[ {"id":"8e57853e-1d3a-528e-963c-de891bde1708","type":"article","starttime":"1474857780","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-25T19:43:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474887942","sections":[{"outdoors":"entertainment/outdoors"},{"weekend":"entertainment/weekend"},{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"families":"lifestyles/families"},{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Get Moving Tucson: Build up to a half-marathon","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/article_8e57853e-1d3a-528e-963c-de891bde1708.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/get-moving-tucson-build-up-to-a-half-marathon/article_8e57853e-1d3a-528e-963c-de891bde1708.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/get-moving-tucson-build-up-to-a-half-marathon/article_8e57853e-1d3a-528e-963c-de891bde1708.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Randy Accetta\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"For the next few months, Tucson is a half-marathoners paradise. On Oct. 30 is the TMC \u201cA\u201d Mountain Half-Marathon, a 13.1 mile run that starts in downtown Tucson, with runners going up \u201cA\u201d Mountain, then back down and along the Santa Cruz River path, finishing downtown. On Nov. 12, is the Veteran\u2019s Day Half-Marathon, on the gently rolling foothill roads near Sabino High School. On Dec. 12, the Tucson Marathon includes a half-marathon option, in which runners cruise down Oracle Road, starting at Biosphere Road and ending at the Golder Ranch Fire Station.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#weekend","#columnist","#latest"],"customProperties":{},"revision":11,"commentID":"8e57853e-1d3a-528e-963c-de891bde1708","body":"

For the next few months, Tucson is a half-marathoners paradise.

On Oct. 30 is the TMC \u201cA\u201d Mountain Half-Marathon, a 13.1 mile run that starts in downtown Tucson, with runners going up \u201cA\u201d Mountain, then back down and along the Santa Cruz River path, finishing downtown.

On Nov. 12, is the Veteran\u2019s Day Half-Marathon, on the gently rolling foothill roads near Sabino High School. On Dec. 12, the Tucson Marathon includes a half-marathon option, in which runners cruise down Oracle Road, starting at Biosphere Road and ending at the Golder Ranch Fire Station.

Last week, we discussed an easy strategy to combine walking and running: At its simplest, walk for a minute, jog for a minute, walk for a minute, jog for a minute. Today, let\u2019s look today at how you can incorporate some of that lesson into training for one of these great half-marathons.

Each week, see if you can do two or thee \u201crunning\u201d efforts that last for between 30-60 minutes. Those of you who are already in running shape can try to run for a full hour, but the rest of us might want to alternate a few minutes of walking followed by a minute or two of jogging. There is no perfect formula, so start with the one-minute walk followed by one-minute jog and see if you can extend the jogging portion.

If you can complete two or three of these sessions in close to an hour, you will get in good shape.

If possible, incorporate hills into one effort each week. If you can go to Sabino Canyon, Tumamoc Hill or \u201cA\u201d Mountain and get 30-60 minutes of steady exercising, the effort of going uphill will help you get in shape and make you that much tougher.

For example, you can attend the free Monday evening Meet Me at Maynard\u2019s, (meet on the north side of Hotel Congress, 311 E. Congress St.) then do the 6-mile round trip along Broadway, up and down \u201cA\u201d Mountain and back.

These strategies will get you in shape for any event \u2014 but if you want to do a half-marathon, you\u2019ll probably want to go a bit farther. Once a week you should try to extend your typical 30-60 minute effort all the way to 90 minutes or more. So pick a morning when you have plenty of time . Then do your typical run/walk repeats. Extend it so that you can go for an hour and a half.

If you can do that for a few weekends, I promise that you will be able to accomplish any of our great local half-marathon events.

In the coming weeks, we will discuss locations where you can run and offer some \u201csports psychology\u201d tips that you can use as you extend your fitness program.

"}, {"id":"0b7a6d60-c5a5-50da-bd4d-00c0528a6f72","type":"article","starttime":"1474857300","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-25T19:35:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474887945","priority":35,"sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"The National Alliance on Mental Illness has comprehensive local presence","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_0b7a6d60-c5a5-50da-bd4d-00c0528a6f72.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/the-national-alliance-on-mental-illness-has-comprehensive-local-presence/article_0b7a6d60-c5a5-50da-bd4d-00c0528a6f72.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/the-national-alliance-on-mental-illness-has-comprehensive-local-presence/article_0b7a6d60-c5a5-50da-bd4d-00c0528a6f72.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Marsi Quigley\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Mental illness refers to a wide range of mental health conditions, such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, that affect your mood, thinking and behavior. Those conditions may affect your ability to function and relate to others on a daily basis. Mental illnesses are physical diseases just like heart disease or diabetes. With heart disease, the organ affected is the heart.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["mental health","programs"],"internalKeywords":["#weekend"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"3fba182f-d563-50a6-a1a9-9165fc94be48","description":"Mark Ruffalo, left, as Cam Stuart, Imogene Wolodarsky as Amelia Stuart and Ashley Aufderheide as Faith Stuart in \u201cInfinitely Polar Bear.\u201d Ruffalo portrays a father who has bipolar disorder and is raising his two daughters while his wife attends school in another city.","byline":"Sony Pictures Classics/Loft Cinema","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"413","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fb/3fba182f-d563-50a6-a1a9-9165fc94be48/57e179289bae9.image.jpg?resize=620%2C413"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fb/3fba182f-d563-50a6-a1a9-9165fc94be48/57e179289bae9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fb/3fba182f-d563-50a6-a1a9-9165fc94be48/57e179289bae9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fb/3fba182f-d563-50a6-a1a9-9165fc94be48/57e179289bae9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"0b7a6d60-c5a5-50da-bd4d-00c0528a6f72","body":"

Mental illness refers to a wide range of mental health conditions, such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, that affect your mood, thinking and behavior.

Those conditions may affect your ability to function and relate to others on a daily basis. Mental illnesses are physical diseases just like heart disease or diabetes. With heart disease, the organ affected is the heart.

With mental illnesses, the organ affected is the brain. Anyone can have a mental illness. It\u2019s not anyone\u2019s fault and mental illnesses are treatable.

Did you know that one in five adults experience a mental health condition in any given year? Did you know that one in five or 20 percent of youths between the ages of 13 and 18 experience a mental- health condition in a given year?

Fifty percent of youth between the ages of 8 and 15 with a mental health condition don\u2019t receive treatment. The average delay between onset of symptoms and receiving treatment is 8 to 10 years due to stigma and lack of education. That\u2019s where NAMI can help.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness is the largest grassroots nonprofit mental health organization in the country.

NAMI Southern Arizona is the local affiliate with a mission to improve the lives of all those affected by mental illness. NAMI SA has staff and volunteers who work in the community to raise awareness, provide support and education to those in need.

NAMI SA\u2019s vision for the future is to make Southern Arizona a \u201cstigma-free community in which abundant resources and support exist to ensure that everyone is healthy in mind and body.\u201d

NAMI SA offers educational programs at no cost for those living with mental health conditions, their families and friends, as well as schools, churches and other organizations. These educational programs include:

NAMI BASICS: Provides parents and other caregivers of children and adolescents living with mental illnesses with the tools necessary to be effective caregivers and advocates for their children.

FAMILY TO FAMILY EDUCATION PROGRAM: For family, friends and loved ones of individuals with mental illnesses. This course provides information on mental illnesses and medications and side effects. Problem solving, listening and communication techniques and strategies for handling crises are discussed.

PEER-TO-PEER: For people with any serious mental illness who are interested in establishing and maintaining their wellness and recovery. This 10-week program can lead to peer mentor training and becoming a peer support specialist.

IN OUR OWN VOICE: For any group interested in hearing firsthand stories from people with mental health conditions. Learn what it\u2019s like to live with a mental illness and stay in recovery.

PARENTS AND TEACHERS AS ALLIES: For school personnel, parents and the community. It is designed to explain the early warnings signs of mental illnesses in children and adolescents so schools can best communicate with families about mental health concerns. This class was created in response to President George W. Bush\u2019s New Freedom Commission report on mental health that called for schools to play a larger role in early identification .

ENDING THE SILENCE: For middle school and high school students. This 50-minute presentation is designed to be held in a classroom and engage students in a discussion on mental health. Students will learn the early warning signs of mental illness and be provided with resources to help themselves or their friends. Signs of mental illness can begin as early as age 14.

SUPPORT GROUPS: For individuals living with a mental illness and their family and friends. There are groups located around Tucson that meet once a month. There are groups for Spanish-speaking individuals. There is also a NAMI Book Club that discusses books related to mental illnesses and a Creative Expressions Group which provides a positive outlet for dealing with the struggles of mental illness.

ADVOCATES: Serve people with mental illness and family members by providing them with assistance and access to resources in the community. Any information shared with the advocates is strictly confidential.

HEART TO HEART: Program creates a friendship between a volunteer and a person with a mental illness with many benefits for both.

For more information on any of those programs, please go to the NAMI SA website, namisa.org, call 622-5582 or visit the NAMI SA office at 6122 E. 22nd St.

"}, {"id":"2d9b0844-8c34-55f8-9bc0-ad46cfb956e7","type":"article","starttime":"1474856280","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-25T19:18:00-07:00","priority":45,"sections":[{"outdoors":"entertainment/outdoors"},{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"},{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Time to review Your Medicare coverage","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/article_2d9b0844-8c34-55f8-9bc0-ad46cfb956e7.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/time-to-review-your-medicare-coverage/article_2d9b0844-8c34-55f8-9bc0-ad46cfb956e7.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/time-to-review-your-medicare-coverage/article_2d9b0844-8c34-55f8-9bc0-ad46cfb956e7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Cate Kortzeborn\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Sometime in late October, I\u2019ll host the 12th Annual Friends of Elaine Kortzeborn Medicare Open Enrollment Party. Every year since 2005, I\u2019ve helped a dozen or so my mom\u2019s buddies review their Medicare Part D prescription drug insurance and make sure it still works for them. At first, I ran into some resistance. Mom\u2019s friends didn\u2019t want to bother. They had coverage and didn\u2019t see why they needed to keep checking their drug plans. After a couple of years, though, that attitude disappeared.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#weekend"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"17a6751f-04f5-5c71-af84-ba9b24492d2a","description":"Cate Kortzeborn with her mother, Elaine.","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"562","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/7a/17a6751f-04f5-5c71-af84-ba9b24492d2a/57e1c0e3ccaf7.image.jpg?resize=620%2C562"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"91","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/7a/17a6751f-04f5-5c71-af84-ba9b24492d2a/57e1c0e3ccaf7.image.jpg?resize=100%2C91"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"272","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/7a/17a6751f-04f5-5c71-af84-ba9b24492d2a/57e1c0e3ccaf7.image.jpg?resize=300%2C272"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"928","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/7a/17a6751f-04f5-5c71-af84-ba9b24492d2a/57e1c0e3ccaf7.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"2d9b0844-8c34-55f8-9bc0-ad46cfb956e7","body":"

Sometime in late October, I\u2019ll host the 12th Annual Friends of Elaine Kortzeborn Medicare Open Enrollment Party.

Every year since 2005, I\u2019ve helped a dozen or so my mom\u2019s buddies review their Medicare Part D prescription drug insurance and make sure it still works for them.

At first, I ran into some resistance. Mom\u2019s friends didn\u2019t want to bother. They had coverage and didn\u2019t see why they needed to keep checking their drug plans. After a couple of years, though, that attitude disappeared.

We kept finding that, every year, their health needs changed and so did the list of drugs covered by their plans. Shopping among the numerous plans and choosing the right one could mean saving hundreds of dollars a year.

\u00a0Now, everyone\u2019s on board to make sure they have coverage that\u2019s right for them.

