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PHOENIX \u2014 An ongoing fight in the Arizona House over what constitutes a real prayer has heated up again.

The latest skirmish came last week after Democratic Rep. Athena Salman of Tempe delivered the chamber's daily invocation at the start of the session.

Salman said a humanist prayer and didn't ask members to pray to God or any other deity, a move that broke an informal House rule and led to a protest from Republicans on the House floor.

GOP Rep. Mark Finchem of Oro Valley was then allowed to offer a Christian prayer.

The dual messages, delivered Tuesday, were the latest in a series of prayer conflicts in the House.

Last year, then-Rep. Juan Mendez gave an invocation similar to Salman's, setting off a more vocal protest from GOP members. Republican leaders quickly called up a pastor who was in the chamber to give a Christian prayer. Mendez did the same in 2013, leading to similar results.

Mendez is now a senator and gave a nonreligious invocation last month that drew no complaints in the upper chamber.

Sen. Warren Peterson, who was a House member during Mendez's previous invocations, objected loudly last year. This year, he sat in silence.

In an interview Friday, he said members were deferring to Republican Senate leaders in letting Mendez's invocation go.

\"I certainly haven't changed my position \u2014 we don't pledge during the prayer, we don't pray during the pledge,\" Peterson said. \"Sometimes, you just let it go. I think the temperature's a lot hotter in the House.\"

The House order-of-business rules show the daily session starting with the Pledge of Allegiance, followed by a prayer. The Senate follows a similar routine, although the prayer and pledge aren't in the rulebook.

House Majority Leader John Allen issued an informal directive this year defining what constitutes a prayer. It should be \"short, focused on a higher power, and serve no political platform.\"

The Republican said Salman's prayer didn't pass muster.

\"She didn't pray. She told us she didn't pray,\" Allen said. \"Prayer has a definition. Even if she probably would have said, 'Would you pray with me,' or 'I personally don't have a higher power, but if you do would you turn this into your prayer' or something like that,\" it would have been fine.

Salman, who like Mendez is an atheist, is protesting mightily. She said a rule specifying what constitutes a prayer is unconstitutional.

\"We're talking about different faith perspectives, and it's not the government's job to define which faith perspectives are welcome in a prayer and how that should look,\" she said in an interview.

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Over the past 20 years, thousands of injured birds and critters have been quietly nursed back to health at a wildlife sanctuary nestled in the hills of northwest Tucson.

On the night of March 30 a fire ripped through the center, killing multiple animals and destroying structures, equipment, food and supplies the Wildlife Rehabilitation in Northwest Tucson relied on to operate.

It took 22 firefighters more than 20 minutes to extinguish the fire and another 45 minutes to search through the home for hot spots. With no hydrants in the area, firefighters had to use a water tender to battle the blaze.

Three weeks later, Wildlife Rehabilitation's training and operations continue despite the fact that many of the surviving animals have been moved to other centers or private homes until the sanctuary is rebuilt.

The cause of the fire hasn't been determined and much of the damage is still visible, as volunteers aren't able to clear out the wreckage until the fire inspection is complete.

\"It was devastating,\" volunteer Nancy Chilton said. \"The loss of property was one thing, but we lost some of our education birds and other birds who were in recovery and to whom we were very attached.\"

The sanctuary, owned and operated by 86-year-old Janet Miller, is licensed by the Arizona Game and Fish Department. In addition to rehabbing injured animals, the center also provides education to students across Tucson about desert wildlife and the ways animals can be injured by sharing their environment with humans.

The center takes in all types of animals, many of which are birds, but also small and larger mammals, including bobcats and coyotes.

Of the thousands of animals that have come through the center over the years, a high percentage have been rehabbed and released and a large number of the animals who had permanent injuries that didn't allow them to be released into the wild have been transferred to wildlife education facilities all over the country, including the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum and Reid Park Zoo, Chilton said.

The center has always been funded by private donations and staffed by volunteers, whom Miller says are essential to the sanctuary's day-to-day functioning.

There are roughly 60 volunteers who fill two shifts a day at the center, doing everything from housekeeping duties to assisting with wound care, physical therapy and feeding the animals, Chilton said.

Although more than a dozen birds of prey remain on site in the center's outdoor aviaries, many of the other surviving animals have been temporarily moved to other locations, leaving the volunteers with fewer birds to feed and tend to.

\"We're actually using the time that we have to work on other projects that have needed attention for a long time,\" Chilton said.

Once the fire inspection is complete, volunteers can begin cleaning up the structure, after which they'll begin to replace equipment and restock supplies lost in the fire. The next step will be rebuilding the main room where the animals were held and the adjacent cages.

\"This is going to be very much focused on redesigning and making the space more appropriate for the kind of work we're doing there,\" Chilton said. \"The center was one of those things that was added onto as need increased, now we have this opportunity to start from scratch and really design the whole place so that it's a good space for the animals and it's easy for the volunteers to move around in.\"

In early April, Chilton set up a\u00a0fundraising site with a goal of $10,000. In 18 days, it's exceeded its goal, raising more than $16,000.

\"The funding is going to be very helpful, but we're going to need continued funding to get through it. The insurance from the fire should help, but as far as running the center, we're always going to depend on public help,\" Chilton said.

While the large volume of donations that rolled in quickly was wonderful, the outpouring of support from community members offering to help in other ways was also a welcome surprise.

\"A lot of people have called and said they really want to help by either offering services or bringing us supplies,\" Chilton said. \"We've had Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts, and different groups like that who have come forward to offer their help with clean-up or with anything else where we need people. It's really encouraging.\"

"}, {"id":"27abd04c-464d-54ab-bbe8-d758c5aee182","type":"article","starttime":"1492972620","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-23T11:37:00-07:00","sections":[{"state":"ap/state"},{"business":"ap/business"},{"travel":"ap/travel"},{"local":"news/local"}],"flags":{"ap":"true","top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Grand Canyon tram project stalls","url":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/article_27abd04c-464d-54ab-bbe8-d758c5aee182.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/grand-canyon-tram-project-stalls/article_27abd04c-464d-54ab-bbe8-d758c5aee182.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/ap/state/grand-canyon-tram-project-stalls/article_27abd04c-464d-54ab-bbe8-d758c5aee182.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"The Associated Press","prologue":"The project calls for building a tram that would drop 3,200 feet into the canyon.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["business","general news","small business","travel","government and politics","canyons","environment and nature"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"147a6060-de21-57ae-b007-e4ea75cbf5ff","description":"Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Sunset on Cedar Ridge on South Kaibab Trail. July 12, 1957.","byline":"U.S. Geological Survey","hireswidth":1764,"hiresheight":1175,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147a6060-de21-57ae-b007-e4ea75cbf5ff/585afffa3ae97.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1141","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147a6060-de21-57ae-b007-e4ea75cbf5ff/585afffa39c72.image.jpg?resize=1141%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"56","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147a6060-de21-57ae-b007-e4ea75cbf5ff/585afffa39c72.image.jpg?crop=1764%2C992%2C0%2C127&resize=100%2C56&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147a6060-de21-57ae-b007-e4ea75cbf5ff/585afffa39c72.image.jpg?crop=1764%2C992%2C0%2C127&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"576","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/47/147a6060-de21-57ae-b007-e4ea75cbf5ff/585afffa39c72.image.jpg?crop=1764%2C992%2C0%2C127&resize=1024%2C576&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"27abd04c-464d-54ab-bbe8-d758c5aee182","body":"

PHOENIX \u2014 A project to build a 1.6-mile tram that would take visitors into the Grand Canyon is on hold for a few months after failing to gain enough support from Navajo Nation lawmakers.

The proposal must go through four committees before the tribal council votes. Two committees voted it down, a third wanted to table it and another, in which the whole council will debate the project, had not yet considered it before the spring session ended last week, The Arizona Republic reported.

The council could approve the measure even if the committees do not. But Larry Foster, a former Navajo council member and political adviser, said the measure is struggling for broad backing.

\"They don't have the votes. I think until they do, it's not in their interest to bring it to the council,\" said Roger Clark, of the group Grand Canyon Trust.

The project calls for building a tram that would drop 3,200 feet into the canyon, taking visitors from the rim to the Colorado River in about 10 minutes. It also calls for building commercial and retail space, a multimedia complex, a river walk and administrative buildings.

Supporters say the project would bring jobs to the cash-strapped reservation, while opponents say it could desecrate the region and turn the Grand Canyon into an amusement park.

The council could still vote on the proposal during the summer session, which starts July 17.

Council members have questioned the cost of the proposal in committee meetings. The Navajo Nation must come up with $65 million to start the project and will receive 8 to 18 percent of gross revenue, while the rest goes to outside investors.

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A Sahuarita woman mailed a package labeled \u201cmetal artwork\u201d to Hong Kong. But instead of artwork, the package contained a Ruger semi-automatic rifle.

The January 2014 mailing was the first of at least 27 packages of \u201cartwork\u201d Irina Cvetkovic, 58, would send to a Hong Kong man her fianc\u00e9e met online, according to documents filed in U.S. District Court in Tucson.

Six months later, Homeland Security Investigation agents knocked on her door with a search warrant.

Agents found $6,000 in cash, 10 guns, about 7,700 rounds of ammunition and 65 silencers. All told, the smuggling scheme run by four people in Green Valley and Sahuarita involved sending $124,000 of guns, ammunition and silencers to Hong Kong, court records show.

