9f-1512cca3cd5e","body":"

Throughout history, strongmen used the fear of terrorism to justify breaking societal norms and the rule of law. Such was case with Putin in Chechnya and Hitler with the Reichstag Fire.

Security experts agree that it is only a matter of time until there is a terrorist attack in America.

President Trump has set up the context for a classic \u201cstrongman\u201d response to such events. His subjective criticisms of our free press, and the judicial and legislative branches have created an atmosphere for setting up the typical strong man response of \u201cI told you so\u201d when an event actually occurs. At such time, strongmen count on the public\u2019s fearful willingness to swap the constitutional protection and rule of law for personal safety \u2014 and in doing so they get neither.

When chaos happens, as it possibly will, Americans cannot let their fears weaken their resolve to protect the Constitution and rule of law.

As President Franklin D. Roosevelt said in 1933, \u201cThe only thing we have to fear is fear itself\u201d.

Leonard Kronman

Foothills

"}, {"id":"b61b1953-5102-58e7-9626-72b392e95178","type":"article","starttime":"1487873940","starttime_iso8601":"2017-02-23T11:19:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1487972170","sections":[{"commentary":"ap/commentary"},{"column":"news/opinion/column"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Charles Krauthammer: Trump and the 'Madman Theory'","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/article_b61b1953-5102-58e7-9626-72b392e95178.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/charles-krauthammer-trump-and-the-madman-theory/article_b61b1953-5102-58e7-9626-72b392e95178.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/charles-krauthammer-trump-and-the-madman-theory/article_b61b1953-5102-58e7-9626-72b392e95178.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Washington Post","prologue":"His inconsistency02251 on foreign policy may be on purpose.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["national security","military and defense","government and politics","foreign policy","international relations","government policy","diplomacy"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"7fbb8606-9d0d-5597-a467-ffc46c1b8665","description":"Charles Krauthammer","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"367","height":"456","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/fb/7fbb8606-9d0d-5597-a467-ffc46c1b8665/5801a519839fd.image.jpg?resize=367%2C456"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/fb/7fbb8606-9d0d-5597-a467-ffc46c1b8665/557b656a35156.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"372","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/fb/7fbb8606-9d0d-5597-a467-ffc46c1b8665/53ff88337e360.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1272","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/fb/7fbb8606-9d0d-5597-a467-ffc46c1b8665/53ff883376bab.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"b61b1953-5102-58e7-9626-72b392e95178","body":"

At the heart of Donald Trump\u2019s foreign policy team lies a glaring contradiction. On the one hand, it is composed of men of experience, judgment and traditionalism. Meaning, they are all very much within the parameters of mainstream American internationalism as practiced since 1945. Practically every member of the team \u2014 the heads of State, Homeland Security, the CIA, and most especially Defense Secretary James Mattis and national security adviser H.R. McMaster \u2014 could fit in a Cabinet put together by, say, Hillary Clinton.

The commander in chief, on the other hand, is quite the opposite \u2014 inexperienced, untraditional, unbounded. His pronouncements on everything from the \u201cone China\u201d policy to the two-state (Arab-Israeli) solution, from NATO obsolescence to the ravages of free trade, continue to confound and, as we say today, disrupt.

The obvious question is: Can this arrangement possibly work? The answer thus far, surprisingly, is: perhaps.

The sample size is tiny but take, for example, the German excursion. Trump dispatched his grown-ups \u2014 Vice President Pence, Defense Secretary Mattis, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson \u2014 to various international confabs in Germany to reassure allies with the usual pieties about America\u2019s commitment to European security. They did drop a few hints to Trump\u2019s loud complaints about allied parasitism, in particular shirking their share of the defense burden.

Within days, Germany announced a 20,000-man expansion of its military. Smaller European countries are likely to take note of the new setup. It\u2019s classic good-cop, bad-cop: The secretaries represent foreign policy continuity but their boss preaches America First. Message: Shape up.

John Hannah of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies suggests that the push-pull effect might work on foes as well as friends. Last Saturday, China announced a cutoff of all coal exports from North Korea for the rest of 2017. Constituting more than one-third of all North Korean exports, this is a major blow to its economy.

True, part of the reason could be Chinese ire at the brazen assassination of Kim Jong Un\u2019s half-brother, who had been under Chinese protection. Nonetheless, the boycott was declared just days after a provocative North Korean missile launch \u2014 and shortly into the term of a new American president who has shown that he can be erratic and quite disdainful of Chinese sensibilities.

His wavering on the \u201cone China\u201d policy took Beijing by surprise. Trump also strongly denounced Chinese expansion in the South China Sea and conducted an ostentatious love-in with Japan\u2019s prime minister, something guaranteed to rankle the Chinese. Beijing\u2019s boycott of Pyongyang is many things, among them a nod to Washington.

This suggests that the peculiar and discordant makeup of the U.S. national security team \u2014 traditionalist lieutenants, disruptive boss \u2014 might reproduce the old Nixonian \u201cMadman Theory.\u201d That\u2019s when adversaries tread carefully because they suspect the U.S. president of being unpredictable, occasionally reckless and potentially crazy dangerous. Henry Kissinger, with Nixon\u2019s collaboration, tried more than once to exploit this perception to pressure adversaries.

Trump\u2019s people have already shown a delicate touch in dealing with his bouts of loopiness. Trump has gone on for years about how we should have taken Iraq\u2019s oil for ourselves. In Baghdad last Sunday, Mattis wryly backed off, telling his hosts that \u201cAll of us in America have generally paid for our gas and oil all along, and I\u2019m sure that we will continue to do so in the future.\u201d

Yet sometimes an off-center comment can have its uses. Take Trump\u2019s casual dismissal of a U.S. commitment to a two-state solution in the Middle East. The next day, U.S. policy was brought back in line by his own U.N. ambassador. But this diversion might prove salutary. It\u2019s a message to the Palestinians that their decades of rejectionism may not continue to pay off with an inexorable march toward statehood \u2014 that there may actually be a price to pay for making no concessions and simply waiting for the U.S. to deliver them a Palestinian state.

To be sure, a two-track, two-policy, two-reality foreign policy is risky, unsettling and has the potential to go totally off the rails. This is not how you would draw it up in advance. It\u2019s unstable and confusing. But the experience of the first month suggests that, with prudence and luck, it can yield the occasional benefit \u2014 that the combination of radical rhetoric and conventional policy may induce better behavior both in friend and foe.

Alas, there is also a worst-case scenario. It needs no elaboration.

"} ]