All this is just my way of reminding you that Medicare\u2019s annual open enrollment season begins Oct. 15 and runs through Dec. 7. This is the time every year when you can sign up for a new Medicare drug or health plan, or switch the one you have now.\u00a0

Any new coverage you select will take effect Jan. 1, 2017.\u00a0

In addition to Part D drug plans, open enrollment applies to Medicare Advantage health plans, which are essentially managed care plans run by private insurers approved by Medicare.\u00a0

If you have Original (traditional) Medicare and you\u2019re satisfied with it, you don\u2019t need to do anything during open enrollment.\u00a0

If you have a Medicare Advantage health plan or Part D drug plan, keep in mind that these plans can make changes each year, including what they cover, how much they charge for monthly premiums and deductibles, and which doctors, hospitals, and pharmacies are in their networks.

Always review the materials your health or drug plan sends you, like the \u201cEvidence of Coverage\u201d and \u201cAnnual Notice of Change.\u201d Make sure your plan still meets what you anticipate will be your health needs for next year. If you\u2019re satisfied with your current plan, and your insurer is still offering it in 2017, you don\u2019t need to make any changes.

Here are resources to help you compare your current coverage with new plan offerings for 2017. You can:

\u2022 Visit www.medicare.gov to review drug and health plans, including costs, available in your area and enroll in a new plan if you decide to. This information will be live on or around Oct. 1 (and before that on www.cms.gov.) Medicare rates the plans on a scale of one to five stars. Open enrollment information also is available in Spanish.

\u2022 Call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) for around-the-clock assistance to find out more about your coverage options. TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048. Counseling is available in a variety of languages.

\u2022 Review the Medicare & You handbook. This handbook is mailed to the homes of people with Medicare each fall and it\u2019s also online at: \u00a0www.medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/10050.pdf

\u2022 Get free, unbiased, one-on-one counseling from your local State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Local SHIP contact information can be found:

\u2022 At www.medicare.gov/contacts/organization-search-criteria.aspx or;

\u2022 On the back of the Medicare & You handbook or;

\u2022 By calling Medicare (at the 1-800 number above).

People with Medicare who have limited income and resources may qualify for Extra Help to pay for their Part D drug plans. There\u2019s no cost or obligation to apply for Extra Help, and it can save you thousands of dollars each year.\u00a0

Medicare beneficiaries, family members, or caregivers can apply online at www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp or call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 to find out more. TTY users should call 1-800-325-0778.\u00a0

Cate Kortzeborn is Medicare\u2019s acting regional administrator for Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, and the Pacific Territories. You can always get answers to your Medicare questions by calling 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).

"}, {"id":"3008e8b9-d256-5ce1-97db-e96e1c486710","type":"article","starttime":"1474753860","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-24T14:51:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474801290","sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"askrosie":"lifestyles/askrosie"},{"gardensage":"lifestyles/gardensage"},{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Ask Rosie: How do I replace the rusty screws in my grab bars?","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_3008e8b9-d256-5ce1-97db-e96e1c486710.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/ask-rosie-how-do-i-replace-the-rusty-screws-in/article_3008e8b9-d256-5ce1-97db-e96e1c486710.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/ask-rosie-how-do-i-replace-the-rusty-screws-in/article_3008e8b9-d256-5ce1-97db-e96e1c486710.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Rosie Romero\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Each year, thousands of Arizona residents email or call Rosie Romero\u2019s radio show with questions about everything from preventing fires in their chimneys to getting rid of tree roots invading their sewer system. His goal is to provide answers that suit the specific lifestyle wherever someone lives in Arizona.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["landscaping","plants"],"internalKeywords":["#weekend"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"c7b753c9-8d07-5ccc-84a5-45fa9499d9e6","description":"Under each little disk at the end of a grab bar is a mounting plate with screws in it.","byline":"Christine Cox","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"413","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7b/c7b753c9-8d07-5ccc-84a5-45fa9499d9e6/57e4083cefdb9.image.jpg?resize=413%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7b/c7b753c9-8d07-5ccc-84a5-45fa9499d9e6/57e4083cefdb9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7b/c7b753c9-8d07-5ccc-84a5-45fa9499d9e6/57e4083cefdb9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7b/c7b753c9-8d07-5ccc-84a5-45fa9499d9e6/57e4083cefdb9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"3008e8b9-d256-5ce1-97db-e96e1c486710","body":"

Each year, thousands of Arizona residents email or call Rosie Romero\u2019s radio show with questions about everything from preventing fires in their chimneys to getting rid of tree roots invading their sewer system. His goal is to provide answers that suit the specific lifestyle wherever someone lives in Arizona.

QUESTION: The screws have rusted on the grab bars in our bathroom. The heads of the screws are now gone, and I need to remove the screw shaft to install news screws. Any tips? Also, should I use brass or stainless steel screws with my stainless grab bars? The stainless steel screws rusted after 10 years.

ANSWER: Attempting to remove the body of the damaged screw from the existing mounting location will more than likely do more damage to the surrounding wall surface than you may be willing to repair. Instead, you can probably move the mounting plates slightly so that the new screw location will be adjacent to the existing ones. We recommend using stainless steel screws again as they are more durable and stronger than brass screws. To help slow corrosion, use high-quality stainless screws and inject some clear silicone caulking into the predrilled pilot hole before inserting the screw. Then put a small amount of silicone on the screw\u2019s head itself to protect it.

Q: About six years ago, I put in patios and stucco-covered walls in my yard. Now the front wall has a narrow crack that runs between the concrete blocks underneath the stucco from the bottom to the top of the wall. It\u2019s a very thin crack about the thickness of the lead in a mechanical pencil. What\u2019s happening and how can I fix this?

A: If the crack is that thin, there\u2019s probably nothing structural going on with your wall. Just clean out the crack thoroughly, while removing any loose material and dirt. Then you can fill the crack with latex caulk mixed with sand. Feather in the mixture with your finger and then use a damp sponge to smooth out the area. After the area thoroughly dries, you can use regular paint on the wall to cover up the caulking \u2014 not elastomeric paint.

Q: My peaked roof was recently redone with 30-year shingles and I also had my flat roof foamed. Now I\u2019d like to put solar panels on the roof, but I\u2019m worried about what effect that will have on the warranty for my roofing job. Will my warranty be any good anymore?

A: This change can definitely affect your warranty. You need to have the solar company contact the roofing company in advance to demonstrate how and where the solar installation will be done. Generally, only the warranty on the area covered by panels would be affected. The rest of the roof should still be under warranty.

Q: I have a very large, 25-year-old chinaberry tree in my yard, and something is eating away at it. I had a dead limb cut off the tree, and now I have holes in the area of the tree where pruning was done; sawdust is also coming out of the tree. I think some large beetles, like the kind that attack palo verde trees, could be boring from the inside the tree. I don\u2019t want to lose the tree because it throws a lot of shade, but I\u2019m also afraid the tree may fall on the house.

A: Most likely, big black carpenter bees entered the tree after you had the limbs cut off. They love eating away at old dead wood, and it\u2019s possible that there is still dead wood in the area they are feeding on. You can apply some kind of organic compound to kill the borers. Contact your local nursery about options.

"}, {"id":"78d1ac12-82e0-5fd3-a44c-088345c2847d","type":"article","starttime":"1474753500","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-24T14:45:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474801294","priority":35,"sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"families":"lifestyles/families"},{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Babies need to develop trust, and then autonomy","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_78d1ac12-82e0-5fd3-a44c-088345c2847d.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/babies-need-to-develop-trust-and-then-autonomy/article_78d1ac12-82e0-5fd3-a44c-088345c2847d.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/babies-need-to-develop-trust-and-then-autonomy/article_78d1ac12-82e0-5fd3-a44c-088345c2847d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Marilyn Heins\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"The best thing grandparents can do for the parents of their grandchildren is to not undermine their confidence in parenting.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#weekend","#columnist","#families"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"7d3163d4-8615-578b-a030-e6dc3adf0e3d","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"600","height":"500","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/d3/7d3163d4-8615-578b-a030-e6dc3adf0e3d/554ae3c999e94.image.jpg?resize=600%2C500"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"83","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/d3/7d3163d4-8615-578b-a030-e6dc3adf0e3d/53d7e86f33d79.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"250","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/d3/7d3163d4-8615-578b-a030-e6dc3adf0e3d/53d7e86f351c0.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"853","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/d3/7d3163d4-8615-578b-a030-e6dc3adf0e3d/53d7e86eef302.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"78d1ac12-82e0-5fd3-a44c-088345c2847d","body":"

\u201cWe just returned from a visit to our adorable granddaughter. We celebrated her first birthday and hated to get on the plane to come home. Our question is about how much a baby should be held. Either our daughter-in-law or son held her all the time or were on the floor with her handing her toys. One of them held her until she fell asleep. They never let her cry or be alone. My husband says she is happy and healthy so don\u2019t worry about it. We didn\u2019t say anything but I feel she may have a hard time giving up being carried.\u201d

You are both right. First a baby has to develop trust. Next the baby must begin to develop autonomy. The parents are the key to both these developmental tasks.

Infants need to develop trust that their parents will meet their needs. Babies are born helpless but with a brain that is ready to learn. In order to survive the baby needs food, changing, and loving stimulation but also needs predictability. If the baby is fed promptly today but left to scream for an hour tomorrow, trust is not a sure thing. Why is this sense of trust so important? It is the basis for love \u2014 not only of the parents but every subsequent relationship.

Will your granddaughter figure out what toy to select on her own? Of course she will. Will she learn how to amuse herself when she is not in the arms of Mommy or Daddy? Of course. Are there any adverse consequences to being held all the time? Maybe. A recent question was about a 10-month-old child who screamed in the car seat as it was the only time Mommy was not holding him or carrying him in a sling. (He eventually stopped fussing.)

Some parents believe that constant contact and attention ensure good parenting. I believe good parenting derives from paying close attention to the baby\u2019s needs while keeping in mind your job is to help the baby grow up and not need you at all.

Falling asleep on their own is the first \u201cskill\u201d babies learn. How do parents help babies do this? They hesitate a bit before responding and do not let the baby fall asleep in their arms. We all have sleep associations like snuggling into a favorite pillow or turning to a favored side. The wise parent gives the baby a chance to develop sleep associations.

My advice? Spend those wonderful moments cuddling your sleepy baby in your arms in the rocking chair. But learn the baby\u2019s signals that it is about to fall asleep and put the baby down before that happens. Baby still fusses? Pat the baby and croon soft, soothing words, \u201cGo to sleep now.\u201d

Most parenting educators tell parents to pick up a crying infant. Although responding to needs promptly is the first task of parenting, another equally important task lies ahead. Alas, advice-givers have not always stressed the importance of the next phase of development when the child needs to develop a sense of self and begin to explore the world. In early infancy the baby\u2019s mobility depends on your willingness to carry it.

In the second half of the first year the baby will begin to creep and then crawl. Now the parents\u2019 task is to provide a safe environment for the baby to develop these motor skills. So the parent shifts from carrying the baby to encouraging the baby\u2019s mobility.

Shifting gears to change parenting as the child grows and develops is the essence of successful parenting. The best way is to understand how babies develop and take your clues from the baby. Don\u2019t let your parenting philosophy hold back a baby who is ready to go on to the next stage.

As a grandmother I must add two comments. First it is possible your granddaughter\u2019s parents held her all the time so she wouldn\u2019t fuss and cry when you visited. Second, the best thing grandparents can do for the parents of their grandchildren is to not undermine their confidence in parenting. Glad you didn\u2019t say anything.

