[ {"id":"25505355-ad89-5107-a5cf-51296401dfa8","type":"article","starttime":"1480983053","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:10:53-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991692","priority":0,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Texas Republican elector says he won't cast ballot for Trump","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/article_25505355-ad89-5107-a5cf-51296401dfa8.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/texas-republican-elector-says-he-won-t-cast-ballot-for/article_25505355-ad89-5107-a5cf-51296401dfa8.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/govt-and-politics/texas-republican-elector-says-he-won-t-cast-ballot-for/article_8cdf8af9-ec30-5f41-8157-c3ec5f549b29.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By WILL WEISSERT\nAssociated Press","prologue":"AUSTIN, Texas (AP) \u2014 A Republican member of the Electoral College from Texas said Monday that he won't cast one of his state's 38 electoral votes for Donald Trump because \"I am here to elect a president, not a king.\"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","government and politics","united states presidential election","events","2016 united states presidential election","state governments","electoral college","national elections","elections"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":7,"commentID":"25505355-ad89-5107-a5cf-51296401dfa8","body":"

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) \u2014 A Republican member of the Electoral College from Texas said Monday that he won't cast one of his state's 38 electoral votes for Donald Trump because \"I am here to elect a president, not a king.\"

Dallas paramedic Chris Suprun previously indicated he would support Trump. But he now says the president-elect's postelection attacks on the First Amendment and the country's electoral process, as well as the billionaire businessman's continued promotion of his brand and business interests overseas, changed his mind.

Texas law doesn't mandate that electors vote according to the results of the state's presidential election, which Trump won by nine percentage points over Hillary Clinton. Suprun and the GOP's other electors signed pledges at the state Republican convention in Dallas this summer promising to vote for their party's nominee, but those aren't legally binding.

\"I'm expecting backlash, but that has been par for the course this campaign. People are unhappy. They're angry. But I'm angry, too,\" said Suprun, who said that prior to changing his mind he had received hundreds of emails, letters and phone calls urging him not to support Trump.

Suprun said the Electoral College system \"is fine as it currently exists.\" His problem is just with its winner.

\"I was told if we elected Donald Trump he would transform his personality into being presidential. He isn't,\" Suprun said. \"I wanted him to be presidential, but since the election he hasn't grown into our institution, he's attacked them. I am here to elect a president, not a king.\"

Another Texas Republican elector, Art Sisneros, resigned last week rather than vote for Trump. Electors will vote to replace Sisneros when they convene Dec. 19 in Austin and in state capitals across the country to vote for president.

Suprun said he was not resigning but also won't be voting for Hillary Clinton.

\"I am not sure of who I will vote for, but would have to strongly consider someone like (Ohio Gov. John) Kasich who has both executive and legislative experience bringing people together,\" he said.

Suprun said he was waiting to see if other electors will revolt and rally behind a Trump alternative like Kasich.

\"I'm looking for someone we can all unify behind,\" he said.

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IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 Cordell Pemsl muscled in 21 points Monday night as Iowa snapped a four-game losing streak with a 95-68 victory over Stetson.

Isaiah Moss, a redshirt freshman, pumped in five 3-pointers and also scored 21 points for Iowa (4-5). Peter Jok collected 15 points, eight rebounds and seven assists for the Hawkeyes.

Leo Goodman led Stetson (4-6) with 14 points.

The Hawkeyes got off to a fast start and had a 14-2 lead a little more than four minutes in. Iowa led 44-28 at halftime and raised the margin to 30 points at 90-60 on another 3-pointer by Moss, who finished with a career high in 3-pointers and points.

Iowa had surrendered 100, 92 and 98 points in its last three games, including a stunning 98-89 loss to Nebraska-Omaha, but the Hawkeyes played a much tighter game against the visitors from Florida.

"}, {"id":"8153b988-567c-5a62-967c-e26f42a564af","type":"article","starttime":"1480989248","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:54:08-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"college":"sports/basketball/college"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Freshman Ponds scores season-best 25, St. John's beats CSUN","url":"http://tucson.com/sports/basketball/college/article_8153b988-567c-5a62-967c-e26f42a564af.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/sports/basketball/college/freshman-ponds-scores-season-best-st-john-s-beats-csun/article_8153b988-567c-5a62-967c-e26f42a564af.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/sports/freshman-ponds-scores-season-best-st-john-s-beats-csun/article_230b4c83-f802-5020-bcd0-eb6268b8117b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Freshman Shamorie Ponds scored a season-best 25 points and St. John's held off Cal State Northridge 76-70 on Monday night.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","sports","men's basketball","college basketball","basketball","college sports","men's sports"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"8153b988-567c-5a62-967c-e26f42a564af","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Freshman Shamorie Ponds scored a season-best 25 points and St. John's held off Cal State Northridge 76-70 on Monday night.

Darin Johnson hit two free throws with 1:08 left to get CSUN within 71-68. After Bashir Ahmed went 1 of 2 at the other end, Tavrion Dawson made a layup with 40.3 seconds left to cut it to 72-70.

Kendall Smith, who finished with 10 points for CSUN, fouled out with 18.7 seconds left and Ponds sealed it with two free throws.

Ahmed added 13 points and Federico Mussini had 12 for St. John's (4-5), which was coming off a 20-points victory \u2014 its largest winning margin on the road since 2009. The Johnnies set a program by hitting 16 3-pointers against Tulane on Friday and went 10 of 21 against CSUN.

Johnson finished with 16 points for Cal State Northridge (3-6), which is still seeking its first road win of the season after six tries.

Aaron Parks completed a 3-point play with 6:52 remaining to give CSUN a 62-61 lead \u2014 its first since 28-27.

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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) \u2014 Any good South Korean protest needs a soundtrack, and the music that accompanies the massive rallies on the verge of bringing down President Park Geun-hye includes the mournful, the tongue-and-cheek and a smattering of defiance from \"Les Miserables.\"

Music resounds in the crammed streets around South Korea's presidential palace. It's both a rallying point and communal glue as crowds that organizers estimate at more than 1 million gather each Saturday to try to topple a president who prosecutors say allowed a corrupt confidante to pull government strings.

The songs are often modified versions of hits from South Korea's long and vibrant protest culture, which came of age rallying against military dictatorship in the 1980s.

Where the old songs of defiance tended toward somewhat monotonous chants by militant, fist-swinging protesters, however, the new tunes are often short and funny. They are often sung by families and young couples.

Protesters, for instance, cheerfully sway as they sing a tune that mostly just repeats the word \"Resign!\" Another song taps into lofty language in the country's constitution. Several harken to a recent tragic ferry sinking.

Here is a small sampling of the many songs that have accompanied historic protests in Seoul in recent weeks:

___

\"WHAT KIND OF COUNTRY IS THIS?\"

This fast-paced call for Park's arrest is one of the most popular songs at the protests.

The song by Yoon Min-seok calls Park, her allegedly corrupt confidante Choi Soon-sil, members of the conservative ruling party and the media \"criminals,\" ''treacherous servants\" and \"ugly accomplices\" who have made people's lives hell.

The chorus goes \"Resign! Resign! Resign! Resign now! Park Geun-hye, immediately resign! Imprison! Imprison! Imprison! Imprison now! Imprison Park Geun-hye!\"

___

\"BRING TO HARMONY\"

This was released by folk singer Han Young-ae in 1992 and has since become one of the country's most popular protest songs.

It's heavy with social commentary and laments a people who \"don't know what really matters and just run without knowing where they're going\" and \"ignore the truth.\"

In the chorus Han sings, \"Hey, God, who's asleep, please wake up. Like you did with the old colors of the sky, make things harmonious.\"

Toward the end, the song expresses a desire for solidarity by turning \"hate to love, anger to forgiveness, isolation to sympathy and impulsiveness into patience.\"

___

\"FLY AWAY CHICK\"

This one was released in 1994 by the rock band N.E.X.T., which was led by the late vocalist Shin Hae-chul. Before his death in 2014, Shin was influential for both his music and biting social commentary.

The song's narrator remembers a chick, called Yali, that he bought as a child on the way home from school, the grief he felt when it died and how that experience shaped him as an adult.

The song was a big hit when it was released and has become an anthem about death and grievance. It resonates also because of its use by relatives of the victims of a 2014 ferry disaster, which killed more than 300 people, mostly schoolchildren, and was partially blamed on government incompetence and corruption.

The chorus goes: \"Goodbye, Yali, are you flying in a world that has no pain? ... Did flowers blossom at your small burial mound this year too?\"

___

\"HAYA SONG\"

The song most frequently heard at the protests is a short and humorous improvisation of a decades-old song South Koreans sing while rooting for sports teams at stadiums.

Song writer Lim Han-bin changed the howling chorus of \"Arirang Shepherd Boy\" from \"ya ya, ya-ya-ya-ya, ya-ya-ya-ya, ya-ya-ya\" to \"haya, haya-haya, haya-haya, haya-ya.\"

\"Haya\" means \"resignation\" in Korean.

The song goes on to describe Park as a \"puppet\" who \"screwed the nation.\"

\"Arrest Park Geun-hye. .... Cough out all the money you have gobbled up,\" the song goes before shifting to the chorus again.

___

\"CONSTITUTION ARTICLE 1\"

The short tune written and composed by Yoon Min-seok simply repeats two lines paraphrased from South Korea's Constitution.

It expresses the pride of protesters, whose jovial mood is partially based on the belief that they are taking matters into their own hands to restore the country's democracy, which they say has been undermined by Park's scandal.

The song repeats \"The Republic of Korea is a democratic republic\" twice before adding, \"All authority in the Republic of Korea originates from the people.\"

___

\"THE TRUTH DOES NOT SINK\"

This solemn song, also by Yoon, is linked to the 2014 ferry sinking. A chorus of yellow-shirted singers sings it while standing with relatives of victims on a large stage that has become the center of the protests.

The lyrics include, \"Darkness cannot defeat the light; Lies cannot defeat the truth; the truth does not sink; We do not give up.\"

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on Republican incumbent Pat McCrory conceding to Democrat Roy Cooper in their close race for North Carolina governor (all times local):

8:25 p.m.

Pending litigation challenging North Carolina's process to ensure people who use same-day registration to vote are whom they claim to be are no longer could delay final election results this fall.

A federal judge late Monday granted a request by lawyers for the head of a conservative-leaning group to withdraw his bid to prevent the certification of statewide results until the voter verification was complete. A hearing on blocking the certification had been set for Thursday.

Attorneys for the Civitas Institute president wrote that State Board of Elections rulings involving election protests and recounts have changed the necessity for blocking the certification.

The withdrawal request was filed the same day Republican Gov. Pat McCrory conceded his close race to Democrat Roy Cooper.

The lawyers say the Civitas Institute president still wants to pursue the underlying litigation challenging the same-day registration process of verifying the addresses of new voters.

__

2:35 p.m.

Gay rights groups that made the defeat of North Carolina Republican Gov. Pat McCrory this year a top priority because of a law limiting LGBT rights that he signed are celebrating after his concession to Democrat Roy Cooper.

Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin said Monday that McCrory's \"reign of discrimination is finally over\" after McCrory announced publicly it appeared Cooper won.

The law known as House Bill 2 prevented local nondiscrimination ordinances designed to protect LGBT people. The law also tells transgender people to use restrooms in schools and government buildings that correspond to the sex on their birth certificate.

Cooper says he wants the law repealed. Republicans who approved to still control the legislature.

Tami Fitzgerald with the North Carolina Values Coalition supported the law and McCrory. Fitzgerald says McCrory's defeat \"was orchestrated by radical forces outside North Carolina\" and warned Cooper against any attempt to \"compromise the privacy and safety of our children.\"

__

1 p.m.

Democrat Roy Cooper has responded to North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory's concession in their close race by praising the Republican for his service to the state.

Cooper said in a Facebook post Monday that he's honored to receive the support of so many in this fall's election and believes \"there is more that unites us than divides us\" despite the contentious election season.

McCrory conceded earlier Monday as a partial recount of ballots in Durham County saw essentially no changes in their tallies. The State Board of Election has ordered the recount in heavily-Democratic Durham after technical troubles on election night led to a formal protest there.

Unofficial results show the outgoing attorney general ahead of McCrory by more than 10,000 votes of 4.7 million cast. The state board is likely to certify the result later this week.

__

12:10 p.m.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory has conceded the governor's race, clearing the way for Democrat Roy Cooper to be declared the winner.

The concession nearly four weeks after Election Day comes after appeals dried up and postelection counts saw Cooper's narrow lead increasing.

McCrory announced Monday in a video posted on YouTube that he is giving up four years after he won the office by a comfortable margin. This time around McCrory was weighed down by a law he signed limiting LGBT rights and was unable to generate the same voter support that lifted Republicans Donald Trump and Richard Burr to victory in the state.

Cooper's win marks an important consolation prize for national Democrats after a disappointing election. Cooper is the outgoing attorney general.

McCrory's defeat marks the first time a sitting North Carolina governor elected to a four-year term has lost a re-election bid.

___

11:05 a.m.

The recount of ballots in a North Carolina county has resumed and could soon bring a conclusion to the undecided race for governor.

Paid volunteers resumed their work Monday at the Durham County elections board office to carry out an order to recount more than 90,000 ballots cast during early voting and on Election Day. By midmorning, only 10,000 ballots still had to be run through tabulation machines.

Partial Durham recount returns through Sunday showed little change in tallies for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and Democratic challenger Roy Cooper. Unofficial statewide results have Cooper leading McCrory by about 10,250 votes. Representatives of McCrory and Cooper's campaign team are observing the Durham count.

McCrory has said he won't ask for a statewide recount if the Durham recount shows the same results.

__

3 a.m.

The undecided election for North Carolina governor could reach a conclusion Monday as a recount of thousands of votes wraps up.

Democrat Roy Cooper currently leads Republican incumbent Pat McCrory by about 10,250 votes. McCrory, who could not capitalize on the wave of support that delivered statewide victories for Republicans Donald Trump and Sen. Richard Burr, can demand a statewide recount if the margin is 10,000 or less.

A review of more than 94,000 votes cast in heavily Democratic Durham County during the early-voting period and on election day is expected to finish Monday. McCrory has said he won't ask for a statewide recount if that recount shows the same results.

Most other protests filed by McCrory's Republican allies have already been tossed out.

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(Reuters) - Former Vice President Al Gore, a leading voice in the fight against climate change, and Donald Trump, who at one point called it a hoax, met on Monday in what Gore called a productive session.

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Graphiq
PrettyFamous | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"2cd56b9c-b2e7-50dc-a86a-6c907c1298e5","type":"article","starttime":"1480974808","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T14:53:28-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991452","priority":0,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"},{"government-and-politics":"news/nation/government-and-politics"},{"government-and-politics":"news/national/government-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"New York City seeks up to $35 million for Trump-related security costs","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/article_2cd56b9c-b2e7-50dc-a86a-6c907c1298e5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/new-york-city-seeks-up-to-million-for-trump-related/article_2cd56b9c-b2e7-50dc-a86a-6c907c1298e5.html","canonical":"http://graphiq-alerts.findthebest.com/stories/25031/New-York-City-seeks-up-to-$35-million-for-Trump-related-security-costs","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - New York City is asking the U.S. government for up to $35 million to cover security costs related to President-elect Donald Trump, Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Monday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","graphiq","politics-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":29,"commentID":"2cd56b9c-b2e7-50dc-a86a-6c907c1298e5","body":"

(Reuters) - New York City is asking the U.S. government for up to $35 million to cover security costs related to President-elect Donald Trump, Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Monday.

InsideGov | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"94603da4-21ed-5885-aec1-a92628d94f08","type":"article","starttime":"1480974741","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T14:52:21-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991452","priority":0,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"},{"government-and-politics":"news/nation/government-and-politics"},{"government-and-politics":"news/national/government-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Defying Trump, Green Party pursues recounts in three US states","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/article_94603da4-21ed-5885-aec1-a92628d94f08.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/defying-trump-green-party-pursues-recounts-in-three-us-states/article_94603da4-21ed-5885-aec1-a92628d94f08.html","canonical":"tag:reuters.com,0000:newsml_L1N1E007T:662809279","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein pressed her case on Monday for recounts of U.S. presidential ballots in three states, and locked horns with President-elect Donald Trump over her motives.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","graphiq","politics-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":29,"commentID":"94603da4-21ed-5885-aec1-a92628d94f08","body":"

(Reuters) - Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein pressed her case on Monday for recounts of U.S. presidential ballots in three states, and locked horns with President-elect Donald Trump over her motives.

InsideGov | Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"b6791f0f-0948-58ba-83ae-82b24368073f","type":"article","starttime":"1480941360","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T05:36:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991452","priority":0,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"},{"government-and-politics":"news/nation/government-and-politics"},{"government-and-politics":"news/national/government-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Trump nominates Ben Carson to head HUD","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/article_b6791f0f-0948-58ba-83ae-82b24368073f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/trump-nominates-ben-carson-to-head-hud/article_b6791f0f-0948-58ba-83ae-82b24368073f.html","canonical":"tag:reuters.com,0000:newsml_L4N1E03NY:34666447","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - U.S. President-elect Donald Trump on Monday nominated Dr. Ben Carson to serve as secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","graphiq","politics-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":103,"commentID":"b6791f0f-0948-58ba-83ae-82b24368073f","body":"

(Reuters) - U.S. President-elect Donald Trump on Monday nominated Dr. Ben Carson to serve as secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

InsideGov | Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"0535dd95-dd8c-50cd-857a-71faf0a3a9f2","type":"article","starttime":"1480941300","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T05:35:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991438","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Death toll in Oakland, California, loft fire rises to 36","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_0535dd95-dd8c-50cd-857a-71faf0a3a9f2.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/death-toll-in-oakland-california-loft-fire-rises-to/article_0535dd95-dd8c-50cd-857a-71faf0a3a9f2.html","canonical":"tag:reuters.com,0000:newsml_L1N1DZ0EG:17212915","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - A fire that devastated an Oakland, California, loft building during a weekend dance party has taken at least 36 lives and the toll will likely rise, authorities said on Sunday, as criminal investigators joined recovery teams at the charred ruin.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","us-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":54,"commentID":"0535dd95-dd8c-50cd-857a-71faf0a3a9f2","body":"

(Reuters) - A fire that devastated an Oakland, California, loft building during a weekend dance party has taken at least 36 lives and the toll will likely rise, authorities said on Sunday, as criminal investigators joined recovery teams at the charred ruin.

Graphiq
Graphiq
Graphiq
"}, {"id":"dbe03d2a-9aa5-5f49-a72e-38119ee7c072","type":"article","starttime":"1480941060","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T05:31:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991438","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"international":"news/international"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Italy's Renzi to resign after referendum rout","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_dbe03d2a-9aa5-5f49-a72e-38119ee7c072.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/italy-s-renzi-to-resign-after-referendum-rout/article_dbe03d2a-9aa5-5f49-a72e-38119ee7c072.html","canonical":"tag:reuters.com,0000:newsml_L5N1DZ12W:1342771467","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi is set to resign on Monday after suffering a crushing defeat on Sunday in a referendum on constitutional reform, tipping the euro zone's third-largest economy into political turmoil.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","world-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":54,"commentID":"dbe03d2a-9aa5-5f49-a72e-38119ee7c072","body":"

(Reuters) - Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi is set to resign on Monday after suffering a crushing defeat on Sunday in a referendum on constitutional reform, tipping the euro zone's third-largest economy into political turmoil.

InsideGov | Graphiq
Graphiq
FindTheCompany | Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
Graphiq
Graphiq
FindTheData | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"9b895bf7-c765-5e6c-bc0e-874722e6896b","type":"article","starttime":"1480957980","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T10:13:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Inspired by a fake news story, gunman charged after storming into a pizza place with a rifle","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_9b895bf7-c765-5e6c-bc0e-874722e6896b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/inspired-by-a-fake-news-story-gunman-charged-after-storming/article_9b895bf7-c765-5e6c-bc0e-874722e6896b.html","canonical":"http://graphiq-alerts.findthebest.com/stories/25014/Gunman-charged-after-threatening-DC-restaurant-hit-by-fake-news","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - A man who took a rifle into a Washington pizza restaurant on Sunday \"to self-investigate\" a fake news report that it was operating a child abuse ring has been charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, police in the U.S. capital said.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","us-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":35,"commentID":"9b895bf7-c765-5e6c-bc0e-874722e6896b","body":"

(Reuters) - A man who took a rifle into a Washington pizza restaurant on Sunday \"to self-investigate\" a fake news report that it was operating a child abuse ring has been charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, police in the U.S. capital said.

Graphiq
Graphiq
Graphiq
"}, {"id":"4308bee3-1069-5fc7-9989-1aa87aa30b3e","type":"article","starttime":"1480956966","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T09:56:06-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Owner of Pulse nightclub says she won't sell building, where 49 were killed in June attack, to city","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_4308bee3-1069-5fc7-9989-1aa87aa30b3e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/owner-of-pulse-nightclub-says-she-won-t-sell-building/article_4308bee3-1069-5fc7-9989-1aa87aa30b3e.html","canonical":"http://graphiq-alerts.findthebest.com/stories/25017/Owner-of-Pulse-nightclub-says-she-won't-sell-building,-where-49-were-killed-in-June-attack,-to-city","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Graphiq","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","us-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":35,"commentID":"4308bee3-1069-5fc7-9989-1aa87aa30b3e","body":"
Graphiq
Graphiq
"}, {"id":"a5b7d33a-579a-52e1-ae84-9bd5ca0ed947","type":"article","starttime":"1480955970","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T09:39:30-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Dylann Roof allowed to hire lawyers back, for now","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_a5b7d33a-579a-52e1-ae84-9bd5ca0ed947.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/dylann-roof-allowed-to-hire-lawyers-back-for-now/article_a5b7d33a-579a-52e1-ae84-9bd5ca0ed947.html","canonical":"http://graphiq-alerts.findthebest.com/stories/25016/Dylann-Roof-allowed-to-hire-lawyers-back,-for-now","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(AP) -- A federal judge on Monday allowed a white man accused of fatally shooting nine black parishioners at a Charleston, South Carolina, church to hire back his lawyers, at least for the first phase of his trial.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","us-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":35,"commentID":"a5b7d33a-579a-52e1-ae84-9bd5ca0ed947","body":"

(AP) -- A federal judge on Monday allowed a white man accused of fatally shooting nine black parishioners at a Charleston, South Carolina, church to hire back his lawyers, at least for the first phase of his trial.

Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"a9d5ce93-5e4e-503a-b71e-65c6243afec4","type":"article","starttime":"1480952264","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T08:37:44-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"international":"news/international"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"West Mosul shelled as Iraq steps up fight against Islamic State","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_a9d5ce93-5e4e-503a-b71e-65c6243afec4.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/west-mosul-shelled-as-iraq-steps-up-fight-against-islamic/article_a9d5ce93-5e4e-503a-b71e-65c6243afec4.html","canonical":"tag:reuters.com,0000:newsml_L5N1E01I0:693475940","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - Western-backed Iraqi forces have begun shelling parts of west Mosul, residents said, preparing to open a new front against Islamic State seven weeks into a tortuous campaign to drive the militants from the city.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","world-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":40,"commentID":"a9d5ce93-5e4e-503a-b71e-65c6243afec4","body":"

(Reuters) - Western-backed Iraqi forces have begun shelling parts of west Mosul, residents said, preparing to open a new front against Islamic State seven weeks into a tortuous campaign to drive the militants from the city.

FindTheData.org | Graphiq
FindTheData.org | Graphiq
FindTheData.org | Graphiq
FindTheData | Graphiq
InsideGov | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"34c8b6fc-73aa-53a5-a3f3-07f021621440","type":"article","starttime":"1480950746","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T08:12:26-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"international":"news/international"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"New Zealand's popular Prime Minister John Key announces his resignation after eight years as leader","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_34c8b6fc-73aa-53a5-a3f3-07f021621440.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/new-zealand-s-popular-prime-minister-john-key-announces-his/article_34c8b6fc-73aa-53a5-a3f3-07f021621440.html","canonical":"http://graphiq-alerts.findthebest.com/stories/25010/New-Zealand's-popular-Prime-Minister-John-Key-announces-his-resignation-after-eight-years-as-leader","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(AP) - New Zealand's popular Prime Minister John Key stunned the nation on Monday when he announced, in a breaking voice, he was resigning after eight years as leader.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","world-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":45,"commentID":"34c8b6fc-73aa-53a5-a3f3-07f021621440","body":"

(AP) - New Zealand's popular Prime Minister John Key stunned the nation on Monday when he announced, in a breaking voice, he was resigning after eight years as leader.

InsideGov | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"cde0fc17-b2ed-5cbf-a10b-3165a91f4cfc","type":"article","starttime":"1480948911","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T07:41:51-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"international":"news/international"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Bob Dylan won't be at the Nobel Prize ceremony, but he will be writing a speech for it","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_cde0fc17-b2ed-5cbf-a10b-3165a91f4cfc.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/bob-dylan-won-t-be-at-the-nobel-prize-ceremony/article_cde0fc17-b2ed-5cbf-a10b-3165a91f4cfc.html","canonical":"http://graphiq-alerts.findthebest.com/stories/25009/Dylan-writes-Nobel-Prize-fest-speech;-Patti-Smith-to-sing","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(AP) -- He won't be there in person but the Nobel Foundation says Bob Dylan has written a speech that will be read out at the traditional Nobel Prize banquet.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","world-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":45,"commentID":"cde0fc17-b2ed-5cbf-a10b-3165a91f4cfc","body":"

(AP) -- He won't be there in person but the Nobel Foundation says Bob Dylan has written a speech that will be read out at the traditional Nobel Prize banquet.

PrettyFamous | Graphiq
FindTheData | Graphiq
FindTheData | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"59496c38-5c47-54c4-8334-63d907cfe7ab","type":"article","starttime":"1480947562","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T07:19:22-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Trump lashes out at China after getting criticism over phone call with Taiwan","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_59496c38-5c47-54c4-8334-63d907cfe7ab.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/trump-lashes-out-at-china-after-getting-criticism-over-phone/article_59496c38-5c47-54c4-8334-63d907cfe7ab.html","canonical":"http://graphiq-alerts.findthebest.com/stories/25005/Trump-lashes-out-at-China-after-getting-criticism-over-phone-call-with-Taiwan","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Business Insider) - President-elect Donald Trump lashed out at China on Sunday, accusing the nation of manipulating its currency and blasting it for the military conflict in the South China Sea.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","us-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":44,"commentID":"59496c38-5c47-54c4-8334-63d907cfe7ab","body":"

(Business Insider) - President-elect Donald Trump lashed out at China on Sunday, accusing the nation of manipulating its currency and blasting it for the military conflict in the South China Sea.

Graphiq
Graphiq
"}, {"id":"f846ed00-d46c-53b0-9f37-136056e0bb53","type":"article","starttime":"1480945905","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T06:51:45-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"international":"news/international"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"South Korean tycoons to take center stage in political scandal","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_f846ed00-d46c-53b0-9f37-136056e0bb53.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/south-korean-tycoons-to-take-center-stage-in-political-scandal/article_f846ed00-d46c-53b0-9f37-136056e0bb53.html","canonical":"tag:reuters.com,0000:newsml_L4N1E036L:1272975591","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - The heads of nine of South Korea's top conglomerates controlling revenue equivalent to half the country's economy face an unprecedented televised grilling by lawmakers on Tuesday, as the glare from a widening political scandal falls on Korea Inc.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","business-alerts,world-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":49,"commentID":"f846ed00-d46c-53b0-9f37-136056e0bb53","body":"

(Reuters) - The heads of nine of South Korea's top conglomerates controlling revenue equivalent to half the country's economy face an unprecedented televised grilling by lawmakers on Tuesday, as the glare from a widening political scandal falls on Korea Inc.

InsideGov | Graphiq
FindTheCompany | Graphiq
"}, {"id":"3b5e704e-0bcd-59ce-875c-802b4400c2b5","type":"article","starttime":"1480945938","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T06:52:18-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"At Dakota pipeline protest, activists celebrate, mindful fight isn't over","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_3b5e704e-0bcd-59ce-875c-802b4400c2b5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/at-dakota-pipeline-protest-activists-celebrate-mindful-fight-isn-t/article_3b5e704e-0bcd-59ce-875c-802b4400c2b5.html","canonical":"tag:reuters.com,0000:newsml_L1N1E005F:2081171750","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(Reuters) - Thousands of protesters in North Dakota celebrated after the federal government ruled against a controversial pipeline project on Sunday, even though many recognized that the fight is likely to continue into next year.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","us-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":49,"commentID":"3b5e704e-0bcd-59ce-875c-802b4400c2b5","body":"

(Reuters) - Thousands of protesters in North Dakota celebrated after the federal government ruled against a controversial pipeline project on Sunday, even though many recognized that the fight is likely to continue into next year.

Graphiq
"}, {"id":"92ab2b78-e9fb-5acf-b88f-49762e3828d7","type":"article","starttime":"1480944625","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T06:30:25-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991437","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Trump's Taiwan call, tweets point to flashpoints with China","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_92ab2b78-e9fb-5acf-b88f-49762e3828d7.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/trump-s-taiwan-call-tweets-point-to-flashpoints-with-china/article_92ab2b78-e9fb-5acf-b88f-49762e3828d7.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/trump-s-taiwan-call-tweets-point-to-flashpoints-with-china/article_73d2ac85-9c12-5c90-9f1b-6c5abcf57da7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By CHRISTOPHER BODEEN\nAssociated Press","prologue":"BEIJING (AP) \u2014 Donald Trump's unprecedented phone conversation with Taiwan's president and tweets criticizing China point to the possibility of major friction between the world's two largest economies.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","territorial disputes","nuclear weapons","human rights and civil liberties","international trade","economy","war and unrest","international relations","diplomacy","weapons of mass destruction","social issues","social affairs","economic policy","business","government business and finance","government and politics","government policy"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"e28bb5cd-deb7-56a4-9601-1ab2706e8b65","description":"This combination of three 2016 file photos shows, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, left, speaking at a ceremony at the Gen. Andres Rodriguez school in Asuncion, Paraguay, on June 29, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, center, talking with President Barack Obama at White House in Washington, U.S.A. on Nov. 10, and China's President Xi Jinping arriving at La Moneda presidential palace in Santiago, Chile, on Nov. 22. With Trump's latest tweets touching on sensitive issues, China must decide how to handle an incoming American president who relishes confrontation and whose online statements appear to foreshadow shifts in foreign policy. China awoke Monday, Dec. 5, to criticism from Trump on Twitter, days after it responded to his telephone conversation with Taiwan's president by accusing the Taiwanese of playing a \"little trick\" on Trump. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz, Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Luis Hidalgo, Files)","byline":"STF","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"210","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/28/e28bb5cd-deb7-56a4-9601-1ab2706e8b65/58456fa8d702f.image.jpg?resize=512%2C210"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"41","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/28/e28bb5cd-deb7-56a4-9601-1ab2706e8b65/58456fa8d702f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C41"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"123","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/28/e28bb5cd-deb7-56a4-9601-1ab2706e8b65/58456fa8d702f.image.jpg?resize=300%2C123"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"420","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/28/e28bb5cd-deb7-56a4-9601-1ab2706e8b65/58456fa8d702f.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"92ab2b78-e9fb-5acf-b88f-49762e3828d7","body":"

BEIJING (AP) \u2014 Donald Trump's unprecedented phone conversation with Taiwan's president and tweets criticizing China point to the possibility of major friction between the world's two largest economies.

Trump's talk with Tsai Ing-wen diverged sharply from U.S. practice since Washington switched diplomatic relations from Taipei to Beijing in 1979. Especially noteworthy were his direct reference to Tsai as \"president\" and to U.S. arms sales to Taiwan \u2014 a practice that particularly infuriates Beijing.

That could dampen Chinese expectations that his election would benefit China through a less confrontational approach and reduced attention to the Asia Pacific region, where China sees itself as eventually supplanting the U.S. as the dominant power.

Here are six areas that could develop into flashpoints.

___

THE ISSUE: Taiwan.

THE STICKING POINT: China and Taiwan split during a civil war in 1949 and China threatens to reunite with the island by force if necessary. Although China grudgingly accepts unofficial ties with Taiwan, it objects vociferously to arms sales and any official recognition of the island's government \u2014 both of which Trump referenced in his tweets.

THE POSSIBLE IMPACT: A leading Chinese scholar says Beijing will take a wait-and-see approach, but one possible response is to punish Taiwan, perhaps by further reducing its scope for participation in international organizations. China has already cut off relations with Tsai's administration and reduced the number of Chinese tourists visiting the island. Similar measures could follow, although how that would affect Trump's approach remains an open question.

___

THE ISSUE: Trade disputes.

THE STICKING POINT: In his tweets, Trump accused China of currency manipulation and over-taxation of American imports \u2014 practices seen by some as exacerbating the U.S. trade deficit with China, which rose to $367 billion last year. During the election campaign, Trump proposed a 45 percent tariff on Chinese imports, something experts say could spark a trade war.

THE POSSIBLE IMPACT: U.S. businesses that complain of facing unfair barriers in the Chinese market could benefit if Trump's tough talk persuades Beijing to avoid confrontation by making concessions. However, Beijing is equally likely to harden its position and impose retaliatory measures. A significant rise in U.S. tariffs on Chinese imports, primarily inexpensive consumer goods, would also hurt lower-income Americans, the sort of people that voted for Trump in large numbers in the election.

___

THE ISSUE: North Korea.

THE STICKING POINT: China is the hard-line communist regime's biggest source of trade, aid and diplomatic support, something the U.S. argues gives it unique leverage to press North Korea to end its nuclear and missile programs. Beijing counters that its influence is overstated and strongly implies that Washington's refusal to talk directly to North Korea is impeding progress toward a solution.

THE POSSIBLE IMPACT: A sharp downturn in the U.S.-China relationship could further reduce Beijing's willingness to pressure North Korea through the imposition of United Nations Security Council sanctions, which it has so far reluctantly supported. That could give North Korea more room to develop nuclear weapons, which it regards as a guarantee against U.S. and South Korean aggression.

___

THE ISSUE: Korean Peninsula missile defense.

THE STICKING POINT: China is adamantly opposed to South Korea's deployment of a highly advanced U.S. anti-missile system known as Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD. South Korea and the U.S. say it is targeted only at a possible North Korean missile attack, not just on the Korean Peninsula but also on Japan and the U.S. mainland. However, China and Russia say THAAD threatens their security by allowing the U.S. to peer deep into northeastern China and gives the U.S. the ability to launch a pre-emptive first strike.

THE POSSIBLE IMPACT: As with North Korea in general, severe turbulence in U.S.-China relations will erode China's willingness to cooperate on pressuring the North into giving up its programs. Beijing already opposes any measures that could drive the North Korean regime to the brink, possibly sending refugees into China's northeast and U.S. and South Korean troops to its border. It could also add momentum to China and Russia's budding alliance, stiffening opposition against the West in areas from Syria to arms control.

___

THE ISSUE: South China Sea.

THE STICKING POINT: China has been making major strides in asserting its claim to virtually the entire South China Sea, its islands and reefs, challenging the U.S. Navy's insistence on free navigation in the disputed, strategically vital waterbody. Trump raised the issue during the campaign and referred to China's fortified man-made islands in his tweet, saying Beijing didn't ask the U.S. if it was OK to \"build a massive military complex in the South China Sea.\"

THE POSSIBLE IMPACT: Experts, including retired U.S. Navy officers, say China is committed to asserting control over the area and Trump's tough rhetoric \u2014 unless backed by action \u2014 may further its sense of mission. China may move ahead with the long-anticipated step of announcing an air defense zone in the area that would require other countries to report to it and follow China's instructions, presenting the U.S. with yet another security challenge. China could also take stronger action to assert its claims to uninhabited East China Sea islands controlled by Japan.

