[ {"id":"417a8b95-031b-59cd-8e56-e0d36cc654f8","type":"article","starttime":"1474808400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-25T06:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"commentary":"ap/commentary"},{"column":"news/opinion/column"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"George Will: In Colorado, a Republican worth voting for","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/article_417a8b95-031b-59cd-8e56-e0d36cc654f8.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/george-will-in-colorado-a-republican-worth-voting-for/article_417a8b95-031b-59cd-8e56-e0d36cc654f8.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/george-will-in-colorado-a-republican-worth-voting-for/article_417a8b95-031b-59cd-8e56-e0d36cc654f8.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Washington Post","prologue":"Mike Coffman is a refreshing, engaging candidate to watch.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["hispanics","primary and secondary education","immigration","government and politics","voting","legislature","education","social affairs","social issues","elections"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"revision":5,"commentID":"417a8b95-031b-59cd-8e56-e0d36cc654f8","body":"

AURORA, Colo. \u2014

Here on the High Plains, where the deer and the antelope once played, Denver\u2019s suburbs roam toward the Rockies\u2019 front range and the nature of today\u2019s polyglot politics is written in the local congressman\u2019s campaign schedule. One day last week, Republican Mike Coffman went from a Hispanic charter school in a strip mall, to another strip mall for lunch at an Ethiopian restaurant with leaders of the Ethiopian-American community, then to a meeting with the editor of the largest of two Korean-language newspapers serving more than 3,000 Korean-Americans .

Coffman was elected to Congress in 2008 with 61 percent of the vote, replacing Tom Tancredo, a firebrand who that year ineffectually ran for president as a scourge of illegal immigrants. Coffman\u2019s thinking was somewhat congruent with Tancredo\u2019s. Then, however, the political market \u2014 aka democracy \u2014 began to work, with an assist from Democrats, who inadvertently made Coffman a better politician and person.

After he was re-elected with 66 percent in 2010, his district was gerrymandered to make it more Democratic \u2014 20 percent Hispanic, with a generous salting of other minorities. He won in 2012 with just 48 percent of the vote. In 2014, national Democrats recruited a formidable opponent, a Yale graduate who had taught, in Spanish, in Central American schools. So, Coffman learned Spanish well enough to do an entire debate in the language and today banters in Spanish with the children at Roca Fuerte Academy.

The pastor who founded it in 2008 says this charter school is anathema to, and underfunded by, the local school district, which is obedient to the teachers union, which dislikes charters that are not obedient to it. The district\u2019s schools have just a 61 percent graduation rate. Roca Fuerte does better.

Some of the academy\u2019s pupils are antecedents of the pronoun in Donald Trump\u2019s four-word immigration policy: \u201cThey have to go.\u201d They were brought here by illegal immigrants. Trump wants to send them \u201chome\u201d to countries they do not remember. Coffman has co-authored legislation that would provide legal status and a path to lawful permanent resident status to those who came before age 16, have lived here five consecutive years and who have been accepted to a college or vocational school or who meet other qualifications.

At the Nile restaurant, Coffman\u2019s cowboy boots go beneath a table groaning under the weight of trays laden with Ethiopian food . Coffman sits next to an Orthodox bishop who is wearing a cassock and a glittering pectoral cross. As guests arrive, several kiss his crucifix. Many of those around the table have been in America for at least a decade and are citizens and small-business entrepreneurs. Ethiopians are Colorado\u2019s second-largest immigrant community and are grateful for Coffman\u2019s attempts to pressure Ethiopia\u2019s authoritarian government to stop using violence against protesters.

Coffman attends the annual Taste of Ethiopia festival, and Ethiopians for Coffman might matter in November. As might the Korean-American community, which continues to honor those Americans who, like Coffman\u2019s father, fought in the Korean War.

Coffman, 61, enlisted in the Army before receiving his high school diploma, which he earned while serving. After leaving the Army and graduating from the University of Colorado, he went to Marine Corps officer training. When he left the Corps, he became a state legislator until called back in 1991 for the Gulf War. In 2005, he resigned as state treasurer to serve in Iraq. There he helped organize elections in a place where diversity is rather more problematic than in Colorado\u2019s 6th Congressional District.

His opponent this year, who dislikes charter schools and school choice, does not speak fluent Spanish and, unlike almost all candidates challenging incumbents, does not seem to want many debates . Coffman thinks she does not want anything to distract from her theme, which is: Trump is a Republican and so is Coffman.

In early August, however, Coffman acted pre-emptively with a television ad that began: \u201cPeople ask me, \u2018What do you think about Trump?\u2019 Honestly, I don\u2019t care for him much.\u201d Spoken like a Marine .

"}, {"id":"8e852c68-94c0-50c4-a5a4-6fd370d9144c","type":"article","starttime":"1474808400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-25T06:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"commentary":"ap/commentary"},{"column":"news/opinion/column"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Leonard Pitts Jr.: How did officer know Terence Crutcher was a bad dude?","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/article_8e852c68-94c0-50c4-a5a4-6fd370d9144c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/leonard-pitts-jr-how-did-officer-know-terence-crutcher-was/article_8e852c68-94c0-50c4-a5a4-6fd370d9144c.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/leonard-pitts-jr-how-did-officer-know-terence-crutcher-was/article_8e852c68-94c0-50c4-a5a4-6fd370d9144c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Miami Herald","prologue":"It couldn't be because of his skin color, could it?","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["violent crime","crime","general news"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"7f1b2e96-8797-5f35-bbc2-5f0ddf9caa48","description":"Leonard Pitts Jr.","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"249","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f1/7f1b2e96-8797-5f35-bbc2-5f0ddf9caa48/572d055c2b42c.image.jpg?crop=249%2C201%2C1%2C91&resize=249%2C201&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f1/7f1b2e96-8797-5f35-bbc2-5f0ddf9caa48/54ee646de0a8e.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f1/7f1b2e96-8797-5f35-bbc2-5f0ddf9caa48/54ee646de1334.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"573","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f1/7f1b2e96-8797-5f35-bbc2-5f0ddf9caa48/572d055c2b42c.image.jpg?crop=250%2C140%2C0%2C117"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"8e852c68-94c0-50c4-a5a4-6fd370d9144c","body":"

Dear Tulsa police:

I\u2019m not here to debate the shooting of Terence Crutcher.

His death a little over a week ago at the hands of one of your officers has, of course, created a firestorm. Betty Shelby has said she shot the 40-year-old man after he refused to communicate with her or obey her commands, walked back to his SUV, which was stopped in the middle of the road, and appeared to reach inside for a weapon.

Crutcher\u2019s family and their attorneys say video of the shooting, which was released last week, tells a different story. It shows Crutcher walking with his hands up. And he couldn\u2019t have been reaching into the car for anything, they say, because the video shows the driver\u2019s-side window, where he was standing, was closed. Crutcher had no weapon, though you\u2019ve said you did find PCP in the SUV.