"}, {"id":"e637e845-83b2-5f31-9c01-0606c87392df","type":"article","starttime":"1474752540","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-24T14:29:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474801292","priority":35,"sections":[{"weekend":"entertainment/weekend"},{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"collectibles":"lifestyles/collectibles"},{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Civil War era piece appeals to multiple collectors","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/weekend/article_e637e845-83b2-5f31-9c01-0606c87392df.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/weekend/civil-war-era-piece-appeals-to-multiple-collectors/article_e637e845-83b2-5f31-9c01-0606c87392df.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/weekend/civil-war-era-piece-appeals-to-multiple-collectors/article_e637e845-83b2-5f31-9c01-0606c87392df.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Danielle Arnet\nThe Smart Coillector","prologue":"The gun is a crossover collectible\u2014appealing to a variety of different interests.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#weekend","#columnist","#civilwar"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"597a8b1b-1b19-5c99-9728-54b9e1db8ca8","description":"A bronze ship gun pulled from a burning Confederate ship in 1865 sold for $12,870 late last year at Bonhams San Francisco.","byline":"Bonhams","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"397","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/97/597a8b1b-1b19-5c99-9728-54b9e1db8ca8/57e30db202f15.image.jpg?resize=620%2C397"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/97/597a8b1b-1b19-5c99-9728-54b9e1db8ca8/57e30db202f15.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/97/597a8b1b-1b19-5c99-9728-54b9e1db8ca8/57e30db202f15.image.jpg?resize=300%2C192"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"655","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/97/597a8b1b-1b19-5c99-9728-54b9e1db8ca8/57e30db202f15.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C655"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"e637e845-83b2-5f31-9c01-0606c87392df","body":"

WHAT: A bronze ship gun removed from a burning Confederate ship in 1865 sold for $12,870 at Bonhams San Francisco late last year. The gun clearly spoke to Civil War collectors. More precisely, the boarding cannon with a 24-inch tapered bronze tube and a bore of 1 5/8 inches spoke to collectors of the Confederacy, plus maritime and arms collectors.

MORE: Lacquered onto the piece is a note of provenance written in 1928 stating that \u201cThis small bronze boarding/cannon was taken from the/burning ship CSS Patrick Henry.\u201d It continues that Nathaniel E. Venable of Texas, a member of the 23rd Virginia Volunteers in the Confederate Marines and a recruiter in Marine service, rescued the gun.

CSS Patrick Henry was once a passenger and freight steamer called \u201cYorktown\u201d that ran between Richmond, Virginia, and New York. The ship was seized when Virginia seceded, and she figured in the battle of Hampton Roads, Virginia. The vessel was burned in 1865 by Confederates when Richmond was evacuated.

SMART COLLECTORS KNOW: The gun is a crossover collectible, therefore of interest to history buffs, fans of the Confederacy, maritime enthusiasts and Civil War plus arms collectors. That\u2019s a large pool of potential bidders.

HOT TIP: Civil War artifacts have become increasingly hard to find intact. With collectors fighting for the rare and finest pieces, prices have zoomed. Confederate items are particularly scarce, as lack of resources meant that fewer goods were made and many were made badly. Items were used until they fell apart, and that makes what remains all the more valuable.

BOTTOM LINE: A catalog note reads that \u201cCasting flaws present on the tube would suggest Confederate manufacture.\u201d

This gun is a survivor.

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Daniel Martin Diaz wanted the devil.

Robin Westenhiser couldn\u2019t believe her luck when she picked the watermelon.

And Ron Kovatch just wanted something out of his comfort zone.

The Tucson artists are among 40 who have contributed pieces to the Galer\u00eda Senita\u2019s upcoming Loter\u00eda! de Tucson exhibit. It will feature 54 11-by-14-inch pieces, each based on a different card in the traditional Mexican game of chance, Loter\u00eda.

\u201cI was trying to come up with a show that was different,\u201d says Kevin M. Pawlak, who co-owns the gallery within the Arte de la Vida shop with James Goodreau. \u201cI wanted to do something around Day of the Dead, and that was Mexican themed.\u201d

Loter\u00eda cards each have a number, but it is the images that people pay attention to in the game, which is similar to bingo.

Pawlak put the word out through social media and the artist grapevine. While the bulk of the artists signing on are from Arizona, there are three from outside the country participating.

His original thought was to have the artists select which ones they wanted to do. \u201cBut then we realized we would be stuck with the same six or seven images,\u201d he says.

So he decided to extend the idea of chance, put a deck of Loter\u00eda cards in a hat and drew the card they would interpret.

That\u2019s how Diaz, who is internationally known for his images that are inspired by saints and science, was assigned card 43, the bell.

\u201cI thought, \u2018Oh, what can I do,\u2019\u201d recalls Diaz. \u201cI thought I would ask to trade with someone for something interesting, like the devil.\u201d

Instead, he kept the card and allowed it to take him in a new direction: He\u2019s thinking he\u2019ll take on painting a series of Loter\u00eda cards.

Women are often the subject of Liz Vaughn\u2019s art, so when she drew Number 17, the mandolin, she knew just what to do. \u201cMy first reaction was I could make that into a woman.\u201d

Some artists grumbled with their assignment, others delighted. But all of them came through with interpretations that will fill the wall of the gallery.

Take a look at some of the works that make up the show\u2019s Loter\u00eda deck. All artists are from Tucson unless otherwise noted.

Alec Dempster

Toronto

No. 6, la sirena, the mermaid, linocut

Loter\u00eda cards are nothing new to Dempster \u2014 he has created two complete sets, with books published on each. One, \u201cLoter\u00eda Jarocha,\u201d is based on son jarocho, folk music from Mexico\u2019s Veracruz region. The other, \u201cLoter\u00eda Huasteca,\u201d recreates his journey to La Huasteca, Mexico, with cards depicting everything from folk tales to salamanders. Dempster was happy that he got the mermaid. \u201cSome of the other (cards) might not have been as inspiring,\u201d he says. His biggest challenge in creating his piece? \u201cI knew that other artists would be participating, so I wanted to do my best in order to stand out.\u201d

Carolyn King

No. 7, la escalera, the ladder, mixed media on panel

\u201cA ladder turned sideways is a bridge,\u201d says King, who lived in Mexico for more than two decades. \u201cIt\u2019s personally meaningful to me because I live a life of bridging between the States and Mexico.\u201d

But this image of the ladder propped up against the wall that separates our country from Mexico, and with a small image of Our Lady of Guadalupe, has an even deeper meaning.

\u201cIn my piece, I thank the Virgin of Guadalupe for her protection of two beloved men in my life who crossed the border illegally in their younger days,\u201d says King.

Melo Dominguez

No. 13, el gorrito, the bonnet, Bic pen on muslin

Dominguez was flummoxed about how to give a contemporary interpretation to her card. \u201cI was wondering, \u2018What the hell am I going to do?\u2019\u201d she recalls. What she did: an iconic image of the late rapper Tupac Shakur, his head wrapped in a bandana and the words \u201cthug life\u201d tattooed across his belly. She\u2019s a painter, but the answer to what to do sent her back to her earlier days of using a pen and doing portraits. And it stretched her imagination. \u201cIt\u2019s always nice to critically think about how to interpret something,\u201d she says.

Rachel Slick

No. 21, la mano, the hand, mixed media

Slick\u2019s art traditionally includes the creation of milagros in which hands are central, so this challenge resonated with her. \u201cFor me, the hand is such a symbol of ability and strength; I usually represent them that way,\u201d she said. While researching her card, she discovered that the hand is generally a thief\u2019s hand. \u201cThat went into my process in creating the piece,\u201d she says. \u201cIt somewhat changed the way I was approaching it.\u201d And that eye? \u201cIt\u2019s about the all-seeing of the thief, and being a spy.\u201d

Kyle Johnston

No. 26, el negrito, the little black one, mixed media assemblage

Johnston knew nothing about the game, so he did some extensive research when he drew this card. \u201cWhen I started to put the piece together, I was cautious about not being offensive,\u201d he says. \u201cI think the card is kind of anachronistic.\u201d The original card has a dapper black man with a hat, a cane and a rose in his lapel. It has sometimes been called the Sammy Davis Jr. card. Johnston took the \u201clittle\u201d literally and found a small black figure slipped into a sort of shadow box. A metal rose is a nod to the one worn by the figure in the original.

Robin Westenhiser

No. 28, la sand\u00eda, the watermelon, acrylic on birch board

This card was perfect for her, says Westenhiser. \u201cIt was a shock when I got it, but I was pretty happy because I very often include watermelons in my paintings.\u201d Westenhiser\u2019s paintings are whimsical and bright. But she also paints in a much bigger size, so she was forced to compact her usual images. \u201cI had fun with this,\u201d she says. \u201cI knew I wanted to make a girl that loves watermelon, a goofy girl with watermelon.\u201d

Ron Kovatch

No. 40, el alacr\u00e1n, the scorpion, mixed media

Kovatch was intrigued with the idea of creating a piece based on a card. \u201cI liked the challenge of taking on something I have little control over,\u201d he says, explaining that what he paints is dictated by his imagination, not an image on a card. He describes his abstract works as \u201cslash and burn,\u201d so creating the scorpion took him out of his comfort zone. Since Kovatch\u2019s recent work has leaned toward the abstract, he infused that aesthetic into the card. \u201cThat work was about the physical process of scribbling with great urgency and pressure, free of any burden of narrative,\u201d Kovatch said in an email about creating the scorpion. \u201c... I applied this physical process, basically mimicking the Loter\u00eda card of the scorpion. El alacran is an image loaded with symbolism, feared by most, a strange and eccentric, enigmatic and wonderful exoskeleton. I simply reinterpreted the Loter\u00eda card in my raw and rugged style which pays homage to Abstract Expressionism.\u201d

Daniel Martin Diaz

No. 43, la campana, the bell, oil and gouache on wood

As he struggled to think of how to interpret the card artistically, Diaz remembered sitting in a little village in the Alps listening to the church bells ring in his village, then the next and the next. He was once told that church bells are rung to destroy evil spirits. \u201cEverywhere the bells resonate, they are shattering evil,\u201d says Diaz. \u201cThat idea spoke to me.\u201d He had been studying Russian propaganda posters when he was asked to do the card, and he decided to use that aesthetic in creating it. \u201cI was conflicted, but once I finished it I was really happy with it. \u2026 It made me do something I never would have done; now I\u2019m anxious to start on a whole deck.\u201d

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Warren\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Q: I was surprised to read your answer to the Green Valley lady who wanted to relocate lizards. I am the opposite of her: I would love to relocate some lizards from my office building area to my home, if I could catch them. I live in the northwest area of Tucson near the Tucson Mountain foothills and we do have a few lizards. 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Q: I was surprised to read your answer to the Green Valley lady who wanted to relocate lizards. I am the opposite of her: I would love to relocate some lizards from my office building area to my home, if I could catch them. I live in the northwest area of Tucson near the Tucson Mountain foothills and we do have a few lizards. I would like to know how to encourage them to stay and bring their friends.

Answer: The Arizona Native Plant Society has a brochure on its website that describes how to make your yard lizard friendly. You can also check the Tucson Herpetological Society website for more information on lizard species.

In short, providing a variety of plants and shelters for lizards should entice them to make homes in your landscape. Lizard-friendly plants can be trees, shrubs, cacti, and flowering plants that provide places to forage, bask, hibernate, and breed. Native plants such as prickly pear cactus, desert spoon, and cholla cactus work well for this purpose. Lizards need protection from predators like cats, dogs, and birds. A simple way to provide protection is by creating rock or log piles. These piles will give lizards places to bask and forage. If you build it, they will come.

Q: I have a navel orange tree in my yard and I noticed this year that as the oranges are getting ripe in many cases they are splitting in half and falling off the tree. Not sure why or what would cause this. Any feedback would be great.

A: Oranges often split due to uneven irrigation. We usually notice this after significant rain events. The trees are unaccustomed to a lot of water at once and the split fruit is the result. The way to mitigate this is to water the trees more deeply throughout the year so that large amounts are less of a shock to their system.

For citrus, the recommendation is to provide water every seven to 10 days in the summer to a depth of 36 inches. In the fall and spring you can adjust the timing to once every 10 to 14 days and in the winter once every 14 to 21 days. Using a drip irrigation system is best and the emitters should be arranged in a circular fashion near the drip line of the tree. Based on the size of your tree, four emitters would be sufficient.