Steve Smith, owner of Wild West Air Arms in Green Valley, was sentenced earlier this month to 8\u00bd years in prison for his role in the scheme, which resulted in a 65-count indictment.

Peter Plesinger, 56, sales advisor at Top Gun Airguns in Sahuarita, pleaded guilty to smuggling charges and likely will be sentenced in coming weeks. His plea agreement included a sentence of about seven years. However, he asked to withdraw his plea because he did not understand the sentencing.

Cvetkovic faces up to a year of probation and Earl Richmond, 70, of Green Valley, was sentenced to three years of probation.

The scheme evolved from an online encounter between Plesinger and Wong Kin Wai, a fast-food restaurant manager in Hong Kong, according to federal court records and Hong Kong media reports.

After Wong inquired about buying U.S. guns, Plesinger said he knew how to ship guns without the FBI noticing, such as buying guns a few at a time and sending the guns in pieces.

To further hide the scheme, he offered to have his fianc\u00e9e, Cvetkovic, sign customs forms for the packages, court records show.

When Wong wanted a particular gun, Plesinger would order the gun through his store. Plesinger would take it apart and put the pieces in different packages. Cvetkovic would then take the packages to post offices in Sahuarita and Green Valley and send them to Wong.

Packages containing wood parts, such as the stock, she labeled \u201cwood art\u201d and packages with metal parts, such as the barrel or magazine, as \u201cmetal art.\u201d

Wong collected all the packages in Hong Kong and assembled the guns. He would then pay Plesinger through Paypal.

Wong paid Plesinger 50 percent more than the market value of the guns, plus a service fee and the cost of shipping and handling. In six months, Plesinger made $64,500 through his arrangement with Wong, court records show.

After a few successful shipments, Wong asked for higher-quality, more-expensive guns, as well as more ammunition and silencers.

The guns sent to Wong included Tikka T3 Sporter rifles, Benelli M4 Tactical 12-gauge shotguns, Sig Sauer semi-automatic rifles, Henry AR-7 rifles, and multiple handguns.

\u201cHe asked me for 10,000 rounds,\u201d Plesinger told federal agents, describing it as \u201cnot enough to start a war, but some ammo.\u201d

In a \u201cstroke of genius,\u201d Plesinger said Wong told him to wrap the ammunition in lead sheets to avoid detection by law enforcement scanners.

Some boxes of ammo were so heavy that Cvetkovic couldn\u2019t lift them and had to use a dolly to get them into the post office. Plesinger told authorities that she dropped one of the packages on her foot and was injured, court records show.

Smith began dealing with Wong as well, buying and shipping $59,550 in firearms to Wong as Plesinger had been doing, records show.

Smith told Wong that he knew someone who could build silencers. Wong asked for handgun and rifle silencers and agreed to pay $150 apiece for them.

Smith contacted his friend Richmond, who he knew from a Green Valley air-gun club, with the order for silencers, records show.

Authorities found silencers and equipment to make silencers in his garage, court records show. Richmond gave the silencers to Smith, who gave them to Plesinger.

The smuggling scheme came apart when two bullets fell out of a package at a Hong Kong post office, according to a report in the South China Morning Post.

The post office notified Hong Kong customs, who sent an agent disguised as a letter carrier to the restaurant where Wong worked. The agent offered Wong the package with the ammunition and then arrested Wong when he accepted it.

Authorities searched his house and found several guns, a silencer, and 9,000 rounds of ammunition. They also found 30 spent shell casings. Wong admitted he had been firing the guns in his apartment.

Wong had been talking about selling the guns through an online messaging service, according to the news report. He was sentenced to more than six years in prison.

Hong Kong customs notified Homeland Security Investigations, which is a branch of U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement, of the gun smuggling. HSI agents then intercepted two packages at Los Angeles International Airport sent by Plesinger and Cvetkovic to Wong.

HSI then sent agents to Plesinger\u2019s house with the search warrant.

The Star contacted the four lawyers representing the defendants, but they declined to comment.

"}, {"id":"ea1c035e-26b0-11e7-ada3-9b215738eee9","type":"link","starttime":"1492961400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-23T08:30:00-07:00","priority":43,"sections":[{"morguetales":"morguetales"},{"local":"news/local"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Arizona Daily Star front pages: McCarthy, the moon and McCartney","permalink":"http://tucson.com/historical-april-arizona-daily-star-front-pages/collection_4321b81e-26b0-11e7-874c-db9488b22e14.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/historical-april-arizona-daily-star-front-pages/collection_4321b81e-26b0-11e7-874c-db9488b22e14.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"We've collected a few front pages from\u00a0newspapers.com\u00a0to give you a look at some April 23 papers in history. With a subscription to\u00a0newspapers.com\u00a0you can search the Arizona Daily Star and many other newspapers using keywords or dates, and download articles or pages.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"url":"http://tucson.com/historical-april-arizona-daily-star-front-pages/collection_4321b81e-26b0-11e7-874c-db9488b22e14.html"}, {"id":"adb9918e-c8c6-5ea6-a308-ea72c60236d5","type":"article","starttime":"1492959600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-23T08:00:00-07:00","priority":35,"sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"families":"lifestyles/families"},{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"},{"relationships":"lifestyles/relationships"},{"books":"entertainment/books"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Mira Domsky: Why I work at the Pima County Public Library","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_adb9918e-c8c6-5ea6-a308-ea72c60236d5.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/mira-domsky-why-i-work-at-the-pima-county-public/article_adb9918e-c8c6-5ea6-a308-ea72c60236d5.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/mira-domsky-why-i-work-at-the-pima-county-public/article_adb9918e-c8c6-5ea6-a308-ea72c60236d5.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Mira Domsky\nSpecial to the Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"Who doesn\u2019t want to change the world? I\u2019m trying to change my little part of it.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#series"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"75987"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"d447f021-13b8-5d06-be8b-911b7e80cfd9","description":"Teens are in prime position to learn a skill and need to be able to make mistakes without being judged, says Mira Domsky.","byline":"Pima County Public Library","hireswidth":1175,"hiresheight":1762,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/44/d447f021-13b8-5d06-be8b-911b7e80cfd9/58f7ba8253ec1.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/44/d447f021-13b8-5d06-be8b-911b7e80cfd9/58f7ba82522a5.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/44/d447f021-13b8-5d06-be8b-911b7e80cfd9/58f7ba82522a5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/44/d447f021-13b8-5d06-be8b-911b7e80cfd9/58f7ba82522a5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/44/d447f021-13b8-5d06-be8b-911b7e80cfd9/58f7ba82522a5.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"adb9918e-c8c6-5ea6-a308-ea72c60236d5","body":"

This is the latest in a series about what\u2019s going on in the Pima County Public Library.

The library has always been like a second home to me. You see, I was the kid who kept coming to story time even though I was too old; the kid who hung out in the middle school library at lunch; and the kid who did the summer reading program every year until I turned 18. And now I\u2019m an adult who works at the library.

I\u2019ve never really wanted to be anywhere else.

For five years I was the young adult services librarian at the Wheeler Taft Abbett Sr. Library. While there, I did library outreach at schools, held book and movie release parties, an annual zombie prom, a weekly writing club and an anime club. I also trained more than 100 teen volunteers and put together a Teen Advisory Board to improve young adult services and provide leadership opportunities.

Currently I serve as the young adult services librarian at the Dusenberry-River Library. In addition to planning programs, conducting outreach, and working with teens, I serve on the Worlds of Imagination teen art contest, the MegaMania planning team and the Tucson Festival of Books Author Committee.

My belief is quite simple: Teens need opportunities to succeed and a place to learn through self-exploration. I believe the Pima County Public Library can be that place for teens in our community.

At the library, we provide opportunities for learning and cultivating leadership and social skills through volunteering, but we also allow ample time and room for them to explore what excites them. It\u2019s through these things that we help them understand how valuable they are today and how important they are to the future.

No one feels anything more intensely than a teenager. A part of me misses those dizzying highs, but then I remember the abysmal lows, and I\u2019m mostly OK with having grown out of it (mostly). That intense emotion and enthusiasm is what I want to encourage and teach teens to direct into something they can use.

Whether that something is art, science or community service, this is one of the best times in their lives to develop a skill. I want to encourage them in the things they love in hope that it will give them strength to carry through those abysmal lows. I want them to know that they matter, and to realize that they are the future. Someday the world will be theirs, and I want them to be ready.

Children need the approval of their parents, but teens want to break away from their parents and establish their own identity. As a teenager, I had teachers who helped point me towards my path, and I hope I can be a similar adult mentor for some of the teens I work with.

Above all, I want teens to learn how to learn. I want them to be able to distinguish fact from hearsay, news from memes, and opportunities from scams. Reading is one way to learn, and research shows that reading abilities improve regardless of the reading material. The more widely you read, the more you learn.

Learning by doing is another way. I try to provide opportunities for that too, using games to teach critical thinking, and crafts that teach analog skills and encourage creativity.

Since moving to the Dusenberry-River Library last year, I\u2019ve been adjusting to the different kinds of teenagers who hang out here and trying to provide them with intellectually stimulating activities that follow the Connected Learning philosophy of Hang Out, Mess Around, Geek Out, or HOMAGO (We love acronyms in library land).

This philosophy emphasizes social learning, and it encourages teens to try new things in a supportive, low-consequence environment and teach each others what they\u2019ve learned. Over the summer I\u2019ll be offering art classes, 99-cent-store hacks, crafting, and 21st-century tech workshops that offer hands-on learning experiences without the fear of being graded or tested.