But again, I\u2019m not here to argue about the shooting. I\u2019m just curious about something I heard on the video right before Crutcher was killed. The footage was shot from a police helicopter circling high above, and one of the officers watching the scene below can be heard to say, \u201cThat looks like a bad dude, too.\u201d Which raises a question for me: How did the officer know Crutcher was a bad dude?

See, I don\u2019t like bad dudes and I want to avoid them if I can. That copter was circling at \u2014 what? \u2014 100 feet, maybe 200 feet, above the action. Yet your officer was able to discern Crutcher\u2019s character from that distance.

That\u2019s impressive. But then, this isn\u2019t the only time we\u2019ve seen police \u2014 and even a certain police wannabe \u2014 identify the bad dudes with amazing skill.

In 2014, a South Carolina State trooper somehow knew Levar Jones was a bad dude, even though he was just complying with an order to produce his driver\u2019s license.

That same year, a Cleveland police officer somehow knew Tamir Rice was a bad dude, even though he was just playing in the park with a toy gun.

In 2012, George Zimmerman somehow knew Trayvon Martin was a bad dude, even though he was just walking along the street, minding his own business.

Yet last year, Jesse Kidder, a rookie police officer in New Richmond, Ohio, somehow knew Michael Wilcox wasn\u2019t a bad dude, even though he was wanted for murder, even though he led police on a long car chase, even though he refused commands to get down on the ground, even though he was believed to be armed, even though he rushed at the officer crying, \u201cShoot me! Shoot me, or I\u2019ll shoot you!\u201d

Me, I\u2019d have thought: \u201cThis is a bad dude.\u201d I\u2019d have shot him. Officer Kidder did not.

Recognizing bad dudes is a valuable skill. So I\u2019m hoping you\u2019ll share some pro tips.

Maybe the officer in the copter knew Crutcher was a bad dude because he was a big guy? But that doesn\u2019t make sense. Lots of people are big. Many cops are big. And Trayvon Martin was a slightly built 17-year-old. Tamir Rice was only 12.

Is there a bad dude hand signal? A bad dude walk? A bad dude lapel pin?

Please share for your sake, if not for mine. People are already bringing race into this the way they do every little thing. They\u2019re already suggesting your officer thought Crutcher was a \u201cbad dude\u201d just because he was a black dude. Come to think of it, Levar Jones, Tamir Rice and Trayvon Martin were also black, while Michael Wilcox, the deranged murder suspect, was not. Interesting coincidence, don\u2019t you think?

Anyway, we need you to tell us the real story. Your officer wouldn\u2019t have judged Terence Crutcher a \u201cbad dude\u201d just because he had dark skin, right?

I mean, come on. This is America.

"}, {"id":"7abbd839-dcbd-552f-9b43-1f81d1a9c3cb","type":"article","starttime":"1474808400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-25T06:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"gassen":"news/opinion/column/gassen"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Sarah Gassen: A concert to end gun violence","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/gassen/article_7abbd839-dcbd-552f-9b43-1f81d1a9c3cb.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/gassen/sarah-gassen-a-concert-to-end-gun-violence/article_7abbd839-dcbd-552f-9b43-1f81d1a9c3cb.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/gassen/sarah-gassen-a-concert-to-end-gun-violence/article_7abbd839-dcbd-552f-9b43-1f81d1a9c3cb.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Sarah Garrecht Gassen\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Event today intended to bring attention to epidemic of gun deaths.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["gassen","guns","patricia maisch","jan 8 shooting","gabby giffords","concert across america"],"internalKeywords":["#columnist","#columnists"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32","description":"","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"413","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/5733bb60f1eb9.image.jpg?resize=620%2C413"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/5407ce6c40533.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/5407ce6c41878.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/53ff79ac9aae6.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"7abbd839-dcbd-552f-9b43-1f81d1a9c3cb","body":"

Patricia Maisch is relentless. And she is right.

\u201cMy criteria for if I\u2019m having a good day, since Jan. 8, 2011, is, if nobody is shooting at me, how can it be a bad day?\u201d

If her name sounds familiar, it\u2019s because she\u2019s the person who wrestled bullets away from the man who, moments before, had murdered six people and shot 13 more in front of a Tucson grocery store.

The shooter was trying to reload when people who had gathered to talk with U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords wrestled him to the ground. Pat got the magazine of ammunition away from him.

Since that day, her time and attention have been devoted to making people know about the avoidable tragedy of gun violence. She has joined with others moved to activism by their personal experience to speak up for the victims who have been killed or injured by gun violence, and those who have had their loved ones taken from them.

Ninety-one people are killed with a gun every day in the United States. People wanting to minimize the tragedy or who try to deflect attention away from the role guns play in these deaths will often point out that two-thirds of those deaths are suicides \u2014 as if death at one\u2019s own hand lessens the horror.

We were talking earlier this week about her latest push to bring attention to the pervasive problem of gun violence, and the more intransigent problem of getting Congress to do anything that would make it more difficult for people who are dangerous \u2014 to themselves or others \u2014 to easily and quickly buy a gun.

The \u201cConcert Across America to End Gun Violence\u201d is an effort both to remember the thousands of people killed with a firearm each year and to build momentum to improve public safety by changing gun laws.

It\u2019s an uphill climb, yes, but we can\u2019t give up.

Nine years ago, Congress designated Sept. 25 as \u201cNational Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims.\u201d This year the day will be marked across the country with more than 350 concerts in plazas, parks, restaurants, houses of worship, town squares, schools and music halls.

Tucson\u2019s part will be an all-day concert at Monterey Court Studio Galleries and Caf\u00e9. Local musicians will play from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and there will be food, free gun locks, a voter-registration drive and more.

Organizers are asking for a $3 donation, which will go to Christina-Taylor Green Park Improvement Fund, the Gabriel Zimmerman Scholarship Fund at ASU, and the Tucson January 8 Permanent Memorial Fund.

Pat and I talked about the difference between knowing something is a problem and taking action.

\u201cIt takes somebody being personally impacted,\u201d she said. \u201cAfter Columbine, I said, \u2018That\u2019s horrible, someone should do something.\u2019 After Virginia Tech, I said, \u2018Why isn\u2019t anyone doing something?\u2019

\u201cIt took me seeing six people dead on the ground to realize, \u2018It\u2019s supposed to be you \u2014 you\u2019re supposed to be helping.\u2019\u201d

She is helping. She travels to Washington to lobby Congress. She speaks publicly about how every person buying a gun should have to pass a background check.

She points out the ridiculousness that federal law doesn\u2019t require a private seller \u2014 someone selling at a gun show, out of the trunk of their car or over the internet \u2014 to check if the buyer is a felon or has a history of domestic violence or has been committed for serious mental illness.