___

THE ISSUE: Human Rights.

THE STICKING POINT: While Trump has shown little interest in advocating civil liberties in China, past administrations have pushed the cases of imprisoned dissidents, called for respect for the rights of Muslim minorities in China's far northwest, and urged dialogue between Beijing and exiled Tibetan leader the Dalai Lama. Attempts to abandon such advocacy would face heated opposition both in Congress and from rights groups.

THE POSSIBLE IMPACT: China's growing economic and political clout has emboldened it in defying such pressure, a tendency that grows stronger when relations sour with the U.S. and others. China is likely to become even less accommodating in cases such as blind legal activist Cheng Guangcheng, who was permitted to leave China with his family after taking refuge in the American Embassy in Beijing in 2012.

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PHILADELPHIA (AP) \u2014 Damaging testimony that Bill Cosby gave in an accuser's lawsuit, including admissions that he gave young women drugs and alcohol before sex, can be used at his sex assault trial, a judge ruled Monday.

The defense has insisted Cosby testified only after being promised he would never be charged over his 2004 encounter with accuser Andrea Constand. But his lawyers at the time never had an immunity agreement or put anything in writing.

\"This court concludes that there was neither an agreement nor a promise not to prosecute, only an exercise of prosecutorial discretion,\" Montgomery County Judge Steven O'Neill wrote in his ruling.

Cosby, 79, acknowledged in the 2006 deposition that he had a string of extramarital relationships. He called them consensual, but many of the women say they were drugged and molested. Cosby, questioned about the 2004 encounter at his home with Constand, described being on his couch and putting his hand down her pants.

\"I don't hear her say anything. And I don't feel her say anything. And so I continue and I go into the area that is somewhere between permission and rejection. I am not stopped,\" he said in his testimony.

Prosecutors describe Constand as being semiconscious after Cosby gave her three unmarked blue pills for stress that night. The release of the deposition testimony last year prompted them to reopen her 2005 police complaint and arrest Cosby days before the statute of limitations expired. O'Neill has vowed to try the case by June.

The ruling on the deposition is one of two key pretrial issues that will determine the scope of the evidence against Cosby. The other question is how many other accusers will be allowed to testify in prosecutors' attempt to show a pattern of similar conduct. Prosecutors hope to call 13 additional women who say they were assaulted by Cosby as far back as the 1960s. Two days of arguments on that issue are set for next week.

At a pretrial hearing earlier this year, O'Neill said that Cosby's decision to testify at the deposition could have been strategic. The actor \u2014 known as America's Dad for his top-rated family sitcom, \"The Cosby Show,\" which ran from 1984 to 1992 \u2014 could have invoked his Fifth Amendment right not to incriminate himself. But jurors would have heard of that decision if the case went to trial.

Cosby instead settled Constand's lawsuit, for an undisclosed amount, after finishing four days of testimony about his extramarital affairs, his friendship with Constand and other topics.

In another excerpt, Cosby described a phone call with Constand's mother a year later, when he refused to say what the pills were.

\"I'm not going to argue with somebody's mother who is accusing me of something,\" he testified. \"And I'm apologizing because I'm thinking this is a dirty old man with a young girl. I apologized. I said to the mother it was digital penetration.\"

Cosby also described getting seven prescriptions for quaaludes in the 1970s, which he said he kept on hand to give women he hoped to seduce, \"the same as a person would say, 'Have a drink.'\"

Constand had met Cosby at Temple University when she managed the women's basketball team. He was a prominent booster and university trustee. She went to police in 2005 to report that he had sexually assaulted her a year earlier after taking what Cosby described as an herbal product. Constand, then 30, was dating a woman at the time and had no romantic interest in the 66-year-old Cosby, her lawyer has said.

District Attorney Kevin Steele called the ruling on the deposition an important development in the 12-year-old case.

\"Allowing the jury to hear Mr. Cosby's deposition testimony is another step forward in this case and will aid the jury in making its determination. It's important that we are able to present all of the evidence available,\" Steele said.

Defense lawyer Brian McMonagle had no comment on the decision.

The defense will fight strenuously to block the testimony of the other women, arguing that their accounts are vague, decades old and impossible to defend. Cosby's lawyers had hoped to question the women in person to assess their credibility and relevance, but O'Neill rejected the idea.

Defense lawyers also say Cosby is legally blind and can no longer recognize his accusers or help his legal team prepare for trial.

Constand, 43, is now a massage therapist in her native Ontario. She signed off on the decision by prosecutors to reopen the case. The Associated Press does not typically name people who say they are sexual assault victims, but Constand has given permission for her name to be used.

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(AP) -- A Pennsylvania judge has ruled that damaging testimony Bill Cosby gave in an accuser's lawsuit can be used at his criminal sex assault trial.

PrettyFamous | Graphiq
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(AP) \u2014 President-elect Donald Trump is threatening to impose heavy taxes on U.S. companies that move jobs overseas and still try to sell their products to Americans.

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"}, {"id":"5626652b-99fd-5304-886d-0eb600e14ff5","type":"article","starttime":"1480962698","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T11:31:38-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991436","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"North Carolina Gov. McCrory concedes he lost re-election bid","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_5626652b-99fd-5304-886d-0eb600e14ff5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/north-carolina-gov-mccrory-concedes-he-lost-re-election-bid/article_5626652b-99fd-5304-886d-0eb600e14ff5.html","canonical":"http://graphiq-alerts.findthebest.com/stories/25021/North-Carolina-Gov.-McCrory-concedes-he-lost-re-election-bid","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"(AP) -- North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory conceded the governor's race Monday, clearing the way for Democrat Roy Cooper to be declared the winner nearly four weeks after Election Day.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","graphiq","politics-alerts,us-alerts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":30,"commentID":"5626652b-99fd-5304-886d-0eb600e14ff5","body":"

(AP) -- North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory conceded the governor's race Monday, clearing the way for Democrat Roy Cooper to be declared the winner nearly four weeks after Election Day.

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(The Guardian) - A devastating warehouse fire that killed at least 36 people has shone a harsh light on a housing crisis in Oakland and its consequences for artists and low-income residents.

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Some 15,000 Rohingya have arrived in Bangladesh over past month, often brought in by smugglers, according to police and intelligence officials, speaking on condition of anonymity. They have joined up to 500,000 undocumented Rohingya who have been living in Bangladesh after arriving from Myanmar in waves since the 1970s. Survivors of a wave of violence that has swept Myanmar in recent weeks say government forces have targeted minority Rohingya villages, burning many to the ground, killing the innocent and raping women. (AP Photo/A.M. Ahad)","byline":"A.M. 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BANGKOK (AP) \u2014 Myanmar's Muslim Rohingya minority face discrimination and violence from the Buddhist majority in the Southeast Asian country. Their plight generally goes unnoticed by the world at large, even though some rights activists say their persecution amounts to ethnic cleansing. Here are several things to know about the group:

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\"THE MOST FRIENDLESS PEOPLE IN THE WORLD\"

Although Rohingya \u2014 a Muslim ethnic minority of about 1 million among Myanmar's predominantly Buddhist 52 million people \u2014 have lived in Myanmar for generations, most people in the country view them as foreign intruders from neighboring Bangladesh. Bangladesh, which hosts many Rohingya refugees, also refuses to recognize them as citizens. \"The Rohingya are probably the most friendless people in the world. They just have no one advocating for them at all,\" Kitty McKinsey, a spokeswoman for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said in 2009.

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BORDER ATTACKS LED TO LATEST OUTBREAK OF VIOLENCE

Almost all Rohingya live in western Myanmar's Rakhine state, where the military has stepped up operations since November, when nine police officers were killed in attacks on posts along the border with Bangladesh. The identity of the perpetrators remains unclear. Rohingya villagers armed with homemade weapons resisted troops and an unknown number of villagers died, along with a handful of soldiers and officials. Rohingya solidarity groups say several hundred civilians have been killed since October. The New York-based group Human Rights Watch says satellite imagery shows 1,250 houses and other structures have been burned down. In 2012, violence between Rohingya and the Buddhist community killed hundreds and forced about 140,000 people \u2014 predominantly Rohingya \u2014 to flee their homes to camps for the internally displaced. About 100,000 remain in the squalid camps and dependent on charity.

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DISAPPOINTMENT WITH SUU KYI

There has been great disappointment that Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, whose political party took power in Myanmar this year after decades of military rule, has failed to ease the plight of Rohingya despite her reputation as a fighter for human rights. Speaking out for Rohingya rights is an unpopular political position in Myanmar. However, Suu Kyi's government in August appointed former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan to head an advisory panel aimed at finding lasting solutions to the conflict in Rakhine state. He has visited Rakhine over the past few days and is scheduled to speak at a news conference Tuesday in Yangon, Myanmar's biggest city. The U.N. special adviser on the prevention of genocide, Adama Dieng, last week expressed concern about reports of excessive use of force and other human rights violations against civilians, particularly Rohingya, including allegations of extrajudicial executions, torture, rape and the destruction of religious property.

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The death toll was expected to rise, as crews using buckets and shovels slowly made their way through the building, finding victims where they least expected them, Alameda County Sheriff's Sgt. Ray Kelly said. 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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Terry Ewing was among the anxious family and friends who received confirmation Monday of what he already knew in his heart: His girlfriend was among the three dozen killed in the Oakland warehouse fire.

Authorities confirmed the death of Ara Jo as the death toll rose to 36. Prosecutors also said Monday that murder charges could result from their investigation into the fire that broke out during an underground dance party at a building known as the \"Ghost Ship.\"

Alameda County Sheriff Gregory Ahern told The Associated Press he didn't believe there would be additional bodies found in what is the most lethal building fire in the U.S. in more than a decade.

But he cautioned that it was \"impossible to be absolutely positive\" until the entire recovery effort is complete. Authorities had gone through about three-quarters of the building by Tuesday afternoon.

The laborious job of digging with shovels and buckets through the debris was suspended overnight because of a dangerously unstable wall. It resumed in the morning, though a rainstorm Tuesday could complicate the effort. The cluttered warehouse had been converted to artists' studios and illegal living spaces, and former denizens said it was a death trap of piled wood, furniture, snaking electrical cords and only two exits.

Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O'Malley said Monday her office has sent a team to search for evidence of a crime in the warehouse, but has not yet determined whether a crime even occurred. She said potential charges could range from involuntary manslaughter to murder. She declined to say who her team has interviewed.

\"It's too early to speculate on anything,\" O'Malley said. \"We just started our investigation, and we owe it to the community and those who perished in this fire, and those who survived the fire to be methodical, to be thorough, and to take the amount of time it takes to be able to look at every piece of potential evidence.\"

Oakland city councilman Noel Gallo, who lives a block from the warehouse, said he confronted the property's manager \u2014 Derick Ion Almena \u2014 several times about neighbors' concerns about trash in the street and in front of the warehouse. Gallo said Almena essentially told authorities to \"mind their own business\" and appeared resistant to addressing complaints and complying with city codes.

Almena and his partner, Micah Allison, ran the building's arts colony, called the Satya Yuga collective. They were believed to have been away at the time of the blaze.

Relatives, friends and former colleagues said Almena loved to surround himself with followers, but seemed to care little for their well-being.

Asked late Sunday by San Francisco television station KGO about his thoughts on those killed in the fire, Almena said, \"They're my children. They're my friends, they're my family, they're my loves, they're my future. What else do I have to say?\"

Almena did not respond to emails or calls to phone numbers associated with him by The Associated Press. No one answered a call to a number for Allison.

The warehouse is owned by Chor N. Ng, her daughter Eva Ng told the Los Angeles Times. She said the warehouse was leased as studio space for an art collective and was not being used as a dwelling.

\"We are also trying to figure out what's going on like everybody else,\" the family wrote in a statement to NBC Bay Area. \"Our condolences go out to the families and friends of those injured and those who lost their lives.\"

Eva Ng did not immediately return phone calls from The Associated Press.

Gallo said Chor N. Ng put Almena in charge of cleaning up the Ghost Ship, and nothing was done.

\"I hold the owner of the property responsible,\" Gallo said. \"I hold the manager responsible.\"

But questions persisted about whether city officials could have done more to prevent the fire. Oakland planning officials opened an investigation last month after repeated complaints about the warehouse. An inspector who went to the premises couldn't get inside, said Darin Ranelletti, of the Oakland Planning Department.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf said city officials are putting together a record of what they knew about the property.

Gallo said the neighborhood was once an industrial zone and that many warehouses and vacant commercial buildings unfit for habitation remain. He said he's concerned that many of them are being used as illegal dwellings given the dearth of affordable housing in the area. He said he will push for the city to hire more fire marshals and building inspectors to investigate.

Authorities have identified 22 victims and notified their families, city officials said. An additional 11 victims have been tentatively identified, and three victims need \"scientific identification,\" they said.

Most of the victims' names, including the name of a 17-year-old, were not released.

Investigators said they believe they have located the section of the building where the fire started, but the cause remains unknown.

___

Har reported from San Francisco. Associated Press writers Ellen Knickmeyer, Olga R. Rodriguez, Tim Reiterman and Sudhin Thanawala in San Francisco, and Jonathan J. Cooper and Terry Chea in Oakland contributed to this report.

"}, {"id":"17673805-9cb6-5c42-959a-3c04e92b9850","type":"article","starttime":"1480988070","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:34:30-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991435","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Immigrant students seek place in mainstream high schools","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_17673805-9cb6-5c42-959a-3c04e92b9850.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/immigrant-students-seek-place-in-mainstream-high-schools/article_17673805-9cb6-5c42-959a-3c04e92b9850.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/immigrant-students-seek-place-in-mainstream-high-schools/article_1711992e-ee85-56a4-8305-558d54c02a63.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By MARYCLAIRE DALE\nAssociated Press","prologue":"PHILADELPHIA (AP) \u2014 A U.S. appeals court must decide if older immigrant and refugee students steered to an alternative high school in Pennsylvania are getting a meaningful education or are simply being passed through the system.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","primary and secondary education","education","political refugees","immigration","national courts","social affairs","human welfare","social issues","legal proceedings","law and order","national governments","government and politics","courts","judiciary","human rights and civil liberties","language education"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":6,"commentID":"17673805-9cb6-5c42-959a-3c04e92b9850","body":"

PHILADELPHIA (AP) \u2014 A U.S. appeals court must decide if older immigrant and refugee students steered to an alternative high school in Pennsylvania are getting a meaningful education or are simply being passed through the system.

Civil rights lawyers argued Monday that the Lancaster School District is sending immigrant students who are 17 to 21 years old and can't speak English to an alternative school with fewer academic opportunities.

The Lancaster School District said its concentrated program for English language learners allows them to earn degrees more quickly, and prevents the older students from getting frustrated and dropping out.

U.S. Circuit Judge Cheryl Ann Krause, however, questioned whether the degrees have any meaning if the students don't master core academic subjects.

Lancaster has seen an influx of refugees and immigrants, in part through resettlement programs. About 17 percent of the district's 11,000 students are English language learners and nearly 5 percent are refugees. The main high school also has a program for international students that includes English as a Second Language. A district judge, after hearing five days of evidence at trial, had ordered the district to let the students involved in the suit decide which school they want attend.

However, his August ruling did not cover other students.

Plaintiffs experts had said there was no evidence the students benefited from an alternative program that combines both English immersion and an accelerated pace. The students, who come from Somalia, Sudan and other war-torn countries, testified at the trial through translators.

\"We're talking about a vulnerable group of kids. These are kids who didn't win the lottery in life,\" lawyer Witold \"Vic\" Walczak, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania, argued on their behalf Monday.

Lawyer Thomas Specht, representing the district, said the 80-minute block classes at the alternative school, Phoenix Academy, offered more intensive instruction but was not necessarily faster paced. The school is run by a contractor, Camelot Education, and has a policy of not letting students bring books and other items to and from school.

The district allows immigrant students under 17 to enroll at McCaskey High School. District officials were concerned about young teenagers at the high school mixing with students as old as 20 or 21, Specht said. Phoenix Academy enrolls students in grades 7 through 12 who have fallen behind their peers. The middle school program is on a separate floor. The programs are designed to allow students to make up credits at an accelerated pace, Specht said.

Similar lawsuits have been filed in New York state and Florida. The three-judge panel did not indicate when it would rule.

"}, {"id":"a566d5ae-aff3-5dd0-bc3d-869962aec550","type":"article","starttime":"1480988090","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:34:50-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991435","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Race to replace New Zealand's Key grows to 3","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_a566d5ae-aff3-5dd0-bc3d-869962aec550.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/race-to-replace-new-zealand-s-key-grows-to/article_a566d5ae-aff3-5dd0-bc3d-869962aec550.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/race-to-replace-new-zealand-s-key-grows-to/article_fe0b0f59-0fbd-5bd6-80d4-5add029cb6bc.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) \u2014 Three conservative New Zealand lawmakers say they will seek to lead the country after the surprise resignation of Prime Minister John Key.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","political resignations","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"a566d5ae-aff3-5dd0-bc3d-869962aec550","body":"

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) \u2014 Three conservative New Zealand lawmakers say they will seek to lead the country after the surprise resignation of Prime Minister John Key.

The contenders are Deputy Prime Minister Bill English, Health Minister Jonathan Coleman and Corrections Minister Judith Collins. Several other National Party lawmakers on Tuesday said they haven't ruled out entering the race.

In New Zealand, the prime minister is chosen by the governing party's top lawmakers, who make up the caucus. The caucus is expected to make a decision at a meeting on Dec. 12.

Key had been a popular leader for eight years and was widely expected to contest a fourth straight election next year before he stunned the nation on Monday by announcing his resignation.

Key has endorsed English, who is also the finance minister.

"}, {"id":"41344e2d-cb1b-5052-945f-98afc034ca5b","type":"article","starttime":"1480990522","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T19:15:22-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Wisconsin officer will not be charged in black man's death","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_41344e2d-cb1b-5052-945f-98afc034ca5b.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/wisconsin-officer-will-not-be-charged-in-black-man-s/article_41344e2d-cb1b-5052-945f-98afc034ca5b.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/wisconsin-officer-will-not-be-charged-in-black-man-s/article_3397bfae-21e6-51c7-a58e-a22d966af414.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"WAUWATOSA, Wis. (AP) \u2014 A Wisconsin police chief says that no charges will be filed against an officer who fatally shot a black man in a suburban Milwaukee park in June.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","violent crime","crime","police","law enforcement agencies","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"41344e2d-cb1b-5052-945f-98afc034ca5b","body":"

WAUWATOSA, Wis. (AP) \u2014 A Wisconsin police chief says that no charges will be filed against an officer who fatally shot a black man in a suburban Milwaukee park in June.

Wauwatosa Police Chief Barry Weber says Milwaukee County prosecutors decided not to charge Officer Joseph Mensah in the death of Jay Anderson Jr. Under Wisconsin law, an outside agency must investigate police shootings.

Earlier on Monday, Anderson's family was told of the decision in a meeting with prosecutors. Jonathan Safran, an attorney for a family, told the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel that he has asked the U.S. Attorney's office in Milwaukee to investigate whether there could be federal civil rights charge against the officer.

Twenty-six-year-old Anderson was fatally shot in a local park about 3 a.m. on June 23.

"}, {"id":"7b7a2dd0-a690-508c-8ce6-6d94f07f4d94","type":"article","starttime":"1480990203","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T19:10:03-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"El Salvador congress strips ex-defense minister of immunity","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_7b7a2dd0-a690-508c-8ce6-6d94f07f4d94.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/el-salvador-congress-strips-ex-defense-minister-of-immunity/article_7b7a2dd0-a690-508c-8ce6-6d94f07f4d94.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/el-salvador-congress-strips-ex-defense-minister-of-immunity/article_71681b2c-0d76-5048-ad7a-9f21b70951a9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) \u2014 El Salvador's congress has voted to strip a former defense minister of immunity from prosecution, so he can be faced with accusations he used his position for arms trafficking.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","diplomacy","military legal affairs","international relations","government and politics","military and defense"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"7b7a2dd0-a690-508c-8ce6-6d94f07f4d94","body":"

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) \u2014 El Salvador's congress has voted to strip a former defense minister of immunity from prosecution, so he can be faced with accusations he used his position for arms trafficking.

Jose Atilio Benitez Parada is currently the country's ambassador to Germany. He says he has returned to El Salvador to face the charges and contends he is being treated like a criminal on the word of a protected witness.

Prosecutors allege Benitez trafficked weapons from the military's armories and instructed subordinates to register arms that were later sold.

Prosecutors say Benitez committed the crimes first as a vice defense minister and later as minister of defense during the 2009-2014 administration of President Mauricio Funes.

"}, {"id":"552b3a28-dcc8-5cb3-b3f8-d3716bd8f8b0","type":"article","starttime":"1480990063","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T19:07:43-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991434","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Live on TV: Moment of reckoning for S. Korean business elite","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_552b3a28-dcc8-5cb3-b3f8-d3716bd8f8b0.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/live-on-tv-moment-of-reckoning-for-s-korean-business/article_552b3a28-dcc8-5cb3-b3f8-d3716bd8f8b0.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/live-on-tv-moment-of-reckoning-for-s-korean-business/article_e1bb7ef9-e7a3-5d6b-9305-e8e401ff5552.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SEOUL, South Korea (AP) \u2014 It's a rare moment of public reckoning for South Korea's most powerful business leaders, courtesy of the country's biggest political scandal in years.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","political corruption","government and politics","television","political scandals","political issues","media"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"552b3a28-dcc8-5cb3-b3f8-d3716bd8f8b0","body":"

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) \u2014 It's a rare moment of public reckoning for South Korea's most powerful business leaders, courtesy of the country's biggest political scandal in years.

Usually cloistered executives from Samsung, Hyundai Motor and six other companies faced grilling Tuesday as lawmakers looked into their links to prosecution claims that South Korean President Park Geun-hye allowed a corrupt confidante to pull government strings and extort companies.

It is unusual for tycoons like Samsung Electronics Vice Chairman Lee Jae-yong and Hyundai Motor Chair Chung Mong-koo to face public questioning. Major TV channels broadcast the hearing live.

Park's scandal has increased doubts over deep ties between politicians and the country's top family-controlled businesses, known as chaebol.

The Samsung heir will be questioned about why the company sponsored the family of Park's confidante.

"}, {"id":"7dc53ee7-fe19-5097-93df-12340d4d8ab2","type":"article","starttime":"1480989512","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:58:32-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991434","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"In bid to fight art fraud, Sotheby's acquires forensic lab","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_7dc53ee7-fe19-5097-93df-12340d4d8ab2.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/in-bid-to-fight-art-fraud-sotheby-s-acquires-forensic/article_7dc53ee7-fe19-5097-93df-12340d4d8ab2.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/in-bid-to-fight-art-fraud-sotheby-s-acquires-forensic/article_4dd819a4-5bae-502c-a2d2-3f443fe6354b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By ULA ILNYTZKY\nAssociated Press","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 In bid to fight art fraud, Sotheby's announced Monday that it had purchased a forensics firm whose founder once helped the auction house belatedly identify a $10 million painting as a fake.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","arts and entertainment","general news","arts and collectibles auctions","painting","science","forensics","fraud and false statements","shopping","lifestyle","visual arts","law and order","crime","counterfeiting and forgery","arts industry","media and entertainment industry"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"7dc53ee7-fe19-5097-93df-12340d4d8ab2","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 In bid to fight art fraud, Sotheby's announced Monday that it had purchased a forensics firm whose founder once helped the auction house belatedly identify a $10 million painting as a fake.

Sotheby's said that Orion Analytical, based in Williamstown, Massachusetts, will be folded into the company and its founder, the artist, conservator and forensic scientist James Martin, will lead a new scientific research department charged with making sure the works the auction house deals with are authentic.

The purchase comes amid a number of recent art forgeries in the art world, including a supposed Old Master painting that was sold by Sotheby's to an art collector for $10 million in a private sale in 2011.

In March of this year, Sotheby's declared \"Portrait of a Man\" by Frans Hals a fake after questions arose about its authenticity. An in-depth technical analysis by Orion, reviewed by another conservation scientist, confirmed the suspicion. The forger remains unknown.

Sotheby's said Monday that the acquisition of Orion and Martin's appointment would add to collectors' confidence in the auction house.

Martin, who founded Orion Analytical in 1990, has analyzed the chemical and structural composition of disputed artworks for clients around the world, including private collectors, museums, galleries and the FBI.

\"Rather than being retained on a series of one-off assignments when issues arise, Jamie will be establishing a set of protocols to determine which works should be examined proactively, as well as training our specialist staff to identify potential issues, placing us in a position to provide even greater service to our clients,\" in the areas of art, objects and wine, Sotheby's said.

New York art attorney Peter Stern called Sotheby's move \"brilliant\" and said Martin was \"one of the most highly respected art analysts in the world.\"

Among his nearly 2,000 investigations, Martin examined the paintings in a sensational art fraud case involving the once highly respected Knoedler & Company, a Manhattan gallery accused of selling forged fakes of modern masters like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko for millions of dollars.

The 150-year-old gallery closed in 2011. The bogus paintings, created by a Chinese immigrant in New York City, were sold between 1994 and 2011. The civil trial ended in a settlement in February. The terms were not disclosed.

\"Knoedler's lesson may well be that art attorneys need to educate clients who are buying artworks to require warranties relating to authenticity,\" Chicago-based art attorney Scott Hodes said. \"The Orion Analytical acquisition has spotlighted this need.\"

\"Sotheby's will definitely be in a better position than its competition to detect forgeries,\" he added.

Artworks have long been authenticated based on provenance, style, and paint pigments. But in an art market where buyers think nothing of spending several millions of dollars on one piece of art, scientific examination that uses state-of-the-art technical imaging, molecular analysis, magnified visual inspection and other sophisticated methods, adds another layer of assurance that a work is real. It also can protect buyers and sellers from monetary losses and protect the integrity of artists and their works.

Martin has taught at The Getty Conservation Institute and The Smithsonian's Museum Conservation Institute and will continue to teach and consult with museums and conservators as part of his work at Sotheby's.

\"The range of works offered by Sotheby's, as well as the breadth of existing expertise and experience, provides for a unique opportunity to leverage my capabilities across the company's global platform,\" Martin said in a statement.

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\u2018Tis the season, but all is not jolly on the toy front this year, and local nonprofits are asking for help to make some holiday magic for children in need.

\u201cI work with lots of nonprofits and everyone is having a bit of a tough year,\u201d said Sgt. Stephen Derrick, coordinator for the Marine Toys For Tots campaign of Tucson and Southern Arizona. \u201cWe are down about 20 to 25 percent from the toys we had last year at this time. Normally after Thanksgiving, everyone gets the giving spark, but I think it is a little late this year ... maybe it has something to do with the election or maybe it is just that some years are better than others.\u201d

The Toys For Tots campaign is dedicated to bringing a message of hope to less-fortunate children and assisting them in becoming responsible, productive and patriotic citizens. It has committed to providing toys to 1,000 local families, along with at least 10,000 toys to local nonprofits for distribution before the holidays.

The need for toys is dire for children ages 8 to 14. Suggested gifts include LEGO kits, soccer balls, basketballs and any other items that engage children on an intellectual or physical level. Video games and electronics that require other means to play are discouraged, along with weapons of any kind and plush animals (to avoid bedbugs and lice).

\u201cIf you want to spend $50, we suggest you buy a bike instead of a video game,\u201d said Derrick.

Derrick emphasized that Toys For Tots has no ethnic, religious or political restrictions or requirements. \u201cIf we can help one family whose kids won\u2019t have a toy to get one, that is all that we want to do,\u201d Derrick said. \u201cWe don\u2019t morally or ethically judge anyone. ... In my mind, if a kid needs a toy, a kid needs a toy.\u201d

Help children in foster care

About 2,500 children in Pima County fall into that category.

Aviva Children\u2019s Services is trying to ensure that these children, from newborn through 18, are not forgotten this holiday with its annual holiday toy drive, which runs through Monday, Dec. 12.

\u201cWe just want to enable the kids in the care of the Department of Child Safety to have some kind of holiday celebration and give them a sense of normalcy like other children ,\u201d said Aviva\u2019s development and community relations manager, Monica Durand.

Just as with Toys For Tots, the need is greatest for preteens and teenagers. Durand said bath sets and gift cards for $25 or less to stores like Old Navy, Target, Walmart and Hot Topic are particularly helpful for this age group.

Durand credits many local businesses, clubs, organizations and individuals for supporting the cause with everything from toy collections to innovative efforts such as last weekend\u2019s Arizona Wildcat Hockey Teddy Bear Toss and the Tucson High School National Honor Society 12-hour Ultra Run featuring Jerry Schuster, a Tucson High math teacher who has completed numerous ultra runs to benefit local charities.

\u201cI knew I wanted to do a long training run and thought, \u2018Why not do it for a charity?\u2019 So I went to the National Honor Society, and the president suggested that I bring attention to Aviva and what they do and how people can help,\u201d said Schuster, who completed 40 miles on the Tucson High track last Saturday. \u201cSo all the credit goes to these students who did a super job. All I really did was put one foot in front of the other.\u201d

With year-end focus on Aviva, Durand also wants to encourage Tucsonans to take advantage of the Arizona Foster Care Charitable Tax Credit, which has increased from 2015 and now allows a dollar-for-dollar tax credit of up to $500 for singles and up to $1,000 for married couples filing jointly on 2016 Arizona income taxes.

Last year, Aviva raised $300,000 through tax credits for programs such as the Parent Peer Support Program, Life Books Program and Bags for Kids, which provides duffel bags and suitcases so children don\u2019t have to transport their belongings in trash bags.

Miracle in South Tucson

Making a difference to children has also been paramount to Ramon Gonzales for the past 46 years.

The founder of the Miracle on 31st Street Christmas Party said he has been blessed to be part of the event that has become a holiday tradition in South Tucson.

Last year, more than 10,000 children received free toys at the event, which also offers free food, entertainment and a parade of classic cars featuring Santa. Gonzales is expecting at least 10,000 children and their families at the event at 9 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 18, at Casino Del Sol\u2019s AVA Amphitheater.

To date, only about 100 toys have been donated, but he is hopeful that the community will provide toys for children who he said otherwise may not receive any holiday gifts.

\u201cI figure if I can make it to 46 years then maybe, God willing, I can make it to half a century with the help of the community,\u201d Gonzales said.

"}, {"id":"e643abc5-9c78-5355-b337-29456d73e9b0","type":"article","starttime":"1480957802","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T10:10:02-07:00","lastupdated":"1480990705","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Can't buy love? Drug price hikes put sex beyond reach","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_e643abc5-9c78-5355-b337-29456d73e9b0.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/can-t-buy-love-drug-price-hikes-put-sex-beyond/article_e643abc5-9c78-5355-b337-29456d73e9b0.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/can-t-buy-love-drug-price-hikes-put-sex-beyond/article_bb691168-08e5-593a-9654-d61e98c373c9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By LINDA A. JOHNSON\nAP Medical Writer","prologue":"TRENTON, N.J. (AP) \u2014 Imagine not being able to afford one of life's great pleasures \u2014 sex.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","health","health care costs","medication","health issues","diagnosis and treatment"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"43b7bbd9-7095-5d11-ad5a-01ebe123e934","description":"This Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 photo shows a display of prescription medicines for impotence and sexual problems at a doctor's office in San Diego. For many couples, doctors say soaring prices for the prescriptions have made sex unaffordable. 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TRENTON, N.J. (AP) \u2014 Imagine not being able to afford one of life's great pleasures \u2014 sex.

That's true for many older couples, doctors say. Soaring prices for prescription medicines for impotence and other problems have put the remedies out of reach for some.

Without insurance coverage, Viagra and Cialis cost about $50 a pill, triple their 2010 list prices. The new \"female Viagra,\" a daily pill for low sex drive called Addyi, costs $800 per month. Older products for women also have seen huge price run-ups, Truven Health Analytics data show.

\"Many of them don't get past the pharmacy counter once they see the price,\" says Sheryl Kingsberg, a University Hospitals-Cleveland Medical Center behavioral psychologist and researcher who counsels men and women.

What people actually pay out of pocket varies. Some insurance prescription plans, including Medicare, cover some of the medicines. Some plans don't cover any, arguing they're not medically necessary. Many require steep copayments or limit the number of impotence pills per prescription.

\"Once you get to a certain price point, sex becomes a financial decision,\" says Dr. Elizabeth Kavaler, a sexual dysfunction specialist at New York's Lenox Hill Hospital. \"It takes a lot of the joy out of this.\"

Five of six specialists interviewed by The Associated Press say patients have told them they've given up sex because of the cost.

Now, a little relief is coming. Late next year, Viagra and Cialis will get at least one generic competitor costing slightly less; prices will plunge later when more generics reach the market. For women, an Addyi rival is in late-stage testing. A few other products now have generic versions, and other options are in development.

A generation ago, long-married couples accepted their sex lives trailing off with age, Kavaler says. Key hormone levels drop with age, reducing sex drive and causing problems such as impotence and vaginal dryness, which often makes intercourse painful.

Today, midlife divorce is more common, divorced or widowed men and women often seek new partners, and sex becomes important again. Meanwhile, they're bombarded by ads for impotence remedies and other treatments.

\"Couples in their 50s, 60s and 70s are more sexual than they've ever been,\" says Kavaler.

Until Pfizer launched the first impotence pill, Viagra, in 1998, there were few options for men besides penile implants and injections. Viagra and Cialis each quickly topped $1 billion in global annual sales, and products for women's symptoms eventually followed. However, price hikes appear to be limiting usage for some products in the U.S., where prices aren't regulated.

Since 2010, the number of Viagra prescriptions filled in the U.S. has fallen 42 percent to about 5 million a year. Meanwhile, prescriptions for Cialis, which now has a popular daily pill option, have gone up slightly, according to health data firm QuintilesIMS.

Popular women's estrogen products such as Vagifem vaginal tablets and Estrace cream also have seen prescriptions decline in recent years. Addyi, only on the market for a year, has had dismal sales.

Dr. Lauren Streicher offers women four treatment options, and most pick Vagifem. A month's supply costs $170 and insurance coverage is limited. A generic version, Yuvafem, just launched at a slightly cheaper price.

\"They go to their pharmacy and see how much it costs, and then they call me up and say, 'I can't do it,'\" says Streicher, director of the Center for Sexual Medicine and Menopause at Northwestern University's medical school in Chicago.

But not being able to have sex \"is a deal-breaker in a lot of relationships,\" she adds.

The drugs' makers insist list prices far exceed the negotiated prices insurers pay them and say they price products based on their value. According to the companies, nearly all their customers are insured. Pfizer says most insured Viagra users pay $6 to $8 per pill, for instance.

Patients unwilling to forego sex, doctors say, split pills or otherwise ration medicines, beg for scarce samples or seek copay discount coupons. Men with enlarged prostates can request Cialis because it's also approved for that condition, usually with insurance coverage. Some women make do with over-the-counter lubricants.

Many shop for price, which can vary widely by pharmacy.

Others take a big risk, buying \"herbal Viagra\" at gas stations or ordering Viagra online from \"Canadian pharmacies\" that likely sell counterfeit drugs made in poor countries, says Dr. Irwin Goldstein, director of San Diego Sexual Medicine.

Some doctors have gotten inventive.

Dr. Nachum Katlowitz, head of urology at New York's Staten Island University Hospital, offers an alternative costing about $1 per pill at some pharmacies. The active ingredient in Viagra \u2014sildenafil \u2014 is also in Pfizer's now-generic blood pressure pill Revatio but at one-fifth the dose.

One of his patients, a 62-year-old hospital technician, takes several of the blood pressure pills before sex.

\"I couldn't afford it if I had to pay for Viagra,\" says Robert, who asked that his last name not be used to protect his privacy.