They can just have fun, try new things, make mistakes, and try again. Making mistakes is an important part of the learning process, and as author Neil Gaiman says, \u201cIf you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world.\u201d

Who doesn\u2019t want to change the world? I\u2019m trying to change my little part of it. I want the library to be a safe place for people, especially teenagers, to learn and explore. Personally, I want to learn about everything and I love helping other people do the same. That\u2019s why I work at the library.

"}, {"id":"d145d564-6775-5df4-adb9-312366f181d6","type":"article","starttime":"1492956000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-23T07:00:00-07:00","priority":35,"sections":[{"business":"business"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"travel":"travel"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Travel Solutions: Norwegian Cruise Line reneges on its refund offer","url":"http://tucson.com/business/article_d145d564-6775-5df4-adb9-312366f181d6.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/business/travel-solutions-norwegian-cruise-line-reneges-on-its-refund-offer/article_d145d564-6775-5df4-adb9-312366f181d6.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/business/travel-solutions-norwegian-cruise-line-reneges-on-its-refund-offer/article_d145d564-6775-5df4-adb9-312366f181d6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Christopher Elliott\nThe Travel Troubleshooter","prologue":"When Ross Horrocks' cruise goes bad, Norwegian offers him a full refund. Then the company withdraws the offer. Can it do that?","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"75947"},"presentation":"","revision":6,"commentID":"d145d564-6775-5df4-adb9-312366f181d6","body":"

Q: My wife and I recently took an 11-day Southeast Asia cruise onboard the Norwegian Star departing from Singapore. Shortly before our vacation, we were advised that the cruise itinerary had changed because of a technical issue with the ship. This was an extreme disappointment, since we had made plans for my wife\u2019s 50th birthday in Thailand as the main part of our vacation.

Since our new itinerary allowed us an extra two days in Singapore, we planned our time carefully. We made arrangements for activities on the days that had been added to our itinerary and confirmed to us by Norwegian. We also changed extra currency to Singapore dollars on the evening before embarking on the ship in order to cover the cost of our extra time in Singapore.

When we embarked, we were informed that there was another change to our itinerary and that we would not be spending the extra time in Singapore as previously advised by Norwegian. Instead, we were setting sail on that day. This was a complete surprise to us, although other passengers had been informed of this change in itinerary.

Norwegian had offered a 20 percent refund on the cruise before boarding because of problems it was experiencing before we even set off. We rejected this, as it was not acceptable or appropriate. After the cruise, we were offered a full refund for the cruise only, not including hotel and flights, to be taken as a voucher for a future cruise with Norwegian plus a $1,000 credit that could have been taken as either cash or onboard credit. We accepted this in writing.

Norwegian subsequently retracted this offer, after acceptance, returning to a standard 20 percent, cruise-only refund.

I have tried contacting Norwegian, but nobody is returning my emails or assisting in any way. This has been going on since December 2016. I do not understand how Norwegian can retract its offer. Can you help? \u2014 Ross Horrocks, Denholm, Scotland

A: I\u2019m sorry to hear about your schedule changes. It\u2019s a little-known fact that when you\u2019re rerouted, the cruise line owes you virtually nothing. You may get a refund for the port tax, but that\u2019s about it.

Don\u2019t believe me? Check out Norwegian Cruise Line\u2019s Guest Ticket Contract: www.ncl.com/sites/default/files/Guest-Ticket-Contract-11-2015.pdf

That\u2019s the agreement between you and the cruise line. Scroll down to Section 6 for the details. Told you!

In your case, Norwegian offered a vague reason for the change, noting that \u201cthere are malfunctions that affect the vessel\u2019s speed and, therefore, our ability to deliver the itinerary as scheduled.\u201d It probably shouldn\u2019t have said anything; it didn\u2019t have to.

But this isn\u2019t really a case about ticket contracts. No, this is about Norwegian extending an offer and rescinding it \u2014 and I can\u2019t think of a good reason for that. If a business offers you something and you accept it in writing, it\u2019s case closed.

You could have appealed to a Norwegian executive. I list their names, numbers and email addresses on my consumer-advocacy site: elliott.org/company-contacts/norwegian-cruise-line-ncl.

When I checked with you, I learned that you already had, but to no avail. I contacted Norwegian on your behalf, and it agreed to honor its offer.

"}, {"id":"ba49a8a4-6ddc-594d-a15f-6659be5811ce","type":"article","starttime":"1492948800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-23T05:00:00-07:00","priority":35,"sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"application":"editorial","title":"A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later","url":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/article_ba49a8a4-6ddc-594d-a15f-6659be5811ce.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/a-healthy-middle-aged-heart-may-protect-your-brain-later/article_ba49a8a4-6ddc-594d-a15f-6659be5811ce.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/lifestyles/a-healthy-middle-aged-heart-may-protect-your-brain-later/article_ba49a8a4-6ddc-594d-a15f-6659be5811ce.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Dennis Thompson\nHealthDay Reporter","prologue":"MRI scans revealed larger deposits of amyloid in the brains of seniors who smoked, had high blood pressure, were obese, diabetic or had elevated cholesterol levels when middle-aged.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["amyloid plaques","alzheimer's"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"75807"},"presentation":"","revision":5,"commentID":"ba49a8a4-6ddc-594d-a15f-6659be5811ce","body":"

Healthy aging of the brain relies on the health of your heart and blood vessels when you're younger, a new study reports.

People with risk factors for heart disease and stroke in middle age are more likely to have elevated levels of amyloid, a sticky protein known to clump together and form plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, the researchers said.

MRI scans revealed larger deposits of amyloid in the brains of seniors who smoked, had high blood pressure, were obese, diabetic or had elevated cholesterol levels when they were middle-aged, said lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She's an assistant professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

All of these risk factors can affect the health of a person's blood vessels, otherwise known as vascular health, leading to hardening of the arteries and other disorders.

\"Amyloid is what we think, by leading hypotheses, accumulates to cause Alzheimer's disease. So this suggests that vascular risk in middle age may play a direct role in the development of Alzheimer's disease,\" Gottesman said.

Two or more risk factors nearly tripled a person's risk of large amyloid deposits. One risk factor alone increased the likelihood of amyloid deposits by 88 percent, the study found.

Obesity in particular stood out as a strong risk factor, on its own doubling a person's risk of elevated amyloid later in life, said Steven Austad, chair of biology of aging and the evolution of life histories at the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

\"In terms of one risk factor by itself, that turned out to be the most important one, which is interesting,\" Austad said. \"Twenty years ago obesity was not the problem that it is now, suggesting that 20 years from now things might be considerably worse.\"

Gottesman and her colleagues examined data from nearly 350 people whose heart health has been tracked since 1987 as part of an ongoing study. The average age of the study participants was 52 at the start of the study. Sixty percent were women, and 43 percent were black. The average follow-up time was almost 24 years.

When the participants entered the study, none of them had dementia. About two decades later, they were asked to come back and undergo brain scans to check for signs of amyloid.

The researchers discovered a link between heart risk factors and brain amyloid. The relationship did not vary based either on race or known genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's.

Heart risk factors that cropped up late in life were not associated with brain amyloid deposits. What a person does in their middle age is what apparently contributes to their later risk of elevated amyloid, not what happens later, Gottesman said.

The study did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship, but there are several theories why the health of a person's blood vessels might be linked to Alzheimer's.

Blood and spinal fluid contain amyloid, and some think that unhealthy blood vessels might allow amyloid to leak out of the bloodstream and into brain tissue, said Austad, a spokesman for the American Federation for Aging Research.

\"The idea that the first injury to the brain is really an injury to the blood vessels of the brain has been around for a while, and this would support that, generally,\" Austad said. \"The amyloid plaques, you're not seeing them inside the vessels. You're seeing them outside the vessels, in the brain.\"

Blood vessels also play a role in flushing out broken-down amyloid particles that naturally occur in a person's brain, said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach for the Alzheimer's Association.

\"You can imagine if there's something wrong with your brain's circulation, it could affect the clearance of this amyloid in some way,\" Fargo said.

Hardened arteries also can lead to strokes or mini-strokes that affect the ability to think and remember in some people as they age, which contributes to dementia and Alzheimer's, Gottesman said.

Based on these findings, people who want to protect their brain health should protect their heart health, and the sooner the better, Fargo said.

\"You don't want to wait until your 60s to start taking care of yourself. It has to be a lifetime commitment,\" Fargo said.

The findings were published earlier this month in the\u00a0Journal of the American Medical Association.

\u00a0

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The holy hoboes of Holy Trinity Monastery are deciding whether to hit the road for good as the St. David religious community faces an order to shut its doors.

The decree comes from on high \u2014 from leadership within the Order of Saint Benedict, the religious order under which Holy Trinity was formed in 1974.

In February, the Abbot General D. Diego M. Rosa, the top leader of the Benedictine Congregation of Santa Maria of Monte Oliveto Maggiore in Italy, issued a decree closing the monastery and removing the Rev. Henri Capdeville as its prior.

With only a priest and two brothers at the monastery, the Benedictine Congregation decided to dissolve the religious community \u201cbecause there are an insufficient number of monks at Saint David to maintain a regular monastic life,\u201d wrote the Very Rev. Mark-Ephrem Nolan in an email. Nolan, a Benedictine monk from Northern Ireland, was appointed by the abbot general to communicate the decree in person.