Pat speaks with the authority of someone who has been there, who has seen bloodied bodies on the ground around her. She\u2019s cried with the family members and friends of those who have been killed.

\u201cWhen I see people whose children have been taken,\u201d she said, \u201cand I see them lift their head up off the pillow every day \u2014 if they can do that, then I can do this.\u201d

"}, {"id":"900279ae-4182-57c7-a075-54281390a184","type":"article","starttime":"1474761600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-24T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Public libraries are a treasure","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_900279ae-4182-57c7-a075-54281390a184.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-public-libraries-are-a-treasure/article_900279ae-4182-57c7-a075-54281390a184.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-public-libraries-are-a-treasure/article_900279ae-4182-57c7-a075-54281390a184.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"A recent letter questioned the \"value\" our tax dollars receive from the Tucson-Pima libraries. Libraries are heavily used, serve a great diversity of age, and more. I wish the libraries could expand hours and open on holidays to better serve citizens. Tucson Unified School District does not allow students to use school libraries outside of regular school hours (or have librarians). So the public libraries do a great job filling that gap, though not as safe/convenient as allowing students to be in school library with volunteer tutors would be.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"900279ae-4182-57c7-a075-54281390a184","body":"

A recent letter questioned the \"value\" our tax dollars receive from the Tucson-Pima libraries. Libraries are heavily used, serve a great diversity of age, and more. I wish the libraries could expand hours and open on holidays to better serve citizens.

Tucson Unified School District does not allow students to use school libraries outside of regular school hours (or have librarians). So the public libraries do a great job filling that gap, though not as safe/convenient as allowing students to be in school library with volunteer tutors would be.

The joint library system has been a great improvement. Perhaps there is an opportunity for Tucson and Pima County to merge the parks and rec systems. Tucson facilities have been closed Sundays, holidays and evenings for several years \u2014 just when they're needed most.\u00a0

Rather than starting new nonprofits/government programs for fitness and education initiatives, funding to fully utilize existing infrastructure/programs would be of greater value to taxpayers.

Sharon Foltz

Midtown

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John McCain did not go to Washington, D.C. from Arizona, he came to Arizona from Washington. He did not \"go Washington,\" he started there. McCain is actually from the Navy, born in Panama, the son and grandson of admirals. He was already at the Senate, as the US Navy liaison, when it became clear that he was not going to make admiral himself, so he resigned his commission and went into politics.

He married an Arizona woman he met in Washington and moved here to become our senator. In contrast, candidate Ann Kirkpatrick was actually born in Arizona, grew up in Arizona, and went to Washington from Arizona as a representative from the congressional district where she was raised.

Maybe, after 20 years, she will \"go Washington\" too, but for now, she, unlike McCain, is an actual Arizonan, not a carpetbagger or transplant. McCain let veterans down by supporting his party in underfunding the VA and overfunding the Pentagon. He is a hero, but he has not been a good senator for us.

David P. Vernon

Southwest side

"}, {"id":"589913da-dfc5-5430-b699-35c81e6bb2dc","type":"article","starttime":"1474761600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-24T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Increase our bicycling infrastructure","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_589913da-dfc5-5430-b699-35c81e6bb2dc.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-increase-our-bicycling-infrastructure/article_589913da-dfc5-5430-b699-35c81e6bb2dc.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-increase-our-bicycling-infrastructure/article_589913da-dfc5-5430-b699-35c81e6bb2dc.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"As a resident pediatrician at Diamond Children's Medical Center, I was very happy to read the Sept. 21 column by Tim Steller \"Beyond Tucson's bad roads are nonexistent sidewalks.\" I would like to add that ensuring continued funding for further improvements to our bicycling infrastructure should be a continued high priority.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"589913da-dfc5-5430-b699-35c81e6bb2dc","body":"

As a resident pediatrician at Diamond Children's Medical Center, I was very happy to read the Sept. 21 column by Tim Steller \"Beyond Tucson's bad roads are nonexistent sidewalks.\" I would like to add that ensuring continued funding for further improvements to our bicycling infrastructure should be a continued high priority.

Safe areas to walk and cycle help promote healthy lifestyles for all Tucsonans and can help contribute to ending the obesity epidemic.

Yonatan Kurland, MD

Midtown

"}, {"id":"65f1e507-f6a8-5a46-8031-dfabdcc65585","type":"article","starttime":"1474761600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-24T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Trump isn't presidential","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_65f1e507-f6a8-5a46-8031-dfabdcc65585.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-trump-isn-t-presidential/article_65f1e507-f6a8-5a46-8031-dfabdcc65585.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-trump-isn-t-presidential/article_65f1e507-f6a8-5a46-8031-dfabdcc65585.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Re: the Sept. 21 letter \"Trump showing his presidential side\" While articulate and patriotic, the writer of the letter that praised Donald Trump for showing his \"presidential side,\" has been misled by his behavior. She was impressed by: his embarrassing visit to Mexico, during which he publicly lied about his private (but witnessed) conversation with its president; the Louisiana floods, when the governor there had asked politicians (including President Obama) to delay any trips to the area so as to not take away from manpower; and by a visit to Michigan black-populated churches, a fiasco that has not increased his popularity among African Americans, who know his racist history, and see through his insincerity.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"65f1e507-f6a8-5a46-8031-dfabdcc65585","body":"

Re: the Sept. 21 letter \"Trump showing his presidential side\"

While articulate and patriotic, the writer of the letter that praised Donald Trump for showing his \"presidential side,\" has been misled by his behavior. She was impressed by: his embarrassing visit to Mexico, during which he publicly lied about his private (but witnessed) conversation with its president; the Louisiana floods, when the governor there had asked politicians (including President Obama) to delay any trips to the area so as to not take away from manpower; and by a visit to Michigan black-populated churches, a fiasco that has not increased his popularity among African Americans, who know his racist history, and see through his insincerity.

His \u201cplans\u201d have been sketchy and inconsistent, and received sharp criticism from reliable experts. Drawing large crowds at rallies does not mean he is presidential, or will win the presidency. Heaven help us if he does.

Linda Schulman

Northeast side

\u00a0

"}, {"id":"9ad2f084-b4fd-5214-8784-2889a23de4a9","type":"article","starttime":"1474761600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-24T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Trump, the mystery candidate","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_9ad2f084-b4fd-5214-8784-2889a23de4a9.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-trump-the-mystery-candidate/article_9ad2f084-b4fd-5214-8784-2889a23de4a9.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-trump-the-mystery-candidate/article_9ad2f084-b4fd-5214-8784-2889a23de4a9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Donald Trump has been threatening to run for president for decades based on the claim that he is a hugely successful business man and real estate developer. Yet during that time he has provided no evidence that his business empire is what he says it is. Are his companies presently solvent? Is he about to go bankrupt again? How much total debt is he carrying, and how much does he owe to the Russians and Chinese? What complex foreign business entanglements is he mixed up with?","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"9ad2f084-b4fd-5214-8784-2889a23de4a9","body":"

Donald Trump has been threatening to run for president for decades based on the claim that he is a hugely successful business man and real estate developer. Yet during that time he has provided no evidence that his business empire is what he says it is.