He's experienced modest improvements and says he and his wife of 28 years now enjoy sex twice as often.

___

Follow Linda A. Johnson at www.twitter.com/LindaJ_onPharma

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Edward W. \"Mike\" Kelley Jr., who served 14 years as a member of the Federal Reserve Board and was instrumental in modernizing the banking operations of the Federal Reserve system, has died. He was 84.

Kelley, whose death was confirmed Monday by the Fed, for many years ran a Houston manufacturing and services company. President Ronald Reagan appointed him to the seven-member Fed board in 1987. He was reappointed by President George H.W. Bush in 1990.

During much of his tenure on the board, Kelley chaired the committee that oversaw the operations and payment systems of the Fed's 12 regional banks. In that role, he led efforts to modernize the Fed's computer systems and prepare for a smooth transition during the century date change in January 2000.

In October 2005, the Houston branch building of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas was named in his honor.

Speaking at the dedication ceremony, then-Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan called Kelley \"my friend, confident and golf partner.\" He said Kelley's work to get the Fed system prepared for the Y-2K computer change greatly contributed to the success the Fed had in operating in crisis mode following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Greenspan said Kelley was also instrumental in increasing the efficiency of Fed operations by modernizing the way its regional banks coordinated the handling of services to commercial banks.

__

This story has been corrected to show that the Houston building was dedicated in 2005, not 2007.

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CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 In a story Dec. 4 about developments in the dispute over the Dakota Access oil pipeline, The Associated Press reported erroneously in several separate items that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said that it wouldn't grant an easement for the project. The Army issued the decision to not approve the easement at this time.

Corrected versions of the items are below:

The Latest: Company slams pipeline ruling as political

The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline is slamming the Obama administration after the U.S. Army's decision not to grant an easement for the project

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the Dakota Access pipeline protest (all times local):

10:30 p.m.

The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline is slamming the Obama administration after the U.S. Army's decision not to grant an easement for the project.

Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners released a statement Sunday night calling the decision, \"just the latest in a series of overt and transparent political actions by an administration which has abandoned the rule of law in favor of currying favor with a narrow and extreme political constituency.\"

The company reiterated its plan to complete construction of the pipeline without rerouting around Lake Oahe.

The decision to refuse the easement is a victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters, who argued the project would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites.

___

9:05 p.m.

House Speaker Paul Ryan is calling a decision by the U.S. Army to deny a government permit for the Dakota Access oil pipeline \"big-government decision-making at its worst.\"

The Wisconsin Republican tweeted Sunday night that he looks \"forward to putting this anti-energy presidency behind us.\"

The Army announced Sunday that it will not allow the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe in North Dakota \u2014 a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

The decision is a victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters, who argued the project would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites.

___

7:30 p.m.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is praising the decision of the U.S. Army to deny a permit for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in southern North Dakota.

That decision is a victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters, who argued the project would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites.

Sanders, who made a strong run for the Democratic presidential nomination this year, says he appreciates President Barack Obama \"listening to the Native American people and millions of others who believe this pipeline should not be built.\" He says: \"We should not continue to trample on Native American sovereignty.\"

Sanders says the country should not increase its fossil fuel dependence and accelerate the crisis of climate change.

___

6:50 p.m.

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier, whose department has done much of the policing for the Dakota Access pipeline protests, says \"local law enforcement does not have an opinion\" on the Army's decision not to grant an easement for the project.

Kirchmeier says the sheriff's department's role \"is to enforce the law\" and that it \"will continue to do so.\"

The Army announced Sunday that it will not allow the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

___

5:35 p.m.

Hundreds of demonstrators near the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp broke into cheers and chanted \"water is life\" in the Lakota Sioux language as news spread that the federal government won't grant an easement for the project in southern North Dakota.

Some in the crowd banged drums.

Miles Allard of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe said he was pleased by the decision but remained cautious, saying opponents of the pipeline \"don't know what Trump is going to do.\"

Allard says he's been telling his people \"to stand up and not to leave until this is over.\"

Carla Youngbear of the Meskwaki Potawatomi tribe traveled from central Kansas to be at the protest site. She says she has grandchildren and is going to have great-grandchildren who will need water and that's why she was there.

___

4:55 p.m.

The Morton County Sheriff's Office says that it has lifted the blockade on a bridge north of the large Dakota Access oil pipeline protest encampment.

In a statement, it said that it won't be near the bridge as long as protesters stick to the conditions outlined on Saturday, including only coming to the bridge for predetermined meetings with law enforcement.

The release did not comment on the U.S. Army's decision to not grant an easement for the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir from which the Standing Rock Sioux tribe gets its drinking water.

The large Oceti Sakowin camp is south of the Backwater Bridge, and several hundred people are camped there.

___

4:15 p.m.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch says that the Department of Justice will still monitor the protest in North Dakota and is ready to \"provide resources\" for those who \"can play a constructive role in easing tensions.\"

The U.S. Army said Sunday afternoon that the four-state, $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline cannot be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple said in a statement that the decision \"is a serious mistake,\" ''prolongs the serious problems\" that law enforcement faces and \"prolongs the dangerous situation\" of people camping in cold, snowy conditions.

The federal government has ordered the several hundred people at the main encampment, which is on U.S. Army Corps land, by Monday. Lynch said in a statement that the safety of those in the area, including officers, residents and protesters, \"continues to be our foremost concern.\"

___

4:10 p.m.

North Dakota Republican Rep. Kevin Cramer says that the Army's decision not to grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline is \"a very chilling signal\" for the future of infrastructure in the U.S.

Cramer said in a statement that infrastructure will be hard to build \"when criminal behavior is rewarded this way,\" apparently referring to the large protest encampment on federal land and the clashes between demonstrators and law enforcement.

The Army said Sunday afternoon that the pipeline cannot be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

The route has been the subject of months of protests by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others, who have argued the pipeline threatens a water source and cultural sites.

Cramer also said that \"law and order\" will be restored when Donald Trump takes office and that he feels bad for the Corps having to do \"diligent work ... only to have their Commander-in-Chief throw them under the bus.\"

___

4 p.m.

The Secretary of the Interior says the Army's decision to not grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline \"ensures there will be an in-depth evaluation of alternative routes.\"

Sally Jewell also said in a statement that the decision \"underscores that tribal rights ... are essential components of the analysis\" for the environmental impact statement.

The Army said Sunday afternoon that the pipeline cannot be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

The route has been the subject of months of protests by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others, who have argued the pipeline threatens a water source and cultural sites.

The company constructing the pipeline, Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, and the Morton County Sheriff's Office didn't have immediate comment.

___

3:45 p.m.

The U.S. Army says it won't grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in southern North Dakota.

Spokeswoman Moria Kelley said in a news release Sunday that the administration will not allow the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

Assistant Secretary for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy said her decision was based on the need to \"explore alternate routes\" for the pipeline's crossing.

The route has been the subject of months of protests by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others, who have argued the pipeline threatens a water source and cultural sites.

The company constructing the pipeline, Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, and the Morton County Sheriff's Office didn't have immediate comment.

The federal government has ordered people to leave the main encampment, which is on Army Corps of Engineers' land and is close to the construction site, by Monday.

Demonstrators say they're prepared to stay, and federal, state and local authorities say they won't forcibly remove the protesters.

___

2:45 p.m.

A disabled Gulf War veteran from Flint, Michigan, says he sees irony in the parallels between his city's lead-tainted water issue and the four-state Dakota Access pipeline.

Art Woodson is a disabled Gulf War veteran who served in the Army and drove to the main protest encampment from North Dakota with two others \u2014 a 17-hour nonstop drive. He's here as part of the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock group.

The 49-year-old says he is showing is support for \"Native Americans and for water,\" because Flint residents know \"that water is in dire need.\"

Woodson also said that \"they're trying to force pipes on people\" but that \"we're trying to get pipes in Flint for safe water.\"

The group had said about 2,000 veterans were going to the camp, where several hundred people have for months protested the $3.8 billion pipeline, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived.

The government has ordered people to leave the encampment by Monday. Demonstrators say they're prepared to stay.

___

1:30 p.m.

A Vietnam veteran who's part of a Michigan tribe says he came to the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp because the issue of water quality is \"an issue for everyone.\"

Sixty-six-year-old Steven Perry is from Traverse City, Michigan, and a member of the Little Traverse Bay band of Odawa Indians. He came to help at the Oceti Sakowin camp, which is on federal land in southern North Dakota, as part of the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock group.

Perry says: \"When we fought for this country, we fought for everyone.\"

The group had said about 2,000 veterans were going to the camp, where several hundred people have for months protested the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived.

The government has ordered people to leave the main encampment by Monday, but demonstrators say they're prepared to stay. Federal, state and local authorities say they won't forcibly remove the protesters.

___

1:25 p.m.

An organizer with the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock has told a gathering of veterans near the Dakota Access pipeline protest site that elders have asked they have no confrontations with authorities.

Organizer Wes Clark Jr., the son of former Democratic presidential candidate Gen. Wesley Clark, spoke to about 250 veterans Sunday afternoon.

State authorities have said they talked with the veterans group and will move away Sunday afternoon from the Blackwater Bridge that's north of the Oceti Sakowin camp on federal land if protesters agree to certain conditions.

Wes Clark Jr. spoke of that agreement, saying the National Guard and law enforcement have armored vehicles and are armed. He added: \"If we come forward, they will attack us.\"

The group had said about 2,000 veterans were going to the camp, where several hundred people have for months protested the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived. Clark asked veterans to help out anyone who needs it at camp.

___

11:10 a.m.

A Navy veteran and Harvard graduate student says he came to the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp because he thought they could use his help.

Twenty-nine-year-old Art Grayson of Cambridge, Massachusetts, said he came to the encampment as part of the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock group. He flew, then met up with other veterans and rode the final leg of the trip from Bismarck in the back of a pickup truck.

Hundreds of veterans are expected to come to the camp on federal land, where several hundred people have been in protest of the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline for months.

Grayson said that he \"couldn't stand by and watch people being abused.\" He has finals this week, but told his professors \"I'll see you when I get back.\"

The group's GoFundMe.com page had raised more than $1 million of its $1.2 million goal on Sunday, which is to go toward food, transportation and supplies.

___

7:25 a.m.

Authorities in North Dakota say they'll move away from a bridge near the main Dakota Access pipeline protest camp by Sunday afternoon if demonstrators agree to certain conditions.

A Morton County Sheriff's Office news release details the conditions as outlined Saturday by Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney, which he said are meant to de-escalate conflict.

They include staying in the Oceti Sakowin camp that's south of the Backwater Bridge, coming to it only if there is a prearranged meeting with law enforcement and not removing barriers.

Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman Dave Archambault and Gov. Jack Dalrymple have agreed to meet. Archambault told the Bismarck Tribune this weekend that he wanted the blockade on the bridge, damaged in late October during a protest, lifted.

Hundreds of veterans are due to gather Sunday on the reservation.

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CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 In a story Dec. 4 about an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said it would not grant the easement. The Army issued the decision to not approve the easement at this time.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Federal government blocks Dakota Access oil pipeline route

The U.S. Army says it won't grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota

By JAMES MacPHERSON

Associated Press

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 The U.S. Army said Sunday that it won't grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in southern North Dakota, handing a victory to the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters, who argued the project would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites.

North Dakota's leaders criticized the decision, with Gov. Jack Dalrymple calling it a \"serious mistake\" that \"prolongs the dangerous situation\" of having several hundred protesters who are camped out on federal land during cold, wintry weather. U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer said it's a \"very chilling signal\" for the future of infrastructure in the United States.

The four-state, $3.8 billion project is largely complete except for the now-blocked segment underneath Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir. Assistant Army Secretary for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy said in a news release that her decision was based on the need to \"explore alternate routes\" for the pipeline's crossing. Her full decision doesn't rule out that it could cross under the reservoir or north of Bismarck.

\"Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it's clear that there's more work to do,\" Darcy said. \"The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.\"

The company constructing the pipeline, Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, released a statement Sunday night slamming the decision as politically motivated and alleging that President Obama's administration was determined to delay the matter until he leaves office.

\"The White House's directive today to the (U.S. Army) Corps for further delay is just the latest in a series of overt and transparent political actions by an administration which has abandoned the rule of law in favor of currying favor with a narrow and extreme political constituency,\" the company said.

President-elect Donald Trump, a pipeline supporter, will take office in January, although it wasn't immediately clear what steps his administration would be able to take to reverse the latest decision or how quickly that could happen.

The decision came a day before the government's deadline for the several hundred people at the Oceti Sakowin, or Seven Council Fires, encampment to leave the federal land. But demonstrators say they're prepared to stay, and authorities say they won't forcibly remove them.

As the news spread Sunday, cheers and chants of \"mni wichoni\" \u2014 \"water is life\" in Lakota Sioux \u2014 broke out among the protesters. Some in the crowd banged drums. Miles Allard, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux, said he was pleased but remained cautious, saying, \"We don't know what Trump is going to do.\"

\"The whole world is watching,\" Allard added. \"I'm telling all our people to stand up and not to leave until this is over.\"

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Sunday that the Department of Justice will \"continue to monitor the situation\" and stands \"ready to provide resources to help all those who can play a constructive role in easing tensions.\"

\"The safety of everyone in the area - law enforcement officers, residents and protesters alike - continues to be our foremost concern,\" she added.

Carla Youngbear of the Meskwaki Potawatomi tribe made her third trip from central Kansas to be at the protest site.

\"I have grandchildren, and I'm going to have great grandchildren,\" she said. \"They need water. Water is why I'm here.\"

Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman Dave Archambault didn't immediately respond to messages left seeking comment.

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier, whose department has done much of the policing for the protests, said that \"local law enforcement does not have an opinion\" on the easement and that his department will continue to \"enforce the law.\"

U.S. Secretary for the Interior Sally Jewell said in a statement that the \"thoughtful approach ... ensures that there will be an in-depth evaluation of alternative routes for the pipeline and a closer look at potential impacts.\"

Earlier Sunday, an organizer with Veterans Stand for Standing Rock said tribal elders had asked the military veterans not to have confrontations with law enforcement officials, adding the group is there to help out those who've dug in against the project.

About 250 veterans gathered about a mile from the main camp for a meeting with organizer Wes Clark Jr., the son of former Democratic presidential candidate Gen. Wesley Clark. The group had said about 2,000 veterans were coming, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived.

\"We have been asked by the elders not to do direct action,\" Wes Clark Jr. said. He added that the National Guard and law enforcement have armored vehicles and are armed, warning: \"If we come forward, they will attack us.\"

Instead, he told the veterans, \"If you see someone who needs help, help them out.\"

Authorities moved a blockade from the north end of the Backwater Bridge with the conditions that protesters stay south of it and come there only if there is a prearranged meeting. Authorities also asked protesters not to remove barriers on the bridge, which they have said was damaged in the late October conflict that led to several people being hurt, including a serious arm injury.

\"That heavy presence is gone now and I really hope in this de-escalation they'll see that, and in good faith . the leadership in those camps will start squashing the violent factions,\" Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney said in a statement, reiterating that any violation will \"will result in their arrest.\"

Veterans Stand for Standing Rock's GoFundMe.com page had raised more than $1 million of its $1.2 million goal by Sunday \u2014 money due to go toward food, transportation and supplies. Cars waiting to get into the camp Sunday afternoon were backed up for more than a half-mile.

\"People are fighting for something, and I thought they could use my help,\" said Navy veteran and Harvard graduate student Art Grayson. The 29-year-old from Cambridge, Massachusetts, flew the first leg of the journey, then rode from Bismarck in the back of a pickup truck. He has finals this week, but told professors, \"I'll see you when I get back.\"

Steven Perry, a 66-year-old Vietnam veteran who's a member of the Little Traverse Bay band of Odawa Indians in Michigan, spoke of one of the protesters' main concerns: that the pipeline could pollute drinking water. \"This is not just a native issue,\" he said, \"This is an issue for everyone.\"

Art Woodson and two other veterans drove 17 hours straight from Flint, Michigan, a city whose lead-tainted water crisis parallels with the tribe's fight over water, he said.

\"We know in Flint that water is in dire need,\" the 49-year-old disabled Gulf War Army veteran said. \"In North Dakota, they're trying to force pipes on people. We're trying to get pipes in Flint for safe water.\"

Some veterans will take part in a prayer ceremony Monday, during which they'll apologize for historical detrimental conduct by the military toward Native Americans and ask for forgiveness, Clark said. He also called the veterans' presence \"about right and wrong and peace and love.\"

___

Associated Press writers Jeff Baenen in Minneapolis and Jamie Stengle in Dallas contributed to this report.

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legal action, Tucson council to discuss gun destruction","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_420be6f0-3083-5b2b-9309-b3e12edc7932.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/facing-legal-action-tucson-council-to-discuss-gun-destruction/article_420be6f0-3083-5b2b-9309-b3e12edc7932.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/facing-legal-action-tucson-council-to-discuss-gun-destruction/article_420be6f0-3083-5b2b-9309-b3e12edc7932.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":5,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Joe Ferguson Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Arizona attorney general signals he will take the city to court over its policy to destroy rather than sell confiscated guns.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["sb1487","destroying guns","tucson city council","mayor","jonathan rothschild","karin uhlich","mark finchem","steve kozachik","arizona attorney general's 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The Arizona Attorney General\u2019s Office has issued an ultimatum to Tucson over its policy of destroying confiscated handguns and automatic rifles.

Stop the practice immediately or face an expensive court battle, the office has warned city officials.

\u201cTo be clear, if the Council does not intend to promptly undertake such action to remedy the issues regarding the destruction of firearms identified in the Office\u2019s report, then the Office plans to file a petition for special action with the Arizona Supreme Court shortly thereafter to obtain a resolution,\u201d Assistant Attorney General Brunn Roysden wrote in a letter to city officials last week.

The Tucson City Council will meet in executive session Tuesday, Dec. 6, with City Attorney Mike Rankin to discuss legal strategies about the long-established city policy of turning most guns taken in by police into scrap metal.

Several members of the City Council have publicly defended the policy, saying destroying the firearms is lawful because the disposition of municipal property is a \u201clocal concern.\u201d

The issue involves a new state law known as SB 1487. Signed by Gov. Doug Ducey earlier this year, it restricts local governments from passing any laws that conflict with state laws, and jeopardizes their state-shared revenue if they don\u2019t repeal such laws.

Tucson received $172 million from the state last year.

Mayor Jonathan Rothschild said, whether through the guns case or another, the state law will eventually be challenged in court. He noted officials of other towns and cities are also concerned about the law, which could impact local decisions ranging from minimum wages to banning the use of plastic bags.

Tucson Councilman Steve Kozachik contends the law violates the state constitution. \u201cIt\u2019s like these guys legislate to litigate and ignore they\u2019re wasting taxpayer money,\u201d he said.

If the city defends the policy in court, it is required to post a $70 million bond just to fight SB 1487, Kozachik said.

State Rep. Mark Finchem, an Oro Valley Republican, filed the complaint with the Attorney General\u2019s Office earlier this year, stating Tucson is violating a 2013 Arizona law that requires the sale of otherwise legal guns obtained by law enforcement agencies.

The Tucson Police Department has destroyed 4,820 guns since the beginning of 2013, city records show.

"}, {"id":"501e88e1-1099-584c-a86a-57bf19d6d33a","type":"article","starttime":"1480948620","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T07:37:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1480989605","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"application":"editorial","title":"APX Group Holdings, Inc. to Present at the Imperial Capital 2016 Security Investor Conference","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_501e88e1-1099-584c-a86a-57bf19d6d33a.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/apx-group-holdings-inc-to-present-at-the-imperial-capital/article_501e88e1-1099-584c-a86a-57bf19d6d33a.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/apx-group-holdings-inc-to-present-at-the-imperial-capital/article_501e88e1-1099-584c-a86a-57bf19d6d33a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PROVO, Utah--(BUSINESS WIRE)--APX Group Holdings, Inc. (\u201cAPX Group\u201d or \u201cVivint\u201d) will be participating at the Imperial Capital Security Investor Conference being held at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, Thursday, December 8, 2016. Vivint President Alex Dunn will participate in a fireside chat at 11:00","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#prwire"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"501e88e1-1099-584c-a86a-57bf19d6d33a","body":"

PROVO, Utah--(BUSINESS WIRE)--APX Group Holdings, Inc. (\u201cAPX Group\u201d or \u201cVivint\u201d) will be participating

at the Imperial Capital Security Investor Conference being held at the

Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, Thursday, December 8, 2016.

Vivint President Alex Dunn will participate in a fireside chat at 11:00

a.m. EST.

A live webcast of the fireside chat will be available on the investor

relations section of Vivint\u2019s website at www.investors.vivint.com.

The webcast will be archived and available for replay for 30 days after

the event.

About Vivint

Vivint is a leading provider of smart home technology. Vivint delivers

services through a cloud-based platform that integrates a wide range of

wireless features and components to provide simple, affordable home

security, energy management and home automation. Dedicated to redefining

the home experience with intelligent products and services, Vivint

serves more than one million customers throughout the U.S. and Canada.

For more information, visit www.vivint.com.

Contacts

APX Group Holdings, Inc.

Dale R. Gerard, 801-705-8011

Senior

Vice President of Finance and Treasurer

dgerard@vivint.com

"}, {"id":"11700f69-7a19-5b0e-a9bf-93d112bd210e","type":"article","starttime":"1480940460","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T05:21:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1480989605","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Marcus & Millichap\u2019s IPA Division Closed the Sale of The Isle at Arrowhead Ranch For $42 Million","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_11700f69-7a19-5b0e-a9bf-93d112bd210e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/marcus-millichap-s-ipa-division-closed-the-sale-of-the/article_11700f69-7a19-5b0e-a9bf-93d112bd210e.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/marcus-millichap-s-ipa-division-closed-the-sale-of-the/article_11700f69-7a19-5b0e-a9bf-93d112bd210e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"GLENDALE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--#apartment--Marcus & Millichap (NYSE: MMI) today announced its Institutional Property Advisors (IPA) division closed the sale The Isle at Arrowhead Ranch, a 256-unit apartment property in Glendale, Arizona. The $42 million sales price equates to $164,000 per unit.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#prwire"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"11700f69-7a19-5b0e-a9bf-93d112bd210e","body":"

GLENDALE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--#apartment--Marcus & Millichap (NYSE: MMI) today announced its Institutional

Property Advisors (IPA) division closed the sale The Isle at Arrowhead

Ranch, a 256-unit apartment property in Glendale, Arizona. The $42

million sales price equates to $164,000 per unit.

\u201cDeveloped by Evans Withycombe Residential in 1996, The Isle at

Arrowhead Ranch is an exclusive lakeside destination within Arrowhead

Ranch, the preeminent master-planned community in the northwest Valley,\u201d

said Steve Gebing, IPA senior director. \u201cSupported by excellent

submarket fundamentals and strong operational momentum, the property is

a prime candidate for common area upgrades and apartment interior

renovations.\u201d

Gebing and Cliff David, a senior director of Marcus & Millichap\u2019s

National Multi Housing Group in Phoenix, represented the seller and

procured the buyer.

Located at 20250 North 67th Ave. in Glendale, the property is five miles

west of the economic region known as the Deer Valley Employment

Corridor, which has more than 80,000 employees in 24 million square feet

of office, industrial and flex space. Notable employers include Discover

Financial Services, American Express, PetSmart and Cigna Healthcare

Arizona. Two of the busiest north-south thoroughfares in the Phoenix

MSA, Black Canyon Highway and the Piestewa Freeway, are nearby and the

1.2 million-square-foot Arrowhead Towne Center super-regional mall is

approximately three miles away.

The Isle at Arrowhead Ranch features spacious apartment interiors, fully

equipped kitchens with gas appliances, full-size washers and dryers,

large windows with lake views, walk-in closets, and sizable patios or

balconies. Community amenities include two resort-style swimming pools,

a 24-hour fitness center, clubhouse, outdoor grilling areas,

controlled-access gated entry, covered parking, and detached garages.

About Marcus & Millichap (NYSE: MMI)

With over 1,600 investment sales and financing professionals located

throughout the United States and Canada, Marcus & Millichap is a leading

specialist in commercial real estate investment sales, financing,

research and advisory services. Founded in 1971, the firm closed over

8,700 transactions in 2015 with a value of approximately $37.8 billion.

The company has perfected a powerful system for marketing properties

that combines investment specialization, local market expertise, the

industry\u2019s most comprehensive research, state-of-the-art technology, and

relationships with the largest pool of qualified investors. To learn

more, please visit: www.MarcusMillichap.com

About Institutional Property Advisors

With a network of senior-level investment advisors located throughout

the United States, Institutional Property Advisors (IPA) is qualified to

meet the needs of institutional and major private investors. IPA\u2019s

combination of real estate investment and capital markets expertise,

industry-leading technology, superior support services and acclaimed

research offer customized solutions for the acquisition and disposition

of institutional properties and portfolios. www.IPAusa.com

Contacts

Marcus & Millichap

Gina Relva, 925-953-1716

Public

Relations Manager

"}, {"id":"28b6f44f-892f-506b-a558-38db90e6c9ce","type":"article","starttime":"1480979850","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T16:17:30-07:00","lastupdated":"1480988843","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"German chancellor denounces rape-killing of student","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_28b6f44f-892f-506b-a558-38db90e6c9ce.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/german-chancellor-denounces-rape-killing-of-student/article_28b6f44f-892f-506b-a558-38db90e6c9ce.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/german-chancellor-denounces-rape-killing-of-student/article_152ed71e-3bdb-58cd-9b94-f42a0398b765.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By GEIR MOULSON\nAssociated Press","prologue":"BERLIN (AP) \u2014 German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Monday denounced the rape and killing of a university student as a \"tragic event,\" responding for the first time to a case that has inflamed passions since police arrested a 17-year-old Afghan migrant last week.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","european mass migration crisis","juvenile crime","crime","arrests","violent crime","events","law and order","government and politics","political refugees","nationalism","human welfare","social issues","social affairs"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"e6916fdd-3e71-5f68-bf47-22feef54087a","description":"FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2016 file photo flowers and candles sit in front of a tree close to the Dreisam river in Freiburg, Germany, where the body of a student was found. A 17-year-old Afghan migrant, who entered Germany last year as an unaccompanied minor, was arrested Friday in connection with the killing. The 19-year-old medicine student vanished on her way home from a party in mid-October. (Patrick Seeger/dpa via AP)","byline":"Patrick Seeger","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"313","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e6916fdd-3e71-5f68-bf47-22feef54087a/58453b0dbdb56.image.jpg?resize=512%2C313"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"61","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e6916fdd-3e71-5f68-bf47-22feef54087a/58453b0dbdb56.image.jpg?resize=100%2C61"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"183","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e6916fdd-3e71-5f68-bf47-22feef54087a/58453b0dbdb56.image.jpg?resize=300%2C183"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"626","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e6916fdd-3e71-5f68-bf47-22feef54087a/58453b0dbdb56.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"03f99f37-540c-5f71-8bb4-ebb47155a551","description":"In this Dec. 3, 2016 photo, from left, Andreas Stenger, head of the forensic institute of the Baden-Wuerttemberg police, David Mueller, head of the task force 'Dreisam', Peter Egetemaier, head of the criminal police Freiburg, Bernhard Rotzinger, president of the Freiburg police, Dieter Inhofer, head of the prosecution, and police spokeswoman Laura Riske give information on a the arrest of an Afghan teenager after a 19-year-old student had been killed in the southern city in October. The teen, who entered Germany last year as an unaccompanied minor, was arrested Friday. The 19-year-old medicine student vanished on her way home from a party in mid-October and her body was found in a river. (Patrick Seeger/dpa via AP)","byline":"Patrick Seeger","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"176","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/3f/03f99f37-540c-5f71-8bb4-ebb47155a551/58453b0de274b.image.jpg?resize=512%2C176"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"34","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/3f/03f99f37-540c-5f71-8bb4-ebb47155a551/58453b0de274b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C34"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"103","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/3f/03f99f37-540c-5f71-8bb4-ebb47155a551/58453b0de274b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C103"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"352","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/3f/03f99f37-540c-5f71-8bb4-ebb47155a551/58453b0de274b.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"28b6f44f-892f-506b-a558-38db90e6c9ce","body":"

BERLIN (AP) \u2014 German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Monday denounced the rape and killing of a university student as a \"tragic event,\" responding for the first time to a case that has inflamed passions since police arrested a 17-year-old Afghan migrant last week.

A nationalist party has seized on the death to argue that Merkel's government bears a share of the blame.

\"If it turns out that (the perpetrator) was an Afghan refugee then that needs to be condemned, absolutely, just like with any other murderer,\" Merkel said in an interview with public broadcaster ARD.

\"But that shouldn't be combined with a rejection of an entire group, just like we don't draw conclusions about an entire group from (the actions of) one person in other instances,\" she added.

The victim, a 19-year-old medical student, vanished in mid-October on her way home from a party in the southwestern city of Freiburg. Her body was found in a river.

Police say the suspect, who was arrested on Friday, was linked to the crime through DNA evidence and video footage from near the scene. The teenager, who entered Germany last year as an unaccompanied minor, hasn't made a statement. His arrest, however, has played into ongoing tensions about the arrival in Germany last year of hundreds of thousands of migrants.

Joerg Meuthen, a co-leader of the nationalist Alternative for Germany party, argued Sunday that Merkel and Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel bear \"a decisive share of the responsibility for this cruel act and many other 'isolated cases' that have happened daily in Germany since the unhindered entry of illegal immigrants.\"

The nationalist party rose in polls following last year's migrant influx and hopes to enter the national Parliament in an election next year in which Merkel is seeking a fourth term. In the U.S., businessman Donald Trump focused on crimes linked to immigrants in the country illegally as part of his successful presidential campaign.

Merkel's deputy said the student's death must not be used for \"rabble-rousing and conspiracy propaganda.\"

\"It is clear to everyone that refugees can commit equally terrible crimes as people born in Germany,\" Gabriel told Monday's edition of the Bild daily.

Merkel's spokesman, Steffen Seibert, condemned the \"appalling crime,\" telling reporters in Berlin that \"the perpetrator must be punished with the full force of our laws.\"

While many Germans have welcomed refugees, there has been strong opposition from a vocal minority. A string of sexual assaults and robberies on New Year's Eve in Cologne blamed primarily on foreigners also fed fears, as well as accusations that the media were slow to report on such incidents.

ARD, the public television station, drew criticism for not featuring the Freiburg arrest in its evening news bulletin Saturday, the day it was announced. The broadcaster said in a blog that it hadn't considered the case to rise above other killings to be \"nationally and internationally relevant.\"

In her interview Monday with ARD, Merkel said it was right that \"one should talk openly\" about such incidents.

___

Associated Press writer Frank Jordans contributed to this report.

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Fritz, a musician and artist from Connecticut, recently moved to San Francisco to be with friends, according to her brother, Ben Fritz. The family was notified Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016, that Riley, also known as Feral Pines, likely was killed in a warehouse fire in Oakland, Calif., according to Ben Fritz. 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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) \u2014 A therapist who used music to help kids cope with trauma. A woman who taught at a Montessori school. A couple who planned to marry and live together in Europe.

These were some of the people killed when flames ripped through a converted Oakland warehouse during a dance party Friday night. The death toll from Friday night's fire climbed to 36 on Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the rubble.

The victims also included 17-year-olds and people from Europe and Asia, Alameda County Sheriff's Sgt. Ray Kelly said. Here's a closer look at who they were:

PASSIONATE MUSIC THERAPIST

Travis Hough, 35, believed music healed people, including himself.

Hough was an experimental electronic artist behind Ghost of Lightning, a project in which he created music to explore and understand his own psyche, said Michelle Campbell, founder of Mixtape, an artist management company based in Oakland.

Hough worked by day as a therapist in schools in the Bay area, using music to help children cope with trauma, Campbell said.

\"Really his passion was his work in helping find ways to use music as a means of healing,\" Campbell said.

Hough played bass and keyboard and was a performance artist who was inspired by Prince and other male performers \"who wear ruffles, glitter and makeup,\" she said. His shows included orbs of rhythmically pulsating light.

He enjoyed a good meal with family and friends and hiking through northern California's Redwood forests.

\"He was definitely a radiant light,\" Campbell said.

EXTRAORDINARY CO-WORKER

Nick Gomez-Hall, 25, made a warm impression on friends and colleagues in California and Rhode Island as a musician, mentor and community advocate who most recently worked for an independent publisher.

Berkeley, California-based publisher Counterpoint Press said Monday it was devastated by the loss of an \"extraordinary co-worker and a true friend.\"

\"Whether he was recommending new music to listen to (and it was always so good), regaling us with tales of the bowling alley, offering his beloved truck for a ride if anyone needed it or sharing his much-appreciated opinions about a jacket or manuscript, he made everyone feel like they were his friend,\" the company wrote in a social media post. \"He was kind, considerate, hilarious.\"

Gomez-Hall was a 2013 graduate of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, where he concentrated in American Studies. The university on Monday said he \"played an integral role\" in the school's Swearer Center for Public Service. He volunteered to teach at an elementary school while an undergraduate and later helped run an after-school program.

He also became well-known in Providence's music scene for playing guitar and singing in the two-man band Nightmom.

Gomez-Hall recently moved to the San Francisco Bay Area. He was originally from Southern California and graduated from Coronado High School.

'TOTAL GOOFBALL'

Cash Askew, a 22-year-old musician from Oakland, was kind, gentle and a \"total goofball,\" said her girlfriend, Anya Taylor.

The couple met about a year ago at a concert in Oakland and connected through their love of music.

Taylor told the Washington Post (http://wapo.st/2gZc0Qu) she rushed to the scene after hearing about the blaze, but \"all we could do was stand there.\"

Leisa Baird Askew said her daughter grew up in a musical and artistic family.

Cash was one of two members of the band Them Are Us Too and had been performing with bandmate Kennedy Ashlyn since 2013. The duo met while studying at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Ashlyn said Askew had recently started becoming \"her best self\" after she came out as transgender about two years ago.

TEACHER, GARDENER

Sara Hoda, 30, of Walnut Creek, was a \"sweet person\" who gardened and taught at a Montessori school, friend Carol Crewdson told the Los Angeles Times (http://lat.ms/2g3oOTH)

Crewdson, 33, met Hoda in 2010 when they started a collective where artists and creatives could stay, avoiding the San Francisco Bay Area's high rent.

They lost touch after the collective shut down. But Crewdson said while it was operating, Hoda was very active in the collective process.

UNIQUE STYLE

Donna Kellogg, 32, of Oakland, was described as energetic and intelligent by friends and co-workers.

Josh Howes, an ex-boyfriend, said Kellogg wanted to be a healer, the East Bay Times reported (http://bit.ly/2h0AbAl). He said she was studying nutrition.

Kellogg worked at Highwire Coffee Roasters, where founder Robert Myers said she had just cut her hair and was on the brink of changes. He said all her co-workers enjoyed connecting with her through their shared interests in coffee and her quirky sense of style.

\"I loved that she had a belt with her name on it and would wear it to work,\" Myer said.

LIKE A BROTHER

Peter Wadsworth was thoughtful, caring and always willing to lend a hand, his friend Tammy Tasoff said.

Tasoff, 29, said Wadsworth looked out for her, doing little things that made her life easier. He would organize her messy files, give her advice and fix her computer if she needed help, said Tasoff, a dental student.

He bought video games because he knew she loved them, and he would often watch her play, she said.

\"Usually he'd say, 'Let's play video games,' and then he'd say, 'No, I just want to watch you play,'\" she said, sobbing. \"He'd make me food. He took really good care of me. He was like my big brother.\"

OTHER VICTIMS

The city of Oakland also identified David Clines, 35, of Oakland, and Brandon Chase Wittenauer, 32, of Hayward, as victims.