Capdeville and the two brothers are not the only ones who call the estimated 150-acre property home. A handful of laypeople devoted to the Rule of Saint Benedict \u2014 called oblates \u2014 live on site, along with the self-proclaimed holy hoboes who park in the monastery\u2019s Monte Cassino RV Park each winter.

Those residents will be less affected than the three vowed religious men, according to the congregation.

Taking it to court

After Capdeville received the orders and \u201crefused to obey the decrees which the Congregation issued and to cooperate as required,\u201d the congregation took the matter to Cochise County Superior Court, wrote Nolan, whom the decrees appointed president of the monastery\u2019s corporation in lieu of Capdeville.

Capdeville requested that the congregation reconsider the decree and though it was modified, it remained mostly the same, said his attorney, Lisa Anne Smith of DeConcini McDonald Yetwin and Lacy PC.

Capdeville, 60, has lived at the monastery about 40 years. He said his sister and stepfather are buried there. This is his whole life.

\u201cIt was too much for me,\u201d Capdeville said of the news. \u201cWe came here with the idea that it would be a lifetime commitment to the monastery, and that\u2019s what we understood.\u201d

The congregation\u2019s complaint of trespass filed with Superior Court requests the removal of Capdeville as the president of the monastery\u2019s corporation and requires that he leave the grounds and turn over \u201ckeys, passwords and other useful information,\u201d court records show.

It also identifies three congregation-selected men to be appointed to the monastery corporation (including Nolan). The congregation argues that as the religious order under which the monastery operates, it has authority over the Arizona sanctuary.

The heart of the case revolves around Capdeville leaving and who owns the corporation and property, Smith said. The hearing for a preliminary injunction was Wednesday, April 5.

The court sided with the congregation, meaning Capdeville has to move out by the end of April. He has been reassigned to Our Lady of Guadalupe Abbey in Pecos, New Mexico, he said.

Although the case is still in Superior Court, Capdeville filed an appeal and requested a stay that, if granted, would allow him to remain on the property while the Arizona Court of Appeals reviews the case.

A community disrupted

Thelma Meyer, 84, has been wintering at Holy Trinity for 27 years. An oblate, she is also the self-declared RV host. For her, this might be the end of an era.

Her late husband built the outdoor Stations of the Cross and oversaw the construction of a building used as a central hub for the RVers. The family funded the project, with the monastery matching the donation.

\u201cBut that\u2019s water under the bridge,\u201d Meyer said from her home in Iowa. She left the monastery in early April. \u201cThat has done its duty ... It drew people there and brought a family of RVers there who wanted to work ... It felt like a little extended home for everybody. So it was just really fantastic that everyone could get together and do what needed to be done.\u201d

During peak snowbird season, oblate and monastery newsletter editor Tom McGuire estimated that around 20 people live on the grounds volunteering. McGuire, 77, and his wife, Florence, spend six months out of the year at the monastery in their RV.

RVers pay rent to work, doing upkeep for the monastery during their stays. Some come for the religious life. Others just like the property and the people.

\u201cThe Olivetan Benedictines are committed to dialogue with the residential lay oblates to maintain their presence and the Catholic and Benedictine ethos of Holy Trinity, \u201d Nolan wrote.

In a statement released after the April 5 hearing, the congregation also noted that \u201cwhile there will no longer be Benedictine monks or priests at the facility, the Olivetan Benedictines also are working to find a way to continue some Catholic liturgies for those in the area that have come to rely on the Monastery church.\u201d

Still, winter residents such as McGuire are waiting to decide if they\u2019ll return to St. David . Meyer thinks her years there might be over.

The future of the property seems uncertain, and they will miss their friends.

\u201cOn a human level, it\u2019s devastating to all of us that were a part of that community,\u201d McGuire said.

Downsizing religious life

Beyond daily services and monastic living, the property also hosts spiritual retreats, an annual festival, a book shop and thrift store. Bird-watchers flock to the avian sanctuary along the San Pedro River, and rows of pecan trees greet visitors entering the grounds. A 70-foot-tall Celtic cross looms over the property.

These are a few of the ways the self-sufficient monastery has supported itself over the years.

\u201cA lot of religious communities are in the process of downsizing,\u201d said Mary Gautier, a senior research associate at the Catholic Church\u2019s Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate. \u201cThey are converting mother houses into assisted-living facilities and combining congregations. ... The very small monasteries have had to all but disappear.\u201d

The Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration, a Tucson monastery at 800 N. Country Club Road, announced its closure last fall. After more than 75 years in Tucson, the sisters will join the community\u2019s larger congregation in Clyde, Missouri.

Gautier said that after World War I and World War II, American Catholicism saw a spike in young people interested in the priesthood and vowed religious life. Interest peaked in the late 1960s, meaning that many religious communities have aged as fewer new members join.

That leaves religious orders with the task of figuring out how to make use of excess property and care for aging members in a way that best supports the order.

\u201cThey\u2019re trying to be good stewards,\u201d Gautier said, noting that when monks age, they are no longer able to care for a property as easily.

The property in St. David is now being overseen by Rick Valencia, a Roman Catholic Diocese of Tucson deacon who lives in the area, said diocese spokeswoman Steff Koeneman, clarifying that the diocese does not currently own the property.

Valencia, who was appointed secretary and treasurer of the corporation in the decree, is just caring for the property on behalf of the Benedictine Congregation for the time being.

\u201cThey\u2019re going to say I\u2019m disobedient, but it\u2019s really devastating,\u201d Capdeville said. \u201cIf this wasn\u2019t the place where I spent most of my life, and if I wasn\u2019t 60 years old, maybe it would have been easier. But that\u2019s where it\u2019s at.\u201d

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Is this the first crisis of Jay Johnson\u2019s tenure with the Arizona Wildcats?

That\u2019s probably too severe. This is baseball, after all. The season is long and winding. The 2016 Wildcats endured three three-game losing streaks before finding their form and reaching the College World Series finals.

But what happened at Hi Corbett Field this weekend at least qualifies as a speed bump.

Sixth-ranked Arizona, which had lost only one home game all season, got swept by Utah, which came to Tucson with a sub-.500 record. The Utes completed the sweep with a 4-2 victory Saturday night in front of an announced crowd of 3,732.

\u201cThe most disappointing thing is we did not improve throughout the weekend,\u201d Johnson said. \u201cWe\u2019re going to go back to work on that, make some adjustments (and) work on getting better, getting it right and being prepared to play on Tuesday.\u201d

After Utah\u2019s victory in the series opener Thursday night, Johnson said of the Utes: \u201cThere isn\u2019t a better ninth-place team in the country.\u201d They\u2019re no longer in ninth place. Nor is Utah (17-17, 8-10 Pac-12) under .500 overall.

The Utes have won six in a row over the Wildcats under Johnson and eight straight dating to 2015.

\u201cDon\u2019t let their record tell you anything about them,\u201d said reliever Robby Medel, who threw four scoreless innings. \u201cThey\u2019ve had our number for three years.\u201d

Arizona entered this week ranked No. 2 in RPI. The Wildcats were a consensus choice to be a national seed in the NCAA Tournament.

That still might happen, but Arizona now has serious work to do. The sweep dropped the Wildcats to 9-9 in the Pac-12. They\u2019re 26-12 overall.

Arizona had hoped to jump on Utah early Saturday night \u2014 a formula that helped the UA secure a series victory over Oregon one week earlier. But starter Rio Gomez couldn\u2019t get out of the first inning.

Gomez surrendered three runs before getting his first out, on a sacrifice bunt. Johnson pulled him at that point for Michael Flynn, who prevented any further damage with considerable help from right fielder Alfonso Rivas, who threw out a baserunner and made a running catch.

Flynn allowed a run in the second inning but settled into a groove after that. The sophomore right-hander yielded only that one run on three hits in 4\u00ba innings.

The performances of Flynn and Medel were bright spots in an otherwise bleak weekend. Medel has yet to allow a run in Pac-12 play, spanning five appearances and 11\u00aa innings.

Normally, four runs wouldn\u2019t be enough to beat Arizona. The Wildcats entered this week averaging a conference-best nine runs per game.

They scored 10 in three games vs. Utah. Utes lefty Josh Lapiana pitched a complete game, striking out six, mostly on breaking balls in the dirt.

\u201cWe swung at more bad pitches tonight than we have in a month and a half,\u201d Johnson said. \u201cWe\u2019ll address that.\u201d

Arizona also fell victim to spectacular infield defense. Utah shortstop Ellis Kelly thwarted a potential seventh-inning rally by leaping to spear Ryan Haug\u2019s line drive. Rivas, who led off the inning with a double, ended up being stranded at third.