Are his companies presently solvent? Is he about to go bankrupt again? How much total debt is he carrying, and how much does he owe to the Russians and Chinese? What complex foreign business entanglements is he mixed up with?

We don't know because he hasn't given us anything to prove the legality and health of his businesses enterprises. And worst of all, he refuses to enlighten us by releasing his federal tax returns. Truly a mystery candidate.

Alan Rubens

Northeast side

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The Aug. 30 primaries effectively decided who will represent most Arizona voters in Congress and the state Legislature.

Because few districts will be seriously contested in November, the primary is often the only election that matters. That reality draws attention to a serious problem: Two key congressional nominees won despite most voters opposing them.

In the 5th Congressional District, which is heavily Republican, state senator Andy Biggs defeated businesswoman Christine Jones by just 16 votes.

That narrow margin will trigger a recount, yet the winner will have earned less than 30 percent and barely 25,000 votes \u2014 far less than the 273,000 votes cast in the district in November 2012.

The 1st Congressional District presents a different issue. The general election promises to be competitive, but controversial Republican nominee Paul Babeu won with just 31 percent.

Earlier in August, House Speaker David Gowan had dropped out and urged voters to support Gary Kiehne because he feared that Babeu would be a \u201clost cause.\u201d

Had only two candidates run, Babeu and the 5th District winner might have earned majority support against their top opponent. But, because primaries attract crowded fields, they are at particular risk for nominating candidates without majority support.

That can reward divisive tactics that help earn a plurality of the vote, but undermine the goal of identifying a consensus candidate.

Some states hold primary runoff elections to uphold majority rule. But states are moving away from runoffs due to logistical difficulties. Runoffs cost taxpayers millions, voter turnout often plummets and the first round would need to be in early summer.

Modern voting technology allows for a proven solution that would help elect consensus winners in a single election: ranked-choice voting.

Ranked-choice voting is literally as easy as 1, 2, 3. Voters have the freedom to rank as many candidates as they want in order of preference. The candidate with a majority of first choices wins, like in other elections.

However, if nobody has a majority, an \u201cinstant runoff\u2019 is held on the same ballot comparing the top two candidates head-to-head. Candidates in last place are eliminated, and their supporters\u2019 votes are counted for their next choice. When it\u2019s down to two, the winner earns a majority of the vote.

Adopting ranked-choice voting accommodates voter choice in primaries. It\u2019s good for parties, as they are more likely to get a nominee that voters can rally behind. It\u2019s good for voters, as they can always vote for their favorite without fear of \u201cwasting their vote\u201d on a \u201cspoiler.\u201d

Cities in California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Minnesota use ranked-choice voting to elect local leaders, and the League of Women Voters of Arizona endorsed it after a statewide study.

Maine could become the first state to adopt ranked-choice voting for statewide elections if voters approve a ballot initiative this November.

Research shows that ranked-choice voting does more than promote majority rule. In 2013 and 2014, political scientists Todd Donovan and Caroline Tolbert worked with the Rutgers-Eagleton poll to survey more than 4,800 voters in seven cities using ranked-choice voting and 14 \u201ccontrol\u201d cities without it.

A strong majority of voters in ranked-choice voting cities supported it, and voters in those cities generally found the campaigns to be more civil and satisfying.

"}, {"id":"36ac770c-2165-5fd1-bb56-265ab2e0f165","type":"article","starttime":"1474678800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-23T18:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474715034","sections":[{"commentary":"ap/commentary"},{"column":"news/opinion/column"}],"flags":{"ap":"true","web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Fareed Zakaria: The center can still hold","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/article_36ac770c-2165-5fd1-bb56-265ab2e0f165.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/fareed-zakaria-the-center-can-still-hold/article_36ac770c-2165-5fd1-bb56-265ab2e0f165.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/fareed-zakaria-the-center-can-still-hold/article_36ac770c-2165-5fd1-bb56-265ab2e0f165.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Washington Post","prologue":"World leaders share their struggles.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["financial crisis","government and politics","political approval ratings","demographics","economy","business","financial markets","public opinion","social affairs"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"f68e823e-2f37-5c98-b0bc-9a142ef2a5b9","description":"Portrait of Fareed Zakaria","byline":"James Kegley","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"598","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/68/f68e823e-2f37-5c98-b0bc-9a142ef2a5b9/57520d6369623.image.jpg?resize=620%2C598"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"96","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/68/f68e823e-2f37-5c98-b0bc-9a142ef2a5b9/557a231b96ff0.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/68/f68e823e-2f37-5c98-b0bc-9a142ef2a5b9/57520d6369623.image.jpg?crop=1466%2C824%2C0%2C100&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/68/f68e823e-2f37-5c98-b0bc-9a142ef2a5b9/57520d6369623.image.jpg?crop=1466%2C824%2C0%2C100&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"36ac770c-2165-5fd1-bb56-265ab2e0f165","body":"

NEW YORK \u2014

It\u2019s the annual gathering of world leaders in New York this week, and for most of them, it\u2019s time for group therapy. Around the globe, leaders of all stripes seem afflicted with the same malady: low approval ratings. Morgan Stanley\u2019s Ruchir Sharma has pointed out that the median approval rating for the leaders of the top 20 emerging and developing economies has dropped by 17 points over the last decade. What is going on?

Sharma argues that the cause is economic. Global growth has slowed from a post-World War II average of 3.5 percent to 2 percent since 2008. There is no region of the world that is growing faster today than it was before the global financial crisis. And yet, the very rich continue to prosper. Sharma notes that the number of billionaires globally has doubled, to more than 1,800.

But, in fact, the problem is deeper than simply a slowdown. There is a wider sense of political paralysis, which leads to public frustration. The underlying causes for this anger are even more fundamental in many Western countries. Growth in the West has been falling since the 1970s. Productivity growth has never returned to postwar levels, except for a brief period in the 1990s.

Western countries face four structural challenges \u2014 demography, globalization, automation and increasing debt burdens. The demographic challenge might be the most fundamental. In almost every advanced economy, fertility has dropped sharply, from Japan to South Korea, Germany to Italy. The number of centenarians in Japan is more than twice what it was a decade ago, with 32,000 people in the country expected to turn 100 just this year.

Globalization and the information revolution boost growth overall, but they concentrate the costs on skilled and semi-skilled workers, particularly in basic manufacturing industries that once provided large numbers of stable, high-paying jobs.

As a response to the global financial crisis, governments have taken on huge debts. In addition, the aging population means that spending on the elderly is crowding out the investment needed for growth \u2014 in infrastructure, education, science, technology.