Q: I have a mature palo verde tree in my back yard that has what appear to be some kind of white scale on the trunk and several main branches \u2014 it almost looks like cement or mortar. On some of the smaller limbs there are some blemishes that look like they might be eruptions in the bark. Happened to see a woodpecker working very hard on one of these areas yesterday. Tree seems to be losing some leaves. How do I save this tree?

A: There is a species of scale insect that infests palo verde trees, especially those in urban environments. In some cases, the scale population is so high that they completely cover the bark on parts of the tree. The appearance you described begins with small eruptions in the bark. I\u2019ve seen many like this in downtown Tucson and on the University of Arizona campus.

While these insects will feed on sap and reduce the vigor of the trees, they aren\u2019t likely the primary problem. Trees in urban areas surrounded by buildings and other hard surfaces are subject to more stress than the trees out in the open desert. Scale insects, like many other insects, seem to be attracted to stressed trees. So there are a couple things you can do. One is to take good care of your tree if you aren\u2019t already properly irrigating and pruning. The second is you can treat the trunk where the scale insects reside. Typically, the recommendation for scale management is a horticultural oil spray when the immature scale insects, called crawlers, are moving about the tree. This usually happens in late winter once the weather warms sufficiently for them to reproduce. The exact timing depends on local microclimates but usually there is at least a two-week window. Keeping an eye on the situation with a magnifier should allow you to see when the immature scale insects are active. You might also find predator insects such as the twice-stabbed lady beetle feeding on these scale insects. That is why I recommend horticultural oil instead of something stronger.

Q: My pine tree is not doing well. I was wondering if pine beetles causing the problem.

A: I looked at your tree and I saw no sign of bark beetles. The signs to look for are red-boring dust on the bark, exit holes in the bark, and overall discoloration of the needles from green to a straw color. While your tree does show some dead needles, it doesn\u2019t show the widespread discoloration typically seen on trees with beetle infestations. The tree appears to be too dry and I couldn\u2019t tell if the soaker hose nearby is functioning or not. If not, that would be a good thing to fix and put on a schedule either manually or with a drip irrigation controller using the schedule describe above in the citrus question.

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Fill up the tank, get that bus pass, inflate your bicycle tires, put on your walking shoes. Fall garden tours are coming in October.

GOING GREEN

Kathleen and Mike Marron were new Tucsonans about a year ago when they bought their small north-side home.

\u201cI\u2019d never gardened in the desert before,\u201d says Kathleen, an Ohio transplant who originally wanted to turn her pea-gravel-covered backyard into a flower-filled garden she saw in a Sunset magazine picture.

Then she spoke with someone at Watershed Management Group, which is holding its annual fall home tour Oct. 1. \u201cThey said that none of that was native and sustainable on their own,\u201d she recalls.

Wanting to be responsible Tucson gardeners, the couple worked with the organization to shape the land in the tiny backyard so that rainwater runs along a modest, rock-lined channel where plants grow inside and along it.

They wedged rainwater receptacles between their house and the neighbor\u2019s fence to collect 1,050 gallons of water from the solar-paneled roof. A hose connected to the receptacles allows them to water plants as needed.

Underground piping guides water from the laundry to tree basins.

Together, these efforts have allowed many plants to thrive solely on rain and gray water: queen\u2019s wreath vine, barrel cactus, a peach tree, a sweet lime tree, a chiltepin bush and side-oats grama grass.

The landscape fosters volunteers, too, including a desert tobacco that\u2019s over 5 feet tall and some desert marigolds.

The only time they turn on the drip irrigation is when they\u2019re away for a few days.

Marron says she\u2019s learned several tricks about watering that save resources, including responding to seasonal changes.

\u201cI know now that these plants go dormant in the winter,\u201d she says, \u201cand I don\u2019t need to water them.\u201d

Marron hopes tour visitors will get some ideas from her small landscape.

\u201cI hope they can think of creative ways to use their spaces,\u201d she says, \u201cand create green space that will cool Tucson and replenish the aquifer.\u201d

The tour also will highlight composting bins and toilets, wildlife habitat, shade oases and uses for recyclable materials.

BICAS will lead a guided bicycle tour of five stops and hold a lunch at Watershed Management\u2019s Living Lab.

VEGGIE GARDENING

The fairly new edible garden for Pascua Yaqui seniors will show off the fruits \u2014 and veggies \u2014 of community labor during a tour Oct. 1.

The 10-bed community garden at the tribe\u2019s senior center has been growing produce since spring 2015, says Pete C. Rodriguez, one of the volunteers who tend the garden.

Some elder tribal members have done some planting, and a slew of volunteers has been taking care of and harvesting the bounty, which is used by the senior center.

Organizers hope to expand the use of the garden by the general tribal community, as well as get the seniors more involved in gardening, Rodriguez says.

The tour will highlight growing gourds that, when dried and carved, are important accessories in Yaqui cultural ceremonies. Gourd carvings, rattles and musical instruments will be displayed. Yaqui artist Louis David Valenzuela will be on hand to show his gourd works.

RITA RANCH GARDENS

As an avid snorkler, Lance Belhumeur loves the look of coral reefs.

The manufacturing project manager also is a wannabe landscape designer.

\u201cI\u2019ve always thought it would be a great profession,\u201d says Lance, whose garden is among at least 10 that will be on the Rita Ranch Areawide Fall Garden Tour Oct. 29.

\u201cI\u2019ve always loved landscapes and landscaping.\u201d

He combined his two hobbies to create a reef-like garden in the backyard of the home he and his wife, Anna, had built two years ago.

Lady slipper, small agaves, aloe and Autumn Joy sedum are among the 100 or so plants that surround a fountain, which provides watery sounds.

Lance and Anna themselves built the well-ordered backyard, the 10th landscape Lance has designed by himself. \u201cI do all the manual labor and leave all the design elements to him,\u201d Anna jokes.

The couple divided the yard into dining, cooking and gathering spaces. A trampoline and artificial turf area provide recreational space for their four sons. Large rocks define the garden beds.

Two other garden areas include a pomegranate and a fig tree, which Anna wanted, and roses, a nod to Lance\u2019s mother\u2019s love of the flowers.

Lance focuses on perennial flowering species, which live longer than annuals. If a plant dies, he will find a different species as a replacement.

He\u2019s not inclined to baby plants to keep them alive. He calls that philosophy \u201cbeauty by attrition.\u201d

The neighborhood tour also includes a plant sale, pumpkin-carving contest and a guided bicycle tour.

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\u201cThe Shallows\u201d: Blake Lively stars as a surfer squaring off against a hungry shark in a patch of ocean just 200 yards from shore.

\u201cCentral Intelligence\u201d: Kevin Hart and Dwayne Johnson are former high-school classmates who reunite as adults to carry out a dangerous mission.

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\u201cWarcraft\u201d: Duncan Jones (\u201cMoon\u201d) directs this big-budget fantasy inspired by the computer game about a war between orcs and humans.

\u201cAn American Werewolf in London\u201d: John Landis\u2019 immortal 1981 horror comedy gets a fresh high-def transfer in this Blu-ray re-release.

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{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/99/f9940bb4-fa64-5f72-9760-f5d6e308b83f/57dc8041a31c0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/99/f9940bb4-fa64-5f72-9760-f5d6e308b83f/57dc8041a31c0.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"f1b68cc0-940d-55b6-a1ec-111bfd2902a3","body":"

Tranquil forests, far-horizon views, cool autumn air and the last hurrah of summer wildflowers \u2014 these are some of the rewards of a hike on the Sunset Trail in the Catalina Mountains north of Tucson.

Not to mention some splendid sunsets if you trek the trail near day\u2019s end.

The 1.6-mile trail leads from the Soldier Camp cabin area along the Catalina Highway to Marshall Gulch, a popular recreation site about a mile south of the mountain community of Summerhaven.

Some hikers trek the trail out and back from trailheads at either end. Others arrange a car shuttle to accommodate a one-way hike.

DIVERSE TERRAIN

A mix of terrain along the trail includes evergreen forests, enormous rock outcrops and a canyon with an often-flowing stream at the Marshall Gulch end of the route.

The trail \u2014 at altitudes ranging from 7,400 feet to 7,750 feet \u2014 passes several unsigned overlook points including one known as Sunset Rock near the midway point in the hike. This high perch provides a soaring-hawk\u2019s view of distant ridges and canyons and some pretty good sunset shows when the light is right.

One stretch of the trail is steep and rocky. With a deep canyon below, this is a place to watch your footing and keep a close eye on children.

TAKE-ALONGS

Trail shoes or light hiking boots are ideal for this trek. Be sure to carry plenty of water, sun protection and some energy food.

Autumn weather along the trail is often mild, but be aware that it can change quickly. A fleece garment or jacket can come it handy if it gets chilly.

TRAILHEADS

To reach the trailheads from Tucson, take Tanque Verde Road to the Catalina Highway and follow the highway into the mountains.

The trailhead at the Soldier Camp cabin area is on the left side of the highway between mile markers 22 and 23. From the parking lot, two unpaved roads lead into the woods. Follow the left one. Signs will guide the way to a point where the trail leaves the road.

For the Marshall Gulch trailhead, enter Summerhaven and follow the road about a mile south to a parking area at Marshall Gulch. The trail begins at the end of the parking lot and follows a streambed before angling uphill over rocky terrain.

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Eating vegan can be easy. We found five delicious local spots.

Check out each restaurant\u2019s location, hours of operation, prices, most popular dish and our favorite dish.

BLUE WILLOW

2616 N. Campbell Ave.

Hours: Monday-Friday, 7 a.m.-9 p.m., Weekends, 8 a.m.-9 p.m.

Blue Willow is more than just a favorite brunch spot. It has a gift shop full of things you don\u2019t need but desperately want and its menu is considerate of special diets. Blue Willow has a gluten-free and vegan menu with breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert options.

People\u2019s pick: Tofu Scramble with spinach, mushrooms, tomatoes, scallions, sesame seeds with brown rice or potatoes and your choice of bread for $9.75.

Our pick: Greek Salad with feta cheese, kalamata olives, red onion, and tomato with greek dressing (minus the feta cheese) for $9.50.

Prices: Their special diets menu has options from $4.75 to $10.95.

URBAN FRESH

73 E. Pennington St.

Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

Get a delicious vegan meal without breaking the bank. Urban Fresh has everything you might need before dinner; including smoothies, snacks, salads and wraps under $10. Seriously, go here if you want something fresh and delicious.

People\u2019s pick: Maca Java and Funky Monkey smoothie

Owner Dana Padilla\u2019s pick: Ginger Snap smoothie

Our pick: Rainforest Purple Haze with blueberries, acai, apple and black cherries for $5.95 (16 ounces). This is the perfect light afternoon pick-me-up.

Prices: Smoothies run $5.95 to $7.95 and lunch could set you back as much as $8.25 for wraps.

THE TASTEFUL KITCHEN

722 N. Stone Ave.

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 5 p.m.-9 p.m.

This restaurant is every vegan\u2019s dream. The entire menu is made for vegans, vegetarians and people who eat gluten-free. Unfortunately, The Tasteful Kitchen is only open for dinner but they offer free cooking demos for those that want to make eating vegan a lifestyle. Call 250-9600 to sign up.

Ingredients are listed under each item on the menu and it even tells you if gluten or dairy has been added to an entr\u00e9e or starter. The Tasteful Kitchen wants you to know what\u2019s going in your body before you order.

People\u2019s pick: Miso Eggplant with eggplant medallions, miso glaze, coconut black rice, green curry sauce and Asian greens ( $18).

Our pick: The sweet potato and chickpea enchiladas made with quinoa, green chiles, corn tortillas, red chile sauce, cilantro pumpkin seed pesto, slaw and fajita vegetables ($18).

The Tasteful Kitchen gives you the option to dine in or take out \u2014 this might be the healthiest take out you\u2019ve ever eaten. Enjoy the sweet potato and chickpea enchiladas at home in your comfiest pajamas with your favorite show playing in the background.

Prices: Starters are $6 to $10 and entrees are $18.