\u201cI don\u2019t want to say d\u00e9j\u00e0 vu, but they did sweep us last year,\u201d Medel said. \u201cWe do a really good job as a team \u2026 of letting it get off of us. Not to say that this one didn\u2019t sting, but it\u2019s off of you and we\u2019re on to New Mexico State on Tuesday.\u201d

Inside pitch

"}, {"id":"325cbd7d-2c41-5ced-acca-9bbd8f4db71f","type":"article","starttime":"1492923600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-22T22:00:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1492975615","priority":35,"sections":[{"border":"news/local/border"},{"crime":"news/local/crime"}],"flags":{"watchdog":"true","enterprise":"true","top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Illegal crossers being snatched for ransom on O'odham land","url":"http://tucson.com/news/local/border/article_325cbd7d-2c41-5ced-acca-9bbd8f4db71f.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/local/border/illegal-crossers-being-snatched-for-ransom-on-o-odham-land/article_325cbd7d-2c41-5ced-acca-9bbd8f4db71f.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/local/border/illegal-crossers-being-snatched-for-ransom-on-o-odham-land/article_325cbd7d-2c41-5ced-acca-9bbd8f4db71f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Curt Prendergast\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Illegal border crossers held until families pay ransom.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["u.s.-mexico border","homeland security investigations","sells","kidnapping","illegal immigration"],"internalKeywords":["#latest"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"76002"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"54ac5a8c-4fcc-5741-b264-ca3be0aa3461","description":"Kidnappers see illegal immigrants as \u201cwalking bags of money,\u201d says a federal agent in Sells.","byline":"Greg Bryan / Arizona Daily Star 2009","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"906","height":"604","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/4a/54ac5a8c-4fcc-5741-b264-ca3be0aa3461/58fa8bc8ddde8.image.jpg?resize=906%2C604"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/4a/54ac5a8c-4fcc-5741-b264-ca3be0aa3461/564e51e463456.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"169","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/4a/54ac5a8c-4fcc-5741-b264-ca3be0aa3461/58fa8bc8ddde8.image.jpg?crop=906%2C509%2C0%2C47&resize=300%2C169&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"575","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/4a/54ac5a8c-4fcc-5741-b264-ca3be0aa3461/58fa8bc8ddde8.image.jpg?crop=906%2C509%2C0%2C47"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"325cbd7d-2c41-5ced-acca-9bbd8f4db71f","body":"

When four illegal immigrants walked up to a man running a carne asada cart in Sells on Jan. 25 they were seeking help.

Instead, they ended up locked in a room while their captors demanded thousands of dollars in ransom.

They had walked across the border illegally on the Tohono O\u2019odham Reservation, and the man with the cart, later identified by authorities as Francisco Ruelas Pe\u00f1a, said he knew someone who could help them, documents filed in U.S. District Court in Tucson show.

Ruelas Pe\u00f1a called Rosanna Manuel, 42, who drove them to a house in nearby Cowlic and held them for two days in a room that did not have electricity, plumbing or a bathroom.

The captives \u2014 two women and a man from Guatemala and a Mexican woman \u2014 were fed through a gap at the bottom of a locked door while their captors demanded they have family members send $6,000 for each of them, according to court records. A relative of one of the captives wired $200 to Manuel\u2019s niece.

They begged to be released from the room and on Jan. 27 they broke down the door and escaped, court records show. Border Patrol agents arrested them walking in the desert east of Sells. They told the agents about their ordeal and identified Manuel\u2019s blue SUV.

Agents arrested Manuel, who said she picked up the migrants and took them to her residence in Cowlic, court records show. Homeland Security Investigations agents searched the room where the migrants were held and found the door broken, as the captives had described.

Manuel pleaded guilty on March 17 to a felony human smuggling conspiracy charge. Per the plea agreement, Manuel will be sentenced to five years in prison. Ruelas Pe\u00f1a also was charged with human smuggling. He has pleaded not guilty.

Erik Breitzke, assistant special agent in charge for the HSI office in Sells, said he could not comment on the case while the prosecution unfolds, but he spoke in general terms about migrants taken hostage in Southern Arizona.

While crossing the border, migrants can get lost or separated from their guide when pursued by Border Patrol agents or other law enforcement, Breitzke said.

\u201cThey\u2019re looking for civilization. They\u2019re looking for food and water, for people to help them,\u201d he said. But they can appear to hostage takers as \u201cwalking bags of money.\u201d

In a second recent incident, a Honduran man and a Mexican man were walking through the desert near Sells when they were \u201cintercepted by the same armed \u2018mafia\u2019 men who had demanded the payment in order for them to cross into the United States,\u201d according to a criminal complaint filed April 14 in federal court.

They were forced into a car and taken to a gray cinderblock house in Sells where they were tied to a chair and held at gunpoint inside the back room of the house until they paid $1,000 each.

The captives told authorities they were held by three men and a woman until one of the captives called his family and arranged their release through three $500 money orders that were cashed in Tucson, records show.

The captives were taken to a bus stop and their captors watched them get on a shuttle to Tucson. One of their captors took photos of them and threatened to kill their families if they reported the kidnapping to law enforcement, records show.

In a lineup, the captives identified Melissa Marquez, 30, and Rosa Marquez Duran, 26, as two of their captors. Marquez and Marquez Duran each were charged with one count of kidnapping and one count of transporting illegal immigrants.

Kidnapping migrants often is a crime of opportunity committed by people who are not professional smugglers, Breitzke said. Professionals depend on word-of-mouth referrals and must do a good job for their clients.

Authorities find out about kidnapping cases only when the illegal immigrants report the incidents, which means kidnappings near the border likely occur more often than authorities know, Breitzke said.

\u201cAliens break laws, but in some ways that makes them more prone to victimization,\u201d he said.

Illegal immigrants may hesitate to contact law enforcement, which makes it easier for them to be extorted, he said. They are \u201cclose to their goal\u201d and their relatives will pay to get them to their destination.

After escaping their captors, migrants sometimes flag down police, Brietzke said, or they will decide to go back home.

\u201cSometimes they will just continue on their journey,\u201d he said.

In the past 10 years, migrants have faced more kidnapping, violence, and extortion as border enforcement ramped up, said Maryada Vallet, spokeswoman for Tucson-based humanitarian aid group No More Deaths.

With tougher border enforcement, the cost of crossing rose and cartels moved into the business of smuggling migrants, leading to harsher treatment of migrants, she said.

With the increase in Central Americans arriving at the border in recent years, volunteers heard stories from migrants about kidnappings south of the border, Vallet said.

Mexican news reports regularly show migrants, particularly those from Central America, reporting kidnappings as they travel toward the United States.

In November, a woman from the Mexican state of Nayarit broke her ankle when she leaped from a second-story window in Nogales, Sonora, to escape kidnappers who demanded $30,000 for her release, the Hermosillo newspaper El Imparcial reported.

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Basis school network is planning to open a primary campus on Tucson\u2019s south side as part of an initiative to bring its challenging curriculum to underserved areas.

\u201cThis is something that\u2019s been on the hearts and minds of the board and me as well,\u201d said Peter Bezanson, CEO of Basis.ed, the parent company for the nationally acclaimed Basis schools.

Basis Tucson South, one of two new campuses approved by the Arizona State Board for Charter Schools, would open in the fall of 2018 or 2019. The other campus, Phoenix South, is set to open this fall. In coming years, Basis plans to open a third school in north Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The proposed Tucson South school will be in the vicinity of the I-10/I-19 interchange, and is expected to serve about 300 students in kindergarten through third grade in its first year. The school would add fourth grade the following year.

Basis does not yet have a facility for the new school, Bezanson said. The network is working on building a donor base and finding just the right place.

The new school will be the fourth Basis campus in the Tucson area. Existing campuses are on the north side at River and Craycroft roads, in Oro Valley on North Oracle Road and in central Tucson near Speedway and Alvernon Way.

The Tucson South campus would serve \u201ca somewhat different target population than Basis Tucson Primary,\u201d according to the school proposal submitted to the state charter schools board. The area has more lower- to middle-income families compared to Basis Tucson Primary.

An analysis included in Basis\u2019 proposal to the charter schools board says the population in the area of the new school has about 69 percent of students who qualify for free or reduced lunch \u2014 an indicator of poverty \u2014 and nearly 64 percent are Hispanic. At Basis Tucson Primary, 18 percent are Hispanic.

The academic program at the new school will be identical to that of the existing primary school, but \u201cBasis Tucson South Primary will be prepared to adapt its operation to the unique needs of the community in South Tucson,\u201d according to the proposal. Part of that includes creating individual language plans for students who are learning English.

Basis schools typically do not offer lunch or transportation, which are barriers to lower-income students. However, Bezanson said the three schools in underserved areas may take part in the National School Lunch Program.

Transportation is much trickier, he said. Basis could consider looking into philanthropy for help. \u201cIt\u2019s something we\u2019d like to do if we can afford it.\u201d

The new school would draw students who are mostly within the Tucson Unified School District\u2019s boundaries. TUSD schools in the proposed area include Borton Magnet, C.E. Rose PreK-8, Carrillo K-5 Magnet and Drachman Montessori K-8 Magnet.

Those are excellent schools, said Interim TUSD Superintendent Gabriel Trujillo. Basis will not have an easy time getting parents, who he says are already thoroughly happy with their district schools, to enroll there.

TUSD would be prepared for any enrollment decreases that may happen, Trujillo said, but he added the school district should not fear charter schools opening within its boundaries.

\u201cWe need to dramatically improve our product,\u201d Trujillo said.

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Vector Space Systems is hurtling ahead on all fronts as it moves to build out its Tucson rocket factory and start commercial rocket launches as soon as next year.

Opened just last year, Vector is building small rockets to launch a growing class of micro-satellites into orbit.

The company was founded by a group of space veterans including CEO Jim Cantrell, an alumnus of Elon Musk\u2019s SpaceX, and John Garvey, a veteran of space programs at Boeing and McDonnell Douglas who ran his own spacecraft company for 16 years before merging it with Vector.