Facing these forces, leaders have no easy path to restore growth and revive their countries. Deep, radical reforms are unpopular, and in this climate do not seem to lead to roaring growth. Ireland, Portugal and Mexico have all enacted broad market reforms, and yet, growth has not come booming back. Japan has spent hundreds of billions on stimulus plans and yet it is just muddling along. Thus, even the leaders who come to office with strong public approval and much promise find themselves trapped by the same forces. Very quickly their approval ratings begin to drop and new populist anger grows. Italy\u2019s reformist Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has seen his numbers fall below 30 percent.

President Obama outlined many solutions to the problems of growth and inequality in his speech Tuesday to the United Nations. He explained how the United States has focused its reform and recovery efforts on helping the middle class gain better access to jobs, health care, training and housing. He argued that furthering these efforts \u2014 with new investments in child care, infrastructure and basic research \u2014 would keep this momentum going. He pointed out that immigration and assimilation can work for all of society.

But the policy solutions he put forth and the ones that other countries are adopting are all small-bore, specific and incremental. They are wonky efforts to nudge the market, government and people in ways that will work gradually. Meanwhile, the populists promise dramatic, bold solutions that sound much more satisfying. Donald Trump tells Americans that their lives are hard and there is a simple reason for it: foreigners. They steal jobs, burden America\u2019s welfare state and make Americans less safe. His solution is to get tough on them. That will make the country great again, he promises.

It\u2019s not hard to understand the appeal of simplicity in a complex world. There is little drama in plans to expand early childhood education \u2014 and yet they work. The persistent and energetic efforts at reform do pay off. Sensible, fact-based, market-friendly government policy makes a difference. A recent Census Bureau report, showing the biggest one-year drop in poverty in America in almost 50 years, highlights that these efforts in America are working.

Canada is handling its slowdown, welcoming thousands of refugees and celebrating diversity. And the two major leaders in the Western world with the highest approval ratings today are Barack Obama and Justin Trudeau. The center can hold.

"}, {"id":"2e6ff982-d3eb-557c-9cc5-b939ab88940c","type":"article","starttime":"1474675200","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-23T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Write in VP candidates on ballot","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_2e6ff982-d3eb-557c-9cc5-b939ab88940c.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-write-in-vp-candidates-on-ballot/article_2e6ff982-d3eb-557c-9cc5-b939ab88940c.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-write-in-vp-candidates-on-ballot/article_2e6ff982-d3eb-557c-9cc5-b939ab88940c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"It's time to face the facts. This election is a complete and utter sham. But, there is a way for the United States to demonstrate to ourselves and the world at large that we have a viable constitution. Everyone should look at the list of presidential candidates and the vice-presidential candidates. If you don't believe that there's any reason the presidential candidates should attain the highest office in the land, please choose one of the vice-presidential candidates and write that person in as your choice for president.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"2e6ff982-d3eb-557c-9cc5-b939ab88940c","body":"

It's time to face the facts. This election is a complete and utter sham. But, there is a way for the United States to demonstrate to ourselves and the world at large that we have a viable constitution.

Everyone should look at the list of presidential candidates and the vice-presidential candidates. If you don't believe that there's any reason the presidential candidates should attain the highest office in the land, please choose one of the vice-presidential candidates and write that person in as your choice for president.

This would accomplish many things: The major political parties would have to review their processes and vetting procedures. The world would have to acknowledge that Americans are a good deal smarter than they thought. We would have a president who understands that all the nonsense being spouted by either side is seen as just that, utter nonsense. God Bless the U. S. of A.

Gregg Gilbert

Southeast side

\u00a0

"}, {"id":"285c4d71-3f19-546e-8ea7-0b96e0317194","type":"article","starttime":"1474675200","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-23T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Enough with hard-to-read receipts","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_285c4d71-3f19-546e-8ea7-0b96e0317194.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-enough-with-hard-to-read-receipts/article_285c4d71-3f19-546e-8ea7-0b96e0317194.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-enough-with-hard-to-read-receipts/article_285c4d71-3f19-546e-8ea7-0b96e0317194.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"When I am out in town I usually make at least one local purchase. Stores usually give purchaser a paper receipt, unless you are at convenience store! I swear the merchants use disappearing ink in their computers and cash registers (oops that dates me). If I need to research or recover an old receipt it is usually hard to tell where it came from and the dollar amount on it, because the \"print\" has faded. Has anyone else experienced this, or am I the only one?","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"285c4d71-3f19-546e-8ea7-0b96e0317194","body":"

When I am out in town I usually make at least one local purchase. Stores usually give purchaser a paper receipt, unless you are at convenience store! I swear the merchants use disappearing ink in their computers and cash registers (oops that dates me).

If I need to research or recover an old receipt it is usually hard to tell where it came from and the dollar amount on it, because the \"print\" has faded. Has anyone else experienced this, or am I the only one?

Kenneth Unwin

East side

"}, {"id":"54bc5783-88b4-57bb-8b8a-dec753004b7e","type":"article","starttime":"1474675200","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-23T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: The Stars and Stripes","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_54bc5783-88b4-57bb-8b8a-dec753004b7e.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-the-stars-and-stripes/article_54bc5783-88b4-57bb-8b8a-dec753004b7e.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-the-stars-and-stripes/article_54bc5783-88b4-57bb-8b8a-dec753004b7e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"The iconic picture of the raising of the flag on Mt. Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima in World War II hangs on a wall in my home. There are no words on the picture, but only the image of those few Marines who raised the flag on that hill that took a treacherous fight to attain. This image says everything to me as to why I honor the flag so dearly. When I see the picture I can only think of the bloody battle weary Marines on the beach that looked up to see the Stars and Stripes flying on Mt. Suribachi.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"54bc5783-88b4-57bb-8b8a-dec753004b7e","body":"

The iconic picture of the raising of the flag on Mt. Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima in World War II hangs on a wall in my home. There are no words on the picture, but only the image of those few Marines who raised the flag on that hill that took a treacherous fight to attain.

This image says everything to me as to why I honor the flag so dearly. When I see the picture I can only think of the bloody battle weary Marines on the beach that looked up to see the Stars and Stripes flying on Mt. Suribachi.

May God bless all those who fought so hard in wars so that Americans who feel the need can have the right to sit down when the national anthem and the flag in view is being honored. As for me, I will NEVER sit as long as I can physically stand.