CUP QUEQUITOS

110 E. Pennington St.

Vegan cupcakes don\u2019t usually sound appetizing, but these totally are. At Cup Quequitos, you don\u2019t have to worry about eating a cardboard box disguised as a cupcake. Owner and baker Shanali D\u00e1vila gives each cupcake the love and attention it deserves.

D\u00e1vila\u2019s favorite: Chocolate Raspberry Rose

People\u2019s pick: Mole and Coconut dos Leches

CASHEW COW

16 S. Eastbourne Ave.

Hours: Closed Monday, Open noon-9 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, noon-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and noon-9 p.m. on Sundays.

Experience the hidden treasure that is Cashew Cow. Their ice cream is made with cashews, which means it\u2019s dairy-free, local, vegan, cholesterol-free, gluten-free, and non-gmo ice cream. Go in after dinner for a single scoop or buy a quart to last you the whole week.

Flavors: They range from lemon poppy to reliable chocolate and vanilla and everything in between.

People\u2019s pick: Kahlua Almond Fudge.

Our pick: Strawberry

Prices: Start at $4.25 for a single scoop.

"}, {"id":"b5b4a83c-6549-5a6d-a87d-8c8668c20e8d","type":"article","starttime":"1474499340","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-21T16:09:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474542244","priority":30,"sections":[{"dining":"entertainment/dining"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Zona 78 opening early for football on Sundays","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/dining/article_b5b4a83c-6549-5a6d-a87d-8c8668c20e8d.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/dining/zona-opening-early-for-football-on-sundays/article_b5b4a83c-6549-5a6d-a87d-8c8668c20e8d.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/dining/zona-opening-early-for-football-on-sundays/article_b5b4a83c-6549-5a6d-a87d-8c8668c20e8d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":2,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Kristen Cook Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Are you ready for some football \u2014 and spareribs? You\u2019ll find them both at Zona 78 Sunday morning. The eastside eatery \u2014 7301 E. Tanque Verde Road \u2014 is opening up its bar at 10 a.m., an hour earlier than usual, so football fans can catch the NFL games, said manager Paul Leathers. Zona has done it since the season started.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#caliente","#dining","#weekend"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"8b986c81-4b44-583d-a76d-74e091d86dd4","description":"An antipasto platter might make a nice football appetizer when Zona 78 opens early Sunday for NFL fans.","byline":"A.E. Araiza / Arizona Daily Star","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"442","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b9/8b986c81-4b44-583d-a76d-74e091d86dd4/57e19eaece8b3.image.jpg?resize=442%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"140","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b9/8b986c81-4b44-583d-a76d-74e091d86dd4/568d9a62971f3.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"421","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b9/8b986c81-4b44-583d-a76d-74e091d86dd4/57e19eaece8b3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C421"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1436","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/b9/8b986c81-4b44-583d-a76d-74e091d86dd4/57e19eaece8b3.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"be410613-5e02-5cbd-8c96-ec239a8668bf","description":"In addition to its award-winning pizza, Zona 78 on East Tanque Verde Road is serving spareribs Sunday mornings.","byline":"Courtesy Zona 78 via Facebook","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"353","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/e4/be410613-5e02-5cbd-8c96-ec239a8668bf/57e19eafddd3b.image.jpg?resize=620%2C353"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/e4/be410613-5e02-5cbd-8c96-ec239a8668bf/552304927ee4a.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"170","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/e4/be410613-5e02-5cbd-8c96-ec239a8668bf/5523049280191.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"583","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/e4/be410613-5e02-5cbd-8c96-ec239a8668bf/57e19eafddd3b.image.jpg"}}}],"youtube":[{"id":"4dd8052e-dbeb-51e3-8995-39c6a9c7c977","starttime":"1454369160","starttime_iso8601":"2016-02-01T16:26:00-07:00","title":"Eat Super Bowl dip like a UA Wildcat","description":"Try this cheesy, delicious recipe straight from RichRod's wife, Rita Rodriguez.\u00a0","byline":"","video_id":"id8hPgXNtns"},{"id":"907e5770-a0cb-510a-90d1-a4503efd6e08","starttime":"1448996460","starttime_iso8601":"2015-12-01T12:01:00-07:00","title":"How to make Chiltepin hot chocolate","description":"Kick your cocoa game up a notch by using real chocolate and local chiltepin chiles.\u00a0","byline":"","video_id":"o2EfvTdVr4c"}],"revision":9,"commentID":"b5b4a83c-6549-5a6d-a87d-8c8668c20e8d","body":"

Are you ready for some football \u2014 and spareribs?

You\u2019ll find them both at Zona 78 Sunday morning.

The eastside eatery \u2014 7301 E. Tanque Verde Road \u2014 is opening up its bar at 10 a.m., an hour earlier than usual, so football fans can catch the NFL games, said manager Paul Leathers. Zona has done it since the season started.

\u201cIt\u2019s a lot of good food, a lot of fun,\u201d said Leathers, who comes in wicked early to cook the St. Louis-style ribs. \u201cWe\u2019ve never really done this before.\u201d

When daylight savings time ends (Nov. 6 for those of you paying attention), Zona will return to its regular 11 a.m. opening time.

The NFL menu features rotating dishes. Making appearances have been everything from a breakfast wrap and pizza with eggs, sausage and bacon to a BELT \u2014 that would be a BLT with the addition of egg, Leathers said.

\u201cWe\u2019re just going to keep changing it up,\u201d he said.

Oh, and of course, there are mimosas.

Everyone needs a morning mimosa,\u201d Leathers added.

"}, {"id":"aea8264c-3d65-503d-873d-a6cf1e8f8079","type":"article","starttime":"1474498980","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-21T16:03:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474635302","priority":34,"sections":[{"outdoors":"entertainment/outdoors"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Welcome fall during the day, gaze at Cygnus the Swan at night","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/article_aea8264c-3d65-503d-873d-a6cf1e8f8079.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/welcome-fall-during-the-day-gaze-at-cygnus-the-swan/article_aea8264c-3d65-503d-873d-a6cf1e8f8079.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/outdoors/welcome-fall-during-the-day-gaze-at-cygnus-the-swan/article_aea8264c-3d65-503d-873d-a6cf1e8f8079.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Tim Hunter\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"It's official: summer ends Sept. 22. Unpack the sweaters.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#weekend","#latest","#columnist"],"customProperties":{},"revision":10,"commentID":"aea8264c-3d65-503d-873d-a6cf1e8f8079","body":"

Fall officially starts Thursday, Sept. 22, at 7:21 a.m. Mountain Standard Time. That\u2019s when the sun shines directly on the equator as it travels from the northern part of the sky into the southern. If we were on the equator, the sun would be overhead at noon local time.

Thursday is also a good time to enjoy Cygnus the Swan which will be almost directly north and about 70-75 degrees above the northern horizon at 8:30 p.m. Because the six brightest stars of Cygnus form a cross with the top of the cross pointing northeast and the bottom of the cross pointing southwest, Cygnus is commonly called the Northern Cross.

Cygnus is supposed to represent a Swan flying south along the Milky Way. The brightest star in Cygnus, Deneb, is at the top of the cross. However, Deneb is actually the tail of the Swan, because the \u201cCross\u201d and the \u201cSwan\u201d point in different directions. Deneb is the Arabic word for tail.

Deneb is one of my favorite stars. It is the 19th-brightest star in the sky and is one of the most luminous stars in the entire galaxy. Deneb is so far away its exact distance is unknown, but it is felt to be around 1,425 light years with Deneb having a luminosity of nearly 60,000 times that of the sun. Deneb has a diameter more than 100 times that of the sun.

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The Gaslight Theatre is back on the Frankenstein wagon. Or would that be hearse?

We saw this in 2002. And in 2008. And just a few weeks ago. We suspect Gaslight has mounted the show more than three times \u2014 David Fanning, who grunts the title character with a surprising hilarity, says in the program notes that this is the fourth time he\u2019s played it.

Here\u2019s the thing about Gaslight: It knows what its audience likes. And the audience likes good singing, bad jokes, and the let-me-entertain-you-at-all-costs vibe at the theater. Who cares if they\u2019ve seen it before if it keeps \u2019em laughing? And it does.

So, rather than a fresh review, we\u2019re taking the lead from Gaslight, giving you excerpts from our previous reviews of the show. Because, basically, with the exception of a few players, everything is the same.

This, from the review of the 2008 show. We\u2019ve noted it if there is a change in the recent production:

Mary Shelley would not be pleased.

We think, in fact, she would be horrified.

We speak of The Gaslight Theatre\u2019s rendition of Shelley\u2019s 1818 novel, \u201cFrankenstein,\u201d or \u201cThe Modern Prometheus.\u201d

Gaslight\u2019s title: \u201cFrankenstein Lives! or The Jolt\u2019s on You.\u201d (The subtitle has been dropped in the current production.)

Miss Mary\u2019s novel was thick with themes about alienation and the reckless pursuit of knowledge, and she took inspiration from such publications as Milton\u2019s \u201cParadise Lost\u201d and Coleridge\u2019s \u201cThe Rime of the Ancient Mariner.\u201d

Peter Van Slyke, who wrote and directed this stage version, took his inspiration from Paul Anka (as in Anka\u2019s hit \u201cLonely Boy,\u201d sung by the isolated Monster); Bobby \u201cBoris\u201d Pickett, who wrote and performed the early 1960s hit \u201cMonster Mash\u201d (not a half-hour had passed before it was sung); and from Van Slyke\u2019s own treasure trove of groanable humor.

OK, maybe inspiration isn\u2019t the right word. We aren\u2019t sure what the right word is. If we were, we aren\u2019t sure we could print it in a family paper.

All right, we\u2019ll admit it: We laughed. We tried to stifle it, but it was just too hard.

After all, this was full of Gaslight favorites who have perfected their let\u2019s-milk-this-for-all-it\u2019s-worth attitudes.

There\u2019s David Fanning, who played the Monster with a rock \u2019n\u2019 roll swagger and an amazing number of incomplete sentences. His lines mostly consisted of \u201cFriend?\u201d \u201cMust have girlfriend.\u201d \u201cAlone bad\u201d (it was about this time that he broke into Anka\u2019s \u201cLonely Boy\u201d).

And this, from the 2002 review:

\u201cFrankenstein Lives!\u201d does have a story line: Victor has returned to his ancestor\u2019s castle determined to rid himself of the family\u2019s cursed curse: monster creation. (The \u2018Lives!\u201d has been dropped from the title of the current production.) But that very evil Dr. Polvard is determined to change his mind. He does. Then Victor changes his mind back. Then Polvard changes it again. Then it changes back. See, there\u2019s conflict in that plot.

Gaslight has been around a long time, and a few of the players have changed. Joe Cooper, long a fan favorite for his willingness to make fellow cast members laugh at all costs, has retired. In earlier productions, he was the hunchbacked Hans, a lab assistant with an expertise in increasing the level of chaos. Mike Yarema \u2014 who was the Burgomaster in the 2008 show \u2014 steps into the hump and manages to keep the audience laughing and loving him just as much.

Heather Stricker played the role of Dr. Frankenstein\u2019s betrothed, Elisabeth in 2002, and is back as the swooning bride-to-be this year.

Also reviving his role as the blumbling, Bronx-cheery Inspector is David Orley \u2014 he did it in 2001 and \u201908. And likely more often, but those are the two times we caught it.

Todd Thompson is a familiar face at Gaslight, but we had not seen him in the role of Dr. Frankenstein, which he handled smoothly. And Jacob Brown, the evil Dr. Polvard, was, well, evil. And his evil was relatively fresh: He has not played the role before.

Now, let\u2019s revisit that 2002 review again, as it applies to the current show:

The sets, from the crypts to a burning cottage, were impressive \u2014 not surprising; Tom Benson designed them.

The cast of Gaslight regulars knew that their mission here was one they\u2019ve had so many times before: Sing well and make the audience laugh. That they did.