Officials said they have identified yet another victim but are withholding the name because the person was 17 years old.

One of the people killed was the son of a local deputy, Kelly said at a news conference Sunday. He did not release the name.

___

Many friends and family members were still anxiously awaiting word of their missing loved ones as the laborious search for remains continued. Some gathered outside a sheriff's office for news.

LONG-DISTANCE RELATIONSHIP

Among the missing are Alex Ghassan and his fianc\u00e9e, Hanna Henrikka Ruax.

Ghassan is a director and producer who worked with Spike Lee and Talib Kweli. He also is the father of twin toddlers.

Ruax is a yoga instructor, entrepreneur and activist visiting from Helsinki, Finland. She arrived in Oakland in late November.

The pair had been dating long-distance, and Ghassan was preparing to move to Europe, said his roommate Vikram Babu. \"He was fed up with the U.S.,\" Babu said.

Ghassan previously lived in Orange, New Jersey. He has lived in Oakland on and off for about a year, Babu said.

Ghassan's mother, Emilie Grandchamps, told WABC-TV (https://goo.gl/HFH3eN), that Ghassan often went out of his way to help other artists.

Before the fire, Ghassan posted video of the warehouse party on Instagram. \"Oakland reminds me of #JerseyCity so much at times,\" he wrote.

Ruax, meanwhile, is a social justice activist who organized a large protest in Finland after a neo-Nazi rally in that European country, Babu said. \"She is very gentle,\" he said.

Ruax's Instagram account is filled with playful photos of her and Ghassan. Last week, she posted a selfie with Ghassan where both made funny faces into the camera.

\"Sent this pic to my mumz after arriving home to my boo,\" she wrote. \"Home sweet home!\"

'SO SUPPORTIVE TO US'

Barrett Clark, 35, was a popular sound engineer at the San Francisco club The Bottom of the Hill. And his friends say he appeared to be everywhere.

Parker T. Gibbs, chief operating officer at Magnolia Media Productions, said when he'd walk into a rave full of strangers, he'd always spot Clark. \"I knew where I'd be for the rest of the night,\" Gibbs said. \"Right next to him.\"

Authorities have listed Clark among the missing.

Friends say the Santa Rosa native was a sound engineer and DJ who was a \"standup guy\" and appeared always ready to help musicians and fellow DJs.

\"Mourning Barrett Clark -- so supportive to us,\" composer and musician Holly Herndon tweeted Monday. \"Played mesmeric live techno. Best sound engineer. Always laughing & making things work for ppl.\"

Lynn Schwarz, co-owner of The Bottom of the Hill, said Clark was the engineer she hired to impress popular bands.

\"You couldn't shock the guy,\" Schwarz said. \"He had all kinds of friends.\"

PHOTOGRAPHER WHO LOVED MUSIC

Friends and family were holding out hope that photographer Amanda Allen, 34, would be found safe.

The Chelmsford, Massachusetts, native is a dancer with a passion for music, loved ones told The Lowell Sun (http://bit.ly/2gISHNd).

\"We are all praying for a miracle and coming together as a family,\" said her mother, Linda Smith Regan.

Allen's husband, Andy Kershaw, a DJ, called her vibrant and magnetic.

Allen graduated from Bridgewater State University in 2004. She and Kershaw moved to San Francisco from Boston in 2008.

Chelmsford native Shannon Fisher said Allen took ballet as a child and later embraced \"that underground musical life.\" Fisher described Allen as smart and funny, with a laugh that comes easily.

A photography website belonging to Allen says she shoots portraits and events.

A BEAUTIFUL SOUL

Kershaw said his friend and fellow DJ Johnny Igaz also was unaccounted for.

Igaz reportedly was playing a set when the fire broke out. He was listed on Facebook as a record buyer at Green Apple Books and Music in San Francisco.

His Facebook page was littered with tearful posts from friends who called him a beautiful soul and a true friend.

HER TRUE SELF

Riley Fritz, 29, a musician and artist from Connecticut, recently moved to San Francisco to be with friends, according to her brother, Ben Fritz.

\"She was a kind and beautiful person who had the strength to be her true self even when she knew that was not an easy path,\" Ben Fritz, 39, told The Associated Press. He said she appeared to be the \"happiest she had been in a few years.\"

Ben Fritz said the family was notified Sunday night that Riley, also known as Feral Pines, likely was killed in the fire.

Their father, Bruce Fritz, told the San Francisco Chronicle (http://bit.ly/2haW54C) he was flying to Oakland on Monday to identify the body. He said he would be joined by Ben Fritz, who lives in Los Angeles.

Riley Fritz graduated from Staples High School in Westport in 2005 and the School for the Visual Arts in Manhattan in 2010. She lived in several places before moving to the Bay Area, according to her family.

___

Associated Press writers Janie Har in Oakland, Russell Contreras in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Matt O'Brien in Providence, Rhode Island, contributed to this report.

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President-elect Donald Trump chose Carson to become secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Trump's decision, announced early Monday, Dec. 5, by his transition office at Trump Tower in New York, comes as the real estate mogul continues a series of interviews, meetings with aides and other sessions aimed at forming his administration. 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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Donald Trump chose retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson on Monday to be secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, raising fresh concerns about the lack of experience some of Trump's Cabinet picks have with agencies they're now being chosen to lead.

Carson, who opposed Trump in the Republican primaries, has no background in government or running a large bureaucracy.

In addition, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, Trump's choice to be ambassador to the United Nations, has no foreign policy experience. Steve Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs partner and Hollywood executive, is Trump's man to lead the Treasury Department but has never worked in government. And retired Gen. James Mattis, a widely praised battlefield commander, spent decades in the Marines but now is tapped to run the nation's largest government agency, the Defense Department, with 740,000 civilian employees in addition to 1.3 million service personnel.

Democrats swiftly criticized Carson's qualifications for his job. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi called him a \"disconcerting and disturbingly unqualified choice.\" And New York Sen. Charles Schumer said he had \"serious concerns about Dr. Carson's lack of expertise and experience in dealing with housing issues. Someone who is as anti-government as him is a strange fit for housing secretary, to say the least.\"

Carson would oversee a budget of nearly $50 billion that provides rental assistance for more than 5 million households. Demand for that assistance is high in part because housing costs are rising faster than incomes. HUD also promotes home ownership with the Federal Housing Administration underwriting about 1 in 6 mortgages issued in the U.S. The agency is charged with enforcing federal fair housing laws, too.

In a statement, Trump said he was \"thrilled to nominate\" Carson, describing his \"brilliant mind\" and his passion \"about strengthening communities and families within those communities.\"

Carson, who grew up poor, quickly endorsed Trump after ending his own presidential bid despite Trump noting what he called Carson's \"pathological temper.\" Carson has been coy about joining the new administration, saying shortly after Trump's election victory that he wasn't certain he'd fit into a Cabinet-style role in a job like Health and Human Services secretary.

\"Ben shares my optimism about the future of our country,\" Trump said, \"and is part of ensuring that this is a presidency representing all Americans.\"

Heading a Cabinet agency is a huge bureaucratic job, with responsibility for overseeing massive budgets and thousands of employees. Choosing a leader without management experience could present challenges, warned Ben Chang, who worked under three different administrations.

\"People can learn the policies and the talking points, but the transition will be dictated by their own managerial style,\" said Chang, who remembered incoming Secretary of State Colin Powell walking the halls to meet with career officers and not just his executive staff.

Trump's selections also highlight a frequent divide between the two major political parties in their strategies in filling out a Cabinet: In early 2009, Republicans criticized incoming President Barack Obama for not making enough selections with private sector experience.

On Monday, Trump received a fresh stream of visitors to the New York skyscraper that bears his name. His most surprising guest was Democratic former Vice President Al Gore. Transition officials said early Monday that Gore would meet with Trump's daughter, Ivanka, about climate change, which is Gore's signature issue.

But Gore said he also met with Trump directly and the two had a \"very productive conversation.\"

\"It was a sincere search for areas of common ground,\" said Gore, who did not detail what the men discussed. The president-elect has called man-made climate change a hoax and has pledged to undo a number of regulations designed to protect the environment.

Outside the building, Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein vowed to forge ahead with her push for a recount in three states \u2014 Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania \u2014 that helped Trump win.

\"Let every vote count,\" Stein said. \"That's what makes America great.\"

Her news conference was repeatedly interrupted by shouts of protest. Several Trump supporters and Clinton supporters shouted at each other.

Separately, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said he's asking the government for $35 million to cover costs related to protecting Trump, who has indicated he will largely work out of Trump Tower before his inauguration. He will continue his \"thank you\" tour with a stop Tuesday in North Carolina.

His running mate, Mike Pence, told reporters that \"decisions were made\" Monday that would be announced in the coming days. It was unclear if one of those was Secretary of State, for which Trump has expanded his pool of candidates beyond the four finalists his aides identified last week.

Over the weekend, two people close to the transition told The Associated Press that Trump is moving away from two of the four: former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee.

That would leave former CIA Director Petraeus, who pleaded guilty to leaking classified information, and Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Among other possibilities, one official says, is Jon Huntsman, a former Republican Utah governor who also served as the ambassador to China and speaks Mandarin.

The people close to the transition spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the private process publicly.

Meanwhile, the president-elect dined at one of his favorite New York restaurants, 21 Club, Monday night with this family. He ate at the same Midtown Manhattan restaurant last month but did not notify the reporters and photographers who follow his movements, drawing criticism from journalist groups. The press pool did travel with Trump to the restaurant Monday and waited outside in a van while the president-elect ate.

___

AP Writer Julie Pace reported from Washington.

___

Reach Lemire on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@JonLemire and Pace at http://twitter.com/@JPaceDC

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The thin, fast-talking Arabic teacher, fled into nearby fields after his village was attacked on Nov. 11. As he fled north, he used his mobile phone to film destruction in other Rohingya villages he passed through. \u201cThey came and killed mercilessly. They burned our homes,\u201d says Gani, standing near the Naf River over the weekend. \u201cNo one was there to save us.\u201d (AP Photo/A.M. Ahad)","byline":"A.M. 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COX'S BAZAR, Bangladesh (AP) \u2014 The Myanmar soldiers came in the morning, the young mother says. They set fire to the concrete-and-thatch homes, forcing the villagers to cluster together. When some of her neighbors tried to escape into the fields, they were shot. After that, she says, most people stopped running away.

\"They drove us out of our houses, men and women in separate lines, ordering us to keep our hands folded on the back of our heads,\" says 20-year-old Mohsena Begum, her voice choking as she described what happened to the little village of Caira Fara, which had long been home to hundreds of members of Myanmar's minority Rohingya community. She said that when about 50 people had been gathered together, the soldiers, along with a group of local men, pulled four village leaders from the crowd and slit their throats.

Muslims in an overwhelmingly Buddhist nation, the Rohingya have long faced persecution in Myanmar, where most are denied citizenship. The latest outbreak of violence was triggered by October attacks on guard posts near the Bangladesh border that killed nine police officers. While the attackers' identities and motives are unclear, the government launched a massive counter-insurgency sweep through Rohingya areas in western Rakhine state. Most Rohingya live in Rakhine, which borders Bangladesh.

The government, which has implied the attacks were carried out by Rohingya sympathizers, has acknowledged using helicopter gunships in support of ground troops in the sweep. While survivors and human rights groups have tracked waves of anti-Rohingya violence in recent weeks, the Myanmar government insists that stories like Begum's are exaggerations.

Myanmar's leader, the Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, has accused the international community of stoking unrest.

\"It doesn't help if everybody is just concentrating on the negative side of the situation, in spite of the fact that there were attacks on police outposts,\" she said in a recent interview on Singapore's Channel News Asia.

Suu Kyi, whose party took power in March after decades of military-backed rule, has been accused of not acting strongly enough to curb the violence against the more than 1 million Rohingya believed to be in the country. Although many have lived in Rakhine for generations, they are widely seen as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

\"It helps if people recognize the difficulty and are more focused on resolving these difficulties rather than exaggerating them, so that everything seems worse than it really is,\" she said in the interview.

But Begum says she has no need to exaggerate what happened in Caira Fara.

She said that after the four leaders were killed, violence churned through the village in chaotic scenes of horror. Begum's husband, a poor, illiterate farm laborer, was beaten and then murdered by having his throat slit, along with an unknown number of other villagers, she said. Their bodies were eventually driven away in a truck.

She said attackers knocked her young son knocked from her grasp, then raped her.

Finally, when the soldiers weren't paying attention, she grabbed her son and ran into the nearby hills. After hiding for two days, her brother gave her enough money \u2014 about $38 \u2014 to pay smugglers to get her and her son into Bangladesh.

When Bangladeshi border guards stopped them, she began to weep.

\"I told them I have no one to protect me there,\" she says, and told them: \"'Look at my baby! He will die if I go back there.'\" After that, they let her pass.

Much of Rakhine has been closed to outsiders, including journalists, since the violence began. However, former U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan, leader of a commission formed to investigate the situation in Rakhine state, was allowed to visit in recent days. He is expected to hold a press conference Tuesday in Yangon, Myanmar's biggest city.

Along the banks of the Naf River, which marks the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar, it's not difficult to find people who can talk about what is happening.

Some 15,000 Rohingya have arrived in Bangladesh over past month, often brought in by smugglers, according to police and intelligence officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because the government refuses to release numbers publicly. They have joined up to 500,000 undocumented Rohingya who have been living in Bangladesh after arriving from Myanmar in waves since the 1970s. Some 33,000 registered Rohingya refugees live the Cox's Bazar district. Bangladesh does not welcome Rohingya \u2014 its maritime patrols sometimes turn back refugee boats full of them \u2014 but it is seen as a haven compared to Myanmar.

The U.N. says up 30,000 Rohingya Muslims have abandoned their homes amid the recent violence. Satellite images analyzed by the rights group Human Rights Watch show 1,250 structures destroyed in November in Rohingya villages.

Osman Gani, a thin, fast-talking Arabic teacher, fled after his village, Gouzo Bil, was attacked Nov. 11.

\"They came and killed mercilessly. They burned our homes,\" says Gani, standing near the Naf River over the weekend. \"No one was there to save us.\"

He hid with his family for about a week near the village. But when searches intensified, and with soldiers targeting men, he was forced to leave Myanmar without his family.

\"I had no other choice but to leave them behind. I came to the bank of the river and started swimming,\" he says. His family was able to join him in Bangladesh a few days later.

As he fled north, he used his mobile phone to film destruction in other Rohingya villages he passed through. In some, the blackened remains of what appear to be children can be seen amid the wreckage of homes. Gani's voice can be heard in some of the videos but The Associated Press could not confirm their authenticity.

\"I have shot videos!\" he says, holding out his mobile phone to a reporter. \"Don't you see the charred bodies?\"

While he was initially in hiding after the attack, Osmani said he also managed to slip back into his village and film what remained of his home.

As he walks through the village, a child can be heard talking to him.

\"Where are you coming from?\" the boy asks.

Gani doesn't answer, instead asking, \"Where's my cow?\"

Then he pans through the ashes and broken concrete. \"This is my land, my home,\" he says. \"This is Puitta's. This is Uncle Yunus.\"

___

AP writer Tim Sullivan contributed to this report from New Delhi.

"}, {"id":"554c80bb-50b3-570a-9f2b-d66d89b3ff17","type":"article","starttime":"1480986886","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:14:46-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"sports":"sports"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Heisman finalists: Jackson, Watson, Peppers, 2 Sooners","url":"http://tucson.com/sports/article_554c80bb-50b3-570a-9f2b-d66d89b3ff17.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/sports/heisman-finalists-jackson-watson-peppers-sooners/article_554c80bb-50b3-570a-9f2b-d66d89b3ff17.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/sports/heisman-finalists-jackson-watson-peppers-sooners/article_d1241aeb-ac82-5f34-9ae7-5332507db459.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By RALPH D. RUSSO\nAP College Football Writer","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson is a Heisman Trophy finalist for the second consecutive season, joining Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson, Michigan linebacker Jabrill Peppers and Oklahoma teammates Baker Mayfield and Dede Westbrook.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","sports","college football","heisman trophy","college sports","football","events","general news","fbs college football playoff"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58","description":"Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson (4) celebrates his touchdown, during the second half of the Atlantic Coast Conference championship NCAA college football game against Virginia Tech, Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/Willie J. Allen Jr.)","byline":"Willie J. Allen Jr.","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"411","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/1f/81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58/58445a52adbb2.image.jpg?resize=512%2C411"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/1f/81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58/58445a52adbb2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C80"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"241","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/1f/81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58/58445a52adbb2.image.jpg?resize=300%2C241"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"822","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/1f/81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58/58445a52adbb2.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301","description":"Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) passes against Oklahoma State in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, in Norman, Okla. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)","byline":"Alonzo Adams","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"344","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301/58460e3c8b852.image.jpg?resize=512%2C344"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301/58460e3c8b852.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301/58460e3c8b852.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"688","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301/58460e3c8b852.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"554c80bb-50b3-570a-9f2b-d66d89b3ff17","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson is a Heisman Trophy finalist for the second consecutive season, joining Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson, Michigan linebacker Jabrill Peppers and Oklahoma teammates Baker Mayfield and Dede Westbrook.

The finalists were announced Monday on ESPN and the award will be presented Saturday in New York.

Watson finished third in last year's voting, won by Alabama running back Derrick Henry. Just like last year, he heads to New York not as the favorite but as the contender coming on strong at the end.

\"You just don't have a lot of two-time Heisman finalists over the history of your program. He is our first, and he's very deserving,\" Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said in a statement. \"I've said it before; I believe he is the best player in the nation and has been a great representative of our University.\"

Mayfield finished fourth last season, but did not get an invite to Heisman presentation in New York.

Westbrook and Mayfield are the first teammates to be finalists since Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart from Southern California finished first and third, respectively in 2005.

Peppers is the first defensive player to be a Heisman finalists since Notre Dame linebacker Manti Teo was a distant runner-up to Johnny Manziel in 2012.

Finalists are determined by the margins between vote-getters. The ballots of more than 900 voters, which included former Heisman winners, were due Monday.

Watson entered as the preseason favorite in what looked like a strong field of contenders, but Jackson quickly swept past them all to be front-runner. He was brilliant for the first two months of the season and Louisville was looking like a College Football Playoff contender.

It seemed as if Jackson would be a runaway Heisman winner, but the 15th-ranked Cardinals lost their final two games of the season. He was sacked 11 times in a lopsided loss at Houston and he committed four turnovers in a last-second loss against Kentucky.

Watson, meanwhile, has surged since Clemson's only loss to Pitt in mid-November. He also had the benefit of playing in the Atlantic Coast Conference title game last Saturday and took full advantage of the spotlight. Watson threw three touchdown passes and ran for two scores in a 42-35 victory against Virginia Tech to seal a spot in the College Football Playoff.

The raw numbers still favor Jackson, who is second in the nation in total yards per game (410.7) and has accounted for 51 touchdowns (21 rushing TDs and 30 TD passes) with 13 turnovers (nine INTs and four lost fumbles) in 12 games. Watson averages 341.8 yards per game and has 43 touchdowns (six rushing and 37 passing) with 15 turnovers (all interceptions) in 13 games.

When the two met on Oct. 1 at Clemson in what was one of the season's most entertaining games, Watson threw for 306 yards and five touchdowns, ran for 91 and was picked off three times. Jackson had 295 yards passing, 162 rushing and accounted for three touchdowns with one interception. Clemson won 42-36.

\"It will mean a lot,\" Jackson said about the possibility of winning. \"Just being the first person to win it @ the University of Louisville, so it'll be an honor.\"

Mayfield and Westbrook have been a dynamic combination, and late in the season No. 7 Oklahoma started a dual campaign to promote both for the Heisman. Mayfield is on pace to break the NCAA record for passer efficiency rating in a season (197.75). Westbrook has 74 catches for 1,465 yards and 16 touchdowns and has more receptions covering at least 20 yards (26) than any receiver in the country.

Peppers played defense, offense and special teams for Michigan, lining up all over the field. He had 60 tackles, three sacks and an interception on defense, scored three touchdowns on offense being used mostly as a wildcat quarterback and averaged 14.8 yards with a touchdown on punt returns.

Still, he was a bit of a surprising finalist.

Alabama defensive lineman Jonathan Allen, Florida State running back Dalvin Cook and Washington quarterback Jake Browning were among those who were considered potential finalists that did not draw enough support to get an invitation to New York.

___

Follow Ralph D. Russo at www.Twitter.com/ralphDrussoAP

More college football http://collegefootball.ap.org/

"} ]
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WAUWATOSA, Wis. (AP) \u2014 A Wisconsin police chief says that no charges will be filed against an officer who fatally shot a black man in a suburban Milwaukee park in June.

Wauwatosa Police Chief Barry Weber says Milwaukee County prosecutors decided not to charge Officer Joseph Mensah in the death of Jay Anderson Jr. Under Wisconsin law, an outside agency must investigate police shootings.

Earlier on Monday, Anderson's family was told of the decision in a meeting with prosecutors. Jonathan Safran, an attorney for a family, told the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel that he has asked the U.S. Attorney's office in Milwaukee to investigate whether there could be federal civil rights charge against the officer.

Twenty-six-year-old Anderson was fatally shot in a local park about 3 a.m. on June 23.

"}, {"id":"7b7a2dd0-a690-508c-8ce6-6d94f07f4d94","type":"article","starttime":"1480990203","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T19:10:03-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"El Salvador congress strips ex-defense minister of immunity","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_7b7a2dd0-a690-508c-8ce6-6d94f07f4d94.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/el-salvador-congress-strips-ex-defense-minister-of-immunity/article_7b7a2dd0-a690-508c-8ce6-6d94f07f4d94.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/el-salvador-congress-strips-ex-defense-minister-of-immunity/article_71681b2c-0d76-5048-ad7a-9f21b70951a9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) \u2014 El Salvador's congress has voted to strip a former defense minister of immunity from prosecution, so he can be faced with accusations he used his position for arms trafficking.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","diplomacy","military legal affairs","international relations","government and politics","military and defense"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"7b7a2dd0-a690-508c-8ce6-6d94f07f4d94","body":"

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) \u2014 El Salvador's congress has voted to strip a former defense minister of immunity from prosecution, so he can be faced with accusations he used his position for arms trafficking.

Jose Atilio Benitez Parada is currently the country's ambassador to Germany. He says he has returned to El Salvador to face the charges and contends he is being treated like a criminal on the word of a protected witness.

Prosecutors allege Benitez trafficked weapons from the military's armories and instructed subordinates to register arms that were later sold.

Prosecutors say Benitez committed the crimes first as a vice defense minister and later as minister of defense during the 2009-2014 administration of President Mauricio Funes.

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IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 Cordell Pemsl muscled in 21 points Monday night as Iowa snapped a four-game losing streak with a 95-68 victory over Stetson.

Isaiah Moss, a redshirt freshman, pumped in five 3-pointers and also scored 21 points for Iowa (4-5). Peter Jok collected 15 points, eight rebounds and seven assists for the Hawkeyes.

Leo Goodman led Stetson (4-6) with 14 points.

The Hawkeyes got off to a fast start and had a 14-2 lead a little more than four minutes in. Iowa led 44-28 at halftime and raised the margin to 30 points at 90-60 on another 3-pointer by Moss, who finished with a career high in 3-pointers and points.

Iowa had surrendered 100, 92 and 98 points in its last three games, including a stunning 98-89 loss to Nebraska-Omaha, but the Hawkeyes played a much tighter game against the visitors from Florida.

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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) \u2014 It's a rare moment of public reckoning for South Korea's most powerful business leaders, courtesy of the country's biggest political scandal in years.

Usually cloistered executives from Samsung, Hyundai Motor and six other companies faced grilling Tuesday as lawmakers looked into their links to prosecution claims that South Korean President Park Geun-hye allowed a corrupt confidante to pull government strings and extort companies.

It is unusual for tycoons like Samsung Electronics Vice Chairman Lee Jae-yong and Hyundai Motor Chair Chung Mong-koo to face public questioning. Major TV channels broadcast the hearing live.

Park's scandal has increased doubts over deep ties between politicians and the country's top family-controlled businesses, known as chaebol.

The Samsung heir will be questioned about why the company sponsored the family of Park's confidante.

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\u2018Tis the season, but all is not jolly on the toy front this year, and local nonprofits are asking for help to make some holiday magic for children in need.

\u201cI work with lots of nonprofits and everyone is having a bit of a tough year,\u201d said Sgt. Stephen Derrick, coordinator for the Marine Toys For Tots campaign of Tucson and Southern Arizona. \u201cWe are down about 20 to 25 percent from the toys we had last year at this time. Normally after Thanksgiving, everyone gets the giving spark, but I think it is a little late this year ... maybe it has something to do with the election or maybe it is just that some years are better than others.\u201d

The Toys For Tots campaign is dedicated to bringing a message of hope to less-fortunate children and assisting them in becoming responsible, productive and patriotic citizens. It has committed to providing toys to 1,000 local families, along with at least 10,000 toys to local nonprofits for distribution before the holidays.

The need for toys is dire for children ages 8 to 14. Suggested gifts include LEGO kits, soccer balls, basketballs and any other items that engage children on an intellectual or physical level. Video games and electronics that require other means to play are discouraged, along with weapons of any kind and plush animals (to avoid bedbugs and lice).

\u201cIf you want to spend $50, we suggest you buy a bike instead of a video game,\u201d said Derrick.

Derrick emphasized that Toys For Tots has no ethnic, religious or political restrictions or requirements. \u201cIf we can help one family whose kids won\u2019t have a toy to get one, that is all that we want to do,\u201d Derrick said. \u201cWe don\u2019t morally or ethically judge anyone. ... In my mind, if a kid needs a toy, a kid needs a toy.\u201d

Help children in foster care

About 2,500 children in Pima County fall into that category.

Aviva Children\u2019s Services is trying to ensure that these children, from newborn through 18, are not forgotten this holiday with its annual holiday toy drive, which runs through Monday, Dec. 12.

\u201cWe just want to enable the kids in the care of the Department of Child Safety to have some kind of holiday celebration and give them a sense of normalcy like other children ,\u201d said Aviva\u2019s development and community relations manager, Monica Durand.

Just as with Toys For Tots, the need is greatest for preteens and teenagers. Durand said bath sets and gift cards for $25 or less to stores like Old Navy, Target, Walmart and Hot Topic are particularly helpful for this age group.

Durand credits many local businesses, clubs, organizations and individuals for supporting the cause with everything from toy collections to innovative efforts such as last weekend\u2019s Arizona Wildcat Hockey Teddy Bear Toss and the Tucson High School National Honor Society 12-hour Ultra Run featuring Jerry Schuster, a Tucson High math teacher who has completed numerous ultra runs to benefit local charities.

\u201cI knew I wanted to do a long training run and thought, \u2018Why not do it for a charity?\u2019 So I went to the National Honor Society, and the president suggested that I bring attention to Aviva and what they do and how people can help,\u201d said Schuster, who completed 40 miles on the Tucson High track last Saturday. \u201cSo all the credit goes to these students who did a super job. All I really did was put one foot in front of the other.\u201d

With year-end focus on Aviva, Durand also wants to encourage Tucsonans to take advantage of the Arizona Foster Care Charitable Tax Credit, which has increased from 2015 and now allows a dollar-for-dollar tax credit of up to $500 for singles and up to $1,000 for married couples filing jointly on 2016 Arizona income taxes.

Last year, Aviva raised $300,000 through tax credits for programs such as the Parent Peer Support Program, Life Books Program and Bags for Kids, which provides duffel bags and suitcases so children don\u2019t have to transport their belongings in trash bags.

Miracle in South Tucson

Making a difference to children has also been paramount to Ramon Gonzales for the past 46 years.

The founder of the Miracle on 31st Street Christmas Party said he has been blessed to be part of the event that has become a holiday tradition in South Tucson.

Last year, more than 10,000 children received free toys at the event, which also offers free food, entertainment and a parade of classic cars featuring Santa. Gonzales is expecting at least 10,000 children and their families at the event at 9 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 18, at Casino Del Sol\u2019s AVA Amphitheater.

To date, only about 100 toys have been donated, but he is hopeful that the community will provide toys for children who he said otherwise may not receive any holiday gifts.

\u201cI figure if I can make it to 46 years then maybe, God willing, I can make it to half a century with the help of the community,\u201d Gonzales said.

"}, {"id":"fbf7b19a-759c-5f26-808d-db0cb83c0c86","type":"article","starttime":"1480989600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T19:00:00-07:00","priority":10,"sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Volunteers needed to to teach crochet, help seniors, veterans in Tucson","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/article_fbf7b19a-759c-5f26-808d-db0cb83c0c86.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/volunteers-needed-to-to-teach-crochet-help-seniors-veterans-in/article_fbf7b19a-759c-5f26-808d-db0cb83c0c86.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/volunteers-needed-to-to-teach-crochet-help-seniors-veterans-in/article_fbf7b19a-759c-5f26-808d-db0cb83c0c86.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Browse volunteer opportunities on the Volunteer Center at United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona\u2019s website, volunteer.unitedwaytucson.org, click on \u201cfind needs\u201d and search for the organization\u2019s name. Eastside Neighbors Volunteer Program\u2014 Serving over 300 senior clients in need of transportation and requests from a grateful senior population. Looking for a few dedicated people interested in joining our Board of Directors.Arts for All\u2014In need of a craft teacher, drama teacher and a jewelry teacher with a minimum of three years\u2019 experience in teaching their subject matter. Volunteers must demonstrate good communication skills both written and orally, preferably in more than one language.Habitat for Humanity\u2014 The administration office is in need of a facilities worker to pick up trash on the lawn and parking lot, take out the recycling and trash, sweep the sidewalks and use the blower to clean the lots and landscape.Sentinel Plaza Apartments\u2014Looking for someone to teach crocheting to Sentinel Plaza residents once a week or every other week (Monday if possible). There are different levels of knowledge. Small group.Hospice Family Care\u2014Looking for veterans to help other veterans. As part of the Hospice for Heroes Program, veterans visit with other veterans who are facing a terminal illness. Volunteers are also needed to provide companionship for patients or relief for their caregivers.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["volunteers tucson","tucson nonprofits volunteers","volunteers needed in tucson"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"cbd8a81c-5849-53e1-b36a-0dc5975a11e2","description":"Habitat for Humanity is looking for someone to help keep its grounds clean and tidy.","byline":"Courtesy of Habitat for Humanity Tucson","hireswidth":1188,"hiresheight":792,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bd/cbd8a81c-5849-53e1-b36a-0dc5975a11e2/57202de38efff.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"413","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bd/cbd8a81c-5849-53e1-b36a-0dc5975a11e2/583c751c4b620.image.jpg?resize=620%2C413"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bd/cbd8a81c-5849-53e1-b36a-0dc5975a11e2/57202de3afc6e.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bd/cbd8a81c-5849-53e1-b36a-0dc5975a11e2/583c751c4b620.image.jpg?crop=1188%2C668%2C0%2C61&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bd/cbd8a81c-5849-53e1-b36a-0dc5975a11e2/583c751c4b620.image.jpg?crop=1188%2C668%2C0%2C61&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"fbf7b19a-759c-5f26-808d-db0cb83c0c86","body":"

Browse volunteer opportunities on the Volunteer Center at United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona\u2019s website, volunteer.unitedwaytucson.org, click on \u201cfind needs\u201d and search for the organization\u2019s name.

"}, {"id":"f1387283-2766-5fb1-a9da-b875eea41501","type":"html","starttime":"1480989724","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T19:02:04-07:00","lastupdated":"1480989783","sections":[{"automated":"weather/automated"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Current conditions and forecast for Tucson, AZ","url":"http://tucson.com/weather/automated/html_f1387283-2766-5fb1-a9da-b875eea41501.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/weather/automated/current-conditions-and-forecast-for-tucson-az/html_f1387283-2766-5fb1-a9da-b875eea41501.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/weather/automated/current-conditions-and-forecast-for-tucson-az/html_f1387283-2766-5fb1-a9da-b875eea41501.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star / Weather Underground","prologue":"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#free","#weatherforecastrecent"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":12877}, {"id":"142088df-9be5-55d8-83ed-4eceef2d0796","type":"html","starttime":"1480989723","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T19:02:03-07:00","sections":[{"automated":"weather/automated"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Current conditions and forecast for Tucson, AZ","url":"http://tucson.com/weather/automated/html_142088df-9be5-55d8-83ed-4eceef2d0796.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/weather/automated/current-conditions-and-forecast-for-tucson-az/html_142088df-9be5-55d8-83ed-4eceef2d0796.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/weather/automated/current-conditions-and-forecast-for-tucson-az/html_142088df-9be5-55d8-83ed-4eceef2d0796.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star / Weather Underground","prologue":"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#free","#weatherforecast"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1}, {"id":"7dc53ee7-fe19-5097-93df-12340d4d8ab2","type":"article","starttime":"1480989512","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:58:32-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991434","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"In bid to fight art fraud, Sotheby's acquires forensic lab","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_7dc53ee7-fe19-5097-93df-12340d4d8ab2.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/in-bid-to-fight-art-fraud-sotheby-s-acquires-forensic/article_7dc53ee7-fe19-5097-93df-12340d4d8ab2.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/in-bid-to-fight-art-fraud-sotheby-s-acquires-forensic/article_4dd819a4-5bae-502c-a2d2-3f443fe6354b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By ULA ILNYTZKY\nAssociated Press","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 In bid to fight art fraud, Sotheby's announced Monday that it had purchased a forensics firm whose founder once helped the auction house belatedly identify a $10 million painting as a fake.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","arts and entertainment","general news","arts and collectibles auctions","painting","science","forensics","fraud and false statements","shopping","lifestyle","visual arts","law and order","crime","counterfeiting and forgery","arts industry","media and entertainment industry"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"7dc53ee7-fe19-5097-93df-12340d4d8ab2","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 In bid to fight art fraud, Sotheby's announced Monday that it had purchased a forensics firm whose founder once helped the auction house belatedly identify a $10 million painting as a fake.

Sotheby's said that Orion Analytical, based in Williamstown, Massachusetts, will be folded into the company and its founder, the artist, conservator and forensic scientist James Martin, will lead a new scientific research department charged with making sure the works the auction house deals with are authentic.

The purchase comes amid a number of recent art forgeries in the art world, including a supposed Old Master painting that was sold by Sotheby's to an art collector for $10 million in a private sale in 2011.

In March of this year, Sotheby's declared \"Portrait of a Man\" by Frans Hals a fake after questions arose about its authenticity. An in-depth technical analysis by Orion, reviewed by another conservation scientist, confirmed the suspicion. The forger remains unknown.

Sotheby's said Monday that the acquisition of Orion and Martin's appointment would add to collectors' confidence in the auction house.

Martin, who founded Orion Analytical in 1990, has analyzed the chemical and structural composition of disputed artworks for clients around the world, including private collectors, museums, galleries and the FBI.

\"Rather than being retained on a series of one-off assignments when issues arise, Jamie will be establishing a set of protocols to determine which works should be examined proactively, as well as training our specialist staff to identify potential issues, placing us in a position to provide even greater service to our clients,\" in the areas of art, objects and wine, Sotheby's said.

New York art attorney Peter Stern called Sotheby's move \"brilliant\" and said Martin was \"one of the most highly respected art analysts in the world.\"

Among his nearly 2,000 investigations, Martin examined the paintings in a sensational art fraud case involving the once highly respected Knoedler & Company, a Manhattan gallery accused of selling forged fakes of modern masters like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko for millions of dollars.

The 150-year-old gallery closed in 2011. The bogus paintings, created by a Chinese immigrant in New York City, were sold between 1994 and 2011. The civil trial ended in a settlement in February. The terms were not disclosed.