Jane Hilz

Northwest side

\u00a0

"}, {"id":"aaf61fd8-57fa-5c0f-ab84-42d3bb5791b1","type":"article","starttime":"1474675200","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-23T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Spoiled professional athletes","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_aaf61fd8-57fa-5c0f-ab84-42d3bb5791b1.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-spoiled-professional-athletes/article_aaf61fd8-57fa-5c0f-ab84-42d3bb5791b1.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-spoiled-professional-athletes/article_aaf61fd8-57fa-5c0f-ab84-42d3bb5791b1.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"I have a suggestion for the professional athletes who want to kneel down during the playing of the national anthem. If they truly want to make a difference in the world, make a substantial donation to a charity every time they show their disrespect for this country. For example, Wounded Warriors who have put their lives on the line and who have enabled these overpaid athletes to express their right to freedom of speech could use the money. Scholarship funds I'm sure would also appreciate a donation.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"aaf61fd8-57fa-5c0f-ab84-42d3bb5791b1","body":"

I have a suggestion for the professional athletes who want to kneel down during the playing of the national anthem. If they truly want to make a difference in the world, make a substantial donation to a charity every time they show their disrespect for this country. For example, Wounded Warriors who have put their lives on the line and who have enabled these overpaid athletes to express their right to freedom of speech could use the money. Scholarship funds I'm sure would also appreciate a donation.

These athletes make an absurd amount of money for what they do compared to the average american and work half the hours. If they truly want to make a positive change in the world, let them put their money where their mouths are. The freedoms we enjoy today were earned through blood and sweat and not handed to us.

Fred DiNoto

Northwest side

"}, {"id":"91bee4eb-d88c-5672-b128-3156c150cde3","type":"article","starttime":"1474675200","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-23T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Disappearing sidewalks are dangerous","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_91bee4eb-d88c-5672-b128-3156c150cde3.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-disappearing-sidewalks-are-dangerous/article_91bee4eb-d88c-5672-b128-3156c150cde3.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-disappearing-sidewalks-are-dangerous/article_91bee4eb-d88c-5672-b128-3156c150cde3.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Re: the Sept. 21 column \"Tucson's roads are bad, but\u00a0sidewalks\u00a0are nonexistent\" With reference to Tim Steller's column, I completely concur that this is reality and about the dangers that lurk just beyond the disappearing sidewalks. I retired permanently toTucson over five years ago, enveloped by the splendor of the light on the mountains, the raw and beauteous landscape and the desert that speaks to me each day with wild abandonment.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"91bee4eb-d88c-5672-b128-3156c150cde3","body":"

Re: the Sept. 21 column \"Tucson's roads are bad, but\u00a0sidewalks\u00a0are nonexistent\"

With reference to Tim Steller's column, I completely concur that this is reality and about the dangers that lurk just beyond the disappearing sidewalks. I retired permanently toTucson over five years ago, enveloped by the splendor of the light on the mountains, the raw and beauteous landscape and the desert that speaks to me each day with wild abandonment.

I am truly a happily transplanted N.Y.C. retiree and enjoy a home here in Tucson. But, watch out folks, the case of the disappearing sidewalks augment a clear and present danger to those of us who bike, walk our dogs and other pets or enjoy a stroll around the neighborhood.

Suddenly, one loses footing and there you have it \u2014 another lost but brief sidewalk leading to rocky slopes, curious hedges, brush and other unidentifiable footing. Tucsonans best beware. Let's advocate and be vigilante. Completed sidewalk should be part of future infrastructure for our health and safety.

Lindy M. Elias\u00a0

Midtown

"}, {"id":"f4b19ae8-dc93-5e68-9c1e-8f42c223e394","type":"article","starttime":"1474675200","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-23T17:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474715035","sections":[{"guest":"news/opinion/column/guest"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Ann Nichols: Arizona program helps grandparents raising grandchidren","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/guest/article_f4b19ae8-dc93-5e68-9c1e-8f42c223e394.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/guest/ann-nichols-arizona-program-helps-grandparents-raising-grandchidren/article_f4b19ae8-dc93-5e68-9c1e-8f42c223e394.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/guest/ann-nichols-arizona-program-helps-grandparents-raising-grandchidren/article_f4b19ae8-dc93-5e68-9c1e-8f42c223e394.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Ann Nichols\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Arizona group is helping families.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["ann nichols","grandparents day","grandparents rights"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"104308af-10cf-5a1a-bbbb-ebcfee28fea3","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/04/104308af-10cf-5a1a-bbbb-ebcfee28fea3/576e163158c3d.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/04/104308af-10cf-5a1a-bbbb-ebcfee28fea3/55d4bb3ca8c46.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/04/104308af-10cf-5a1a-bbbb-ebcfee28fea3/576e163158c3d.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C54&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/04/104308af-10cf-5a1a-bbbb-ebcfee28fea3/576e163158c3d.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C54"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"f4b19ae8-dc93-5e68-9c1e-8f42c223e394","body":"

September is a good month for grandfathers and grandmothers. The Sunday after Labor Day is celebrated annually as Grandparents Day in the United States.

President Obama, in his 2016 proclamation for National Grandparents Day, commended such characteristics as their wisdom, compassion, grit and a legacy of hard work and community involvement.

One category of grandparents he singled out for recognition is the millions who are primary caregivers for their grandchildren, \u201cproviding the discipline, guidance and encouragement needed to thrive.\u201d

He called these grandparents \u201cour heroes, our confidantes and our fiercest advocates.\u201d

Here in Arizona, some grandparents have organized to speak up for the needs of grandparents raising grandchildren, as well as other kinship families (non-parents caregivers for children).

The Arizona Grandparent Ambassadors are a support network and an advocacy movement. They have groups that meet in the Phoenix area, Central Arizona and Tucson, and have plans to expand throughout the state.

Besides meetings and workshops, every year they sponsor a Grandparents Day at the Legislature and an Arizona Grandparent Ambassadors Summit to provide education and determine priorities for action.

Why have Arizona Grandparent Ambassadors decided to include advocacy as well as mutual support in their mission?

According to the Children\u2019s Action Alliance, more than 76,200 children in Arizona are being raised by grandparents or other relatives. In one-fourth of these families, the grandparent has a disability.

A similar proportion of these families lives below the poverty line.

Most grandparents didn\u2019t plan to be responsible for caring for children in their older years.

They have stepped up because they were needed and to prevent these children from having to enter the overburdened foster-care system.

Some are still working or find themselves going back to work to support their expanded family. Others are living on Social Security or using their retirement savings earlier than they had planned.

The Grandparent Ambassadors have worked successfully with legislators to secure financial support for some of these families. One enactment provides support for certain families in unlicensed kinship foster care.

The Grandparent Stipend is $75 per month per child and is administered by the Department of Child Safety.

Another bill corrected a \u201cgrandparent penalty\u201d in the TANF program (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families.)

Now a child affected by the \u201ckidcap\u201d policy can receive TANF benefits while living in a kinship family.

Another accomplishment by the Grandparent Ambassadors with the Legislature has been the proclamation of September as Kinship Care Month.

Arizona is one of eight states to have passed such a resolution. The others are Virginia, New York, South Dakota, Vermont, Georgia, Ohio, and New Jersey.