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If you\u2019re like me, you may head out for a run through the neighborhood and within a few steps hit your groove and start rolling along, saying to yourself, \u201cDude, I feel good.\u201d A couple of minutes later, though, you find your legs start to burn, your breathing gets ragged, and your will begins to falter.

You went out too fast. Running too fast is a common problem for all runners, but especially new runners.

The trick to avoid this: go slower. One way is to walk. If you want to run a 5K or half-marathon, you might think walking is a bad thing. It\u2019s not.

In fact, integrating intentional walk breaks into your runs is a great way to start a running program. As Olympian and author Jeff Galloway writes, a walk break \u201clets you break up the distance into manageable chunks,\u201d which gives you \u201ccontrol over the way you feel during and after\u201d an exercise bout. That is, by planning to slow down to a walk, you\u2019re the one in charge.

That \u201cmanageable chunk\u201d depends on your fitness.

"}, {"id":"9f23d3af-8e14-5a05-a6e4-bfc6064cdaba","type":"article","starttime":"1474149300","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-17T14:55:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474196519","sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"families":"lifestyles/families"},{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"},{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Bonnie Henry: Fruits of modern living aren't always as sweet","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_9f23d3af-8e14-5a05-a6e4-bfc6064cdaba.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/bonnie-henry-fruits-of-modern-living-aren-t-always-as/article_9f23d3af-8e14-5a05-a6e4-bfc6064cdaba.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/bonnie-henry-fruits-of-modern-living-aren-t-always-as/article_9f23d3af-8e14-5a05-a6e4-bfc6064cdaba.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Bonnie Henry\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Hard to find a decent watermelon or tomato these days.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["bonnie henry"],"internalKeywords":["#weekend","#columnist"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"e441d64b-e7d7-5813-8b3e-c5d5a48110ec","description":"Bonnie Henry","byline":"Ron Medvescek/Arizona Daily Star","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"493","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/44/e441d64b-e7d7-5813-8b3e-c5d5a48110ec/560d4371a3181.image.jpg?resize=620%2C493"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"79","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/44/e441d64b-e7d7-5813-8b3e-c5d5a48110ec/53d7e897b6318.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"239","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/44/e441d64b-e7d7-5813-8b3e-c5d5a48110ec/53d7e897b6d2d.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"814","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/44/e441d64b-e7d7-5813-8b3e-c5d5a48110ec/53d7e897868a9.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"9f23d3af-8e14-5a05-a6e4-bfc6064cdaba","body":"

Well, here it is, nearing the end of September. Summer\u2019s almost over \u2014 at least on the calendar. And I\u2019ve yet to bite into more than one decent watermelon.

Same for cantaloupe. As for tomatoes, that\u2019s hasn\u2019t happened since my neighbor down the street shared some from her garden a couple of summers ago.

What passes for tomatoes these days in the supermarket are beautiful to look at, tasteless to consume. According to Treehugger.com, \u201cMost supermarket tomatoes sold in North America share a genetic mutation that makes them all round, smooth, and deep scarlet red when ripe. The only problem is that this widely embraced mutation deactivates a gene that produces the sugars and aromas that are essential for a flavorful tomato.\u201d

Wasn\u2019t always that way. I can remember years ago reaching into my grandmother\u2019s refrigerator for a store-bought tomato, sprinkling it with salt, and devouring the whole thing in one setting, juice and seeds dribbling down my chin.

Back on her farm in Oklahoma, Granny had her own garden full of nature\u2019s bounty. Not so in Tucson, where she moved in the mid-1940s. Even so, my grandmother knew how to pick her produce.

To this day, I remember her tips on how to pick a good lemon \u2014 buy one with a slick rind. She must have also known how to pick a watermelon, for I never remember one that was either unripe or had gone to mush at her house.

Alas, when it comes to watermelon picking, all I remember her saying was to give it a good thump. Sure, I try that today, straining to hear just the right sound of hollowness over the chatter of the produce clerks, and James Taylor crooning through the loudspeakers.

So far this summer, I\u2019ve found one perfect watermelon. Another was so mushy at first slice that I wound up throwing the whole thing away \u2014 and it was labeled \u201corganic.\u201d The last two have been borderline, forcing me to cut half of each slice away. Remember when our mothers had the store plug a watermelon before they\u2019d buy it? Tell me who still does that.

Cantaloupes are even worse. Used to be, I could pick out just about any one of them from the pile, let it set on the counter for a few days, then enjoy. As I write this, my current cantaloupe purchase has been resting on the counter a dozen days \u2014 the last five in a paper bag. And it is no way ripe enough to slice \u2014 not unless I\u2019m wanting to introduce plenty of chewy fiber into my diet.

Sure, there are plenty of directives on picking the perfect cantaloupe, beginning with finding one that\u2019s yellow, not green. Good luck with that. Most seem to come in various shades of chartreuse.

Yes, I know the answer is to haunt the local farmers\u2019 markets. Trouble is, melons don\u2019t grow locally in the mountains. What does grow here, given enough time and attention, are apples. Right now, my husband can point to seven of them growing on his two apple trees. I figure each one is worth about $75.

He\u2019s also planted blueberry, raspberry and blackberry vines. Among them, he\u2019s harvested maybe a dozen berries \u2014 worth about $7 each, I\u2019d say.

While I\u2019m on a tear about supermarket deficiencies, why don\u2019t they carry canned pumpkin in the summer? I realize there was a shortage of the stuff last fall, though the stores finally came through. But try buying a can of it in July, as I needed to do to make the pumpkin bread I bake all year round.

I scoured every store shelf in the White Mountains and in Tucson. No luck. So I turned to the internet. Trouble was, I didn\u2019t want to buy a pack of 24 cans for 80 bucks on eBay. Thank heavens, I found another site where I could buy just one can for less than $4, no shipping fee.

Today, four loaves of pumpkin bread rest in my freezer, ready for company breakfast. As for that cantaloupe, it\u2019s still resting on my counter. I\u2019ll let you know if it ever ripens.

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Bob Tepper guzzles Ocean Spray cranberry juice.

Once, he spent days binge-eating Cheetos.

\u201cI had orange fingers for a week,\u201d he says, holding all 10 digits up for emphasis.

The things you do for love.

Bob, you see, is one very supportive husband. His folk-artist wife, Halina, doesn\u2019t typically work in traditional mediums. She prefers recycling everyday household items like juice cartons and containers that hold Canadian army-sized portions of cheese puffs and ... buttons.

Especially buttons.

You could call her work fasten-ating.

She takes those little utilitarian discs and transforms them into fanciful creatures like a rockhopper penguin and a 50-pound pewter-and-gold rhino that\u2019s on display at the International Wildlife Museum.

\u201cBecause the button is so humble, I enjoy bringing them to life,\u201d says Halina, 75, who was born in Siberia and spent a chunk of her childhood in war-torn Europe.

Buttons have always been special to her. Her Jewish stepfather \u2014 a Polish soldier during World War II who fought against the Russians \u2014 was captured and survived only because, as a master tailor, he could mend uniforms. He regularly gifted Halina with shiny buttons and fabric swatches, which she treasured and kept tucked in a cigar box.

Resourcefulness was a way of life for Halina, whose family came to the United States in 1949. Clothes were made, not bought, and nothing was wasted or thrown out. So even though she and Bob, 73, who retired as director of sales and marketing for Guittard Chocolate Co., have raised four daughters and lived comfortably in their 50-plus years together, Halina\u2019s continued to recycle and salvage. So much so that their two youngest grandchildren have been known to scavenge through fast-food restaurant trash cans saying, \u201cGrandma needs this!\u201d

She recalls a time back in the \u201960s that she went poking around a spot in the desert where people had tossed broken windshields. A police officer found her and threatened to cite her for illegal dumping. She explained she was picking up, not throwing out. The same officer later bought one of Halina\u2019s windshield wildlife paintings that she\u2019d mounted onto reclaimed wood.

At the northeast-side home where the two have lived for 36 years, there\u2019s not a bare patch to be found. Mostly because Bob points out any empty spaces to Halina.

The kitchen cabinets bloom with giant sunflowers, birds adorn the doors, even a bedroom floor is a mosaic masterpiece crafted from granite cemetery scraps. Halina salvaged broken shutters and turned them into shelves, pounded saguaro ribs into furniture and even patched and rehung a broken mirror, seashells glued over the offending cracks.

\u201cThe whole house is the studio,\u201d says Halina, who used to visit and watch famed artist Ted DeGrazia work. Her first pieces, she says with a laugh, were actually children\u2019s paint-by-the-numbers kits.

But it\u2019s buttons that have captured her creativity these days. She uses them like fabric. She sews them together, usually with thin wire in each hole, and then spreads the button blankets over plastic-container skeletons that are covered in regular packaging tape and a skin of glued-on felt.

She and Bob love to travel \u2014 in fact, her husband will tell you, Halina keeps a suitcase packed \u2014 and know the best swap meets and antique shops to find buttons from here to Snowflake. Bob jokes that his name is actually an acronym for \u201cButtons On a Budget.\u201d

Halina buys assortments and then separates them out by color. If she can\u2019t find exactly what she needs, she\u2019ll make her own buttons out of plastic, as she did for a kangaroo, which has a drop-open pouch and two babies tucked inside. They\u2019re gold \u2014 the same hue as the Aleene\u2019s Original Tacky Glue containers they\u2019re made from.

When she can, and there\u2019s interest, she volunteers her time teaching crafting classes. But, she doesn\u2019t sell her work anymore. She prefers to give her art as gifts, which isn\u2019t easy.

\u201cWhen I give something away,\u201d Halina says, \u201cit\u2019s like watching my kids go away.\u201d

"}, {"id":"e9c546a5-fca0-57a8-9456-814637dc0af7","type":"article","starttime":"1474146600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-17T14:10:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474196514","priority":35,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"askrosie":"lifestyles/askrosie"},{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Will duct cleaning remove construction dust?","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/article_e9c546a5-fca0-57a8-9456-814637dc0af7.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/will-duct-cleaning-remove-construction-dust/article_e9c546a5-fca0-57a8-9456-814637dc0af7.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/will-duct-cleaning-remove-construction-dust/article_e9c546a5-fca0-57a8-9456-814637dc0af7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Rosie Romero\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"It'll cost about $400 to $500 to do it right.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["olives","ductwork"],"internalKeywords":["#weekend","#columnist"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"c9ea6e80-c34f-52a4-add1-d6364099a71c","description":"If you have a tree loaded with olives, you might be thinking about curing them and eating them. You\u2019ll find lots of recipes online.","byline":"IStock","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"418","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/9e/c9ea6e80-c34f-52a4-add1-d6364099a71c/57da16eb1a0a2.image.jpg?resize=620%2C418"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/9e/c9ea6e80-c34f-52a4-add1-d6364099a71c/57da16eb1a0a2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/9e/c9ea6e80-c34f-52a4-add1-d6364099a71c/57da16eb1a0a2.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"690","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/9e/c9ea6e80-c34f-52a4-add1-d6364099a71c/57da16eb1a0a2.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C690"}}},{"id":"6d1fed37-305c-55c3-a3c2-3a852f182eaf","description":"Cleaning of air ducts should be done by a licensed contractor who can also clean the coil on your air conditioner.","byline":"AQ Specialists","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"439","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d1/6d1fed37-305c-55c3-a3c2-3a852f182eaf/57da16ebb197f.image.jpg?resize=439%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d1/6d1fed37-305c-55c3-a3c2-3a852f182eaf/57da16ebb197f.image.jpg?crop=1167%2C656%2C0%2C566&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d1/6d1fed37-305c-55c3-a3c2-3a852f182eaf/57da16ebb197f.image.jpg?crop=1167%2C656%2C0%2C566&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/d1/6d1fed37-305c-55c3-a3c2-3a852f182eaf/57da16ebb197f.image.jpg?crop=1167%2C656%2C0%2C566&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"e9c546a5-fca0-57a8-9456-814637dc0af7","body":"

Each year, thousands of Arizona residents email or call Rosie\u2019s radio show with questions about topics ranging from preventing fires in their chimneys to getting rid of tree roots invading their sewer system. His goal is to provide answers that suit the specific lifestyle wherever someone lives in Arizona.