\"Knoedler's lesson may well be that art attorneys need to educate clients who are buying artworks to require warranties relating to authenticity,\" Chicago-based art attorney Scott Hodes said. \"The Orion Analytical acquisition has spotlighted this need.\"

\"Sotheby's will definitely be in a better position than its competition to detect forgeries,\" he added.

Artworks have long been authenticated based on provenance, style, and paint pigments. But in an art market where buyers think nothing of spending several millions of dollars on one piece of art, scientific examination that uses state-of-the-art technical imaging, molecular analysis, magnified visual inspection and other sophisticated methods, adds another layer of assurance that a work is real. It also can protect buyers and sellers from monetary losses and protect the integrity of artists and their works.

Martin has taught at The Getty Conservation Institute and The Smithsonian's Museum Conservation Institute and will continue to teach and consult with museums and conservators as part of his work at Sotheby's.

\"The range of works offered by Sotheby's, as well as the breadth of existing expertise and experience, provides for a unique opportunity to leverage my capabilities across the company's global platform,\" Martin said in a statement.

"}, {"id":"f0487485-38d9-55df-a893-0c338d538dbb","type":"article","starttime":"1480989270","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:54:30-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991435","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"AP Explains: What's behind persecution of Myanmar's Rohingya","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_f0487485-38d9-55df-a893-0c338d538dbb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/ap-explains-what-s-behind-persecution-of-myanmar-s-rohingya/article_f0487485-38d9-55df-a893-0c338d538dbb.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/ap-explains-what-s-behind-persecution-of-myanmar-s-rohingya/article_2e8d6b36-20f1-5714-9a0a-bf85d89e2a9d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By GRANT PECK\nAssociated Press","prologue":"BANGKOK (AP) \u2014 Myanmar's Muslim Rohingya minority face discrimination and violence from the Buddhist majority in the Southeast Asian country. Their plight generally goes unnoticed by the world at large, even though some rights activists say their persecution amounts to ethnic cleansing. Here are several things to know about the group:","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","religious strife","human rights and civil liberties","ethnic cleansing","war and unrest","political activism","social issues","social affairs","race and ethnicity","religious issues","religion","political issues","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"a49543dd-41a2-5efc-a2c0-979b8ffb81ba","description":"In this Dec. 2, 2016 photo, Rohingya from Myanmar make their way in an alley at an unregistered refugee camp in Teknaf, near Cox's Bazar, a southern coastal district about, 296 kilometers (183 miles) south of Dhaka, Bangladesh. 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Ahad","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/49/a49543dd-41a2-5efc-a2c0-979b8ffb81ba/5845a4b6dc627.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/49/a49543dd-41a2-5efc-a2c0-979b8ffb81ba/5845a4b6dc627.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/49/a49543dd-41a2-5efc-a2c0-979b8ffb81ba/5845a4b6dc627.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/49/a49543dd-41a2-5efc-a2c0-979b8ffb81ba/5845a4b6dc627.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"3db74a63-433e-5335-b6b3-35a957c18c99","description":"In this Dec. 2, 2016 photo, Rohingya from Myanmar, watch a television program about them being played on a mobile phone inside a tea stall, at an unregistered refugee camp in Teknaf, near Cox's Bazar, a southern coastal district about, 296 kilometers (183 miles) south of Dhaka, Bangladesh. 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BANGKOK (AP) \u2014 Myanmar's Muslim Rohingya minority face discrimination and violence from the Buddhist majority in the Southeast Asian country. Their plight generally goes unnoticed by the world at large, even though some rights activists say their persecution amounts to ethnic cleansing. Here are several things to know about the group:

___

\"THE MOST FRIENDLESS PEOPLE IN THE WORLD\"

Although Rohingya \u2014 a Muslim ethnic minority of about 1 million among Myanmar's predominantly Buddhist 52 million people \u2014 have lived in Myanmar for generations, most people in the country view them as foreign intruders from neighboring Bangladesh. Bangladesh, which hosts many Rohingya refugees, also refuses to recognize them as citizens. \"The Rohingya are probably the most friendless people in the world. They just have no one advocating for them at all,\" Kitty McKinsey, a spokeswoman for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said in 2009.

___

BORDER ATTACKS LED TO LATEST OUTBREAK OF VIOLENCE

Almost all Rohingya live in western Myanmar's Rakhine state, where the military has stepped up operations since November, when nine police officers were killed in attacks on posts along the border with Bangladesh. The identity of the perpetrators remains unclear. Rohingya villagers armed with homemade weapons resisted troops and an unknown number of villagers died, along with a handful of soldiers and officials. Rohingya solidarity groups say several hundred civilians have been killed since October. The New York-based group Human Rights Watch says satellite imagery shows 1,250 houses and other structures have been burned down. In 2012, violence between Rohingya and the Buddhist community killed hundreds and forced about 140,000 people \u2014 predominantly Rohingya \u2014 to flee their homes to camps for the internally displaced. About 100,000 remain in the squalid camps and dependent on charity.

___

DISAPPOINTMENT WITH SUU KYI

There has been great disappointment that Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, whose political party took power in Myanmar this year after decades of military rule, has failed to ease the plight of Rohingya despite her reputation as a fighter for human rights. Speaking out for Rohingya rights is an unpopular political position in Myanmar. However, Suu Kyi's government in August appointed former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan to head an advisory panel aimed at finding lasting solutions to the conflict in Rakhine state. He has visited Rakhine over the past few days and is scheduled to speak at a news conference Tuesday in Yangon, Myanmar's biggest city. The U.N. special adviser on the prevention of genocide, Adama Dieng, last week expressed concern about reports of excessive use of force and other human rights violations against civilians, particularly Rohingya, including allegations of extrajudicial executions, torture, rape and the destruction of religious property.

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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Freshman Shamorie Ponds scored a season-best 25 points and St. John's held off Cal State Northridge 76-70 on Monday night.

Darin Johnson hit two free throws with 1:08 left to get CSUN within 71-68. After Bashir Ahmed went 1 of 2 at the other end, Tavrion Dawson made a layup with 40.3 seconds left to cut it to 72-70.

Kendall Smith, who finished with 10 points for CSUN, fouled out with 18.7 seconds left and Ponds sealed it with two free throws.

Ahmed added 13 points and Federico Mussini had 12 for St. John's (4-5), which was coming off a 20-points victory \u2014 its largest winning margin on the road since 2009. The Johnnies set a program by hitting 16 3-pointers against Tulane on Friday and went 10 of 21 against CSUN.

Johnson finished with 16 points for Cal State Northridge (3-6), which is still seeking its first road win of the season after six tries.

Aaron Parks completed a 3-point play with 6:52 remaining to give CSUN a 62-61 lead \u2014 its first since 28-27.

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President-elect Donald Trump announced that James N. Mattis was his choice to lead the Department of Defense, what seemed to delight him most was the retired general\u2019s Iraq war nickname: \u201cMad Dog.\u201d

\u201cMad Dog Mattis!\u201d Trump told a post-election rally. \u201cMad Dog. He is great, he is great. \u2026 They say he is the closest thing to Gen. George Patton that we have.\u201d

We\u2019re going to hear a lot about Mattis\u2019 prowess as a combat commander and his salty exhortations to his troops.

\u201cBe professional, be polite, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet,\u201d he told his Marines. (A pretty good definition of what combat forces are for, actually.)

And he incautiously told a partly civilian audience that fighting is \u201ca hell of a hoot. \u2026 It\u2019s fun to shoot some people.\u201d (He apologized for that one.)

But if Trump chose Mattis for his mad-dog reputation, he made a good choice for the wrong reason.

Yes, Mattis demanded \u201cferocity\u201d from his troops in battle. But he\u2019s also a strategic thinker and scholar who ordered his officers to read military history, can quote Marcus Aurelius or Ulysses S. Grant \u2014 and never much liked the \u201cmad dog\u201d sobriquet his men bestowed on him .

Off the battlefield, he\u2019s soft-spoken, thoughtful, cautious \u2014 and, most important, un-Trumplike.

Indeed, Mattis has already disagreed with many of the foreign-policy positions Trump adopted without evidence of deep study during his campaign.

Trump has suggested that the United States should adopt an \u201cAmerica First\u201d foreign policy, shedding excess obligations and spending less on traditional alliances. Mattis has called for \u201ccontinued engagement in the world\u201d and \u201cstronger alliances,\u201d and said Trump\u2019s dismissal of the North Atlantic Treaty Alliance was \u201ckooky.\u201d

When Trump called for a ban on Muslims entering the United States, Mattis said the proposal caused \u201cgreat damage\u201d to U.S. relationships in the Middle East.

Trump has suggested that Vladimir Putin\u2019s Russia could be a U.S. ally; Mattis considers Putin a major threat and believes the U.S. should do more to help Ukraine.

And, as Trump himself reported, Mattis told the president-elect to his face that he was wrong to suggest that U.S. forces should torture suspected terrorists for information. \u201cGive me a pack of cigarettes and a couple of beers, and I\u2019ll do better,\u201d the general told the president-elect.

Trump and Mattis also differ on Iran, which could set up one of the new administration\u2019s first big foreign-policy debates.

Trump has said dismantling Obama\u2019s 2015 nuclear arms deal with Tehran would be his top priority. Mattis says that\u2019s simply impractical.

\u201cThere\u2019s no going back,\u201d Mattis said in April. \u201cI don\u2019t think that we can take advantage of some new president\u2019s (arrival) and say we\u2019re not going to live up to our word on this agreement. I believe we would be alone if we did, and unilateral economic sanctions from us would not have near the impact of an allied approach.\u201d

Instead, he said, the priority should be to keep pressure on Iran to curb its intervention in the rest of the Middle East and to deter Iran from abandoning the nuclear agreement .

\u201cI think we\u2019re going to have to hold at risk the nuclear program in the future \u2014 in other words, make plans now of what we\u2019d do if in fact they restarted,\u201d he said.

There\u2019s one big problem with Mattis\u2019 nomination: the law that prohibits a former military officer from being secretary of defense unless he or she has been retired for at least seven years.

It\u2019s a sensible law, meant to guarantee the principle of civilian control, and it\u2019s only been waived once before, for George C. Marshall in 1950. Marshall was an extraordinary case: the chief of staff who organized victory in World War II and then served as a successful secretary of state.

This is an extraordinary case for a different reason: Trump needs Cabinet officers who are willing to stand up to him and push back when he\u2019s wrong. Mattis has already done that.

And Trump needs someone to balance the influence of his other favorite general, the volcanic Michael Flynn, who will be his national security advisor. Mattis and Flynn, who know each other well, are likely to go head-to-head on a long list of issues. (According to one report, Flynn wasn\u2019t thrilled with the idea of nominating Mattis, who outranked him, four stars to three. Generals remember details like that.)

Trump\u2019s infatuation with generals \u2014 he boasted frequently in the campaign about their support \u2014 sometimes takes on an odd fanboy tone. (\u201cMad Dog!\u201d)

But in this case, it might be a good thing. When Mattis tells Trump that blowing up the Iran nuclear agreement, weakening alliances, bombing civilians or reinstating torture is a bad idea, the boss might actually listen.

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Officials described the scene inside the warehouse, which had been illegally converted into artist studios, as a death trap that made it impossible for many partygoers to escape the Friday night fire. 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Firefighters struggled to get to bodies in the rubble Saturday, after a deadly fire tore through a converted Oakland warehouse during a late-night electronic music party Friday, making the charred structure unsafe for emergency crews to enter. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)","byline":"Marcio Jose Sanchez","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/41/1419c6d9-65fe-5d48-bc17-4035245a959e/5845662175741.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/41/1419c6d9-65fe-5d48-bc17-4035245a959e/5845662175741.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/41/1419c6d9-65fe-5d48-bc17-4035245a959e/5845662175741.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/41/1419c6d9-65fe-5d48-bc17-4035245a959e/5845662175741.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"3bd0906e-5835-5b06-a3f5-c7df15477354","description":"Cleanup continues at the site of a warehouse fire that started Friday night and killed dozens, Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016, in Oakland, Calif. The death toll was expected to rise, as crews using buckets and shovels slowly made their way through the building, finding victims where they least expected them, Alameda County Sheriff's Sgt. Ray Kelly said. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)","byline":"Marcio Jose Sanchez","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"379","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/bd/3bd0906e-5835-5b06-a3f5-c7df15477354/5845c832c8a3e.image.jpg?resize=512%2C379"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"74","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/bd/3bd0906e-5835-5b06-a3f5-c7df15477354/5845c832c8a3e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C74"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"222","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/bd/3bd0906e-5835-5b06-a3f5-c7df15477354/5845c832c8a3e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C222"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"758","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/bd/3bd0906e-5835-5b06-a3f5-c7df15477354/5845c832c8a3e.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"265faac5-bd4f-514a-b36a-dc47dea0cfe3","description":"A group prays near the site of a warehouse fire Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016, in Oakland, Calif. The death toll from a fire that tore through a warehouse hosting a late-night dance party climbed on Sunday as firefighters painstakingly combed through rubble for others believed to still be missing.(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)","byline":"Marcio Jose Sanchez","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/65/265faac5-bd4f-514a-b36a-dc47dea0cfe3/5845c40fbf3e0.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/65/265faac5-bd4f-514a-b36a-dc47dea0cfe3/5845c40fbf3e0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/65/265faac5-bd4f-514a-b36a-dc47dea0cfe3/5845c40fbf3e0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/65/265faac5-bd4f-514a-b36a-dc47dea0cfe3/5845c40fbf3e0.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"f3b762f0-1bbb-5f10-b989-d199959328de","description":"Mourners embrace near the site of a warehouse fire Monday, Dec. 5, 2016, in Oakland, Calif. The death toll in the Oakland warehouse fire on Friday climbed Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the blackened ruins, and families anxiously awaited word of their missing loved ones. 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The death toll in the Oakland warehouse fire on Friday climbed Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the blackened ruins, and families anxiously awaited word of their missing loved ones. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)","byline":"Marcio Jose Sanchez","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/7c/17cb5156-0935-5d53-b4cf-efcc66e6a04a/5845c40f22bc7.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/7c/17cb5156-0935-5d53-b4cf-efcc66e6a04a/5845c40f22bc7.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/7c/17cb5156-0935-5d53-b4cf-efcc66e6a04a/5845c40f22bc7.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/7c/17cb5156-0935-5d53-b4cf-efcc66e6a04a/5845c40f22bc7.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"42b73e2d-6f0b-5b82-9d13-3451a00ce532","description":"Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., second from left, tours the site of a warehouse fire Monday, Dec. 5, 2016, in Oakland, Calif. The death toll in the Oakland warehouse fire on Friday climbed Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the blackened ruins, and families anxiously awaited word of their missing loved ones. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)","byline":"Marcio Jose Sanchez","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"355","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/2b/42b73e2d-6f0b-5b82-9d13-3451a00ce532/5845c833e5f26.image.jpg?resize=512%2C355"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/2b/42b73e2d-6f0b-5b82-9d13-3451a00ce532/5845c833e5f26.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"208","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/2b/42b73e2d-6f0b-5b82-9d13-3451a00ce532/5845c833e5f26.image.jpg?resize=300%2C208"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"710","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/2b/42b73e2d-6f0b-5b82-9d13-3451a00ce532/5845c833e5f26.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"5f310bab-7bf9-53b4-bfa4-09f8756de682","description":"Robert Lewis, right, and his daughter Sophie walk past a makeshift memorial in memory of victims of a warehouse fire near the site Monday, Dec. 5, 2016, in Oakland, Calif. The death toll in the Oakland warehouse fire climbed Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the blackened ruins, and families anxiously awaited word of their missing loved ones. 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The death toll in the Oakland warehouse fire climbed Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the blackened ruins, and families anxiously awaited word of their missing loved ones. 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The death toll in the Oakland warehouse fire climbed Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the blackened ruins, and families anxiously awaited word of their missing loved ones. 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The death toll in the Oakland warehouse fire climbed Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the blackened ruins, and families anxiously awaited word of their missing loved ones. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)","byline":"Marcio Jose Sanchez","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/a2/ca20a104-cef6-59da-841d-a0824f3e9efd/5845c8349e755.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/a2/ca20a104-cef6-59da-841d-a0824f3e9efd/5845c8349e755.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/a2/ca20a104-cef6-59da-841d-a0824f3e9efd/5845c8349e755.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/a2/ca20a104-cef6-59da-841d-a0824f3e9efd/5845c8349e755.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"474eba4d-3154-5097-93c3-3310ecafbaa3","description":"Danielle Boudreaux cries near the site of a warehouse fire Monday, Dec. 5, 2016, in Oakland, Calif. The death toll in the fire climbed to 36 Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the blackened ruins, and families anxiously awaited word of their missing loved ones. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)","byline":"Marcio Jose Sanchez","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/74/474eba4d-3154-5097-93c3-3310ecafbaa3/5845e76d59473.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/74/474eba4d-3154-5097-93c3-3310ecafbaa3/5845e76d59473.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/74/474eba4d-3154-5097-93c3-3310ecafbaa3/5845e76d59473.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/74/474eba4d-3154-5097-93c3-3310ecafbaa3/5845e76d59473.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"eff4371e-cbe9-5902-91be-4d27cc77f97c","description":"This still frame from exclusive video provided by San Francisco TV station KGO-TV, made late Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016, shows Derick Ion Almena, front, and Micah Allison, partly hidden behind him, the couple who operated the Ghost Ship warehouse where dozens have died in a fire, at the Oakland, Calif., Marriott Hotel. When a KGO reporter asked if he had anything to say to the families of those who were killed, Almena said: \"They're my children. They're my friends, they're my family, they're my loves, they're my future. 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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Terry Ewing was among the anxious family and friends who received confirmation Monday of what he already knew in his heart: His girlfriend was among the three dozen killed in the Oakland warehouse fire.

Authorities confirmed the death of Ara Jo as the death toll rose to 36. Prosecutors also said Monday that murder charges could result from their investigation into the fire that broke out during an underground dance party at a building known as the \"Ghost Ship.\"

Alameda County Sheriff Gregory Ahern told The Associated Press he didn't believe there would be additional bodies found in what is the most lethal building fire in the U.S. in more than a decade.

But he cautioned that it was \"impossible to be absolutely positive\" until the entire recovery effort is complete. Authorities had gone through about three-quarters of the building by Tuesday afternoon.

The laborious job of digging with shovels and buckets through the debris was suspended overnight because of a dangerously unstable wall. It resumed in the morning, though a rainstorm Tuesday could complicate the effort. The cluttered warehouse had been converted to artists' studios and illegal living spaces, and former denizens said it was a death trap of piled wood, furniture, snaking electrical cords and only two exits.

Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O'Malley said Monday her office has sent a team to search for evidence of a crime in the warehouse, but has not yet determined whether a crime even occurred. She said potential charges could range from involuntary manslaughter to murder. She declined to say who her team has interviewed.

\"It's too early to speculate on anything,\" O'Malley said. \"We just started our investigation, and we owe it to the community and those who perished in this fire, and those who survived the fire to be methodical, to be thorough, and to take the amount of time it takes to be able to look at every piece of potential evidence.\"

Oakland city councilman Noel Gallo, who lives a block from the warehouse, said he confronted the property's manager \u2014 Derick Ion Almena \u2014 several times about neighbors' concerns about trash in the street and in front of the warehouse. Gallo said Almena essentially told authorities to \"mind their own business\" and appeared resistant to addressing complaints and complying with city codes.

Almena and his partner, Micah Allison, ran the building's arts colony, called the Satya Yuga collective. They were believed to have been away at the time of the blaze.

Relatives, friends and former colleagues said Almena loved to surround himself with followers, but seemed to care little for their well-being.

Asked late Sunday by San Francisco television station KGO about his thoughts on those killed in the fire, Almena said, \"They're my children. They're my friends, they're my family, they're my loves, they're my future. What else do I have to say?\"

Almena did not respond to emails or calls to phone numbers associated with him by The Associated Press. No one answered a call to a number for Allison.

The warehouse is owned by Chor N. Ng, her daughter Eva Ng told the Los Angeles Times. She said the warehouse was leased as studio space for an art collective and was not being used as a dwelling.

\"We are also trying to figure out what's going on like everybody else,\" the family wrote in a statement to NBC Bay Area. \"Our condolences go out to the families and friends of those injured and those who lost their lives.\"

Eva Ng did not immediately return phone calls from The Associated Press.

Gallo said Chor N. Ng put Almena in charge of cleaning up the Ghost Ship, and nothing was done.

\"I hold the owner of the property responsible,\" Gallo said. \"I hold the manager responsible.\"

But questions persisted about whether city officials could have done more to prevent the fire. Oakland planning officials opened an investigation last month after repeated complaints about the warehouse. An inspector who went to the premises couldn't get inside, said Darin Ranelletti, of the Oakland Planning Department.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf said city officials are putting together a record of what they knew about the property.

Gallo said the neighborhood was once an industrial zone and that many warehouses and vacant commercial buildings unfit for habitation remain. He said he's concerned that many of them are being used as illegal dwellings given the dearth of affordable housing in the area. He said he will push for the city to hire more fire marshals and building inspectors to investigate.

Authorities have identified 22 victims and notified their families, city officials said. An additional 11 victims have been tentatively identified, and three victims need \"scientific identification,\" they said.

Most of the victims' names, including the name of a 17-year-old, were not released.

Investigators said they believe they have located the section of the building where the fire started, but the cause remains unknown.

___

Har reported from San Francisco. Associated Press writers Ellen Knickmeyer, Olga R. Rodriguez, Tim Reiterman and Sudhin Thanawala in San Francisco, and Jonathan J. Cooper and Terry Chea in Oakland contributed to this report.

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PHILADELPHIA (AP) \u2014 A U.S. appeals court must decide if older immigrant and refugee students steered to an alternative high school in Pennsylvania are getting a meaningful education or are simply being passed through the system.

Civil rights lawyers argued Monday that the Lancaster School District is sending immigrant students who are 17 to 21 years old and can't speak English to an alternative school with fewer academic opportunities.

The Lancaster School District said its concentrated program for English language learners allows them to earn degrees more quickly, and prevents the older students from getting frustrated and dropping out.

U.S. Circuit Judge Cheryl Ann Krause, however, questioned whether the degrees have any meaning if the students don't master core academic subjects.

Lancaster has seen an influx of refugees and immigrants, in part through resettlement programs. About 17 percent of the district's 11,000 students are English language learners and nearly 5 percent are refugees. The main high school also has a program for international students that includes English as a Second Language. A district judge, after hearing five days of evidence at trial, had ordered the district to let the students involved in the suit decide which school they want attend.

However, his August ruling did not cover other students.

Plaintiffs experts had said there was no evidence the students benefited from an alternative program that combines both English immersion and an accelerated pace. The students, who come from Somalia, Sudan and other war-torn countries, testified at the trial through translators.

\"We're talking about a vulnerable group of kids. These are kids who didn't win the lottery in life,\" lawyer Witold \"Vic\" Walczak, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania, argued on their behalf Monday.

Lawyer Thomas Specht, representing the district, said the 80-minute block classes at the alternative school, Phoenix Academy, offered more intensive instruction but was not necessarily faster paced. The school is run by a contractor, Camelot Education, and has a policy of not letting students bring books and other items to and from school.

The district allows immigrant students under 17 to enroll at McCaskey High School. District officials were concerned about young teenagers at the high school mixing with students as old as 20 or 21, Specht said. Phoenix Academy enrolls students in grades 7 through 12 who have fallen behind their peers. The middle school program is on a separate floor. The programs are designed to allow students to make up credits at an accelerated pace, Specht said.

Similar lawsuits have been filed in New York state and Florida. The three-judge panel did not indicate when it would rule.

"}, {"id":"a566d5ae-aff3-5dd0-bc3d-869962aec550","type":"article","starttime":"1480988090","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:34:50-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991435","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Race to replace New Zealand's Key grows to 3","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_a566d5ae-aff3-5dd0-bc3d-869962aec550.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/race-to-replace-new-zealand-s-key-grows-to/article_a566d5ae-aff3-5dd0-bc3d-869962aec550.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/race-to-replace-new-zealand-s-key-grows-to/article_fe0b0f59-0fbd-5bd6-80d4-5add029cb6bc.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) \u2014 Three conservative New Zealand lawmakers say they will seek to lead the country after the surprise resignation of Prime Minister John Key.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","political resignations","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"a566d5ae-aff3-5dd0-bc3d-869962aec550","body":"

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) \u2014 Three conservative New Zealand lawmakers say they will seek to lead the country after the surprise resignation of Prime Minister John Key.

The contenders are Deputy Prime Minister Bill English, Health Minister Jonathan Coleman and Corrections Minister Judith Collins. Several other National Party lawmakers on Tuesday said they haven't ruled out entering the race.

In New Zealand, the prime minister is chosen by the governing party's top lawmakers, who make up the caucus. The caucus is expected to make a decision at a meeting on Dec. 12.

Key had been a popular leader for eight years and was widely expected to contest a fourth straight election next year before he stunned the nation on Monday by announcing his resignation.

Key has endorsed English, who is also the finance minister.

"}, {"id":"91dacf64-7cd8-5ad7-ab35-e0061c7c4fdb","type":"article","starttime":"1480987800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1480988533","priority":40,"sections":[{"college":"news/local/education/college"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/local/govt-and-politics"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Regents settle suit claiming retaliation against students' group","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/college/article_91dacf64-7cd8-5ad7-ab35-e0061c7c4fdb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/college/regents-settle-suit-claiming-retaliation-against-students-group/article_91dacf64-7cd8-5ad7-ab35-e0061c7c4fdb.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/education/college/regents-settle-suit-claiming-retaliation-against-students-group/article_91dacf64-7cd8-5ad7-ab35-e0061c7c4fdb.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Howard Fischer\nCapitol Media Services","prologue":"Arizona board voted Monday to settle claims it illegally retaliated against the Arizona Students Association by withholding funds over a political difference.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"761bfd46-137e-52f1-91e0-594da0c336bd","description":"A meeting of the Arizona Board of Regents.","byline":"A.E. Araiza / Arizona Daily Star 2015","hireswidth":1500,"hiresheight":763,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/61/761bfd46-137e-52f1-91e0-594da0c336bd/5846167fe5abb.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"315","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/61/761bfd46-137e-52f1-91e0-594da0c336bd/5846167fe4e3e.image.jpg?resize=620%2C315"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/61/761bfd46-137e-52f1-91e0-594da0c336bd/5846167fe4e3e.image.jpg?crop=1356%2C763%2C71%2C0&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/61/761bfd46-137e-52f1-91e0-594da0c336bd/5846167fe4e3e.image.jpg?crop=1356%2C763%2C71%2C0&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/61/761bfd46-137e-52f1-91e0-594da0c336bd/5846167fe4e3e.image.jpg?crop=1356%2C763%2C71%2C0&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"91dacf64-7cd8-5ad7-ab35-e0061c7c4fdb","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 The Arizona Board of Regents voted Monday to settle claims that it illegally retaliated against the Arizona Students Association by withholding funds over a political difference.

Without admitting they did anything wrong, regents agreed to pay the association $250,000. That\u2019s an estimate of the amount the students\u2019 group contends the regents illegally withheld.

In exchange, the association will not pursue other funds it claims it may be owed.

Potentially more significant, the students will not challenge a 2013 state law that permanently changed how the association is funded and undermined its major source of cash, said its attorney, Stephen Montoya.

He said association members concluded it was time to move on. \u201cThey learned that they needed to get over it and look at other methods of funding,\u201d Montoya said. That means convincing students at the three state universities to join the association and pay a fee, as well as seeking outside grants.

\u201cI think the regents realized they needed to work with and preserve ASA,\u201d he said. \u201cAnd ASA realized it needed to work with the Board of Regents. So both sides agreed to disagree and compromise so they could productively move on.\u201d

In a prepared statement, the regents said they are pleased to resolve the differences with the students group \u201cand look forward to working together towards their common goals as they have done for many decades.\u201d

The deal ends more than three years of litigation.

According to court records, the regents directly funded the association from 1974 through 1988.

That year students voted to impose a one-dollar-per-student fee each semester; it was increased, also by student vote, to $2 in 2008.

It was an \u201copt-out\u201d system, meaning students who objected could request a refund.

All that changed in 2012 during the debate over Proposition 204, a measure on the Arizona ballot that year. It would have made permanent a temporary one-cent sales tax increase approved by state voters two years earlier. A large portion of the funds would have been earmarked for education, including some for the universities.

The students association was involved in drafting the initiative. It collected more than 20,000 signatures to get the measure on the ballot, campaigned for it and, perhaps most significant politically, used $120,000 of its student-fee income to promote its support.

All that was against the wishes of then-Gov. Jan Brewer, who also sat on the Board of Regents, which opposed the sales-tax measure. Several regents also criticized the association for its support of the ballot measure.

Shortly after the initiative failed, the regents called a special meeting where they suspended collection of the student fee and voted to withhold the income that already had been collected for the spring 2013 semester.

Several weeks later the board had another special meeting, permanently changing its policies to collect the fee only from students who \u201copted in,\u201d turning the \u201copt-out\u201d policy on its head. The regents also voted to require the association to reimburse the universities for the administrative cost of collecting the fees.

Moreover, after implementing the opt-in policy, the board never remitted the fees already paid by students for the spring 2013 semester.

The association sued, charging that the regents\u2019 action violated the association\u2019s constitutional free-speech rights, \u201ccausing a chilling effect on ASA\u2019s political speech\u201d and depriving it of its only source of income.

A trial judge threw out the case, ruling that it was voluntary for the state to collect the fee and that the policy change wasn\u2019t a First Amendment violation.

But in a ruling earlier this year a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the students did have a case.

Appellate Judge Richard Paez, writing for the court, acknowledged nothing in law required the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) to collect a fee from students to run the association and support its political activities.

\u201cBut having done so for 15 years at no cost, ABOR could not deprive ASA of the benefit of its fee collection and remittance services in retaliation for the ASA\u2019s exercise of its First Amendment rights,\u201d Paez wrote. He said the sudden change by the governmental agency in depriving the association of the benefits of the free collection was \u201csufficiently valuable to give rise to a retaliation claim.\u201d

Monday\u2019s settlement means that claim won\u2019t go to trial. It does not mean, however, the regents will start collecting the fee again.

After the regents first acted, the Arizona Legislature voted to bar universities from collecting the fee.

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PHILADELPHIA (AP) \u2014 Damaging testimony that Bill Cosby gave in an accuser's lawsuit, including admissions that he gave young women drugs and alcohol before sex, can be used at his sex assault trial, a judge ruled Monday.

The defense has insisted Cosby testified only after being promised he would never be charged over his 2004 encounter with accuser Andrea Constand. But his lawyers at the time never had an immunity agreement or put anything in writing.

\"This court concludes that there was neither an agreement nor a promise not to prosecute, only an exercise of prosecutorial discretion,\" Montgomery County Judge Steven O'Neill wrote in his ruling.

Cosby, 79, acknowledged in the 2006 deposition that he had a string of extramarital relationships. He called them consensual, but many of the women say they were drugged and molested. Cosby, questioned about the 2004 encounter at his home with Constand, described being on his couch and putting his hand down her pants.

\"I don't hear her say anything. And I don't feel her say anything. And so I continue and I go into the area that is somewhere between permission and rejection. I am not stopped,\" he said in his testimony.

Prosecutors describe Constand as being semiconscious after Cosby gave her three unmarked blue pills for stress that night. The release of the deposition testimony last year prompted them to reopen her 2005 police complaint and arrest Cosby days before the statute of limitations expired. O'Neill has vowed to try the case by June.

The ruling on the deposition is one of two key pretrial issues that will determine the scope of the evidence against Cosby. The other question is how many other accusers will be allowed to testify in prosecutors' attempt to show a pattern of similar conduct. Prosecutors hope to call 13 additional women who say they were assaulted by Cosby as far back as the 1960s. Two days of arguments on that issue are set for next week.

At a pretrial hearing earlier this year, O'Neill said that Cosby's decision to testify at the deposition could have been strategic. The actor \u2014 known as America's Dad for his top-rated family sitcom, \"The Cosby Show,\" which ran from 1984 to 1992 \u2014 could have invoked his Fifth Amendment right not to incriminate himself. But jurors would have heard of that decision if the case went to trial.

Cosby instead settled Constand's lawsuit, for an undisclosed amount, after finishing four days of testimony about his extramarital affairs, his friendship with Constand and other topics.

In another excerpt, Cosby described a phone call with Constand's mother a year later, when he refused to say what the pills were.

\"I'm not going to argue with somebody's mother who is accusing me of something,\" he testified. \"And I'm apologizing because I'm thinking this is a dirty old man with a young girl. I apologized. I said to the mother it was digital penetration.\"

Cosby also described getting seven prescriptions for quaaludes in the 1970s, which he said he kept on hand to give women he hoped to seduce, \"the same as a person would say, 'Have a drink.'\"

Constand had met Cosby at Temple University when she managed the women's basketball team. He was a prominent booster and university trustee. She went to police in 2005 to report that he had sexually assaulted her a year earlier after taking what Cosby described as an herbal product. Constand, then 30, was dating a woman at the time and had no romantic interest in the 66-year-old Cosby, her lawyer has said.

District Attorney Kevin Steele called the ruling on the deposition an important development in the 12-year-old case.

\"Allowing the jury to hear Mr. Cosby's deposition testimony is another step forward in this case and will aid the jury in making its determination. It's important that we are able to present all of the evidence available,\" Steele said.

Defense lawyer Brian McMonagle had no comment on the decision.

The defense will fight strenuously to block the testimony of the other women, arguing that their accounts are vague, decades old and impossible to defend. Cosby's lawyers had hoped to question the women in person to assess their credibility and relevance, but O'Neill rejected the idea.

Defense lawyers also say Cosby is legally blind and can no longer recognize his accusers or help his legal team prepare for trial.

Constand, 43, is now a massage therapist in her native Ontario. She signed off on the decision by prosecutors to reopen the case. The Associated Press does not typically name people who say they are sexual assault victims, but Constand has given permission for her name to be used.

"}, {"id":"13cb4812-ebf0-53d9-a678-e5349107f3ee","type":"article","starttime":"1480987921","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:32:01-07:00","lastupdated":"1480991452","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"The Latest: Move to delay finalizing election results pulled","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_13cb4812-ebf0-53d9-a678-e5349107f3ee.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/the-latest-move-to-delay-finalizing-election-results-pulled/article_13cb4812-ebf0-53d9-a678-e5349107f3ee.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/the-latest-move-to-delay-finalizing-election-results-pulled/article_dfd3df6d-5498-5f24-b1b2-a649506c34c7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on Republican incumbent Pat McCrory conceding to Democrat Roy Cooper in their close race for North Carolina governor (all times local):","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","government and politics","elections","state elections","united states general election","voting","state governments","election recounts","local elections","events","general elections","politics","gays and lesbians","human rights and civil liberties","social issues","social affairs","protests and demonstrations","national courts","political and civil unrest","national governments","courts","judiciary"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":14,"commentID":"13cb4812-ebf0-53d9-a678-e5349107f3ee","body":"

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on Republican incumbent Pat McCrory conceding to Democrat Roy Cooper in their close race for North Carolina governor (all times local):

8:25 p.m.

Pending litigation challenging North Carolina's process to ensure people who use same-day registration to vote are whom they claim to be are no longer could delay final election results this fall.

A federal judge late Monday granted a request by lawyers for the head of a conservative-leaning group to withdraw his bid to prevent the certification of statewide results until the voter verification was complete. A hearing on blocking the certification had been set for Thursday.

Attorneys for the Civitas Institute president wrote that State Board of Elections rulings involving election protests and recounts have changed the necessity for blocking the certification.