In just the past month or so, the company has raised millions of dollars from investors, prepared to pick a builder for its planned rocket factory south of Tucson International Airport and has identified possible future launch sites including Cape Canaveral.

RAISING MONEY

Vector is looking to raise a total of around $50 million from investors to get the company going.

Most recently, Vector raised $4.5 million in capital in a bridge round of funding ahead of a Series A investment round of $15 million to $20 million, which is expected to close in a couple of months, Cantrell said.

The company had previously raised about $5 million through private investments and with space-vehicle research contracts from NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

In all, Vector has received more than $10 million in funding from angel investors, strategic partners and high net worth individuals, with notable investments from the Space Angels Network, Tucson\u2019s Desert Angels, Arizona Technology Investors and Kanematsu Aerospace in Japan.

Cantrell said he\u2019s been pleased by the support from local angels, who pitched in about half the recent bridge round.

Curtis Gunn, chairman of the Desert Angels, said a number of the group\u2019s members invested a total of $575,000 as part of the round, the group\u2019s largest single investment this year to date. Angels are individuals accredited to make unregistered private-equity investments by virtue of their high net worth or income.

\u201cDesert Angels is excited to support Vector as the company\u2019s work and development is taking another step towards making Tucson a space exploration and space tourism hub,\u201d Gunn said in an email.

The recent round, Cantrell said, also included an investment in a so-called cryptocurrency \u2014 similar to bitcoin \u2014 called Nexus, from Kurrent Investment.

Not coincidentally, the company behind Nexus is trying to develop a satellite- and software- based currency exchange system, and it is led by Cantrell\u2019s son, Colin.

The original idea behind Vector was to build a satellite-based system that would allow customers to use software to operate sensors, using a constellation of satellites as \u201cvirtual machines.\u201d

That concept, called Galactic Sky is still in development as Vector perfects its launch business, Cantrell said.

\u201cThat makes a good business \u2014 it\u2019s a billion-dollar business by itself,\u201d he said.

After the Series A financing round, Vector will be looking to raise $10 to $20 million in a second round that should provide enough capital to get the company going on its own, Cantrell said.

ROCKET FACTORY

Vector has been busy planning its 70,000-square-foot rocket factory in Tucson since securing a lease with Pima County in December for the site at the county\u2019s Aerospace, Defense and Technology Business & Research Park.

The company, which has about 25 employees now, plans to add 40 to 80 people, mainly engineers and skilled workers like machinists, this year and expects to have 200 employees in Tucson in a few years, Cantrell said. Besides Tucson, the company has operations in Orange County and San Jose, California.

The lease deal came on the heels of a successful test of a new rocket engine Vector is developing with NASA.

More recently, in early April, Vector issued a request for notices of intent to bid on construction of the factory and headquarters building, which will cost an estimated $15 million.

The company plans to issue a formal request for proposals on Monday, Cantrell said.

The company is looking for a builder-financed deal with a leaseback arrangement, Cantrell said.

Groundbreaking is now planned for sometime in July or August, with completion expected in a year to 18 months, Cantrell said. Vector already is building rockets at its current site near downtown.

Vector\u2019s development, including the initial capacity of its factory, depends on the pace and success of its fundraising efforts, Cantrell said.

\u201cIt is very much dependent on how quickly we can raise money,\u201d he said.

The company plans to start the new Tucson factory with two \u201cmanufacturing cells,\u201d or self-contained assembly lines, capable of producing 25 rockets a year, Cantrell said, but that can be doubled up relatively easily when needed.

\u201cThe key thing is, we don\u2019t know total flight rates, or how quickly we\u2019ll need to ramp up,\u201d Cantrell said.

The company already has more than 100 launch contracts in hand.

TESTING, RETESTING

Vector continues suborbital testing of its roughly 45-foot-long Vector-R rocket ahead of a potential orbital test next year, Cantrell said.

The next test flight is scheduled for May 3, after a test April 6 at the company\u2019s test site near the Mohave Desert was scrubbed when a sensor caused an automatic abort, Cantrell said.

Engineers quickly determined the rocket was functional but the company decided not to launch after high winds kicked up. But the rocket is fine, he said, adding that failures are part of the testing process.

\u201cWe blew a lot of stuff up, trust me,\u201d he said.

Company officials recently traveled to the East Coast to scout future launch sites, including Cape Canaveral. Vector doesn\u2019t plan to launch from Tucson.

During a visit to Florida\u2019s Cape Canaveral in March, the company placed a mockup of its Vector-R rocket in the NASA Now exhibit at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center.

The company also announced in late March that it will conduct a suborbital test flight of the Vector-R rocket this summer in Camden County, Georgia, on the coast near the Florida border.

The county is still working to win approval for launches from the Federal Aviation Administration.

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Patrick Cicero's sign at the Tucson march and rally for science Saturday conveyed a message in four partial differential equations.

Cicero, an antenna engineer at Raytheon Missile Systems, said Maxwell's equations are the foundation of our knowledge of electro-magnetism.

They \"make Tweets possible,\" read his sign. \"Respect Science!\"

Cicero was one of about 200 scientists and science-advocates who marched from Armory Park to El Presidio Park Sunday morning, where a crowd of about 2,500 assembled for an Earth Day Rally for Science \u2014 one of about 400 \"sister\" events to the Washington, D.C. march.

Other groups assembled at nearby parking lots to walk to the rally in groups.

A longer march had been called off when organizers couldn't raise funds to blockade city streets. When the \"Women's March for Science\" group decided to march from Armory Park anyhow, Tucson Police provided an escort that created a rolling closure of a route along Sixth Avenue and West Alameda Street.

At El Presidio Park, the scientists, many clad in lab coats that proclaimed \"Science, not Silence,\" listened to music and speeches and crowded around 40 science-outreach booths, where their kids handled snakes, insects and desert tortoises.

Shady spots were at a premium as the temperature rose into the 90s at midday.

Snapping cellphone photos of each others' signs seemed to be the most popular activity. Among the messages:

\"You are the result of 3.8 billion years of evolution. Act like it.\"

\"There is no Planet B.\"

\"Be like a proton: Stay positive.\"

\"Grab 'em by the data.\"

\"It's not magic; it's science.\"

\"We are part of the solution.\"

\"Got polio? Me neither. Thanks science.\"

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Remember those claims during the Proposition 206 debate that increasing the minimum wage would lead to less hiring and people being laid off from low-wage jobs?

The latest unemployment statistics suggest that hasn\u2019t happened.

In fact, the data from the state Office of Economic Opportunity shows that the number of people working in bars and restaurants last month not only increased but did so at a rate six times higher than the economy as a whole. Employers who run food-service and drinking establishments added 7,800 new workers compared with February, a 3.3 percent boost.

By contrast, month-over-month employment in the private sector for the entire state grew just 0.5 percent.

Overall, there are now 242,800 people in that sector of the economy, 8 percent more than there were a year ago. That compares with a 2.5 percent increase in all private-sector employment in the past year.

This does not just appear to be a one-year bump in employment.

Doug Walls, the research administrator for the agency, said the entire leisure and hospitality sector, which also includes hotel workers and those who work in the entertainment industry, said employment growth in this sector for the first three months between 2010 and 2016 averaged about 9,500. But for the first three months of this year, the number of jobs is up 14,200.

The new figures come despite the fact that the state\u2019s minimum wage, which had been $8.05 an hour last year, is now $10. Both figures can be $3 less for those who earn tips, provided the employer can show their workers actually got that much.

It was the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry that led the opposition to Proposition 206 with claims there would be fewer entry-level and low-wage jobs as employers culled payrolls to cover the higher expenses. But organization spokesman Garrick Taylor said the strong employment growth numbers do not necessarily mean those fears were unwarranted.

\u201cI think it points to the fact that this governor and legislature have done all they can to put pro-growth policies in place that will blunt the negative impact of a mandated wage increase foisted on employers who rely on entry-level labor,\u201d he said.

But Taylor could not explain why those policies did not result in the same strong growth across the state\u2019s economy that showed up in food and drinking places.

\u201cWe would like to be proven wrong,\u201d he said.

Anyway, Taylor noted, what happened on Jan. 1 is not the last word, with Proposition 206 pushing the minimum wage to $12 by 2020.

\u201cWe are in the early stages of this dramatic mandated wage increase,\u201d he said. \u201cLet\u2019s hope these numbers remain strong, but we have our concerns.\u201d

Economist Dennis Hoffman of the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, said there may be several things that led to this year\u2019s strong growth in these jobs.

One of those, he said, is the fact that the Chicago Cubs won the World Series last year, leading to increased interest in people coming to Arizona to watch spring training.

But Hoffman said that no matter what, the job growth, even in the face of rising wages, can\u2019t be denied.

\u201cAny headwinds that might have been created by mandated higher labor costs have clearly been offset by tailwinds in the industry that have created a demand for workers,\u201d he said.

Overall, the state\u2019s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped a tenths of a point last month, to 5.0 percent. The economy added 11,200 private-sector jobs, a figure more or less in line with the average of 11,900 since the end of the recession.

While jobs in leisure and hospitality grew at the strongest rate, some other sectors actually lost employment. That includes manufacturing, which shed 1,300 jobs last month, much of that due to losses in employment in both the aerospace industry as well as the production of non-durable goods, things like food, snacks and sodas.

Retail trade also continued its lackluster showing, losing 200 jobs. While there were gains in some sectors, like employment in stores that sell building materials and gardening supplies, they were offset by the loss of 600 jobs in department stores as shoppers shift their buying habits online.