QUESTION: We recently remodeled our home, originally built in 1999. In the process we took out and replaced about 1,000 square feet of tile and created a lot of dirt and dust that still seems to be hanging around. Should we hire someone to clean out the air ducts in our HVAC system?

ANSWER: Cleaning your air ducts can be a great idea, but you need to have the work done by a licensed air conditioning contractor who can also partly dismantle your air conditioner to clean the coil as well. It\u2019s a somewhat costly job that will cost about $400 to $500 to do it right. After that, you need to replace your air intake filters on a regular basis. But you usually don\u2019t have to clean the ducts again for from five to seven years.

Q: I have an olive tree in my backyard. Usually, it bears very few olives, but this year it\u2019s loaded with them, and I\u2019d like to know if they are edible or not. The birds certainly love them.

A: This year seems to be a very good year for olives, but if you just pick one off the tree and try to eat it, you\u2019ll find it has a nasty, bitter taste. Olives need to be cured before you can eat them. You\u2019ll find lots of different recipes online for how to cure them. Curing can be done using brine, salt, water or lye; you could try a couple different methods to see which you prefer. Many homeowners, as you probably know, have their trees sprayed to prevent them from bearing olives.

Q: I live in a house built in 1928 and need to replace my windows. I\u2019m wondering whether I should install vinyl clad windows or some other type of windows. Also do I need to talk to a plaster expert about the plaster around the windows because some of the plaster on the walls is crumbling?

A: I\u2019m not a big fan of vinyl clad windows, but there are some companies out there that market good vinyl choices. Windows with fiberglass cladding would be a more durable choice.

But the best selection for preserving the charm of an older home like yours would be aluminum clad wooden windows, which is also the most costly option. This type of window has wood on the inside and weather-proof, maintenance-free aluminum cladding outside.

Whatever you choose, you want dual-pane, insulated windows that will do a good job of keeping your home cooler in summer and warmer in winter.

You usually don\u2019t need to talk to a plasterer in addition to a window company; an expert window installer can handle any problems with the plaster on the walls near your windows.

Q: I live in an apartment building where the water comes out of the faucets looking very cloudy, which makes me wonder about its quality. So I buy bottled water from a machine for drinking. But someone told me that water from machines can be very acidic. Is that true?

A: Yes, that water from the reverse osmosis machines can be slightly acidic, but it\u2019s not very different from tap water in acidity. Regarding the water from your faucets, it may not have any serious problems; the cloudiness might be due to air infiltration in the system. If you set a glass of the water on a table, the cloudiness may go away in a few minutes as the air bubbles dissipate. But if you don\u2019t want to drink water directly from the tap, you might think about installing your own reverse osmosis system under your kitchen sink. It\u2019s a possible do-it-yourself project.

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It takes awhile.","byline":"Homer Edward Price","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/gif","width":"432","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/3e/63efc591-8cfa-5d58-bb33-47b3b4274f62/57db0f9d81b0b.image.gif"},"100": {"type":"image/gif","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/3e/63efc591-8cfa-5d58-bb33-47b3b4274f62/57db0f9d81b0b.image.gif?crop=557%2C313%2C0%2C136&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/gif","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/3e/63efc591-8cfa-5d58-bb33-47b3b4274f62/57db0f9d81b0b.image.gif?crop=557%2C313%2C0%2C136&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/gif","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/3e/63efc591-8cfa-5d58-bb33-47b3b4274f62/57db0f9d81b0b.image.gif?crop=557%2C313%2C0%2C136"}}},{"id":"0c3aa874-3759-5204-9915-28ae578a4be1","description":"These common bugs feed only on milkweed plants. They resemble assassin bugs. Chances are they\u2019re not doing any harm to your caterpillars.","byline":"Rosa Pineda","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"412","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c3/0c3aa874-3759-5204-9915-28ae578a4be1/57db0f9dd15ec.image.jpg?resize=620%2C412"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c3/0c3aa874-3759-5204-9915-28ae578a4be1/57db0f9dd15ec.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C720%2C0%2C65&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c3/0c3aa874-3759-5204-9915-28ae578a4be1/57db0f9dd15ec.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C720%2C0%2C65&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/c3/0c3aa874-3759-5204-9915-28ae578a4be1/57db0f9dd15ec.image.jpg?crop=1280%2C720%2C0%2C65&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":16,"commentID":"6a023c68-6ac2-5c00-a414-b134cd2599cd","body":"

Question: We have lived in Green Valley in a well-established subdivision for about 10 years. Initially we had an occasional lizard, but for the past two years we have in increasing number, which range from small to large (these are not the Gila monsters). The small ones are a real nuisance as they get under the screen doors and into the house. Is there any way to trap and relocate the lizards? My dog doesn\u2019t seem to bother them.

Answer: I am afraid that lizards are just part of living in the desert. Even if you trap and relocate them, others would likely replace them. I expect they are making homes in your area because there is food and shelter nearby. And let\u2019s also not forget that relocating wildlife, lizards or rodents for example, outside your property isn\u2019t legal without a license from Arizona Game & Fish. There are businesses that can do this for you and they are listed on the azgfd.com website. Probably the best thing you can do is make sure your house is well sealed with door sweeps and any other holes protected with fine mesh hardware cloth. You might also consider the benefits of lizards. They are great predators of insects that might otherwise be bothering you and your plants.

Q: I had to cut limbs off of my organ pipe cactus and another tubular cactus because they were blocking the sidewalk to my house. Can I transplant those limbs? Hate to throw them away.

A: The short answer is yes. My retired colleague, Jack Kelly, described the steps this way. First, in case you didn\u2019t already, you should make sure the cut you made to remove the cutting from the parent plant was with a sharp knife so the parent plant will have an easier time sealing the wound. Cutting at a 45 degree angle will protect the parent plant by reducing the chance of water collecting in the wounded area. Square off the base of the cutting, dust with sulfur and/or rooting compounds and let air dry for up to several months until the cut is callused over to prevent rot. Most cactus species are propagated during August through October when nighttime temperatures are 60 degrees or above and soil temperatures are warm and conducive to rooting. After the callus has formed, fill a container with 50 percent pumice or perlite and 50 percent peat or compost. Cuttings should be placed deeply enough in the container so the cuttings will not fall over. Irrigate the cuttings when the soil is slightly damp, and keep them in a bright area. Light levels are important. The dappled shade of a tree will often provide a great location for rooting to occur. With most species, rooting should occur within 4 to 6 weeks in summer. For some species such as organ pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi), rooting may take several months. Once the cuttings are rooted, the growing tip will show signs of new growth. At this time the cuttings will become \u201cplump,\u201d indicating that roots have formed and that water and nutrient uptake has occurred. Cuttings may be grown in 1 or 2 gallon containers for up to a year without requiring transplanting.

Q: I planted milkweed last year in order to attract monarchs to my yard. This year I had a bunch of caterpillars, then I found milkweed assassin bugs. I have not seen any caterpillars since. My question is, are the assassin bugs harmful to the monarchs? I read they are beneficial, but they do kill caterpillars. Nothing I can find says they are bad for monarchs, but I\u2019m thinking they are. Please let me know what I should do.

A: There is a common bug found on milkweed that resembles the assassin bug and feeds only on the plants. The species you are seeing is the large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) as opposed to the small milkweed bug that may also be found. I am seeing them on my milkweed now and the caterpillars that were on my plants just finished pupating. I saw an adult butterfly emerging this weekend. So I would bet the life cycles of these insects are giving you the impression there is cause and effect when there is none.

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If you think you\u2019ve been bugged a little more this summer by pesky moths fluttering around your TV while binge-watching your favorite program or a horde of flying ants invading your indoor space, it\u2019s not your imagination.

Weather conditions this year appear to have made for a particularly active year for insects in general, but especially for the type that make it inside your home, sometimes wreaking havoc on your daily life.

\u201cWe\u2019ve had optimal conditions for these things to be out because we\u2019ve had such an abundant amount of rain,\u201d said Gene Hall, collection manager for the University of Arizona Insect Collection. Hall also conducts insect diagnostics for the UA College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cooperative Extension.

\u201cJune is usually one of the hottest, driest months we have, and that\u2019s usually one of the hardest months on these things,\u201d Hall said. \u201cBut we had a really wet June this year. That has had an impact on things maybe being a little out of sync.\u201d

Tucson\u2019s average rainfall for June is 0.20 inches, according to the National Weather Service. But this June, the city got 1.59 inches, less than a half-inch short of the all-time record. July also was above average, by more than an inch, before the rain slowed a little in August. But just more than a week ago, the area was doused by the remnants of Hurricane Newton, which dropped 1.25 inches of rain in a single day.

The moisture and the cooler temperatures that came with it made conditions ideal for the bugs\u2019 presence to last longer by providing a better food supply with greener and more abundant plants, allowing them to spawn extra generations, Hall said.

One of Hall\u2019s jobs at Cooperative Extension is to field inquiries from residents about bugs. And he\u2019s been busy this summer.

\u201cI get (inquiries) by email because people send attachments and photographs. I get phone calls. I get walk-ins where people drop off specimens. People mail them to me,\u201d Hall said. \u201cThe first thing everybody wants to know is \u2014 what is it? Sometimes it\u2019s because they\u2019re afraid it\u2019s going to be something that\u2019s going to bite them or sting them.

\u201cMy job is to tell people what it is they have and then I tell them about its biology, and what it\u2019s about, its life cycle, and what it\u2019s known to do. Then I try to give them as much education about it as possible. Generally most people are happy with that.\u201d

If there is a next question it tends to be how to get them out of the house, Hall said. The answer is ridiculously simple.

\u201cThe basic line of defense is to not give them a way get in to begin with,\u201d Hall said. But the execution is the trick because of the very nature of how bugs act.

\u201cEvery time you walk through a doorway, they\u2019ll come in with you,\u201d Hall said.

They can squeeze under doors or around windows that aren\u2019t sealed properly. Holes in window screens are like a flashing welcome sign. Flying critters easily get past the barriers put up by exterminators who spray the ground around a home.

And nighttime can be a frustratingly losing battle because of insects\u2019 natural attraction to light.

\u201cInsects navigate by lights at nighttime,\u201d Hall said. \u201cA lot of them get tied in to navigating by the moon and such. We disrupt that with all these lights that we have. That\u2019s why when you go outside at night you have thousands of insects at your porch light.

\u201cIt\u2019s the same thing with interior lights. They can hone in on the light through the windows. Every time we go in and out of doors, or if we don\u2019t have screens that are completely sealed, or if we have gaps under doorways, that\u2019s how insects get in.\u201d

One of the simplest solutions, Hall said, to is to install yellow light bulbs around entryways with lights nearby and on porches. While he\u2019s not conducting a scientific experiment at his own home, Hall said he has indisputable evidence that the yellow bulb works.

\u201cI\u2019ve got one at home and I don\u2019t get bugs at my door at night,\u201d he said. \u201cThis is kind of silly. I have a yellow light at my front porch and I have a regular bulb at my back porch and I can see the difference. I would advise those for people to use if they have issues.\u201d

A two-pack of standard yellow bug lights will cost about $4 at a hardware store. The longer-lasting yellow spiral bulbs are about $5 to $6 apiece.

But if you accept that it\u2019s a losing battle to keep 100 percent of bugs out of the home, what to do once they\u2019re inside?

For the harmless nuisance insects like moths, you can use their weakness for light against them. For instance, when you\u2019re cozied up watching a television show in the dark, and a moth interrupts by landing on the screen, it might work to turn off the TV and let the moth fly toward another light.