The withdrawal request was filed the same day Republican Gov. Pat McCrory conceded his close race to Democrat Roy Cooper.

The lawyers say the Civitas Institute president still wants to pursue the underlying litigation challenging the same-day registration process of verifying the addresses of new voters.

__

2:35 p.m.

Gay rights groups that made the defeat of North Carolina Republican Gov. Pat McCrory this year a top priority because of a law limiting LGBT rights that he signed are celebrating after his concession to Democrat Roy Cooper.

Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin said Monday that McCrory's \"reign of discrimination is finally over\" after McCrory announced publicly it appeared Cooper won.

The law known as House Bill 2 prevented local nondiscrimination ordinances designed to protect LGBT people. The law also tells transgender people to use restrooms in schools and government buildings that correspond to the sex on their birth certificate.

Cooper says he wants the law repealed. Republicans who approved to still control the legislature.

Tami Fitzgerald with the North Carolina Values Coalition supported the law and McCrory. Fitzgerald says McCrory's defeat \"was orchestrated by radical forces outside North Carolina\" and warned Cooper against any attempt to \"compromise the privacy and safety of our children.\"

__

1 p.m.

Democrat Roy Cooper has responded to North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory's concession in their close race by praising the Republican for his service to the state.

Cooper said in a Facebook post Monday that he's honored to receive the support of so many in this fall's election and believes \"there is more that unites us than divides us\" despite the contentious election season.

McCrory conceded earlier Monday as a partial recount of ballots in Durham County saw essentially no changes in their tallies. The State Board of Election has ordered the recount in heavily-Democratic Durham after technical troubles on election night led to a formal protest there.

Unofficial results show the outgoing attorney general ahead of McCrory by more than 10,000 votes of 4.7 million cast. The state board is likely to certify the result later this week.

__

12:10 p.m.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory has conceded the governor's race, clearing the way for Democrat Roy Cooper to be declared the winner.

The concession nearly four weeks after Election Day comes after appeals dried up and postelection counts saw Cooper's narrow lead increasing.

McCrory announced Monday in a video posted on YouTube that he is giving up four years after he won the office by a comfortable margin. This time around McCrory was weighed down by a law he signed limiting LGBT rights and was unable to generate the same voter support that lifted Republicans Donald Trump and Richard Burr to victory in the state.

Cooper's win marks an important consolation prize for national Democrats after a disappointing election. Cooper is the outgoing attorney general.

McCrory's defeat marks the first time a sitting North Carolina governor elected to a four-year term has lost a re-election bid.

___

11:05 a.m.

The recount of ballots in a North Carolina county has resumed and could soon bring a conclusion to the undecided race for governor.

Paid volunteers resumed their work Monday at the Durham County elections board office to carry out an order to recount more than 90,000 ballots cast during early voting and on Election Day. By midmorning, only 10,000 ballots still had to be run through tabulation machines.

Partial Durham recount returns through Sunday showed little change in tallies for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and Democratic challenger Roy Cooper. Unofficial statewide results have Cooper leading McCrory by about 10,250 votes. Representatives of McCrory and Cooper's campaign team are observing the Durham count.

McCrory has said he won't ask for a statewide recount if the Durham recount shows the same results.

__

3 a.m.

The undecided election for North Carolina governor could reach a conclusion Monday as a recount of thousands of votes wraps up.

Democrat Roy Cooper currently leads Republican incumbent Pat McCrory by about 10,250 votes. McCrory, who could not capitalize on the wave of support that delivered statewide victories for Republicans Donald Trump and Sen. Richard Burr, can demand a statewide recount if the margin is 10,000 or less.

A review of more than 94,000 votes cast in heavily Democratic Durham County during the early-voting period and on election day is expected to finish Monday. McCrory has said he won't ask for a statewide recount if that recount shows the same results.

Most other protests filed by McCrory's Republican allies have already been tossed out.

"}, {"id":"f8b50930-7e5b-5490-9b7d-48dfb1d1fe37","type":"article","starttime":"1480987485","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:24:45-07:00","lastupdated":"1480990703","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Correction: Oil Pipeline-Protest-The Latest story","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_f8b50930-7e5b-5490-9b7d-48dfb1d1fe37.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/correction-oil-pipeline-protest-the-latest-story/article_f8b50930-7e5b-5490-9b7d-48dfb1d1fe37.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/correction-oil-pipeline-protest-the-latest-story/article_90b2cad7-ebd1-52d4-bf33-4b3ebb25bd6e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":6,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"CANNON BALL, N.D. 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CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 In a story Dec. 4 about developments in the dispute over the Dakota Access oil pipeline, The Associated Press reported erroneously in several separate items that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said that it wouldn't grant an easement for the project. The Army issued the decision to not approve the easement at this time.

Corrected versions of the items are below:

The Latest: Company slams pipeline ruling as political

The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline is slamming the Obama administration after the U.S. Army's decision not to grant an easement for the project

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the Dakota Access pipeline protest (all times local):

10:30 p.m.

The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline is slamming the Obama administration after the U.S. Army's decision not to grant an easement for the project.

Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners released a statement Sunday night calling the decision, \"just the latest in a series of overt and transparent political actions by an administration which has abandoned the rule of law in favor of currying favor with a narrow and extreme political constituency.\"

The company reiterated its plan to complete construction of the pipeline without rerouting around Lake Oahe.

The decision to refuse the easement is a victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters, who argued the project would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites.

___

9:05 p.m.

House Speaker Paul Ryan is calling a decision by the U.S. Army to deny a government permit for the Dakota Access oil pipeline \"big-government decision-making at its worst.\"

The Wisconsin Republican tweeted Sunday night that he looks \"forward to putting this anti-energy presidency behind us.\"

The Army announced Sunday that it will not allow the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe in North Dakota \u2014 a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

The decision is a victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters, who argued the project would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites.

___

7:30 p.m.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is praising the decision of the U.S. Army to deny a permit for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in southern North Dakota.

That decision is a victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters, who argued the project would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites.

Sanders, who made a strong run for the Democratic presidential nomination this year, says he appreciates President Barack Obama \"listening to the Native American people and millions of others who believe this pipeline should not be built.\" He says: \"We should not continue to trample on Native American sovereignty.\"

Sanders says the country should not increase its fossil fuel dependence and accelerate the crisis of climate change.

___

6:50 p.m.

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier, whose department has done much of the policing for the Dakota Access pipeline protests, says \"local law enforcement does not have an opinion\" on the Army's decision not to grant an easement for the project.

Kirchmeier says the sheriff's department's role \"is to enforce the law\" and that it \"will continue to do so.\"

The Army announced Sunday that it will not allow the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

___

5:35 p.m.

Hundreds of demonstrators near the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp broke into cheers and chanted \"water is life\" in the Lakota Sioux language as news spread that the federal government won't grant an easement for the project in southern North Dakota.

Some in the crowd banged drums.

Miles Allard of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe said he was pleased by the decision but remained cautious, saying opponents of the pipeline \"don't know what Trump is going to do.\"

Allard says he's been telling his people \"to stand up and not to leave until this is over.\"

Carla Youngbear of the Meskwaki Potawatomi tribe traveled from central Kansas to be at the protest site. She says she has grandchildren and is going to have great-grandchildren who will need water and that's why she was there.

___

4:55 p.m.

The Morton County Sheriff's Office says that it has lifted the blockade on a bridge north of the large Dakota Access oil pipeline protest encampment.

In a statement, it said that it won't be near the bridge as long as protesters stick to the conditions outlined on Saturday, including only coming to the bridge for predetermined meetings with law enforcement.

The release did not comment on the U.S. Army's decision to not grant an easement for the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir from which the Standing Rock Sioux tribe gets its drinking water.

The large Oceti Sakowin camp is south of the Backwater Bridge, and several hundred people are camped there.

___

4:15 p.m.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch says that the Department of Justice will still monitor the protest in North Dakota and is ready to \"provide resources\" for those who \"can play a constructive role in easing tensions.\"

The U.S. Army said Sunday afternoon that the four-state, $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline cannot be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple said in a statement that the decision \"is a serious mistake,\" ''prolongs the serious problems\" that law enforcement faces and \"prolongs the dangerous situation\" of people camping in cold, snowy conditions.

The federal government has ordered the several hundred people at the main encampment, which is on U.S. Army Corps land, by Monday. Lynch said in a statement that the safety of those in the area, including officers, residents and protesters, \"continues to be our foremost concern.\"

___

4:10 p.m.

North Dakota Republican Rep. Kevin Cramer says that the Army's decision not to grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline is \"a very chilling signal\" for the future of infrastructure in the U.S.

Cramer said in a statement that infrastructure will be hard to build \"when criminal behavior is rewarded this way,\" apparently referring to the large protest encampment on federal land and the clashes between demonstrators and law enforcement.

The Army said Sunday afternoon that the pipeline cannot be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

The route has been the subject of months of protests by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others, who have argued the pipeline threatens a water source and cultural sites.

Cramer also said that \"law and order\" will be restored when Donald Trump takes office and that he feels bad for the Corps having to do \"diligent work ... only to have their Commander-in-Chief throw them under the bus.\"

___

4 p.m.

The Secretary of the Interior says the Army's decision to not grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline \"ensures there will be an in-depth evaluation of alternative routes.\"

Sally Jewell also said in a statement that the decision \"underscores that tribal rights ... are essential components of the analysis\" for the environmental impact statement.

The Army said Sunday afternoon that the pipeline cannot be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

The route has been the subject of months of protests by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others, who have argued the pipeline threatens a water source and cultural sites.

The company constructing the pipeline, Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, and the Morton County Sheriff's Office didn't have immediate comment.

___

3:45 p.m.

The U.S. Army says it won't grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in southern North Dakota.

Spokeswoman Moria Kelley said in a news release Sunday that the administration will not allow the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

Assistant Secretary for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy said her decision was based on the need to \"explore alternate routes\" for the pipeline's crossing.

The route has been the subject of months of protests by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others, who have argued the pipeline threatens a water source and cultural sites.

The company constructing the pipeline, Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, and the Morton County Sheriff's Office didn't have immediate comment.

The federal government has ordered people to leave the main encampment, which is on Army Corps of Engineers' land and is close to the construction site, by Monday.

Demonstrators say they're prepared to stay, and federal, state and local authorities say they won't forcibly remove the protesters.

___

2:45 p.m.

A disabled Gulf War veteran from Flint, Michigan, says he sees irony in the parallels between his city's lead-tainted water issue and the four-state Dakota Access pipeline.

Art Woodson is a disabled Gulf War veteran who served in the Army and drove to the main protest encampment from North Dakota with two others \u2014 a 17-hour nonstop drive. He's here as part of the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock group.

The 49-year-old says he is showing is support for \"Native Americans and for water,\" because Flint residents know \"that water is in dire need.\"

Woodson also said that \"they're trying to force pipes on people\" but that \"we're trying to get pipes in Flint for safe water.\"

The group had said about 2,000 veterans were going to the camp, where several hundred people have for months protested the $3.8 billion pipeline, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived.

The government has ordered people to leave the encampment by Monday. Demonstrators say they're prepared to stay.

___

1:30 p.m.

A Vietnam veteran who's part of a Michigan tribe says he came to the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp because the issue of water quality is \"an issue for everyone.\"

Sixty-six-year-old Steven Perry is from Traverse City, Michigan, and a member of the Little Traverse Bay band of Odawa Indians. He came to help at the Oceti Sakowin camp, which is on federal land in southern North Dakota, as part of the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock group.

Perry says: \"When we fought for this country, we fought for everyone.\"

The group had said about 2,000 veterans were going to the camp, where several hundred people have for months protested the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived.

The government has ordered people to leave the main encampment by Monday, but demonstrators say they're prepared to stay. Federal, state and local authorities say they won't forcibly remove the protesters.

___

1:25 p.m.

An organizer with the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock has told a gathering of veterans near the Dakota Access pipeline protest site that elders have asked they have no confrontations with authorities.

Organizer Wes Clark Jr., the son of former Democratic presidential candidate Gen. Wesley Clark, spoke to about 250 veterans Sunday afternoon.

State authorities have said they talked with the veterans group and will move away Sunday afternoon from the Blackwater Bridge that's north of the Oceti Sakowin camp on federal land if protesters agree to certain conditions.

Wes Clark Jr. spoke of that agreement, saying the National Guard and law enforcement have armored vehicles and are armed. He added: \"If we come forward, they will attack us.\"

The group had said about 2,000 veterans were going to the camp, where several hundred people have for months protested the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived. Clark asked veterans to help out anyone who needs it at camp.

___

11:10 a.m.

A Navy veteran and Harvard graduate student says he came to the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp because he thought they could use his help.

Twenty-nine-year-old Art Grayson of Cambridge, Massachusetts, said he came to the encampment as part of the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock group. He flew, then met up with other veterans and rode the final leg of the trip from Bismarck in the back of a pickup truck.

Hundreds of veterans are expected to come to the camp on federal land, where several hundred people have been in protest of the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline for months.

Grayson said that he \"couldn't stand by and watch people being abused.\" He has finals this week, but told his professors \"I'll see you when I get back.\"

The group's GoFundMe.com page had raised more than $1 million of its $1.2 million goal on Sunday, which is to go toward food, transportation and supplies.

___

7:25 a.m.

Authorities in North Dakota say they'll move away from a bridge near the main Dakota Access pipeline protest camp by Sunday afternoon if demonstrators agree to certain conditions.

A Morton County Sheriff's Office news release details the conditions as outlined Saturday by Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney, which he said are meant to de-escalate conflict.

They include staying in the Oceti Sakowin camp that's south of the Backwater Bridge, coming to it only if there is a prearranged meeting with law enforcement and not removing barriers.

Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman Dave Archambault and Gov. Jack Dalrymple have agreed to meet. Archambault told the Bismarck Tribune this weekend that he wanted the blockade on the bridge, damaged in late October during a protest, lifted.

Hundreds of veterans are due to gather Sunday on the reservation.

"}, {"id":"1d5037aa-8388-5f5e-986d-5171a062cb4d","type":"article","starttime":"1480986900","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:15:00-07:00","sections":[{"commentary":"ap/commentary"},{"column":"news/opinion/column"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Opinion: Democrats prove they're clueless by keeping Pelosi as leader","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/article_1d5037aa-8388-5f5e-986d-5171a062cb4d.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/opinion-democrats-prove-they-re-clueless-by-keeping-pelosi-as/article_1d5037aa-8388-5f5e-986d-5171a062cb4d.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/opinion-democrats-prove-they-re-clueless-by-keeping-pelosi-as/article_1d5037aa-8388-5f5e-986d-5171a062cb4d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Pittsburgh Post-Gazette","prologue":"The following editorial appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on Friday, Dec. 2: After the rise and electoral triumph of Donald Trump, Democrats could be expected to be searching their souls, re-examining their approach to policy and voters, and maybe even looking for new faces and fresh leadership.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["government and politics","political parties","legislature","political organizations"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"22b2578f-ca5b-5ac8-bbea-944da1313648","description":"Nancy Pelosi","byline":"Cliff Owen / Associated Press","hireswidth":1763,"hiresheight":1175,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/2b/22b2578f-ca5b-5ac8-bbea-944da1313648/583b5f21f021a.hires.jpg","presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"413","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/2b/22b2578f-ca5b-5ac8-bbea-944da1313648/583b5f21ef267.image.jpg?resize=620%2C413"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/2b/22b2578f-ca5b-5ac8-bbea-944da1313648/583b5f21ef267.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C91&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/2b/22b2578f-ca5b-5ac8-bbea-944da1313648/583b5f21ef267.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C91&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/2b/22b2578f-ca5b-5ac8-bbea-944da1313648/583b5f21ef267.image.jpg?crop=1763%2C991%2C0%2C91&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"1d5037aa-8388-5f5e-986d-5171a062cb4d","body":"

The following editorial appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on Friday, Dec. 2:

After the rise and electoral triumph of Donald Trump, Democrats could be expected to be searching their souls, re-examining their approach to policy and voters, and maybe even looking for new faces and fresh leadership.

Yet the Democrats could not even bring themselves to replace Nancy Pelosi as their leader in the U.S. House. She was re-elected last week \u2014 134 to 63.

Pelosi, 76, has led her party in the House since 2003, including four years as speaker. She was challenged for the leadership position by Rep. Tim Ryan of Youngstown, Ohio. The 43-year-old congressman, just re-elected to his seventh term, said it was time for change in the Democratic Party, an assertion it is almost impossible to refute.

Ryan also said that the Democrats losing the presidential election to Trump was a clear signal that his party no longer hears its base of working men and women. They are the very people who helped the president-elect win the so-called Rust Belt or Brexit states. Ryan asserted that his party has become a party of the East and West coasts.

But Ryan did not even get close to toppling Pelosi, which makes one wonder what it would take for Democrats to trade in their reliable old war horses for fresh blood and ideas.

The Democrats, under Pelosi, lost the House in 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2016. In 2010 they lost 63 seats. They went from holding 257 seats in 2008 to 194 in this election. This was the year the Democrats were supposed to retake the House. They picked up six seats.

How many times do House Democrats have to lose before they figure out that Pelosi is not the winning ticket? She comes from a House district in San Francisco, about as distant from middle America as a district can be.

Pelosi wrote to Democratic House members that in order \u201cto be a strong voice for hard-working families and to uphold the values we cherish as Americans, House Democrats must be unified, strategic, and unwavering. These qualities took us to victory in 2006, and I believe they will do so again.\u201d

This is delusional. The election of 2006 was a decade \u2014 a decade of defeat \u2014 ago. By re-electing Pelosi, the Democrats have quite possibly doomed themselves to losing the House again in 2018. It is reasonable to suppose they will never regain the House under Pelosi\u2019s leadership, and most Democratic congressmen know this.

As Ryan said: \u201cUnder our current leadership, Democrats have been reduced to our smallest congressional minority since 1929. This should indicate to all of us that keeping our leadership team completely unchanged will simply lead to more disappointment.\u201d

He told ABC News: \u201cDonald Trump is the president. That is how bad we are out of touch, that the backbone of our party went and voted for Donald Trump. And I say that\u2019s our fault.\u201d

But telling the obvious truth got Ryan precisely nowhere. When a former representative from North Carolina, Heath Shuler, challenged Pelosi in 2010, he did even worse. He got only 43 votes despite the drubbing House Democrats took that year.

Democrats could not even take a first small step of firing Pelosi. Her re-election shows how unimaginative and clueless the House Democratic caucus really is. Worse, it shows that the Democrats cannot break the grip of bicoastal identity politics. They cannot understand the economic anxiety of those who voted for Trump. They cannot even begin to listen to these voters, let alone court them. They don\u2019t live in their world.

"}, {"id":"554c80bb-50b3-570a-9f2b-d66d89b3ff17","type":"article","starttime":"1480986886","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:14:46-07:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"sports":"sports"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Heisman finalists: Jackson, Watson, Peppers, 2 Sooners","url":"http://tucson.com/sports/article_554c80bb-50b3-570a-9f2b-d66d89b3ff17.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/sports/heisman-finalists-jackson-watson-peppers-sooners/article_554c80bb-50b3-570a-9f2b-d66d89b3ff17.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/sports/heisman-finalists-jackson-watson-peppers-sooners/article_d1241aeb-ac82-5f34-9ae7-5332507db459.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By RALPH D. RUSSO\nAP College Football Writer","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson is a Heisman Trophy finalist for the second consecutive season, joining Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson, Michigan linebacker Jabrill Peppers and Oklahoma teammates Baker Mayfield and Dede Westbrook.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","sports","college football","heisman trophy","college sports","football","events","general news","fbs college football playoff"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58","description":"Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson (4) celebrates his touchdown, during the second half of the Atlantic Coast Conference championship NCAA college football game against Virginia Tech, Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/Willie J. Allen Jr.)","byline":"Willie J. Allen Jr.","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"411","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/1f/81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58/58445a52adbb2.image.jpg?resize=512%2C411"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/1f/81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58/58445a52adbb2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C80"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"241","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/1f/81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58/58445a52adbb2.image.jpg?resize=300%2C241"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"822","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/1f/81f7d6df-8f59-5331-8c75-89e0f3d4fb58/58445a52adbb2.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301","description":"Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) passes against Oklahoma State in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, in Norman, Okla. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)","byline":"Alonzo Adams","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"344","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301/58460e3c8b852.image.jpg?resize=512%2C344"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301/58460e3c8b852.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301/58460e3c8b852.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"688","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5ace13b3-cacf-5c71-a235-ddba48bc7301/58460e3c8b852.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"554c80bb-50b3-570a-9f2b-d66d89b3ff17","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson is a Heisman Trophy finalist for the second consecutive season, joining Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson, Michigan linebacker Jabrill Peppers and Oklahoma teammates Baker Mayfield and Dede Westbrook.

The finalists were announced Monday on ESPN and the award will be presented Saturday in New York.

Watson finished third in last year's voting, won by Alabama running back Derrick Henry. Just like last year, he heads to New York not as the favorite but as the contender coming on strong at the end.

\"You just don't have a lot of two-time Heisman finalists over the history of your program. He is our first, and he's very deserving,\" Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said in a statement. \"I've said it before; I believe he is the best player in the nation and has been a great representative of our University.\"

Mayfield finished fourth last season, but did not get an invite to Heisman presentation in New York.

Westbrook and Mayfield are the first teammates to be finalists since Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart from Southern California finished first and third, respectively in 2005.

Peppers is the first defensive player to be a Heisman finalists since Notre Dame linebacker Manti Teo was a distant runner-up to Johnny Manziel in 2012.

Finalists are determined by the margins between vote-getters. The ballots of more than 900 voters, which included former Heisman winners, were due Monday.

Watson entered as the preseason favorite in what looked like a strong field of contenders, but Jackson quickly swept past them all to be front-runner. He was brilliant for the first two months of the season and Louisville was looking like a College Football Playoff contender.

It seemed as if Jackson would be a runaway Heisman winner, but the 15th-ranked Cardinals lost their final two games of the season. He was sacked 11 times in a lopsided loss at Houston and he committed four turnovers in a last-second loss against Kentucky.

Watson, meanwhile, has surged since Clemson's only loss to Pitt in mid-November. He also had the benefit of playing in the Atlantic Coast Conference title game last Saturday and took full advantage of the spotlight. Watson threw three touchdown passes and ran for two scores in a 42-35 victory against Virginia Tech to seal a spot in the College Football Playoff.

The raw numbers still favor Jackson, who is second in the nation in total yards per game (410.7) and has accounted for 51 touchdowns (21 rushing TDs and 30 TD passes) with 13 turnovers (nine INTs and four lost fumbles) in 12 games. Watson averages 341.8 yards per game and has 43 touchdowns (six rushing and 37 passing) with 15 turnovers (all interceptions) in 13 games.

When the two met on Oct. 1 at Clemson in what was one of the season's most entertaining games, Watson threw for 306 yards and five touchdowns, ran for 91 and was picked off three times. Jackson had 295 yards passing, 162 rushing and accounted for three touchdowns with one interception. Clemson won 42-36.

\"It will mean a lot,\" Jackson said about the possibility of winning. \"Just being the first person to win it @ the University of Louisville, so it'll be an honor.\"

Mayfield and Westbrook have been a dynamic combination, and late in the season No. 7 Oklahoma started a dual campaign to promote both for the Heisman. Mayfield is on pace to break the NCAA record for passer efficiency rating in a season (197.75). Westbrook has 74 catches for 1,465 yards and 16 touchdowns and has more receptions covering at least 20 yards (26) than any receiver in the country.

Peppers played defense, offense and special teams for Michigan, lining up all over the field. He had 60 tackles, three sacks and an interception on defense, scored three touchdowns on offense being used mostly as a wildcat quarterback and averaged 14.8 yards with a touchdown on punt returns.

Still, he was a bit of a surprising finalist.

Alabama defensive lineman Jonathan Allen, Florida State running back Dalvin Cook and Washington quarterback Jake Browning were among those who were considered potential finalists that did not draw enough support to get an invitation to New York.

___

Follow Ralph D. Russo at www.Twitter.com/ralphDrussoAP

More college football http://collegefootball.ap.org/

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CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 In a story Dec. 4 about an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said it would not grant the easement. The Army issued the decision to not approve the easement at this time.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Federal government blocks Dakota Access oil pipeline route

The U.S. Army says it won't grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota

By JAMES MacPHERSON

Associated Press

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) \u2014 The U.S. Army said Sunday that it won't grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in southern North Dakota, handing a victory to the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters, who argued the project would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites.

North Dakota's leaders criticized the decision, with Gov. Jack Dalrymple calling it a \"serious mistake\" that \"prolongs the dangerous situation\" of having several hundred protesters who are camped out on federal land during cold, wintry weather. U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer said it's a \"very chilling signal\" for the future of infrastructure in the United States.

The four-state, $3.8 billion project is largely complete except for the now-blocked segment underneath Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir. Assistant Army Secretary for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy said in a news release that her decision was based on the need to \"explore alternate routes\" for the pipeline's crossing. Her full decision doesn't rule out that it could cross under the reservoir or north of Bismarck.

\"Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it's clear that there's more work to do,\" Darcy said. \"The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.\"

The company constructing the pipeline, Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, released a statement Sunday night slamming the decision as politically motivated and alleging that President Obama's administration was determined to delay the matter until he leaves office.

\"The White House's directive today to the (U.S. Army) Corps for further delay is just the latest in a series of overt and transparent political actions by an administration which has abandoned the rule of law in favor of currying favor with a narrow and extreme political constituency,\" the company said.

President-elect Donald Trump, a pipeline supporter, will take office in January, although it wasn't immediately clear what steps his administration would be able to take to reverse the latest decision or how quickly that could happen.

The decision came a day before the government's deadline for the several hundred people at the Oceti Sakowin, or Seven Council Fires, encampment to leave the federal land. But demonstrators say they're prepared to stay, and authorities say they won't forcibly remove them.

As the news spread Sunday, cheers and chants of \"mni wichoni\" \u2014 \"water is life\" in Lakota Sioux \u2014 broke out among the protesters. Some in the crowd banged drums. Miles Allard, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux, said he was pleased but remained cautious, saying, \"We don't know what Trump is going to do.\"

\"The whole world is watching,\" Allard added. \"I'm telling all our people to stand up and not to leave until this is over.\"

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Sunday that the Department of Justice will \"continue to monitor the situation\" and stands \"ready to provide resources to help all those who can play a constructive role in easing tensions.\"

\"The safety of everyone in the area - law enforcement officers, residents and protesters alike - continues to be our foremost concern,\" she added.

Carla Youngbear of the Meskwaki Potawatomi tribe made her third trip from central Kansas to be at the protest site.

\"I have grandchildren, and I'm going to have great grandchildren,\" she said. \"They need water. Water is why I'm here.\"

Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman Dave Archambault didn't immediately respond to messages left seeking comment.

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier, whose department has done much of the policing for the protests, said that \"local law enforcement does not have an opinion\" on the easement and that his department will continue to \"enforce the law.\"

U.S. Secretary for the Interior Sally Jewell said in a statement that the \"thoughtful approach ... ensures that there will be an in-depth evaluation of alternative routes for the pipeline and a closer look at potential impacts.\"

Earlier Sunday, an organizer with Veterans Stand for Standing Rock said tribal elders had asked the military veterans not to have confrontations with law enforcement officials, adding the group is there to help out those who've dug in against the project.

About 250 veterans gathered about a mile from the main camp for a meeting with organizer Wes Clark Jr., the son of former Democratic presidential candidate Gen. Wesley Clark. The group had said about 2,000 veterans were coming, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived.

\"We have been asked by the elders not to do direct action,\" Wes Clark Jr. said. He added that the National Guard and law enforcement have armored vehicles and are armed, warning: \"If we come forward, they will attack us.\"

Instead, he told the veterans, \"If you see someone who needs help, help them out.\"

Authorities moved a blockade from the north end of the Backwater Bridge with the conditions that protesters stay south of it and come there only if there is a prearranged meeting. Authorities also asked protesters not to remove barriers on the bridge, which they have said was damaged in the late October conflict that led to several people being hurt, including a serious arm injury.

\"That heavy presence is gone now and I really hope in this de-escalation they'll see that, and in good faith . the leadership in those camps will start squashing the violent factions,\" Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney said in a statement, reiterating that any violation will \"will result in their arrest.\"

Veterans Stand for Standing Rock's GoFundMe.com page had raised more than $1 million of its $1.2 million goal by Sunday \u2014 money due to go toward food, transportation and supplies. Cars waiting to get into the camp Sunday afternoon were backed up for more than a half-mile.

\"People are fighting for something, and I thought they could use my help,\" said Navy veteran and Harvard graduate student Art Grayson. The 29-year-old from Cambridge, Massachusetts, flew the first leg of the journey, then rode from Bismarck in the back of a pickup truck. He has finals this week, but told professors, \"I'll see you when I get back.\"

Steven Perry, a 66-year-old Vietnam veteran who's a member of the Little Traverse Bay band of Odawa Indians in Michigan, spoke of one of the protesters' main concerns: that the pipeline could pollute drinking water. \"This is not just a native issue,\" he said, \"This is an issue for everyone.\"

Art Woodson and two other veterans drove 17 hours straight from Flint, Michigan, a city whose lead-tainted water crisis parallels with the tribe's fight over water, he said.

\"We know in Flint that water is in dire need,\" the 49-year-old disabled Gulf War Army veteran said. \"In North Dakota, they're trying to force pipes on people. We're trying to get pipes in Flint for safe water.\"

Some veterans will take part in a prayer ceremony Monday, during which they'll apologize for historical detrimental conduct by the military toward Native Americans and ask for forgiveness, Clark said. He also called the veterans' presence \"about right and wrong and peace and love.\"

___

Associated Press writers Jeff Baenen in Minneapolis and Jamie Stengle in Dallas contributed to this report.

"}, {"id":"94426882-86b4-5f9e-ade8-fed94aedc232","type":"article","starttime":"1480986630","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:10:30-07:00","lastupdated":"1480988836","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Rolling Stone challenges verdict in UVa defamation case","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_94426882-86b4-5f9e-ade8-fed94aedc232.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/rolling-stone-challenges-verdict-in-uva-defamation-case/article_94426882-86b4-5f9e-ade8-fed94aedc232.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/rolling-stone-challenges-verdict-in-uva-defamation-case/article_a17376ff-b248-5c1c-8c54-cb909c2ff93f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By ALANNA DURKIN RICHER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"RICHMOND, Va. (AP) \u2014 Rolling Stone magazine has asked a judge to overturn a jury's verdict in the defamation case over its 2014 story about a gang rape at the University of Virginia.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","violent crime","legal proceedings","crime","law and order"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"94426882-86b4-5f9e-ade8-fed94aedc232","body":"

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) \u2014 Rolling Stone magazine has asked a judge to overturn a jury's verdict in the defamation case over its 2014 story about a gang rape at the University of Virginia.

Jurors found in November that the magazine, its publisher and a reporter defamed University of Virginia administrator Nicole Eramo's with its botched story \"A Rape on Campus.\" Eramo was awarded $3 million.

Attorneys for the magazine said in a motion filed Monday that the judge should overrule the jury's verdict. The magazine said there is no evidence that writer Sabrina Rubin Erdely acted with actual malice.

Rolling Stone is also challenging the jury's finding that it \"republished\" the article in December 2014 when it added an editor's note to the online version acknowledging there were problems with the article.

"}, {"id":"d1de8877-4823-5c32-8454-3d3f06439c3e","type":"article","starttime":"1480986747","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:12:27-07:00","lastupdated":"1480988836","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Colombians protest over rape, killing of 7-year-old girl","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_d1de8877-4823-5c32-8454-3d3f06439c3e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/colombians-protest-over-rape-killing-of--year-old-girl/article_d1de8877-4823-5c32-8454-3d3f06439c3e.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/colombians-protest-over-rape-killing-of--year-old-girl/article_d1eff9bc-ee0a-58de-879c-1221beadfa9a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) \u2014 Hundreds of angry Colombians are taking to the streets to protest the kidnapping and rape of a 7-year-old girl found strangled in an upper-class Bogota apartment.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","kidnapping","crimes against children","crime","violent crime"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"d1de8877-4823-5c32-8454-3d3f06439c3e","body":"

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) \u2014 Hundreds of angry Colombians are taking to the streets to protest the kidnapping and rape of a 7-year-old girl found strangled in an upper-class Bogota apartment.

Police said Monday that security cameras captured the moment the girl was snatched while playing outside her home in a poor neighborhood by a man driving a truck.

As many as 40 children are raped every day in Colombia. But the killing has resonated because of the huge class divide separating the girl and the alleged perpetrator, an architect from one of Bogota's wealthiest neighborhoods.

A group of 50 protesters shouting \"rapist\" and \"murderer\" spent the day outside the clinic where the suspect allegedly checked himself in for a cocaine overdose. A much-larger candlelight vigil was held in a plaza.

"}, {"id":"4a197aa3-8700-50cc-8e4b-6414d5cc9223","type":"article","starttime":"1480986295","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T18:04:55-07:00","lastupdated":"1480988836","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"North Carolina Gov. McCrory concedes he lost re-election bid","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_4a197aa3-8700-50cc-8e4b-6414d5cc9223.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/north-carolina-gov-mccrory-concedes-he-lost-re-election-bid/article_4a197aa3-8700-50cc-8e4b-6414d5cc9223.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/north-carolina-gov-mccrory-concedes-he-lost-re-election-bid/article_7ee70131-958f-54a5-9a22-0ca2bf295718.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By EMERY P. DALESIO and GARY D. ROBERTSON\nAssociated Press","prologue":"DURHAM, N.C. (AP) \u2014 North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory conceded the governor's race Monday, clearing the way for Democrat Roy Cooper to be declared the winner nearly four weeks after Election Day.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","government and politics","elections","state elections","state governments","election recounts","politics","local elections","united states general election","campaigns","events","general elections","legislation","legislature","gays and lesbians"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1bcfa7df-4d1f-5d22-8c40-94b24f566f4a","description":"FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, file photo, North Carolina Republican Gov. Pat McCrory speaks during a debate at Research Triangle Park, N.C. McCrory conceded the governor's race Monday, Dec. 5, 2016, clearing the way for Democrat Roy Cooper to be declared the winner nearly four weeks after Election Day. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, Pool, File)","byline":"Gerry Broome","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"357","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/bc/1bcfa7df-4d1f-5d22-8c40-94b24f566f4a/584614fb89cb2.image.jpg?resize=357%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"143","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/bc/1bcfa7df-4d1f-5d22-8c40-94b24f566f4a/584614fb89cb2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C143"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"430","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/bc/1bcfa7df-4d1f-5d22-8c40-94b24f566f4a/584614fb89cb2.image.jpg?resize=300%2C430"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1469","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/bc/1bcfa7df-4d1f-5d22-8c40-94b24f566f4a/584614fb89cb2.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"9ff46442-e3cb-5231-8d22-c2ead2928afa","description":"FILE- In this June 24, 2016, file photo, North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper speaks during a forum in Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory conceded the governor's race Monday, Dec. 5, 2016, clearing the way for Democrat Cooper to be declared the winner nearly four weeks after Election Day. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)","byline":"Chuck Burton","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"376","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ff/9ff46442-e3cb-5231-8d22-c2ead2928afa/584614fbbc279.image.jpg?resize=512%2C376"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ff/9ff46442-e3cb-5231-8d22-c2ead2928afa/584614fbbc279.image.jpg?resize=100%2C73"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"220","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ff/9ff46442-e3cb-5231-8d22-c2ead2928afa/584614fbbc279.image.jpg?resize=300%2C220"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"752","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ff/9ff46442-e3cb-5231-8d22-c2ead2928afa/584614fbbc279.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":30,"commentID":"4a197aa3-8700-50cc-8e4b-6414d5cc9223","body":"

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) \u2014 North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory conceded the governor's race Monday, clearing the way for Democrat Roy Cooper to be declared the winner nearly four weeks after Election Day.