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Katiyana Mauga gripped a Louisville Slugger in each hand as she walked off the Hillenbrand Stadium field late Saturday afternoon.

With those sticks of aluminum, Mauga became Arizona softball\u2019s all-time home-run leader this weekend. Mauga tied the school mark on Friday night before breaking the record on Saturday with a fourth-inning solo blast to right, her 88th career home run.

Mauga\u2019s record-setting day powered No. 3 Arizona (45-3, 15-2) to a 10-7 win over No. 6 Oregon, clinching a big Pac-12 series victory.

\u201cIt\u2019s fabulous to see history made, and I\u2019ve seen a lot of it at Arizona,\u201d head coach Mike Candrea said. \u201cShe\u2019ll definitely be going down with some of the very best who have ever played here.\u201d

Mauga\u2019s homer pushed her past Stacie Chambers\u2019 previous school record. Mauga is now tied for third on the NCAA career home-run record list, eight shy of Oklahoma Sooner Lauren Chamberlain, who set the mark at 95.

With seven games to go in Arizona\u2019s regular season, Mauga could feasibly reach the record in the next few weeks.

\u201cThere\u2019s no words to describe it, but it felt more like an accomplishment,\u201d Mauga said. \u201cIt\u2019s a relief, but people are still going to ask about the NCAA record.\u201d

Of course, Mauga will have the postseason to work with, too.

By winning Saturday, Arizona picked up a r\u00e9sum\u00e9-building series victory that could place the Wildcats among the top national seeds.

The NCAA Selection Committee revealed its first top-10 rankings during the game and Arizona came in at No. 2 in the country, only behind No. 1 Florida.

The Wildcats got out to a rocky start Saturday as Oregon\u2019s Gwen Svekis hit a three-run homer off starter Taylor McQuillin in the top of the first. McQuillin allowed another homer to Svekis in the third, that one a two-run shot.

\u201cI definitely think that girl had my number all day, so that was a bit rough,\u201d McQuillin said. \u201cOther than that, it was a fairly good day.\u201d

McQuillin\u2019s two mistakes on the mound were mostly overshadowed by Arizona\u2019s bats at the plate.

The Wildcats scored one in the first and then tacked on five in the second to give McQuillin an early 6-3 lead.

Back-to-back walks sparked the second inning rally, followed by a Reyna Carranco single to load the bases with no outs.

Ashleigh Hughes tied the game at 3-3 with a two-run single, followed by an RBI fielder\u2019s choice from Mandie Perez and a two-run double by Mauga.

Svekis\u2019 second homer made it 6-5 Arizona in the third, but Arizona answered with Mauga\u2019s record setting homer in the fourth, followed by a fifth inning RBI single from Dejah Mulipola to make the score 8-5.

McQuillin allowed a one-out single in the sixth, leading Candrea to bring in Danielle O\u2019Toole to face the top of the Oregon order.

O\u2019Toole immediately gave up a two-run homer to Danica Mercado, sister of Arizona slugger Mo Mercado.

\u201cI was kind of preparing for that next time around at the top of the order to make a change, because Mercado was seeing (McQuillin) pretty good, too,\u201d Candrea said.

Carranco hit a two-run single in the bottom of the sixth to give O\u2019Toole some insurance runs heading into the seventh.

O\u2019Toole closed out the game with a scoreless frame to earn her first save of the season, while Taylor McQuillin moved to 15-1 with the win.

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A plan to build 178 homes on the historic Lazy K Bar Guest Ranch is headed to a public hearing this week, more than two years after a similar proposal was rejected twice by the Marana Town Council.

But this time around, to the dismay of opponents, developers have found a way around a statute that previously required the proposal to get support from a supermajority of Town Council members.

The development proposal includes a zoning change to allow for increased density on the 138-acre property a half-mile north of Saguaro National Park West. Under its current \u201cresort and recreation\u201d zoning, the land could have about 42 homes \u2014 one home per 3.3 acres \u2014 or a 600-unit hotel.

The plan will be considered by the town\u2019s Planning Commission on Wednesday. If the commission recommends approval, it will go before the full Town Council in May or June.

Once again, developers face stiff opposition from neighbors and environmentalists who object to the project\u2019s encroachment on a critical wildlife corridor and national park lands. Opponents say the project continues a pattern of incremental \u201cup-zoning\u201d in the formerly remote area and is a missed opportunity for a creative and environmentally sensitive project.

The proposal had initially secured the blessing of the Coalition for Sonoran Desert Protection, which had pressed the design firm, The Planning Center in Tucson, to shrink the project\u2019s footprint in the wildlife corridor that connects the Tucson and Tortolita mountains.

But the coalition can no longer commit to supporting the plan in light of recent changes, including infringement on natural washes, said executive director Carolyn Campbell. As the latest proposal is still being tweaked, Campbell requested a month delay in the public hearing, but that doesn\u2019t seem likely, she said.

\u201cWe\u2019ve been clear about what the wildlife needs. If they can provide that, we\u2019re OK, but so far we haven\u2019t seen it,\u201d she said.

AVOIDING SUPERMAJORITY VOTE

Developers may have reason to be optimistic about securing council approval this time around.

Back in 2015, two \u201cnay\u201d votes \u2014 from Councilmembers Patti Comerford and Carol McGorray \u2014 were enough to derail the development plan, which needed support from a supermajority of the seven-member council in order to pass.

Under state statute, if 20 percent of adjacent property owners oppose a zoning change, the change requires support from three-quarters of Marana Town Council members to go into effect.

However, the statute also specifies that the zoning change must be within 150 feet of the opposing neighbors to trigger that requirement, said Marana Town Attorney Frank Cassidy.

This year, developers added a 150-foot strip around the perimeter of the Lazy K property that won\u2019t be rezoned under the development proposal, rendering neighbors\u2019 opposition moot. Now, a simple majority of four \u201cyea\u201d votes is needed for the plan to pass.

The move seems \u201cmanipulative of the process, and not in tune with working with the local community,\u201d said Scott Stonum, chief of science and resource management at Saguaro National Park.

\u201cIt\u2019s not ethical,\u201d said Barbara Rose, a 30-year resident of Scenic Drive near Lazy K and a vocal opponent of the development plan. Rose is still hopeful that opponents can persuade planning commission and council members to hold out for a better alternative at Lazy K. Options include a retreat center, a small-scale boutique hotel or an educational center that is a public-private partnership, she said.

\u201cThis is a national treasure,\u201d she said. \u201cA conventional development of as many homes as you can possibly get, squeezed in to barely accommodate the minimum environmental requirements, it just doesn\u2019t make any sense.\u201d

\u201dSTEPPING BACK IN TIME\u201d

The Lazy K proposal includes at least 60 percent open space on the property and includes a hiking trail, preservation of the original stone homestead and the existing outdoor fireplace, patio and event lawn as a common area, said Linda Morales, CEO of The Planning Center, the planning and design firm hired by property owners Jim Shiner and Peter Evans. All homes in the gated community will be single-story and could be priced between $400,000 and $600,000.

\u201cI won\u2019t say everybody is completely on board with it, but we\u2019re very much ahead of the game as far as where we were last time with people being OK with this proposal,\u201d Morales said.

Dan Withers \u2014 who owns 20 acres directly southeast of the property, plus 14 acres to the east \u2014 said he\u2019s disappointed in the proposal, and that\u2019s not because he\u2019s against growth.

\u201cI\u2019m a builder. I\u2019m pro-development,\u201d said Withers, who owns D.L. Withers Construction. But, he said, Lazy K represents a piece of history. \u201cIt\u2019s a shame to see it become just another subdivision.\u201d

Before Lazy K shut down its operations in 2007, staying at the property felt like a glimpse of mid-century Arizona, Withers said.

\u201cYou could leave the windows open and hear the coyotes at night. (I thought) \u2018Boy, this is like how I remember it from when I was a kid growing up in Arizona.\u2019 It was like stepping back in time. There\u2019s just not many places you can do that.\u201d

Stonum of Saguaro National Park said the incremental additions of higher-density developments around the park are taking their toll.

\u201cThe park cannot survive as an island that\u2019s cut off from the rest of the (natural) world,\u201d he said. \u201cIt appears that we\u2019re losing some of the species in the park that require a healthy landscape and a permeable landscape that they can move through and that is larger than the park, unfortunately.\u201d

Lazy K property owners Shiner and Evans purchased the property \u2014 originally a homestead built in 1928 \u2014 in the late 1990s, when it was still part of Pima County and zoned for one home per 3.3 acres. The land was annexed into Marana in 2001, losing the protection of Pima County\u2019s Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan, which would have required 80 percent open space on the site. Marana is working on its own habitat-protection plan, but it is still in draft form and has never been formally adopted by the town.

When the property owners sought rezoning approval in 2014, they were already under contract with homebuilder Mattamy Homes. But this time, they decided to secure council approval before engaging a homebuilder, Morales said. If they get approval, the property owners \u2014 who are in informal talks with Meritage Homes \u2014 will sell the rezoned property to a homebuilder, she said.

SUPPORTERS
WANT WATER

Facing declining water levels in their wells, some neighbors along Scenic Drive agreed to support the project in exchange for a guarantee of connection to Marana water after the development is built, as the Star reported in 2014. Morales said the development team will still honor that agreement but haven\u2019t yet formalized the deal in writing.