\u201cI\u2019ve had insects fly from one light to the next at my place,\u201d Hall said. \u201cI\u2019ll have a moth in my living room and then I\u2019ll turn off the living room light and go into the bedroom and watch television and then the moth will be in there too. Of course, when all the lights go out, the insects stop flying around.\u201d

Each year is different when it comes to the type of insects that are more prevalent in the Tucson area, Hall said.

One year it\u2019s the scary-looking palo verde beetle with its long, horn-like antenna and black body that looks like it\u2019s covered in armor. They can reach 3\u00bd inches in length. Last summer, Hall said, it was the giant mesquite bug that made a strong appearance with its red and cream colored markings on its back.

This summer, the green fig beetle, commonly known as the June bug, has been making its presence known.

\u201cMonsoon season is definitely the high time here for insect diversity,\u201d Hall said. \u201cArizona in general, and especially Southeastern Arizona, has more insect diversity than any other place in the United States because we have mild winters. We don\u2019t have freezes.\u201d

For the most part, Hall said, locals are just curious when it comes to insects in the region, enough so that an annual event, the Arizona Insect Festival, draws thousands to the UA, and will likely do so again Sunday, Sept. 18.

\u201cPeople in this town really do have a big interest in insects because they\u2019re so dominant in our region,\u201d Hall said. \u201cMost people just learn to live with these things because these bugs are not out to kill us. They\u2019re not out to make our lives miserable. The majority of the insects out there are just doing their thing and they\u2019re just a part of the great biodiversity of our region.\u201d

"}, {"id":"130f8b14-8036-5f36-b712-a184b2db1f11","type":"article","starttime":"1474146060","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-17T14:01:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474196514","priority":35,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"collectibles":"lifestyles/collectibles"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Sawbuck table sells for three times estimated auction price","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/article_130f8b14-8036-5f36-b712-a184b2db1f11.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/sawbuck-table-sells-for-three-times-estimated-auction-price/article_130f8b14-8036-5f36-b712-a184b2db1f11.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/sawbuck-table-sells-for-three-times-estimated-auction-price/article_130f8b14-8036-5f36-b712-a184b2db1f11.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Danielle Arnet\nThe Smart Collector","prologue":"Sawbuck tables, with legs that form an X at each end, are popular with collectors of early American primitives and furniture","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#weekend","#"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"fa08aece-1e3f-5f01-be69-d30abad9ac12","description":"The small, 19th century sawbuck table brought $923 last month at Skinner in Marlborough, Mass.","byline":"Tribune Media","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a0/fa08aece-1e3f-5f01-be69-d30abad9ac12/57dc3d741f8e7.image.jpg?resize=620%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a0/fa08aece-1e3f-5f01-be69-d30abad9ac12/57dc3d741f8e7.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"300","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a0/fa08aece-1e3f-5f01-be69-d30abad9ac12/57dc3d741f8e7.image.jpg?resize=300%2C300"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1024","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a0/fa08aece-1e3f-5f01-be69-d30abad9ac12/57dc3d741f8e7.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"130f8b14-8036-5f36-b712-a184b2db1f11","body":"

WHAT: With estimated pre-sale at $200 to $300, a small 19th century pine sawbuck table measuring 27.5 inches high by 59.5 inches wide, with a scrubbed top on a red painted base, sold for $923 in a Skinner auction last month. That result is more than three times high estimate. What gives?

MORE: Sawbuck tables, with legs that form an X at each end, are popular with collectors of early American primitives and furniture. With painted legs (original paint is a major plus) and a scrubbed pine top, the table was even more interesting because it is small in size. Sold in an online-only Discovery auction of mostly 19th century or earlier country Americana, the piece was offered to niche bidders worldwide.

SMART COLLECTORS KNOW: In the last quarter of the 20th century, a country Americana look was all the rage in home decor. Shelter magazines touted the rustic look, and imported new woven coverlets and rickety pine furniture filled the aisles of decor stores.

Today\u2019s collectors have wised up. The real thing is sometimes available for not much more money. The bonus is that authentic items hold value and may appreciate during a lifespan. Best of all, the real thing has a history.

HOT TIP: Auction houses often post less pricey, but worthwhile, pieces in online only sales. Skinner calls their version Discovery sales. Savvy collectors know that such sales are a good way to find affordable buys.

BOTTOM LINE: Watch during slow selling times (summer, or just after fall/winter holidays), for sales where auctions unload desirable, but non-blockbuster, items.

"}, {"id":"9b05a004-1713-5d8c-97a3-7f81366c8ec7","type":"article","starttime":"1473896280","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-14T16:38:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1473937362","priority":35,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"outdoors":"entertainment/outdoors"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Celebrate the change of seasons \u2014 a Harvest moon and the Autumnal Equinox near","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/article_9b05a004-1713-5d8c-97a3-7f81366c8ec7.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/celebrate-the-change-of-seasons-a-harvest-moon-and-the/article_9b05a004-1713-5d8c-97a3-7f81366c8ec7.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/celebrate-the-change-of-seasons-a-harvest-moon-and-the/article_9b05a004-1713-5d8c-97a3-7f81366c8ec7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Tim Hunter\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Look for the Harvest moon on\u00a0Friday, Sept. 16.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["equinox"],"internalKeywords":["#weekend","#columnist"],"customProperties":{},"revision":9,"commentID":"9b05a004-1713-5d8c-97a3-7f81366c8ec7","body":"

Fall officially starts next Thursday, Sept. 22 at 7:21 a.m. Mountain Standard Time (MST). That\u2019s when the sun shines directly on the equator as it moves south from the northern part of the sky.

As the Earth travels on its orbit around the sun, the sun appears to move against the starry background. The tilt of the Earth\u2019s axis, with respect to its orbital plane around the sun, gives the appearance of the sun being in the northern part of the sky from the vernal (spring) equinox around March 21 until the autumnal equinox around Sept. 21.

We cannot actually see the starry background, because the sun is too bright. However, ancient observers learned to look at the stars along the horizon just before sunrise and just after sunset, giving them a good idea as to the sun\u2019s actual position in the sky.

"}, {"id":"b70b03ca-3576-5cb6-95f0-a011c7476aa5","type":"article","starttime":"1473896340","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-14T16:39:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474564265","priority":40,"sections":[{"arts-and-theatre":"entertainment/arts-and-theatre"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Come to this \u2018Cabaret,\u2019 old chum, even if you've seen it before","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/arts-and-theatre/article_b70b03ca-3576-5cb6-95f0-a011c7476aa5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/arts-and-theatre/come-to-this-cabaret-old-chum-even-if-you-ve/article_b70b03ca-3576-5cb6-95f0-a011c7476aa5.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/arts-and-theatre/come-to-this-cabaret-old-chum-even-if-you-ve/article_b70b03ca-3576-5cb6-95f0-a011c7476aa5.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Kathleen Allen Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Broadway in Tucson brings the Roundabout Theatre Company production to Centennial Hall","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["cabaret","kander & ebb","sam mendes","rob marshall","roundabout theatre company","broadway in tucson"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#weekend"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"f0fe093f-826e-54fc-9dee-c9e9323cbaed","description":"The Kit Kat Girls dance in the seedy nightclub of \u201cCabaret.\u201d","byline":"Broadway in Tucson","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"415","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/0f/f0fe093f-826e-54fc-9dee-c9e9323cbaed/57d357559cd93.image.jpg?resize=620%2C415"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/0f/f0fe093f-826e-54fc-9dee-c9e9323cbaed/57d357559cd93.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/0f/f0fe093f-826e-54fc-9dee-c9e9323cbaed/57d357559cd93.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"685","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/0f/f0fe093f-826e-54fc-9dee-c9e9323cbaed/57d357559cd93.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C685"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"b70b03ca-3576-5cb6-95f0-a011c7476aa5","body":"

\u201cCabaret\u201d is coming to town.

Now, don\u2019t shrug your shoulders. This is exciting.

Some musicals bare repeat viewings.

So even if you saw the production Arizona Repertory Theatre did last year.

Or the Winding Road Theatre Ensemble\u2019s production in 2013.

You want to see \u201cCabaret\u201d again.

And you especially want to see the production Broadway in Tucson is bringing our way next week.

Here are four reasons why:

1. This is the Roundabout Theatre Company road show of the Kander and Ebb musical, directed by Sam Mendes and co-directed and choreographed by Rob Marshall. Mendes is behind the 1998 revival of the musical that snagged all sorts of Tony Awards. This 2014 revival, much the same as Mendes\u2019 earlier one, was nominated for Tonys, as well. The production makes palpable the dark decadence of \u201cCabaret,\u201d about 1931 Berlin, when the Nazis were just beginning to assert themselves in Germany. And its relevance seems particularly profound in this ugly election year.

2. The music, from the title tune, to the heartbreaking \u201cMaybe This Time,\u201d to the chilling \u201cTomorrow Belongs to Me\u201d is just downright brilliant. Each tune serves the story and enlightens the audience.

3. The cast includes Randy Harrison as the Emcee (he was one of the stars of Showtime\u2019s \u201cQueer as Folk\u201d). \u201cHarrison\u2019s Emcee seduces us, flatters us, mocks our square ways \u2014 and then makes us squirm with wondering why we fell for him in the first place,\u201d said the Chicago Tribune. Andrea Goss\u2019 Sally Bowles charmed the Houston Chronicle: \u201cGoss is magnetic as Sally, a regular girl desperately trying to be anything but average.\u201d

4. The reviews: \u201c\u2026 A harrowing, heartbreaking show that will stay with you long after the bleak finale,\u201d said the Houston Chronicle of this road show. \u201cNow this is what \u2018Cabaret\u2019 is supposed to be,\u201d reported the Cincinnati Enquirer. And this from the Baltimore Sun: \u201c\u2026 The musical feels doubly meaningful, given the politics and tone of today, with the fresh efforts to single out ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation. Life is a cabaret, all right, but, as this production so powerfully reminds us, your table may not always be waiting.\u201d

"}, {"id":"6334dc1a-0912-54b4-b95c-6409d5cf4d47","type":"article","starttime":"1473894420","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-14T16:07:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1473937367","priority":24,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"dining":"entertainment/dining"},{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"pets":"lifestyles/pets"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Wining, dining to help a feline","url":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/article_6334dc1a-0912-54b4-b95c-6409d5cf4d47.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/wining-dining-to-help-a-feline/article_6334dc1a-0912-54b4-b95c-6409d5cf4d47.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/entertainment/wining-dining-to-help-a-feline/article_6334dc1a-0912-54b4-b95c-6409d5cf4d47.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"\u201cRescue 911\u201d 2017 calendar features Tucson Firefighters and PAWSitively CATS kitties.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["animal rescue cats"],"internalKeywords":["#weekend"],"customProperties":{},"revision":10,"commentID":"6334dc1a-0912-54b4-b95c-6409d5cf4d47","body":"

Pawsitively Cats has announced a couple of easy ways to help the cats and kittens at the nonprofit, no-kill shelter later this month.

First up is \u201cFeast for Felines\u201d from 11 a.m-9 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 21. Download a flyer from pawsitivelycats.org/upcoming-event/feast-for-felines, bring it to Feast Restaurant at 3719 E. Speedway and buy lunch or dinner, and 20 percent of your check will be donated to Pawsitively Cats. Reservations recommended at 326-9363.

Raise a Glass, taking place 4-6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25, lets you sip six wines, win raffle prizes, and see the \u201cRescue 911\u201d 2017 calendar featuring Tucson Firefighters and Pawsitively Cats kitties.

Calendars are $20 and will be available at a Wine Tasting benefit hosted by CataVinos Wine Shoppe, 3063 N. Alvernon Way. The wine tasting is $20, with $10 going to the cats and tax deductible. Non-alcohol option available. RSVP 323-3063.

Donations of canned Friskies will be accepted at both events. Calendars are also available at the shelter, 1145 N. Woodland Ave., 10 a.m-2 p.m. Monday-Saturday, and at Clues Unlimited Mystery Bookstore, 3154 E. Fort Lowell Road.

"} ]