The win by Cooper, the state's outgoing attorney general, gives Democrats an important consolation prize after a disappointing election across the country. However, Republicans retain super majorities in both legislative chambers.

In a video message from his office posted to YouTube, McCrory said, \"Despite continued questions that should be answered regarding the voting process, I personally believe that the majority of our citizens have spoken, and we now should do everything we can to support the 75th governor of North Carolina, Roy Cooper.\"

McCrory, who became the first sitting North Carolina governor elected to a four-year term to lose a re-election bid, was weighed down by a series of divisive laws he signed, including House Bill 2.

That law limited LGBT rights and directed transgender people to use restrooms in schools and government buildings corresponding to the sex listed on their birth certificates. It led to companies, sports organizations and entertainers pulling their business from the state, costing hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars in spending.

With appeals drying up and postelection counts padding Cooper's narrow lead, McCrory announced he was giving up after Durham County elections workers were nearing completion of a state-ordered recount of 94,000 votes there after technical troubles on election night related to tabulation machines. The completed recount showed Cooper gaining six additional votes and McCrory none compared to their election night tallies.

McCrory, who won the office by a comfortable margin four years ago, was unable to generate the same voter support that lifted Republicans Donald Trump and Richard Burr to victory in the state.

With all 100 counties now completing their counts, unofficial results posted by the State Board of Elections showed Cooper leading McCrory by slightly more than the 10,000 votes needed to avoid an automatic recount. The state board still must officially certify the results, likely this Friday.

A total of 4.7 million votes were cast in a race national Democrats saw as their best chance to flip a gubernatorial seat. Nearly $35 million was spent on broadcast TV ads in the campaign overall, according to estimates from the Center for Public Integrity.

In a written statement posted on social media, Cooper praised McCrory for his public service and said he was proud to have received support from \"so many who believe that we can come together to make a North Carolina that works for everyone.\" He talked up unity following a contentious election season.

Cooper has stated he wants House Bill 2 repealed because he said it promotes discrimination. He had said the law and other legislation McCrory signed has harmed North Carolina's brand.

Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin, whose group invested heavily in electing Cooper, said Monday that \"McCrory's reign of discrimination is finally over.\"

In addition to trying to repeal H.B. 2, Cooper has said if elected he would work to halt the state's recent right-ward slant since Republicans took control of state government this decade.

\"Together, we can make North Carolina the shining beacon in the South by investing in our schools, supporting working families and building a state that works for everyone,\" Cooper said.

But Cooper, a former state legislator first elected attorney general in 2000, won't enter office from a position of strength. Republicans hold veto-proof majorities in the House and Senate, making it difficult for him to push his agenda \u2014 or stop theirs.

\"Policy-wise there's almost nothing he can do,\" said Steven Greene, a political science professor at North Carolina State University. \"But politically, if he plays smart, he can put Democrats in a positon to win back some seats\" in the General Assembly,\" Greene added, providing Cooper more leverage.

McCrory and his allies defended signing House Bill 2 and unsuccessfully tried to focus his campaign on the state's recovering economy and finances during his four years in office. Flooding after Hurricane Matthew in October also gave McCrory the opportunity to project the image of a leader as he directed recovery efforts as cameras watched.

McCrory also may have lost votes in his home county after public opposition to toll lanes being constructed on Interstate 77. He also got criticized for signing new restrictions on abortion and requiring photo identification to vote. An appeals court last summer struck down the voter ID and ballot access law.

McCrory mentioned in his video a record that included budget surpluses, tax overhauls and higher teacher pay.

\"Our team leaves the state in a much better place than when we came into office,\" said McCrory, who had been the first GOP candidate elected governor in 20 years.

McCrory's defeat marks the first for a sitting North Carolina governor since the state constitution was amended in 1977 to allow governors to seek a second term.

___

Robertson contributed from Raleigh.

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COX'S BAZAR, Bangladesh (AP) \u2014 The Myanmar soldiers came in the morning, the young mother says. They set fire to the concrete-and-thatch homes, forcing the villagers to cluster together. When some of her neighbors tried to escape into the fields, they were shot. After that, she says, most people stopped running away.

\"They drove us out of our houses, men and women in separate lines, ordering us to keep our hands folded on the back of our heads,\" says 20-year-old Mohsena Begum, her voice choking as she described what happened to the little village of Caira Fara, which had long been home to hundreds of members of Myanmar's minority Rohingya community. She said that when about 50 people had been gathered together, the soldiers, along with a group of local men, pulled four village leaders from the crowd and slit their throats.

Muslims in an overwhelmingly Buddhist nation, the Rohingya have long faced persecution in Myanmar, where most are denied citizenship. The latest outbreak of violence was triggered by October attacks on guard posts near the Bangladesh border that killed nine police officers. While the attackers' identities and motives are unclear, the government launched a massive counter-insurgency sweep through Rohingya areas in western Rakhine state. Most Rohingya live in Rakhine, which borders Bangladesh.

The government, which has implied the attacks were carried out by Rohingya sympathizers, has acknowledged using helicopter gunships in support of ground troops in the sweep. While survivors and human rights groups have tracked waves of anti-Rohingya violence in recent weeks, the Myanmar government insists that stories like Begum's are exaggerations.

Myanmar's leader, the Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, has accused the international community of stoking unrest.

\"It doesn't help if everybody is just concentrating on the negative side of the situation, in spite of the fact that there were attacks on police outposts,\" she said in a recent interview on Singapore's Channel News Asia.

Suu Kyi, whose party took power in March after decades of military-backed rule, has been accused of not acting strongly enough to curb the violence against the more than 1 million Rohingya believed to be in the country. Although many have lived in Rakhine for generations, they are widely seen as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

\"It helps if people recognize the difficulty and are more focused on resolving these difficulties rather than exaggerating them, so that everything seems worse than it really is,\" she said in the interview.

But Begum says she has no need to exaggerate what happened in Caira Fara.

She said that after the four leaders were killed, violence churned through the village in chaotic scenes of horror. Begum's husband, a poor, illiterate farm laborer, was beaten and then murdered by having his throat slit, along with an unknown number of other villagers, she said. Their bodies were eventually driven away in a truck.

She said attackers knocked her young son knocked from her grasp, then raped her.

Finally, when the soldiers weren't paying attention, she grabbed her son and ran into the nearby hills. After hiding for two days, her brother gave her enough money \u2014 about $38 \u2014 to pay smugglers to get her and her son into Bangladesh.

When Bangladeshi border guards stopped them, she began to weep.

\"I told them I have no one to protect me there,\" she says, and told them: \"'Look at my baby! He will die if I go back there.'\" After that, they let her pass.

Much of Rakhine has been closed to outsiders, including journalists, since the violence began. However, former U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan, leader of a commission formed to investigate the situation in Rakhine state, was allowed to visit in recent days. He is expected to hold a press conference Tuesday in Yangon, Myanmar's biggest city.

Along the banks of the Naf River, which marks the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar, it's not difficult to find people who can talk about what is happening.

Some 15,000 Rohingya have arrived in Bangladesh over past month, often brought in by smugglers, according to police and intelligence officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because the government refuses to release numbers publicly. They have joined up to 500,000 undocumented Rohingya who have been living in Bangladesh after arriving from Myanmar in waves since the 1970s. Some 33,000 registered Rohingya refugees live the Cox's Bazar district. Bangladesh does not welcome Rohingya \u2014 its maritime patrols sometimes turn back refugee boats full of them \u2014 but it is seen as a haven compared to Myanmar.

The U.N. says up 30,000 Rohingya Muslims have abandoned their homes amid the recent violence. Satellite images analyzed by the rights group Human Rights Watch show 1,250 structures destroyed in November in Rohingya villages.

Osman Gani, a thin, fast-talking Arabic teacher, fled after his village, Gouzo Bil, was attacked Nov. 11.

\"They came and killed mercilessly. They burned our homes,\" says Gani, standing near the Naf River over the weekend. \"No one was there to save us.\"

He hid with his family for about a week near the village. But when searches intensified, and with soldiers targeting men, he was forced to leave Myanmar without his family.

\"I had no other choice but to leave them behind. I came to the bank of the river and started swimming,\" he says. His family was able to join him in Bangladesh a few days later.

As he fled north, he used his mobile phone to film destruction in other Rohingya villages he passed through. In some, the blackened remains of what appear to be children can be seen amid the wreckage of homes. Gani's voice can be heard in some of the videos but The Associated Press could not confirm their authenticity.

\"I have shot videos!\" he says, holding out his mobile phone to a reporter. \"Don't you see the charred bodies?\"

While he was initially in hiding after the attack, Osmani said he also managed to slip back into his village and film what remained of his home.

As he walks through the village, a child can be heard talking to him.

\"Where are you coming from?\" the boy asks.

Gani doesn't answer, instead asking, \"Where's my cow?\"

Then he pans through the ashes and broken concrete. \"This is my land, my home,\" he says. \"This is Puitta's. This is Uncle Yunus.\"

___

AP writer Tim Sullivan contributed to this report from New Delhi.

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The Arizona Attorney General\u2019s Office has issued an ultimatum to Tucson over its policy of destroying confiscated handguns and automatic rifles.

Stop the practice immediately or face an expensive court battle, the office has warned city officials.

\u201cTo be clear, if the Council does not intend to promptly undertake such action to remedy the issues regarding the destruction of firearms identified in the Office\u2019s report, then the Office plans to file a petition for special action with the Arizona Supreme Court shortly thereafter to obtain a resolution,\u201d Assistant Attorney General Brunn Roysden wrote in a letter to city officials last week.

The Tucson City Council will meet in executive session Tuesday, Dec. 6, with City Attorney Mike Rankin to discuss legal strategies about the long-established city policy of turning most guns taken in by police into scrap metal.

Several members of the City Council have publicly defended the policy, saying destroying the firearms is lawful because the disposition of municipal property is a \u201clocal concern.\u201d

The issue involves a new state law known as SB 1487. Signed by Gov. Doug Ducey earlier this year, it restricts local governments from passing any laws that conflict with state laws, and jeopardizes their state-shared revenue if they don\u2019t repeal such laws.

Tucson received $172 million from the state last year.

Mayor Jonathan Rothschild said, whether through the guns case or another, the state law will eventually be challenged in court. He noted officials of other towns and cities are also concerned about the law, which could impact local decisions ranging from minimum wages to banning the use of plastic bags.

Tucson Councilman Steve Kozachik contends the law violates the state constitution. \u201cIt\u2019s like these guys legislate to litigate and ignore they\u2019re wasting taxpayer money,\u201d he said.

If the city defends the policy in court, it is required to post a $70 million bond just to fight SB 1487, Kozachik said.

State Rep. Mark Finchem, an Oro Valley Republican, filed the complaint with the Attorney General\u2019s Office earlier this year, stating Tucson is violating a 2013 Arizona law that requires the sale of otherwise legal guns obtained by law enforcement agencies.

The Tucson Police Department has destroyed 4,820 guns since the beginning of 2013, city records show.

"}, {"id":"5c167a9f-e15d-5fcf-bf70-b7d786903968","type":"article","starttime":"1480985697","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:54:57-07:00","lastupdated":"1480987918","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Mexico minimum wage rises to 80 pesos, falls in dollar terms","url":"http://tucson.com/news/world/article_5c167a9f-e15d-5fcf-bf70-b7d786903968.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/world/mexico-minimum-wage-rises-to-pesos-falls-in-dollar-terms/article_5c167a9f-e15d-5fcf-bf70-b7d786903968.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/mexico-minimum-wage-rises-to-pesos-falls-in-dollar-terms/article_5f7c7b56-f490-5831-a7f1-d4550cec7622.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"MEXICO CITY (AP) \u2014 Mexico has increased its minimum wage to just over 80 pesos a day, though its dollar value is down due to the peso's devaluation.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","currency markets","labor issues","social issues","social affairs","financial markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"5c167a9f-e15d-5fcf-bf70-b7d786903968","body":"

MEXICO CITY (AP) \u2014 Mexico has increased its minimum wage to just over 80 pesos a day, though its dollar value is down due to the peso's devaluation.

The minimum wage this year was about 73 pesos, worth $4.20 when it was announced last December. Since then, Mexico's peso has declined from 17.35 for $1 to 20.56 for $1, as of Monday. That means the 80-peso minimum wage for 2017 is worth about $3.90.

Despite a government statement praising the increase in the minimum wage, it barely buys one Big Mac combo with fries and a drink.

About 6.9 million people in Mexico's 50.7 million-member workforce earn the minimum wage.

Manufacturing wages in Mexico average about $2.10 an hour in Mexico, compared to $20.60 per hour in the U.S.

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) \u2014 California lawmakers on Monday urged President-elect Donald Trump to refrain from pursuing mass deportations and introduced urgent legislation to fund immigration lawyers and help public defenders protect the state's immigrants.

Democratic lawmakers also passed resolutions in both chambers urging the incoming administration to uphold a program for hundreds of thousands of young immigrants in the country illegally, despite intense protests from some Republicans.

State Sen. Ben Hueso, D-San Diego, introduced a bill to fund lawyers for immigrants in deportation proceedings, while Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, proposed helping public defenders assess the immigration consequences of criminal convictions.

Both measures were marked urgent and aim to protect immigrants in California \u2014 which has more than 10 million foreign-born residents \u2014 from Trump's campaign promises of tougher immigration enforcement.

\"This is a salvo, if you will, across the board to make it very clear that these are the values of California,\" Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, a Democrat from Los Angeles, told reporters.

Democratic lawmakers, who hold supermajorities in both chambers, proposed the measures following a heated election year where Trump made border enforcement a central point of his campaign and had harsh rhetoric for Mexican immigrants and Muslims.

On the first day of the new legislative session \u2014 which is typically reserved for congratulatory handshakes and bipartisan photo-ops \u2014 debate was heated over Democrats' resolutions urging Trump to continue to issue work permits to young immigrants brought to the country as children. More than 740,000 young people are covered by the program today.

Sen. John Moorlach, a Republican from Costa Mesa, said he thought it was the wrong approach for California to take such an antagonistic tone with a president who is not even inaugurated yet.

\"I'm not comfortable with saying we will fight, although I understand it. I think we ought to try to work with this administration,\" he said. \"We should be collaborative. I don't think defiance is the right approach.\"

De Leon called the resolution necessary and urgent as children are afraid their parents will be deported.

Gov. Jerry Brown declined to take a position Monday on the immigration legislation being introduced. But he said he'll \"look very carefully at whatever they propose.\"

\"I have signed some similar measures in the past, at least through the budget,\" he told reporters in his office. \"I am very supportive of the people of California and those who have come here more recently, so I'll take a good look at whatever they present.\"

About 2.4 million immigrants in California lack legal status, according to estimates by the Washington-based Pew Research Center.

The two immigration bills introduced Monday could cost the state between $10 million and $80 million, according to proponents.

Immigrant advocates said other bills are also being considered to further limit federal immigration enforcement in California and protect immigrants' information in state databases.

In recent years, California has passed a series of measures to assist and protect immigrants in the country illegally, for example, limiting the cases when local law enforcement can turn over immigrant arrestees for deportation.

California offers state-subsidized health care to children from low-income families who are in the country illegally and issues driver's licenses regardless of legal status.

___

Taxin reported from Santa Ana, California. Associated Press writers Juliet Williams in Sacramento contributed to this report.

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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Sheriff: 'We don't believe' additional bodies will be found in Oakland warehouse fire.

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Rincon won 63-56. 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So many would-be basketball coaches start on the bottom rungs of the ladder, a junior-varsity gig here, a varsity assistant position there.

Rarely does a player have the luxury, or the blessing, as it is sometimes described, to start in the college game. The glitz, the glamour, the glory, even at the junior college level, is far greater than the bottom of the totem pole.

Or, at least, that\u2019s what Dylan Hidalgo thought.

Now he and Brian Peabody just laugh.

It\u2019s only been a handful of months, but Peabody, the Pima College men\u2019s basketball head coach who hired his prot\u00e9g\u00e9 and former AAU player straight out of a four-year run as a guard for Kansas Wesleyan, can definitely say \u2018I told you so.\u2019

\u201cThe first week I was here, I don\u2019t think I did anything basketball-wise,\u201d said Hidalgo, who starred for Rincon-University High and averaged 15 points as a senior in 2011-12. \u201cI had to gather academic info, transcripts, test scores, get kids enrolled. I said coach, when do I get to coach?\u201d

Before he got the gig, Peabody tried to tell him.

\u201cThe job is about five percent coaching, 95 percent other stuff,\u201d he said, but Hidalgo had visions of backdoor cuts and trap defenses dancing through his mind.

Peabody guffaws.

\u201cIf people could just see what we do,\u201d the fourth-year Pima coach said. \u201cGame day, I\u2019m going to Costco to get supplies for the snack bar, in a coat and tie carrying a bucket of cheese. That\u2019s juco basketball. Everyone looks at Arizona and thinks that\u2019s college hoops, and there are maybe five UAs in the country.\u201d

So, yes, while starting a coaching career at the junior college level is a coup, it\u2019s not exactly an easy life.

Not that Hidalgo knows anything about that.

\u201823 going on 43\u2019

Hidalgo grew up on the East side of town, didn\u2019t have much money. Had some family issues. From the concrete grew a rose, you know the story.

It\u2019s a story Peabody knows well.

\u201cThat\u2019s the story of my life \u2014 single-parent home, and having coached for 23 years, the kids I relate to are from single parents,\u201d he said. \u201cOn-and-on through my coaching career, the better ones have some type of adversity where they just want to be in the gym. That was his home.\u201d

That he finds himself back in a gym is a little bit of a surprise for Hidalgo.

Throughout high school, even as a team leader, he didn\u2019t want to coach. At least not basketball. Didn\u2019t have the patience for it, he says. When he got the offer from Kansas Wesleyan, an enormous relief to a player who didn\u2019t think he\u2019d have the financial ability to attend college, he intended on being a strength-and-conditioning coach.

His junior year for the Coyotes, Hidalgo was named captain, and the leadership role, he says, \u201chelped me decide coaching is for me.\u201d

\u201cI just started realizing that there were all these coaches who put all this time and effort into me,\u201d he says, \u201cand I just think that\u2019s really cool. I wanted to do something that impacts people. I didn\u2019t want to work in a job where I wasn\u2019t bettering someone.\u201d

Hidalgo considers Peabody one of those coaches.

While he played for Rich Utter and the Rangers during the high school season and remains appreciative of Utter\u2019s role in his development, Hidalgo played for Peabody\u2019s Tucson Heat AAU squad for five years. There, he developed a mentor-mentee relationship that eventually resulted in a de facto apprenticeship when Hidalgo returned home from college during the offseason.

Hidalgo worked for Peabody at clinics and camps, and Peabody started to see a little of the player in himself. And even more, he saw what Hidalgo offered that he lacked.

\u201cFirst and foremost, he\u2019s way beyond his years,\u201d Peabody said. \u201cHe\u2019s 23 going on 43. He\u2019s way more mature than I am. I\u2019m definitely the baby of the staff. He\u2019s basically the head coach his first year here.\u201d

If only he didn\u2019t have to do so much laundry.

Living the dream

\u201cWhat do you do all day?\u201d Hidalgo is often asked by those na\u00efve enough to compare the ACCAC to the Pac-12. \u201cYou\u2019re there 10 hours a day, six days a week.\u201d

Hidalgo just shakes his head.

\u201cThere are so many little tasks,\u201d Hidalgo he says, and he lists them off, everything from the aforementioned jersey-cleaning to rides to doctor\u2019s appointment, grade checks, scouting, film, practice, the list goes on.

If he\u2019s learned anything in the half-year he\u2019s been at Pima, it\u2019s this:

\u201cI\u2019ve always respected my coaches, but, man, the time coaches put into it, the things they have ready for you. There\u2019s someone behind every phone call, every film breakdown, every practice plan. I took for granted how much time they put into it. I also took for granted how rewarding it is when a player plays hard.

\u201cJust play your butts off. If they don\u2019t play hard, our day is no fun. It\u2019s a wasted practice. They play hard, the day is worth it.\u201d

Who\u2019s Hidalgo kidding?

The whole thing is worth it.

\u201cTo start off as a college coach out of college, I think that\u2019s a tremendous accomplishment,\u201d he said. \u201cI want to go to the next step eventually, but I\u2019ve always taken pride in the steps. I\u2019m all about the path. To have this opportunity, I don\u2019t take it for granted. This is a blessing.\u201d

More than that, Hidalgo said, \u201cit\u2019s a dream.\u201d

In a July 2014 column, Hidalgo talked about returning to Pima to coach after college, and here he is, living it in real life.

\u201cI worked some of (Peabody\u2019s) camps, worked some of his practices, and I just liked it. I like Tucson. I like the kids here. I think we\u2019re overlooked a lot of the time. It\u2019s not like we have a lot of prodigies, but I like the stories that come out of here.\u201d

Especially his own.

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LOS ANGELES (AP) \u2014 Former \"Daily Show\" correspondent Jessica Williams flexes her dramatic chops, Cate Blanchett pays homage to great 20th century artists and \"Silicon Valley\" star Kumail Nanjiani tells a very personal story in some of the films premiering at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.

Festival programmers announced their selections for the documentary and narrative premiere sections Monday, which has launched films like \"Boyhood,\" ''Manchester by the Sea\" and \"O.J.: Made in America.\"

As with many years, the Sundance premiere slate can be a place for well-known comedians to take a stab at more dramatic and serious roles.

In what's expected to be one of the breakout films and performances of the festival, comedian Jessica Williams stars in Jim Strouse's \"The Incredible Jessica James,\" about a New York playwright recovering from a breakup and finding solace in a recent divorcee.

Nanjiani is another who might surprise audiences in \"The Big Sick,\" which he co-wrote with his wife Emily V. Gordon and is based on their own courtship. He stars alongside Zoe Kazan in the Michael Showalter-directed pic.

The Festival also has films featuring veteran stars in different kinds of roles. Shirley MacLaine stars in \"The Last Word,\" about a retired businesswoman who strikes up an unlikely friendship with a journalist (Amanda Seyfried) after writing her own obituary. Festival founder Robert Redford, too, is in Charlie McDowell's \"The Discovery,\" about a world where the afterlife has been proven. Jason Segel and Rooney Mara also star.

Cate Blanchett re-enacts artistic statements of Dadaists, Lars von Trier and everyone in between in \"Manifesto\"; Michelle Pfeiffer and Kiefer Sutherland co-star in the drama \"Where is Kyra\"; and \"Avengers\" Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen re-team in the FBI crime thriller \"Wind River,\" the directorial debut of \"Hell or High Water\" writer Taylor Sheridan.

\"Bessie\" director Dee Rees is also poised to be a standout with \"Mudbound,\" a racial drama set in the post-WWII South and starring Carey Mulligan, Jason Clarke, Jason Mitchell and Mary J. Blige.

\"It's quite topical to this time even though it's a period piece,\" said Festival Director John Cooper.

Among the documentaries premiering are a look at the Oklahoma City bombing from Barak Goodman; Stanley Nelson's examination of black colleges and universities, \"Tell Them We Are Rising\"; and Barbara Kopple's account of a champion diver who announces he is transgender, \"This Is Everything: Gigi Gorgeous.\"

\"The beauty of independent film is it's not a copycat world, unlike some of the Hollywood stuff where they follow trends,\" said Programming Director Trevor Groth. \"Independent film has always been about originality and choice and something different.\"

The 2017 Sundance Film Festival runs from Jan. 19 through Jan. 29.

___

This story corrects movie title to \"The Big Sick.\"

___

Online: www.sundance.org/festival

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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson is a Heisman Trophy finalist for the second consecutive season, joining Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson, Michigan linebacker Jabrill Peppers and Oklahoma teammates Baker Mayfield and Dede Westbrook.

The finalists were announced Monday on ESPN and the award will be presented Saturday in New York.

Watson finished third in last year's voting, won by Alabama running back Derrick Henry. Just like last year, he heads to New York not as the favorite but as the contender coming on strong at the end. Mayfield finished fourth last season, but did not get an invite to Heisman presentation in New York.

Peppers is the first defensive player to be a Heisman finalists since Notre Dame linebacker Manti Teo was a distant runner-up to Johnny Manziel in 2012.

Westbrook and Mayfield are the first teammates to be finalists since Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart from Southern California finished first and third, respectively in 2005.

Finalists are determined by the margins between vote-getters. The ballots of more than 900 voters, which included former Heisman winners, were due Monday.

Watson entered as the preseason favorite in what looked like a strong field of contenders, but Jackson quickly swept past them all to be front-runner. He was brilliant for the first two months of the season and Louisville was looking like a College Football Playoff contender.

It seemed as if Jackson would be a runaway Heisman winner, but the 15th-ranked Cardinals lost their final two games of the season. He was sacked 11 times in a lopsided loss at Houston and he committed four turnovers in a last-second loss against Kentucky.

Watson, meanwhile, has surged since Clemson's only loss to Pitt in mid-November. He also had the benefit of playing in the Atlantic Coast Conference title game last Saturday and took full advantage of the spotlight. Watson threw three touchdown passes and ran for two scores in a 42-35 victory against Virginia Tech to seal a spot in the College Football Playoff.

The raw numbers still favor Jackson, who is second in the nation in total yards per game (410.7) and has accounted for 51 touchdowns (21 rushing TDs and 30 TD passes) with 13 turnovers (nine INTs and four lost fumbles) in 12 games. Watson averages 341.8 yards per game and has 43 touchdowns (six rushing and 37 passing) with 15 turnovers (all interceptions) in 13 games.

When the two met on Oct. 1 at Clemson in what was one of the season's most entertaining games, Watson threw for 306 yards and five touchdowns, ran for 91 and was picked off three times. Jackson had 295 yards passing, 162 rushing and accounted for three touchdowns with one interception. Clemson won 42-36.

Mayfield and Westbrook have been a dynamic combination, and late in the season No. 7 Oklahoma started a dual campaign to promote both for the Heisman. Mayfield is on pace to break the NCAA record for passer efficiency rating in a season (197.75). Westbrook has 74 catches for 1,465 yards and 16 touchdowns and has more receptions covering at least 20 yards (26) than any receiver in the country.

Peppers played defense, offense and special teams for Michigan, lining up all over the field.

"}, {"id":"68735103-1616-5e3d-9837-ca590765a3b5","type":"article","starttime":"1480984527","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:35:27-07:00","lastupdated":"1480987048","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Owner of stolen Alaska pickup spots truck, shoots windows","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_68735103-1616-5e3d-9837-ca590765a3b5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/owner-of-stolen-alaska-pickup-spots-truck-shoots-windows/article_68735103-1616-5e3d-9837-ca590765a3b5.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/owner-of-stolen-alaska-pickup-spots-truck-shoots-windows/article_575dd2a1-5d48-5e64-a22a-8d477aa100eb.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) \u2014 An Alaska woman shot the windshield of her own pickup in an attempt to stop a thief from driving off.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"68735103-1616-5e3d-9837-ca590765a3b5","body":"

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) \u2014 An Alaska woman shot the windshield of her own pickup in an attempt to stop a thief from driving off.

Anchorage police say the truck was reported stolen Friday.

The owner spotted it just before 1 p.m. Monday in a parking lot.

Police say she approached the truck on foot, and a man behind the wheel started driving at her.

The owner fired twice, shattering the front driver's window and putting a hole in the windshield.

The pickup has custom lettering on the driver's door that says \"Robyn\" with faded gold graphic stripes. The maroon 1999 GMC four-door truck was last seen driving west.

Police say a skinny man in his late 20s with a thin mustache and black hair was driving. An older woman was a passenger.

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CHENNAI, India (AP) \u2014 Jayaram Jayalalithaa, the hugely popular south Indian actress who later turned to politics and became the highest elected official in the state of Tamil Nadu, died Monday. She was 68.

The Apollo Hospital in the southern Indian city of Chennai said Jayalalithaa died at 11:30 p.m. local time Monday after undergoing surgery following a heart attack on Sunday night.

Known by her followers as \"Amma,\" which means \"Mother\" in the Tamil language, Jayalalithaa inspired intense loyalty among film fans and political supporters alike.

As news of her death spread, thousands of people thronged the road long past midnight to watch as the ambulance carrying her body from the hospital to her home sped by in a motorcade. Police had a hard time controlling people from rushing onto the road. Many people wept and beat their breasts overcome by grief.

Earlier Monday, thousands of Jayalalithaa's supporters, wailing and crying, gathered outside the hospital to pray for her recovery. Police were deployed across the state to ensure security out of fear that her death could trigger widespread violence and riots.

The neighboring state of Karnataka stopped public buses from traveling to Tamil Nadu after one of its buses was attacked Monday.

The U.S. Consulate in Chennai put out an advisory urging Americans to be careful in the city and avoid large crowds.

The Tamil Nadu government declared a seven-day mourning period beginning Tuesday. Schools, colleges, offices and businesses were to be closed for the next three days, which have been designated a public holiday in the South Indian state.

Her body will be taken Tuesday to a public hall in Chennai to allow people to pay their respects. The date and time of her funeral has not yet been announced as the state government needed time to put in place security arrangements to handle the hundreds of thousands of people who are expected to attend.

Within hours of Jayalalithaa's death, her trusted lieutenant, O. Panneerselvam, was sworn in as chief minister of the state.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said he was \"deeply saddened\" by Jayalalithaa's death. \"Her demise has left a huge void in Indian politics,\" Modi tweeted.

Jayalalithaa's body would be kept in a public hall in Chennai for people to pay their respects. The date and time of her funeral had not been announced as the state government put security arrangements in place to control the hundreds of thousands of people who are expected to attend the funeral.

Jayalalithaa had already been in the hospital for two months since Sept. 22, when she was admitted with a fever, dehydration and a respiratory infection.

At the time, thousands of people prayed and fasted outside the hospital for her recovery. Doctors barred visitors, sparking rumors that they were withholding bad news out of fear it could trigger the same outpouring of grief, riots and suicides that followed the death of Jayalalithaa's political and acting mentor, M.G. Ramachandran.

Jayalalithaa was kept on a ventilator in the intensive care unit for weeks, doctors said. She also suffered from diabetes.

Jayalalithaa was 13 when she began her film career and quickly became known as a romantic lead in many of the nearly 150 Tamil-language movies that she worked on.

She entered politics in the early 1980s, under the guidance of Ramachandran. Soon after his death in 1987, she declared herself his political heir and took control of the All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhgam party.

She served as Tamil Nadu's chief minister, the highest elected position in the state of 71 million people, for nearly 14 years over five terms beginning in 1991. She regained her office last year after a corruption case against her was overturned. Her supporters praised her efforts in fighting rural poverty with handouts like laptop computers for students, cows and goats for farmers, and spice grinders for homemakers.

Such free gifts are commonly used by Indian political parties in courting voters, but her handouts were still criticized by some as wasteful pandering and unfair bribery. But Jayalalithaa defended the giveaways as welfare measures aimed at helping the poor.

She herself was known for leading an extravagant lifestyle. In 1997, police found more than 10,000 saris and 750 pairs of shoes after raiding her home as part of a corruption investigation.

In the first half of 2014, Jayalalithaa made a bid to become India's prime minister job by saying she would form a coalition in New Delhi if no party dominated elections. But the Bharatiya Janata Party won a clear majority, catapulting Narendra Modi into the nation's top job.

Later that year, she was forced to step down as chief minister in Tamil Nadu state when she was sentenced to four years in prison for amassing more than $10 million during her political career, a wealth the court said was disproportionate to her income.

She spent 21 days behind bars before the Indian Supreme Court released her on bail. In May 2015, an appeals court overturned the corruption charges, clearing the way for her return to power. She returned to office as chief minister on May 23 and a month later was re-elected in a by-election.

Jayalalithaa was born in 1948 in the village of Melukote, in what is now the state of Karnataka. Her birth name was Jayalalitha, but she reportedly added an \"a'' on advice from a numerologist.

Her lawyer father, also named Jayaram, died when she was 2, prompting her mother to learn shorthand and typing so she could work in a clerical position to support the family and put Jayalalithaa and her brother through school. Her brother died in the early 1990s.

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LUBBOCK, Texas (AP) \u2014 Luis Carlos Montalvan, a decorated Iraq war veteran who became a strong critic of the war and wrote a best-selling book about it, has died in El Paso. He was 43.

Montalvan was found in a hotel room in downtown El Paso late Friday, El Paso police Sgt. Enrique Carrillo said Monday.

The medical examiner's office has not completed a preliminary autopsy report.

Montalvan served 17 years in the Army, doing two tours in Iraq. He received two Bronze Stars and the Purple Heart.

His service dog, Tuesday, was the subject of Montalvan's book, which became a New York Times best seller.

Some Army colleagues said Montalvan, who retired from the Army as a captain in 2007, embellished his account of the incident that led to his Purple Heart.

Tuesday is now being cared for by a loving family in the Northeast, according to a statement from Montalvan's family.

\"He was an extremely dedicated activist nationwide for multiple causes, including rights and benefits of veterans and the disabled, as well as the promotion of service dogs,\" the statement reads. \"His spirit lives on through his family and friends, Tuesday, his writings, and all the people he touched during his years of service to his country and his humanitarian work.\"

Montalvan's book, \" UNTIL TUESDAY: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him,\" was praised by Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota, made him a leading advocate for wounded veterans and even led to an interview on David Letterman's show. But several men who served with him told The Associated Press in 2011 that he had exaggerated or fabricated key events from his service abroad. The AP also obtained documents that contradicted Montalvan's statements about the extent and severity of his injuries.

Montalvan, who earned his bachelor's degree at the University of Maryland \u2014 College Park and a master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, declined to speak with the AP at the time, but issued a statement through his lawyer that his book \"is a reflection of my experiences in the United States Army (and after) during one of the most controversial military actions since the Vietnam War. Some of the events described in 'Until Tuesday' resulted in wounds to myself \u2014 both visible and invisible.\"

Hachette Book Group, which published his first book and will publish his second, \"TUESDAY'S PROMISE: One Veteran, One Dog, and Their Bold Quest to Change Lives,\" said in a statement that it was \"deeply saddened\" at Montalvan's death.

\"With his beloved service dog Tuesday at his side, Luis spent the past decade educating the public about trauma and advocating for veterans and people with disabilities,\" the statement reads. \"He will be missed greatly and our thoughts and prayers are with his family at this time.\"

The organization that united Montalvan with Tuesday has set up a webpage in his honor. Donations can be made at www.ecad1.org/Luis .

___

AP reporter Hillel Italie contributed to this report.

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President-elect Donald Trump chose Carson to become secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Trump's decision, announced early Monday, Dec. 5, by his transition office at Trump Tower in New York, comes as the real estate mogul continues a series of interviews, meetings with aides and other sessions aimed at forming his administration. 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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Donald Trump chose retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson on Monday to be secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, raising fresh concerns about the lack of experience some of Trump's Cabinet picks have with agencies they're now being chosen to lead.

Carson, who opposed Trump in the Republican primaries, has no background in government or running a large bureaucracy.

In addition, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, Trump's choice to be ambassador to the United Nations, has no foreign policy experience. Steve Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs partner and Hollywood executive, is Trump's man to lead the Treasury Department but has never worked in government. And retired Gen. James Mattis, a widely praised battlefield commander, spent decades in the Marines but now is tapped to run the nation's largest government agency, the Defense Department, with 740,000 civilian employees in addition to 1.3 million service personnel.