This official designation recognizes all non-parent caregivers of children, predominantly grandparents, and honors the contributions they are making to the lives of the children they are raising.

There is also a movement to secure a congressional proclamation of September as an official nationally recognized kinship care month.

It would be wise to celebrate the contributions of grandparents raising grandchildren all year long, not just in September.

Research has shown that compared to children who enter the foster-care system, children raised by grandparents have \u201cimproved school performance, less reliance on welfare, more autonomy in decision making and fewer deviant behaviors.\u201d

Kinship care minimizes disruption when children cannot stay with their parents for whatever reason.

These families deserve greater financial support and easier access to health and behavioral health services.

In partnership with an array of community agencies active in working on these issues, Arizona Grandparent Ambassadors pledge to continue their education and advocacy work on behalf of kinship families.

"}, {"id":"8b26178b-3009-5658-9997-7f51c241a8d6","type":"article","starttime":"1474594200","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-22T18:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474628555","sections":[{"commentary":"ap/commentary"},{"column":"news/opinion/column"}],"flags":{"ap":"true","web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Opinion: If Clinton loses, blame the media","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/article_8b26178b-3009-5658-9997-7f51c241a8d6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/opinion-if-clinton-loses-blame-the-media/article_8b26178b-3009-5658-9997-7f51c241a8d6.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/commentary/opinion-if-clinton-loses-blame-the-media/article_8b26178b-3009-5658-9997-7f51c241a8d6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Thomas E. Patterson","prologue":"Coverage of her is negative, and focuses on Trump's response to her.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["2016 united states presidential election","united states presidential election","government and politics","media","national elections","elections","events"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"revision":8,"commentID":"8b26178b-3009-5658-9997-7f51c241a8d6","body":"

If Hillary Clinton loses the presidential election in November, we will know the reason. The email controversy did her candidacy in. But it needed a helping hand \u2014 and the news media readily supplied that.

My analysis of media coverage in the four weeks surrounding both parties\u2019 national conventions found that her use of a private email server while secretary of state and other scandal references accounted for 11 percent of Clinton\u2019s news coverage in the top five television networks and six major newspapers. Excluding neutral reports, 91 percent of the email-related news reports were negative in tone. Then, there were the references to her character and personal life, which accounted for 4 percent of the coverage; that was 92 percent negative.

While Trump declared open warfare on the mainstream media \u2014 and of late they have cautiously responded in kind \u2014 it has been Clinton who has suffered substantially more negative news coverage throughout nearly the whole campaign.

Few presidential candidates have been more fully prepared to assume the duties of the presidency than is Clinton. Yet, her many accomplishments as first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state barely surfaced in the news coverage of her candidacy at any point in the campaign. She may as well as have spent those years baking cookies.

How about her foreign, defense, social or economic policies? Don\u2019t bother looking. Not one of Clinton\u2019s policy proposals accounted for even 1 percent of her convention-period coverage; collectively, her policy stands accounted for a mere 4 percent of it. But she might be thankful for that: News reports about her stances were 71 percent negative to 29 percent positive in tone. Trump was quoted more often about her policies than she was. Trump\u2019s claim that Clinton \u201ccreated ISIS,\u201d for example, got more news attention than her announcement of how she would handle the Islamic State.

I also looked at the year before the 2016 primaries began, and even then Clinton had a 2-to-1 ratio of bad press to good press. There was only one month in all of 2015 where the tone of her coverage on balance was not in the red \u2014 and even then it barely touched positive territory.

During the primaries, her coverage was again in negative territory and again less positive than Trump\u2019s. After the conventions got underway and Trump got embroiled in a testy exchange with the parents of a slain Muslim U.S. soldier, the tone of his coverage nosedived and her coverage looked rosy by comparison. But even then it was not glowing. Her convention-period news coverage was 56 percent negative to 44 percent positive.

Clinton\u2019s emails and the accompanying narrative \u2014 \u201cshe can\u2019t be trusted\u201d \u2014 have been a defining feature of coverage from the campaign\u2019s start. Only occasionally have reporters taken the narrative a step further. How important, exactly, are her emails in the larger context of presidential fitness? And just how large a transgression are they?

Judging from their stories, journalists rate the emails as being a highly important and very serious issue. They cover it heavily and with damning tone. When 90 percent or more of the coverage of a subject is negative, the verdict is in. Even good news gets turned to her disadvantage. For example, when the FBI announced that her emails did not violate the law, the Los Angeles Times ran a story focused on Trump\u2019s response, quoting him as saying, \u201cThis is one of the most crooked politicians in history. \u2026 We have a rigged system, folks.\u201d

In today\u2019s hypercompetitive media environment, journalists find it difficult to resist controversies. Political scientist W. Lance Bennett explored this phenomenon around Trump\u2019s 2011 allegation that President Obama was not a native-born American. Trump\u2019s \u201cbirther\u201d statements were seized upon by cable outlets and stayed in the headlines and on newscasts for days. Veteran CNN correspondent Candy Crowley even interviewed Trump, who was then not a political figure at all. She justified it by saying on air: \u201cThere comes a point where you can\u2019t ignore something, not because it\u2019s entertaining. \u2026 The question was, \u2018Is he driving the conversation?\u2019 And he was.\u201d In truth, the news media were driving the conversation, as they have with Clinton\u2019s emails.

Decades ago, the Hutchins Commission on Freedom of the Press concluded that reporters routinely fail to provide a \u201ccomprehensive and intelligent account of the day\u2019s events in the context that gives them some meaning.\u201d Whatever else might be concluded about the coverage of Clinton\u2019s emails, context has been largely missing. Some stories spelled out how the merging of private and official emails by government officials was common practice. There were also some, though fewer, who tried to assess the harm, if any, that resulted from her use of a private server. As for Clinton\u2019s policy proposals and presidential qualifications, they\u2019ve been completely lost in the glare of damaging headlines and sound bites.