Democrats swiftly criticized Carson's qualifications for his job. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi called him a \"disconcerting and disturbingly unqualified choice.\" And New York Sen. Charles Schumer said he had \"serious concerns about Dr. Carson's lack of expertise and experience in dealing with housing issues. Someone who is as anti-government as him is a strange fit for housing secretary, to say the least.\"

Carson would oversee a budget of nearly $50 billion that provides rental assistance for more than 5 million households. Demand for that assistance is high in part because housing costs are rising faster than incomes. HUD also promotes home ownership with the Federal Housing Administration underwriting about 1 in 6 mortgages issued in the U.S. The agency is charged with enforcing federal fair housing laws, too.

In a statement, Trump said he was \"thrilled to nominate\" Carson, describing his \"brilliant mind\" and his passion \"about strengthening communities and families within those communities.\"

Carson, who grew up poor, quickly endorsed Trump after ending his own presidential bid despite Trump noting what he called Carson's \"pathological temper.\" Carson has been coy about joining the new administration, saying shortly after Trump's election victory that he wasn't certain he'd fit into a Cabinet-style role in a job like Health and Human Services secretary.

\"Ben shares my optimism about the future of our country,\" Trump said, \"and is part of ensuring that this is a presidency representing all Americans.\"

Heading a Cabinet agency is a huge bureaucratic job, with responsibility for overseeing massive budgets and thousands of employees. Choosing a leader without management experience could present challenges, warned Ben Chang, who worked under three different administrations.

\"People can learn the policies and the talking points, but the transition will be dictated by their own managerial style,\" said Chang, who remembered incoming Secretary of State Colin Powell walking the halls to meet with career officers and not just his executive staff.

Trump's selections also highlight a frequent divide between the two major political parties in their strategies in filling out a Cabinet: In early 2009, Republicans criticized incoming President Barack Obama for not making enough selections with private sector experience.

On Monday, Trump received a fresh stream of visitors to the New York skyscraper that bears his name. His most surprising guest was Democratic former Vice President Al Gore. Transition officials said early Monday that Gore would meet with Trump's daughter, Ivanka, about climate change, which is Gore's signature issue.

But Gore said he also met with Trump directly and the two had a \"very productive conversation.\"

\"It was a sincere search for areas of common ground,\" said Gore, who did not detail what the men discussed. The president-elect has called man-made climate change a hoax and has pledged to undo a number of regulations designed to protect the environment.

Outside the building, Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein vowed to forge ahead with her push for a recount in three states \u2014 Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania \u2014 that helped Trump win.

\"Let every vote count,\" Stein said. \"That's what makes America great.\"

Her news conference was repeatedly interrupted by shouts of protest. Several Trump supporters and Clinton supporters shouted at each other.

Separately, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said he's asking the government for $35 million to cover costs related to protecting Trump, who has indicated he will largely work out of Trump Tower before his inauguration. He will continue his \"thank you\" tour with a stop Tuesday in North Carolina.

His running mate, Mike Pence, told reporters that \"decisions were made\" Monday that would be announced in the coming days. It was unclear if one of those was Secretary of State, for which Trump has expanded his pool of candidates beyond the four finalists his aides identified last week.

Over the weekend, two people close to the transition told The Associated Press that Trump is moving away from two of the four: former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee.

That would leave former CIA Director Petraeus, who pleaded guilty to leaking classified information, and Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Among other possibilities, one official says, is Jon Huntsman, a former Republican Utah governor who also served as the ambassador to China and speaks Mandarin.

The people close to the transition spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the private process publicly.

Meanwhile, the president-elect dined at one of his favorite New York restaurants, 21 Club, Monday night with this family. He ate at the same Midtown Manhattan restaurant last month but did not notify the reporters and photographers who follow his movements, drawing criticism from journalist groups. The press pool did travel with Trump to the restaurant Monday and waited outside in a van while the president-elect ate.

___

AP Writer Julie Pace reported from Washington.

___

Reach Lemire on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@JonLemire and Pace at http://twitter.com/@JPaceDC

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NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Two politicians are asking a court to stop New York City from destroying personal records related to its immigrant-friendly municipal ID cards.

Republican state Assembly members Ron Castorina and Nicole Malliotakis sued on Monday.

The city is due to decide by Dec. 31 whether to delete copies of documents more than 900,000 IDNYC cardholders submitted with their applications.

The date was built into the program partly out of concern about the possible election of a Republican president such as President-elect Donald Trump, whose campaign promises included deporting millions of people in the U.S. illegally.

Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio (dih BLAH'-zee-oh) says city officials won't let themselves \"be in a situation where those records would be turned over to the federal government.\"

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BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) \u2014 The airline involved in last week's crash in the Andes left a trail of unpaid bills that forced Bolivia's air force to seize two planes and briefly jail one of the company's owners, Bolivian Defense Minister Reymi Ferreira said Monday.

The revelation added to a string of human errors and unsettling details about the Bolivian-based LaMia charter company's checkered past that experts say should have served as warnings to aviation authorities.

A LaMia jet carrying 77 people, including a Brazilian soccer team heading to a South American championship final, slammed into a Colombian mountainside just minutes after the pilot reported running out of fuel. Investigators are centering their probe on why the short-range jet was allowed to attempt a direct flight with barely enough fuel on board to cover the distance between Santa Cruz, Bolivia, and Medellin, Colombia.

Ferreira said that in 2014, LaMia brought its three airplanes \u2014 all of them short-haul jets made by British Aerospace \u2014 to Bolivia's air force for repair. He didn't say what maintenance work was performed but accused the airline of paying for only half the work and abandoning two of the planes.

After months of the company refusing to pay hangar fees, the government took legal action and seized the planes, Ferreira said. He added that one of LaMia's owners, pilot Miguel Quiroga, who died in the crash, was detained for a few days five months ago in the case.

Ferreira said aviation officials who signed off on LaMia's irregular flight plan would be prosecuted.

The airline, which was only licensed to fly earlier this year, has also been suspended and Bolivian officials are looking into whether the son of another owner, former air force Gen. Gustavo Vargas, favored the airline as head of the office responsible for licensing aircraft.

\"This was a mistake by two or three people who are causing enormous damage to Bolivia's aviation industry, but it's not the country that's to blame,\" Ferreira said, alluding to the possibility that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration could downgrade Bolivia's aviation safety ranking.

Minutes before the crash, Quiroga requested permission to land, telling air traffic controllers that he was having fuel problems without making a formal distress call, according to air traffic tower recordings. Minutes later, as the jetliner circled in a holding pattern awaiting another aircraft with its own mechanical problems to land, his voice became more desperate as he reported the fuel had run out and the aircraft was experiencing a \"complete electrical failure.\"

Passengers on the flight were oblivious to the tense exchange and had no time to prepare for the crash, according to one of six survivors who on Monday described the final moments of the doomed flight.

\"Nobody knew there was a problem,\" Erwin Tumiri, a technician on the flight, told Blu radio of Colombia. \"We felt the plane descending but all along we thought it was preparing to land. Everything happened very quickly and from one moment to the next the plane began to shake, the lights went out and the emergency lights turned on.\"

Tumiri, who is recovering in a hospital in his hometown of Cochabamba, Bolivia, said the cockpit never alerted him that the plane was running low on fuel and that the pilot had requested an emergency landing.

\"I think the pilot should've at least communicated to me the situation,\" Tumiri said, adding that he only learned about the fuel shortage from another survivor, flight attendant Ximena Sanchez.

Investigators in Colombia said Monday that they hope to have their preliminary accident report ready in 10 days.

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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) \u2014 A therapist who used music to help kids cope with trauma. A woman who taught at a Montessori school. A couple who planned to marry and live together in Europe.

These were some of the people killed when flames ripped through a converted Oakland warehouse during a dance party Friday night. The death toll from Friday night's fire climbed to 36 on Monday with more bodies still feared buried in the rubble.

The victims also included 17-year-olds and people from Europe and Asia, Alameda County Sheriff's Sgt. Ray Kelly said. Here's a closer look at who they were:

PASSIONATE MUSIC THERAPIST

Travis Hough, 35, believed music healed people, including himself.

Hough was an experimental electronic artist behind Ghost of Lightning, a project in which he created music to explore and understand his own psyche, said Michelle Campbell, founder of Mixtape, an artist management company based in Oakland.

Hough worked by day as a therapist in schools in the Bay area, using music to help children cope with trauma, Campbell said.

\"Really his passion was his work in helping find ways to use music as a means of healing,\" Campbell said.

Hough played bass and keyboard and was a performance artist who was inspired by Prince and other male performers \"who wear ruffles, glitter and makeup,\" she said. His shows included orbs of rhythmically pulsating light.

He enjoyed a good meal with family and friends and hiking through northern California's Redwood forests.

\"He was definitely a radiant light,\" Campbell said.

EXTRAORDINARY CO-WORKER

Nick Gomez-Hall, 25, made a warm impression on friends and colleagues in California and Rhode Island as a musician, mentor and community advocate who most recently worked for an independent publisher.

Berkeley, California-based publisher Counterpoint Press said Monday it was devastated by the loss of an \"extraordinary co-worker and a true friend.\"

\"Whether he was recommending new music to listen to (and it was always so good), regaling us with tales of the bowling alley, offering his beloved truck for a ride if anyone needed it or sharing his much-appreciated opinions about a jacket or manuscript, he made everyone feel like they were his friend,\" the company wrote in a social media post. \"He was kind, considerate, hilarious.\"

Gomez-Hall was a 2013 graduate of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, where he concentrated in American Studies. The university on Monday said he \"played an integral role\" in the school's Swearer Center for Public Service. He volunteered to teach at an elementary school while an undergraduate and later helped run an after-school program.

He also became well-known in Providence's music scene for playing guitar and singing in the two-man band Nightmom.

Gomez-Hall recently moved to the San Francisco Bay Area. He was originally from Southern California and graduated from Coronado High School.

'TOTAL GOOFBALL'

Cash Askew, a 22-year-old musician from Oakland, was kind, gentle and a \"total goofball,\" said her girlfriend, Anya Taylor.

The couple met about a year ago at a concert in Oakland and connected through their love of music.

Taylor told the Washington Post (http://wapo.st/2gZc0Qu) she rushed to the scene after hearing about the blaze, but \"all we could do was stand there.\"

Leisa Baird Askew said her daughter grew up in a musical and artistic family.

Cash was one of two members of the band Them Are Us Too and had been performing with bandmate Kennedy Ashlyn since 2013. The duo met while studying at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Ashlyn said Askew had recently started becoming \"her best self\" after she came out as transgender about two years ago.

TEACHER, GARDENER

Sara Hoda, 30, of Walnut Creek, was a \"sweet person\" who gardened and taught at a Montessori school, friend Carol Crewdson told the Los Angeles Times (http://lat.ms/2g3oOTH)

Crewdson, 33, met Hoda in 2010 when they started a collective where artists and creatives could stay, avoiding the San Francisco Bay Area's high rent.

They lost touch after the collective shut down. But Crewdson said while it was operating, Hoda was very active in the collective process.

UNIQUE STYLE

Donna Kellogg, 32, of Oakland, was described as energetic and intelligent by friends and co-workers.

Josh Howes, an ex-boyfriend, said Kellogg wanted to be a healer, the East Bay Times reported (http://bit.ly/2h0AbAl). He said she was studying nutrition.

Kellogg worked at Highwire Coffee Roasters, where founder Robert Myers said she had just cut her hair and was on the brink of changes. He said all her co-workers enjoyed connecting with her through their shared interests in coffee and her quirky sense of style.

\"I loved that she had a belt with her name on it and would wear it to work,\" Myer said.

LIKE A BROTHER

Peter Wadsworth was thoughtful, caring and always willing to lend a hand, his friend Tammy Tasoff said.

Tasoff, 29, said Wadsworth looked out for her, doing little things that made her life easier. He would organize her messy files, give her advice and fix her computer if she needed help, said Tasoff, a dental student.

He bought video games because he knew she loved them, and he would often watch her play, she said.

\"Usually he'd say, 'Let's play video games,' and then he'd say, 'No, I just want to watch you play,'\" she said, sobbing. \"He'd make me food. He took really good care of me. He was like my big brother.\"

OTHER VICTIMS

The city of Oakland also identified David Clines, 35, of Oakland, and Brandon Chase Wittenauer, 32, of Hayward, as victims.

Officials said they have identified yet another victim but are withholding the name because the person was 17 years old.

One of the people killed was the son of a local deputy, Kelly said at a news conference Sunday. He did not release the name.

___

Many friends and family members were still anxiously awaiting word of their missing loved ones as the laborious search for remains continued. Some gathered outside a sheriff's office for news.

LONG-DISTANCE RELATIONSHIP

Among the missing are Alex Ghassan and his fianc\u00e9e, Hanna Henrikka Ruax.

Ghassan is a director and producer who worked with Spike Lee and Talib Kweli. He also is the father of twin toddlers.

Ruax is a yoga instructor, entrepreneur and activist visiting from Helsinki, Finland. She arrived in Oakland in late November.

The pair had been dating long-distance, and Ghassan was preparing to move to Europe, said his roommate Vikram Babu. \"He was fed up with the U.S.,\" Babu said.

Ghassan previously lived in Orange, New Jersey. He has lived in Oakland on and off for about a year, Babu said.

Ghassan's mother, Emilie Grandchamps, told WABC-TV (https://goo.gl/HFH3eN), that Ghassan often went out of his way to help other artists.

Before the fire, Ghassan posted video of the warehouse party on Instagram. \"Oakland reminds me of #JerseyCity so much at times,\" he wrote.

Ruax, meanwhile, is a social justice activist who organized a large protest in Finland after a neo-Nazi rally in that European country, Babu said. \"She is very gentle,\" he said.

Ruax's Instagram account is filled with playful photos of her and Ghassan. Last week, she posted a selfie with Ghassan where both made funny faces into the camera.

\"Sent this pic to my mumz after arriving home to my boo,\" she wrote. \"Home sweet home!\"

'SO SUPPORTIVE TO US'

Barrett Clark, 35, was a popular sound engineer at the San Francisco club The Bottom of the Hill. And his friends say he appeared to be everywhere.

Parker T. Gibbs, chief operating officer at Magnolia Media Productions, said when he'd walk into a rave full of strangers, he'd always spot Clark. \"I knew where I'd be for the rest of the night,\" Gibbs said. \"Right next to him.\"

Authorities have listed Clark among the missing.

Friends say the Santa Rosa native was a sound engineer and DJ who was a \"standup guy\" and appeared always ready to help musicians and fellow DJs.

\"Mourning Barrett Clark -- so supportive to us,\" composer and musician Holly Herndon tweeted Monday. \"Played mesmeric live techno. Best sound engineer. Always laughing & making things work for ppl.\"

Lynn Schwarz, co-owner of The Bottom of the Hill, said Clark was the engineer she hired to impress popular bands.

\"You couldn't shock the guy,\" Schwarz said. \"He had all kinds of friends.\"

PHOTOGRAPHER WHO LOVED MUSIC

Friends and family were holding out hope that photographer Amanda Allen, 34, would be found safe.

The Chelmsford, Massachusetts, native is a dancer with a passion for music, loved ones told The Lowell Sun (http://bit.ly/2gISHNd).

\"We are all praying for a miracle and coming together as a family,\" said her mother, Linda Smith Regan.

Allen's husband, Andy Kershaw, a DJ, called her vibrant and magnetic.

Allen graduated from Bridgewater State University in 2004. She and Kershaw moved to San Francisco from Boston in 2008.

Chelmsford native Shannon Fisher said Allen took ballet as a child and later embraced \"that underground musical life.\" Fisher described Allen as smart and funny, with a laugh that comes easily.

A photography website belonging to Allen says she shoots portraits and events.

A BEAUTIFUL SOUL

Kershaw said his friend and fellow DJ Johnny Igaz also was unaccounted for.

Igaz reportedly was playing a set when the fire broke out. He was listed on Facebook as a record buyer at Green Apple Books and Music in San Francisco.

His Facebook page was littered with tearful posts from friends who called him a beautiful soul and a true friend.

HER TRUE SELF

Riley Fritz, 29, a musician and artist from Connecticut, recently moved to San Francisco to be with friends, according to her brother, Ben Fritz.

\"She was a kind and beautiful person who had the strength to be her true self even when she knew that was not an easy path,\" Ben Fritz, 39, told The Associated Press. He said she appeared to be the \"happiest she had been in a few years.\"

Ben Fritz said the family was notified Sunday night that Riley, also known as Feral Pines, likely was killed in the fire.

Their father, Bruce Fritz, told the San Francisco Chronicle (http://bit.ly/2haW54C) he was flying to Oakland on Monday to identify the body. He said he would be joined by Ben Fritz, who lives in Los Angeles.

Riley Fritz graduated from Staples High School in Westport in 2005 and the School for the Visual Arts in Manhattan in 2010. She lived in several places before moving to the Bay Area, according to her family.

___

Associated Press writers Janie Har in Oakland, Russell Contreras in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Matt O'Brien in Providence, Rhode Island, contributed to this report.

"}, {"id":"7ad7af01-2d49-5134-aba0-03c62fc8d015","type":"article","starttime":"1480982945","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:09:05-07:00","lastupdated":"1480985138","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Power line to link Canada, New England gets key US permit","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_7ad7af01-2d49-5134-aba0-03c62fc8d015.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/power-line-to-link-canada-new-england-gets-key-us/article_7ad7af01-2d49-5134-aba0-03c62fc8d015.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/power-line-to-link-canada-new-england-gets-key-us/article_3c307903-2a42-5b56-8611-bc03e418beee.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DAVE GRAM\nAssociated Press","prologue":"MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) \u2014 A power line planned to run under Lake Champlain and link suppliers in Canada with consumers in southern New England has won a key federal permit, clearing its last big regulatory hurdle.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","state governments","lakes","government and politics","environment and nature"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"7ad7af01-2d49-5134-aba0-03c62fc8d015","body":"

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) \u2014 A power line planned to run under Lake Champlain and link suppliers in Canada with consumers in southern New England has won a key federal permit, clearing its last big regulatory hurdle.

Transmission Developers Inc. announced Monday its TDI-New England subsidiary had received a presidential permit from the U.S. Department of Energy for the 154-mile, $1.2 billion power line, dubbed the New England Clean Power Link. CEO Donald Jessom said construction could start in late 2017 or early 2018.

\"This interconnection is a vital link that will unleash low-carbon, cost-effective electricity from Canada for the benefit of New England, replacing fossil-fuel generators and lowering energy prices,\" Jessom, who's also CEO of the parent company, said in a statement.

The company, which is owned by the New York-based Blackstone Group, said it hopes a key market for the power will be utilities in Massachusetts, where Republican Gov. Charlie Baker in August signed legislation calling for a request for power supply proposals that will close April 1.

It said it's the first of about a half-dozen firms planning projects to carry abundant Canadian hydropower to New England to clear all of its key regulatory hurdles.

Vermont utilities already make extensive use of Canadian power, which originates at the massive power dams run by the provincial utility Hydro-Quebec and enters the state at Highgate, near the northern end of Lake Champlain. Jessom would not identify the New England Power Link's Canadian supplier.

The TDI project previously had won needed permits from the Vermont Public Service Board, the Agency of Natural Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, company officials said.

The power line would run north to south under Lake Champlain, which sits between northern New York state and Vermont and extends into Quebec. Jessom said it would be placed on the lake bottom in deeper parts of the lake and would be buried underneath the bottom where the water is shallower, with the goal being to avoid entangling boat anchors and fishing lines.

It would come ashore in Benson and be buried under public rights of way for the 55-mile trip southeast toward Cavendish, where it would connect with the New England power grid at the Coolidge substation.

Gov. Peter Shumlin, a Democrat who leaves office in January, called the New England Power Link \"a well-designed, innovative transmission project\" the state looks forward to hosting.

\"The project will help reduce carbon emissions in our region, provide ratepayer benefits for Vermont and will fund important Vermont-based programs, including support for our Clean Energy Development Fund and the cleanup of Lake Champlain,\" he said.

The power line also won kudos from one of Vermont's leading environmental groups. Sandra Levine, a senior attorney with the Conservation Law Foundation, said, \"TDI-NE's buried transmission line in Vermont shows that the facilities needed to transport electricity can meet high environmental standards and be developed in a responsible, cooperative manner.\"

"}, {"id":"2b22d17a-f451-5ddf-b9b3-90ee3cd48903","type":"article","starttime":"1480983110","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:11:50-07:00","lastupdated":"1480986175","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"United Airlines mechanics approve contract","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_2b22d17a-f451-5ddf-b9b3-90ee3cd48903.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/united-airlines-mechanics-approve-contract/article_2b22d17a-f451-5ddf-b9b3-90ee3cd48903.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/united-airlines-mechanics-approve-contract/article_9f388076-0080-545a-a3c6-f469b0bd3e8c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 Mechanics at United Airlines have approved a six-year labor deal, the latest in a string of pay-raising contracts in the now profitable industry.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","contracts and orders","wages and salaries","corporate news","personnel"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"2b22d17a-f451-5ddf-b9b3-90ee3cd48903","body":"

CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 Mechanics at United Airlines have approved a six-year labor deal, the latest in a string of pay-raising contracts in the now profitable industry.

The contract with the Teamsters union covers more than 9,000 employees at United Continental Holdings Inc. It covers employees of United and the former Continental Airlines; the two merged in 2010.

Few details were disclosed. The union said the contract is worth $1.7 billion more in pay and benefits than the workers' current deal.

Unions have pushed for pay raises now that airlines are making huge profits after losing billions and \u2014 in cases like United \u2014 going through bankruptcy protection in the previous decade.

"}, {"id":"87b359cf-511e-5a0c-8efb-44841706659f","type":"article","starttime":"1480983000","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:10:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1480988349","priority":45,"sections":[{"basketball":"sports/arizonawildcats/basketball"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Allonzo Trier can travel with Arizona Wildcats, still can't play","url":"http://tucson.com/sports/arizonawildcats/basketball/article_87b359cf-511e-5a0c-8efb-44841706659f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/sports/arizonawildcats/basketball/allonzo-trier-can-travel-with-arizona-wildcats-still-can-t/article_87b359cf-511e-5a0c-8efb-44841706659f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/sports/arizonawildcats/basketball/allonzo-trier-can-travel-with-arizona-wildcats-still-can-t/article_87b359cf-511e-5a0c-8efb-44841706659f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Bruce Pascoe\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"\"The only good sign is when he walks out there and plays,\" says head coach Sean Miller.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#topstory","#latest","#editorspick","#top5sports"],"customProperties":{"label":"basketball"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"9cb2b89d-a8cc-58b1-bd6d-734c902bb1a1","description":"Allonzo Trier, left, with Kadeem Allen, has missed all eight of the UA\u2019s regular-season games.","byline":"Mike Christy / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1267,"hiresheight":1635,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb2b89d-a8cc-58b1-bd6d-734c902bb1a1/5845f9e6e3d9a.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"480","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb2b89d-a8cc-58b1-bd6d-734c902bb1a1/5845f9e6e2201.image.jpg?resize=480%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb2b89d-a8cc-58b1-bd6d-734c902bb1a1/5845f9e6e2201.image.jpg?crop=1267%2C712%2C0%2C67&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb2b89d-a8cc-58b1-bd6d-734c902bb1a1/5845f9e6e2201.image.jpg?crop=1267%2C712%2C0%2C67&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/cb/9cb2b89d-a8cc-58b1-bd6d-734c902bb1a1/5845f9e6e2201.image.jpg?crop=1267%2C712%2C0%2C67&resize=1024%2C575&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"87b359cf-511e-5a0c-8efb-44841706659f","body":"

Allonzo Trier\u2019s elongated, opaque quest for eligibility may have made some progress last weekend when he traveled with the Wildcats to Los Angeles.

UA coach Sean Miller said Monday that the NCAA permitted Trier to travel for the game against Gonzaga, though he said the NCAA did not allow him to do so for road trips last month to Honolulu and Las Vegas.

However, when the Star asked if the change represented a good sign for the UA, Miller said it wasn\u2019t.

\u201cNo,\u201d Miller said. \u201cThe only good sign is when he walks out there and plays.\u201d

Normally, players ineligible under NCAA standards are unable to travel unless they pay their own way, but some situations are handled in a case-by-case manner. UA athletic director Greg Byrne also confirmed via text message Monday that Trier \u201cis able to travel,\u201d but did not respond when asked if something changed with Trier\u2019s situation between the Las Vegas and Los Angeles trips.

Arizona\u2019s top returning scorer, Trier has missed all eight of UA\u2019s regular-season games while appealing for NCAA eligibility. The UA has consistently declined to comment on his eligibility status since the issue surfaced in mid-October.

\u20182 months\u2019 possible for PJC

Parker Jackson-Cartwright\u2019s recovery timetable may be on the higher side of the typical 4-to-8 week window for high ankle sprains.

The UA initially declined to give a firm timetable after Jackson-Cartwright sprained his right ankle against Texas Southern on Nov. 30, saying more time was needed for a better determination, but Miller didn\u2019t appear optimistic when asked Monday if he knew more .

\u201cI don\u2019t know,\u201d Miller said. \u201cTwo months, I guess. Eight weeks.\u201d

Eight weeks would mean Jackson-Cartwright would miss seven Pac-12 games and not be back until the Wildcats host Washington State on Jan. 26 \u2013 after a potentially crucial road swing from Jan. 19-21 to play at USC and UCLA.

When asked if such a prognosis changes anything about how he\u2019ll prepare for Pac-12 play, Miller shook his head.

\u201cIt\u2019s like putting an ATM card in and if there\u2019s nothing in there. ... It\u2019s just \u2018here we go,\u2019\u201d Miller said. \u201cWe\u2019re gonna make the best of it and figure it out. We\u2019re making the best of it and we have a lot of players who came to Arizona to have big, big roles, and believe me, everyone of them does right now.\u201d

In Jackson-Cartwright\u2019s absence, Miller moved Kadeem Allen to point guard Saturday against Gonzaga, while freshman shooting guard Kobi Simmons has slid over to back him up.

Miller not concerned

about signee Ayton

Although 24/7 Sports recruiting analyst Jerry Meyer cast doubt Sunday on Twitter over whether top UA signee DeAndre Ayton would play for the Wildcats next season, Miller said he still fully expects him to do so.

Meyer tweeted Sunday that Ayton had a visa issue in his native Bahamas that kept him out of a basketball event last weekend, and when asked about Ayton\u2019s chances of playing in college, wrote, \u201cI have serious doubts.\u201d

In a phone conversation with the Star on Monday morning, Meyer elaborated.

\u201cI\u2019m just answering the question and stating the obvious,\u201d Meyer said. \u201cThe NCAA has investigated his school (Hillcrest Prep), and DeAndre Ayton would have great earning power overseas. So there\u2019s doubts. But in no way am I saying he won\u2019t play at Arizona.\u201d

The consensus No. 1-rated recruit in the high school class of 2017, Ayton signed with the UA last month, and Miller said then \u2014 and Monday \u2014 that he expects Ayton to play for him next season.

\u201cHe\u2019s fine, all set, doing well academically and trying to finish his senior year of high school,\u201d Miller said of Ayton. \u201cBeing able to finish his senior year in a positive way and have a great year, I\u2019ll have no doubts he\u2019ll do that. He\u2019s doing a great job in school, and we\u2019re excited to have him as part of what we\u2019re doing in the future.\u201d

Arizona lost its top recruit in 2016, guard Terrance Ferguson, when he signed a pro contract in Australia and an apparel deal last summer, though Ferguson spent two years at a high school from which the NCAA said it would not accept coursework.

Eye to eye

While UA center Dusan Ristic faced smaller post players through the the first seven games, he was forced to look straight at Gonzaga 7-footer Przemek Karnowski on Saturday.

And to do so by himself, since the UA mostly opted to single-cover Karnowski while staying fully committed to the Zags\u2019 three-point shooters. That strategy resulted in Gonzaga shooting only 33 percent from long range \u2014 but Karnowski getting 18 points inside on 9-for-13 shooting.

\u201cWe already knew he was a great passer and a lot of teams double-team him, but he can really throw a great pass to their shooters,\u201d Ristic said Monday. \u201cWe saw that as a threat to our defense and decided to play one-on-one. We stopped him in one area, but he hurt us inside. We learned something form that, and next time we face somebody like that we\u2019ll be more prepared.\u201d

Next time might be now. Tuesday\u2019s opponent, UC Irvine, features 7-foot-2 Greek center in Ioannis Dimakopoulos, though he has more of a face-up offensive game than Karnowski. Ristic has faced Dimakopoulos several times previously during European tournaments.

Partners in adversity

While Arizona has been without its top returning scorer in Trier and now its only true point guard in Jackson-Cartwright, UC Irvine has issues of its own.

The Anteaters lost five seniors off a team that tied for the Big West title last season, but also 7-6 center Mamadou Ndiaye, who left as a junior for the NBA but was not drafted. What\u2019s more, they have played without all-Big West guard Luke Nelson all season because of a hamstring injury.

\u201cWe\u2019ve just had to rely on other players,\u201d coach Russell Turner said. \u201cAt this stage, we\u2019re starting Max Hazzard who\u2019s a (redshirt) freshmen and the players off the bench are almost all freshmen.

\u201cWe\u2019re trying to do at our level what Arizona is trying to do at their level (without key players) \u2014 and they\u2019re doing it better.\u201d

Rim shots

\u2022 Arizona fell from No. 16 to No. 20 in The Associated Press Top 25 poll, keeping a streak of 83 straight appearances.

\u2022 UCLA forward T.J. Leaf was named the Pac-12\u2019s Player of the Week after collecting 17 points, 13 rebounds and five assists in the Bruins\u2019 97-92 upset win at Kentucky on Saturday.

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AUSTIN, Texas (AP) \u2014 A Republican member of the Electoral College from Texas said Monday that he won't cast one of his state's 38 electoral votes for Donald Trump because \"I am here to elect a president, not a king.\"

Dallas paramedic Chris Suprun previously indicated he would support Trump. But he now says the president-elect's postelection attacks on the First Amendment and the country's electoral process, as well as the billionaire businessman's continued promotion of his brand and business interests overseas, changed his mind.

Texas law doesn't mandate that electors vote according to the results of the state's presidential election, which Trump won by nine percentage points over Hillary Clinton. Suprun and the GOP's other electors signed pledges at the state Republican convention in Dallas this summer promising to vote for their party's nominee, but those aren't legally binding.

\"I'm expecting backlash, but that has been par for the course this campaign. People are unhappy. They're angry. But I'm angry, too,\" said Suprun, who said that prior to changing his mind he had received hundreds of emails, letters and phone calls urging him not to support Trump.

Suprun said the Electoral College system \"is fine as it currently exists.\" His problem is just with its winner.

\"I was told if we elected Donald Trump he would transform his personality into being presidential. He isn't,\" Suprun said. \"I wanted him to be presidential, but since the election he hasn't grown into our institution, he's attacked them. I am here to elect a president, not a king.\"

Another Texas Republican elector, Art Sisneros, resigned last week rather than vote for Trump. Electors will vote to replace Sisneros when they convene Dec. 19 in Austin and in state capitals across the country to vote for president.

Suprun said he was not resigning but also won't be voting for Hillary Clinton.

\"I am not sure of who I will vote for, but would have to strongly consider someone like (Ohio Gov. John) Kasich who has both executive and legislative experience bringing people together,\" he said.

Suprun said he was waiting to see if other electors will revolt and rally behind a Trump alternative like Kasich.

\"I'm looking for someone we can all unify behind,\" he said.

"}, {"id":"631e62ae-ce7e-561e-85f6-9027bfe392fd","type":"article","starttime":"1480982669","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:04:29-07:00","lastupdated":"1480987051","priority":0,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"2 doors of Wal-Mart founder's first store donated to museums","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_631e62ae-ce7e-561e-85f6-9027bfe392fd.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/doors-of-wal-mart-founder-s-first-store-donated-to/article_631e62ae-ce7e-561e-85f6-9027bfe392fd.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/doors-of-wal-mart-founder-s-first-store-donated-to/article_79bfc0be-98d1-5e24-b8ab-57f545df5848.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) \u2014 Two doors from the first store owned by Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton have been donated to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington and The Walmart Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","arts and entertainment","museums","recreation and leisure","lifestyle","leisure travel","travel"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":7,"commentID":"631e62ae-ce7e-561e-85f6-9027bfe392fd","body":"

BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) \u2014 Two doors from the first store owned by Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton have been donated to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington and The Walmart Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas.

The doors from Walton's first shop, opened in 1945 in Newport, Arkansas, were stored for years by Ivy Brother Construction co-owner Gene Ivy, who renovated the store in the 1960s, according to the Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (http://bit.ly/2gZed0P ).

The doors were a great find because nothing else was kept from the first store owned by the man who started the world's largest retailer, said Alan Dranow, senior director of the Wal-Mart Heritage Group.

One door, its frame scattered with scratches and nicks from use, is currently on display in an illuminated case at the Arkansas museum.

\"It means that the very beginning of Sam's journey is represented here,\" Dranow said.

Ivy stored the doors in his business' warehouse until his retirement, and later moved them to his garage. After he died in 2014, his family decided to donate the doors to the museums.

\"This just seemed like where they needed to be since this is where (Walton) started,\" Ivy's daughter Terri Ramsey said.

"}, {"id":"729eb85e-9988-5668-9aec-f07deaa87b95","type":"article","starttime":"1480982400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Thanks to Good Samaritans","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_729eb85e-9988-5668-9aec-f07deaa87b95.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-thanks-to-good-samaritans/article_729eb85e-9988-5668-9aec-f07deaa87b95.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-thanks-to-good-samaritans/article_729eb85e-9988-5668-9aec-f07deaa87b95.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"On Sunday afternoon, Dec. 4, I had a tire blowout as I was driving south on Swan Road, just north of River Road. I called AAA, but before they could get there six Good Samaritans stopped to help. The first gentleman helped pull out my spare and fill it up with air. I kept telling the others I was OK and that help was on the way.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"729eb85e-9988-5668-9aec-f07deaa87b95","body":"

On Sunday afternoon, Dec. 4, I had a tire blowout as I was driving south on Swan Road, just north of River Road. I called AAA, but before they could get there six Good Samaritans stopped to help. The first gentleman helped pull out my spare and fill it up with air. I kept telling the others I was OK and that help was on the way.

The last, Doug Smith, changed my tire and got me on my way in about 10 minutes. Although my Sunday afternoon schedule was disrupted, the inconvenience was more than made up by the thoughtfulness of those who stopped to help me. I wish I had thought to get the first Good Samaritans's and Doug Smith's contact info to thank them personally, but I want to let all those who stopped know how grateful I was for their concern and offers to help.

Valerie Cwik

Foothills

"}, {"id":"d4461cf0-f184-587d-b63b-235b680777a8","type":"article","starttime":"1480982400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-12-05T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: UA study states the obvious","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_d4461cf0-f184-587d-b63b-235b680777a8.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-ua-study-states-the-obvious/article_d4461cf0-f184-587d-b63b-235b680777a8.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-ua-study-states-the-obvious/article_d4461cf0-f184-587d-b63b-235b680777a8.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Re: the Dec. 5 article \u201cUA: Letter grades in foundation courses good indicator of graduation likelihood\u201d On the front page it was reported that a University of Arizona grant-funded study concluded that students getting As and Bs in core or foundation classes, such as English 101, are more likely to graduate than students getting Cs or lower. Wow! Shocking! Wonder how much that study cost?","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"d4461cf0-f184-587d-b63b-235b680777a8","body":"

Re: the Dec. 5 article \u201cUA: Letter grades in foundation courses good indicator of graduation likelihood\u201d

On the front page it was reported that a University of Arizona grant-funded study concluded that students getting As and Bs in core or foundation classes, such as English 101, are more likely to graduate than students getting Cs or lower. Wow! Shocking! Wonder how much that study cost?

David Johnson

Saddlebrooke

"} ]