"}, {"id":"5b9ca900-5645-52c2-88da-6e1a9be3d513","type":"article","starttime":"1474592400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-22T18:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1474628560","sections":[{"guest":"news/opinion/column/guest"}],"flags":{"web_only":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Betty Stauffer: Literacy is the foundation of a community","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/guest/article_5b9ca900-5645-52c2-88da-6e1a9be3d513.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/guest/betty-stauffer-literacy-is-the-foundation-of-a-community/article_5b9ca900-5645-52c2-88da-6e1a9be3d513.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/guest/betty-stauffer-literacy-is-the-foundation-of-a-community/article_5b9ca900-5645-52c2-88da-6e1a9be3d513.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Betty Stauffer\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"It's never too late to learn to read and write.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["betty stauffer","literacy connects","reading","writing","arizon@works"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"e374f2bd-ee7c-58c9-9312-dd89154ffedd","description":"Betty Stauffer","byline":"Maria Parham\nArizona Daily Star","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"429","height":"604","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/37/e374f2bd-ee7c-58c9-9312-dd89154ffedd/57e44d5cc5f89.image.jpg?resize=429%2C604"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"140","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/37/e374f2bd-ee7c-58c9-9312-dd89154ffedd/552fe9dee72d4.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"422","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/37/e374f2bd-ee7c-58c9-9312-dd89154ffedd/541748dd1426e.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1442","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/37/e374f2bd-ee7c-58c9-9312-dd89154ffedd/57e44d5cc5f89.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"5b9ca900-5645-52c2-88da-6e1a9be3d513","body":"

Every day, as the executive director of Literacy Connects, I see the real impact that literacy, or a lack thereof, has on individual lives and the community at large. I\u2019m writing to bring awareness to National Adult Education and Family Literacy Week (Sept. 26 to Oct. 1), and to acknowledge the place that literacy holds in our community.

I recently sat down with one of our Adult Basic Literacy students to talk with him about the role that literacy has played in his life. As a young man, Robert Soto loved school. \u201cI loved to read,\u201d he said. However, he went to work on oil rigs before he graduated from high school. The money was good and he enjoyed working with his hands. From working on oil rigs, to working as a construction foreman to being a manager of auto sales, Robert always held down a good job, but he eventually found it difficult to navigate the job market without a GED.

\u201cI wanted to move forward,\u201d Robert said, and so he contacted Arizona@Work for some guidance. They referred him to the Lindsey Learning Center, a collaboration between Literacy Connects and Arizona@Work, that provides skills improvement and GED preparation to job seekers. In his own words, Robert \u201cjust kept chipping away\u201d and eventually went on to earn his GED last spring. Literacy Connects \u201cempowered me to take steps \u2026 I feel confident,\u201d he said, reflecting on his time in our program.

\u201cYou can go further in life,\u201d Robert says of being able to read and write. When asked what he planned to do next, he was quick with his answer, \u201cPractice law!\u201d He hopes to enroll at the University of Arizona to get his bachelor\u2019s degree, so that one day he can \u201cget a job in the community helping people to go in a good direction.\u201d

Perhaps the most touching part of Robert\u2019s story is the example he set for his grandchildren. One of his grandsons always tells him, \u201cYou know a lot of words. You\u2019re really smart!\u201d Robert passes on his love of learning to his grandchildren. He believes that being able to read and write gives children better self-esteem.

The education level of a parent or guardian is the best predictor of a child\u2019s success in school. Parents and guardians are the first (and often best) teachers, and that is why investing in adult literacy paves the road to success for generation after generation. When you think of the National Adult Education and Family Literacy Week, think of Robert and his grandson, and all the future generations that will come after them. We have to prioritize literacy.

Literacy is the foundation that a community stands on. It is important for academic, economic, and personal success. According to the Arizona State Department of Education, fewer than 10 percent of Arizonans in need of literacy services are being served.

But that can change.

Contact Literacy Connects to learn more about the state of literacy in Southern Arizona, and how you can make a difference by investing in literacy in our community. Visit us on the web today at literacyconnects.org.

"}, {"id":"178e99bc-4a0c-5722-8dd6-8c78c3a50019","type":"article","starttime":"1474588800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-22T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Without funding, education goals are only goals","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_178e99bc-4a0c-5722-8dd6-8c78c3a50019.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-without-funding-education-goals-are-only-goals/article_178e99bc-4a0c-5722-8dd6-8c78c3a50019.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-without-funding-education-goals-are-only-goals/article_178e99bc-4a0c-5722-8dd6-8c78c3a50019.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Gov. Doug Ducey\u2019s announcement of a 60 percent higher education goal by 2030 is commendable. However, he made no commitment to the increased funding necessary to make it a reality. Arizona has cut all funding for community colleges in Pima and Maricopa counties and slashed funding to the state\u2019s public universities. Since the recession, tuition has risen more in Arizona than in any other state, leaving many students unable to pursue a post-secondary degree.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"178e99bc-4a0c-5722-8dd6-8c78c3a50019","body":"

Gov. Doug Ducey\u2019s announcement of a 60 percent higher education goal by 2030 is commendable. However, he made no commitment to the increased funding necessary to make it a reality.

Arizona has cut all funding for community colleges in Pima and Maricopa counties and slashed funding to the state\u2019s public universities. Since the recession, tuition has risen more in Arizona than in any other state, leaving many students unable to pursue a post-secondary degree.

As the executive director of Students for Affordable Tuition, our group is working to change the conversation behind education funding by encouraging people to share their stories of how student debt is affecting them.

If the voters are serious about increasing the number of Arizonans who pursue education beyond high school, they should support candidates like Kirsten Engel who will make education funding a priority. And if the Governor is serious, he should propose a budget that enables universities to keep tuition low and students from all walks of life to succeed.

Chetan Bafna

Downtown

"}, {"id":"ad1ffabd-5b81-5035-9610-3a83c3e699b9","type":"article","starttime":"1474588800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-22T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"letters":"news/opinion/letters"},{"mailbag":"news/opinion/mailbag"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: McSally's confusing messages","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/article_ad1ffabd-5b81-5035-9610-3a83c3e699b9.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-mcsally-s-confusing-messages/article_ad1ffabd-5b81-5035-9610-3a83c3e699b9.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/letters/letter-mcsally-s-confusing-messages/article_ad1ffabd-5b81-5035-9610-3a83c3e699b9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"I find the political TV advertisement for Rep. Martha McSally to be unsettling in a generally unusual election year. She is pictured in a flight suit telling us how she will stop ISIS terrorists and others crossing our southern border, to protect America. Yet the candidate of her party for president, through many covert international business relationships, could be the greatest threat to security the United States and the world has ever seen.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["letters"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"620","height":"457","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?resize=620%2C457"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/55d4bbb53928a.preview-100.png"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"168","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59&resize=300%2C168&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/50/450d33e5-026d-5f3a-ac28-07980a7de4f7/57294d6d56ce9.image.png?crop=620%2C348%2C0%2C59"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"ad1ffabd-5b81-5035-9610-3a83c3e699b9","body":"

I find the political TV advertisement for Rep. Martha McSally to be unsettling in a generally unusual election year. She is pictured in a flight suit telling us how she will stop ISIS terrorists and others crossing our southern border, to protect America. Yet the candidate of her party for president, through many covert international business relationships, could be the greatest threat to security the United States and the world has ever seen.

Regarding safety closer to home, she has ignored the pending bill to fund Zika virus prevention/research and voted not fund women\u2019s health issues. Congress just returned to Washington from a seven-week summer vacation, to work a week and then take time off to campaign. The ad implores us as voters to \u201cdeploy her to Washington.\u201d To do what?

Alan Barreuther

Foothills

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