An earlier version of this year\u2019s Lazy K proposal called for 189 homes on the property. The planning firm even floated the idea of 194 homes in preliminary meetings with neighbors, before dropping back down to 178, Morales said.

For Marana Mayor and Councilmman Ed Honea, any increase from 178 homes would have been a deal-breaker.

\u201cIt\u2019s a pretty pristine area. It\u2019s between two mountain peaks, tucked right up against the mountains,\u201d he said.

\u201cI don\u2019t have problems with growth, but I think it needs to be respectful because of where it\u2019s located.\u201d

Honea plans to support the proposal, as he did two years ago, but he still has concerns about the addition of 6,000-square-foot lot sizes in the newest plan. Last time around, the smallest lot size was 7,000 square feet, he said.

Councilman Dave Bowen, who also supported the plan in the two previous votes, said he\u2019s now undecided. Since he last considered the proposal, he\u2019s noticed a pattern of smaller lot sizes in Marana, and he thinks Lazy K could be a good opportunity for a different kind of project, with bigger lots and fewer homes per acre.

\u201cOn the other hand, you\u2019ve got people that own the land who would like to maximize its profits,\u201d he said. \u201cI understand there\u2019s a lot at stake.\u201d

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An NFL agent is part financial adviser and part mouthpiece, part negotiator and part hurdle-jumper.

But on draft day, there may be no bigger role for an agent than psychologist.

Fortunes are made on this day, lives are changed. Children get to buy their parents houses because of this day. Third cousins get new rides. Generations upon generations can be affected.

Kenny Zuckerman remembers seven years ago, when Cal defensive end Tyson Alualu called him in the morning and told him that his family just had a feeling, a sensation, that something big was going to happen that day. They went out looking for land in his hometown of Honolulu, land on which they\u2019d put a house, maybe even a church.

Not a single mock draft in the land had him going in the first round. But Zuckerman was on the phone with the Jacksonville Jaguars all day, and, he says, \u201cThe conversations were just \u2026 odd.\u201d They told him they were trying to trade down in the draft from pick No. 10, but that they wanted Alualu badly.

When the pick came up and they hadn\u2019t budged, Zuckerman\u2019s heart sank a little. He thought to himself, \u201cAh, man, they couldn\u2019t trade out of it.\u201d

The seconds ticked by. Would it be versatile running back Ryan Mathews of Fresno State? Punishing safety Earl Thomas of Texas? Or would it be an impact defensive end like Michigan\u2019s Brandon Graham, or South Florida\u2019s Jason Pierre-Paul, or Georgia Tech\u2019s Derrick Morgan? Maybe they\u2019d shore up the offensive line with Rutgers tackle Anthony Davis or Idaho guard Mike Iupati or Florida center Maurkice Pouncey. Or, hey, Tim Tebow was still around, and Jacksonville is in Florida, and those Gators fans are rabid, and ... well, it didn\u2019t look good as the clock dwindled down.

Then Roger Goodell strolled up onto the stage and announced, \u201cWith the 10th overall pick in the 2010 NFL draft, the Jacksonville Jaguars select \u2026 Tyson Alualu.\u201d

Back in his office in Sherman Oaks, California, Zuckerman was over the moon.

In an almost three-decade career, this was the one that Zuckerman has singled out.

\u201cI just remember how I felt: It was euphoric,\u201d he said. \u201cIt was unbelievable.\u201d

But then there\u2019s the other side of the draft: When dreams don\u2019t come true. At least, not the way they\u2019ve been envisioned.

\u201cIt\u2019s my job
to be honest\u201d

Zuckerman, a former Arizona Wildcats walk-on wide receiver-turned-scholarship player, counts many NFL standouts among his clients. Atlanta Falcons linebacker Brooks Reed, a former Sabino High School and UA standout, is one of them. So is Ka\u2019Deem Carey, the former Canyon del Oro and UA running back now with the Chicago Bears.

Zuckerman is representing five players in this week\u2019s NFL draft.

Invariably, some of his clients will be elated and some will be disappointed. One might slide a pick or two. One might drop a round or two. One might fall out of the draft altogether.

If that happens, Zuckerman will be unflappable.

\u201cThere are players who are constantly coddled; they don\u2019t even know what\u2019s up and down. My job is to manage my client\u2019s expectations,\u201d he said. \u201cA lot of agents don\u2019t tell their players that. They want to always pat them on the back. Everything\u2019s great! Don\u2019t worry! Then it\u2019s constantly one big fairy tale.

\u201cIt\u2019s my job to be honest and give them a realistic snapshot.\u201d

This is not always easy.

You tell a 22-year-old cornerback that he\u2019s not as good as he thinks he is, and sometimes the door hits you on the way out.

That makes it incredibly important to find someone who knows what\u2019s next.

\u201cListen \u2014 the draft is one day that determines how you enter the league,\u201d he said. \u201cIt\u2019s just another day. Can someone\u2019s next four years be determined? Yeah. But your first contract is not going to get you rich. Your first contract is really an interview to get to the second contract. Players can\u2019t base their whole career on draft day.\u201d

That frankness, the brass tacks of it, made an imprint on Isaac Asiata.

Utah\u2019s 6-foot-3-inch, 323-pound offensive guard is just days away from his life changing forever. Originally projected anywhere from the sixth round to undrafted, the 2016 Morris Award winner as the Pac-12\u2019s best offensive lineman has crept up in mock drafts. Some experts say he could go as high as the second round.

\u201cKenny did a good job when I first met him of always being real about everything. He didn\u2019t sugarcoat it,\u201d said Asiata, whose cousin Matt plays running back for the Minnesota Vikings. \u201cI could tell he wasn\u2019t just blowing smoke. A lot of agents were saying we\u2019re going to get you in the first round. I knew, he knew, I wasn\u2019t going in the first round. I have realistic expectations.\u201d

Asiata started 39 straight games for the Utes. This is not a guy with whom you want to trifle. He wasn\u2019t about to fall for some spiel from a guy with diamonds twinkling in his eyes.

\u201cThe person sitting in front of me was the guy he is,\u201d Asiata said of his first meeting with Zuckerman. \u201cEverything he told me was honest, up front, and I could tell he was a dude I could trust. A guy who I felt comfortable with, who I could call, who my wife could call. I talked to so many guys who just hate their agent. Sometimes I just hit him up to chat. We talk about things other than the draft, we\u2019ll talk about my wife. We\u2019ll just shoot the ****. I can talk to that guy about anything.\u201d

Cut teeth as a Cat
Zuckerman started down this path in college.

While at the UA, he roomed with Wildcats fullback Charles Webb. Zuckerman remembers taking phone calls on the home phone from prospective agents.

\u201cRemember, we didn\u2019t have cellphones then, so I\u2019d talk to these guys, and a lot of them didn\u2019t know anything about football,\u201d said Zuckerman, who played for Arizona from 1982-86. \u201cCharles was sort of having me handle the process. Do you think he\u2019s an I-back, a 1-back, a fullback? These guys would come up in limos, suits, jewelry, one of them owned a bar in Tucson and was sort of funneling free drinks to players, which I didn\u2019t realize until end of my career.\u201d

Zuckerman was no NFL prospect himself. That he even landed at Arizona is a surprise, as, he says, he graduated Birmingham High School in Van Nuys, California, at roughly 5-foot-7 and 150 pounds. But he had the heart.

After a year in law school, Zuckerman landed an internship in Chicago for no pay. That turned into $1,000 a month, then $2,000, then $3,000. He learned the ropes and built a reputation.

\u201cI learned the business, and I was just a football junkie,\u201d he said. \u201cI was a walk-on but ended up lettering senior year, played in some games, and football was my life. There was no bigger student of the game than myself. I knew the scouting report for every team, every week. I figured if I can approach business like this, I\u2019ll be successful.\u201d

And he has been, with almost three decades in what is entirely a cutthroat business.

\u201cI wouldn\u2019t change anything I\u2019ve done,\u201d he said, though he acknowledges that his ethics have perhaps resulted in money being left on the table. \u201cThe one thing I had that allowed me to get into the business and get into college football as a 150-pound kid out of high school was passion.\u201d

A testament to his perspective: He\u2019s been with the same partners at Priority Sports & Entertainment for nearly two decades, and, he says, \u201cWe treat our clients like we\u2019re a Fortune 500 company.\u201d

He sees the flash-in-the-pan agents who have become so commonplace in today\u2019s world and he scoffs. He wonders to himself, how can a player risk his livelihood on a non-entity?

\u201cHow do you get advice from a doctor who\u2019s never done surgery?\u201d he asks. \u201cAt least a doctor went to medical school and operated on a cadaver. Here you can hang up a plaque and say I\u2019m an agent. I always cringe when a player says, \u2018I\u2019m going with this guy, and I\u2019ll be his only client.\u2019 You\u2019re his only client for a reason.\u201d

He sounds disappointed.

\u201cThere are a lot of charlatans in this business,\u201d he continues. \u201cThey\u2019ll move on to the next one. They don\u2019t care about careers. If there is one thing I look back at with Charles, it was remembering how important it was to him to have someone. These kids have a problem trusting people. You\u2019re not hiring a friend. You\u2019re hiring a business partner. Find the best business partner for the job. That\u2019s where a lot of kids drop the ball. They\u2019re swayed by inconsequential things.\u201d

\u201cFootball is really an inexact science\u201d

Zuckerman will spend draft weekend in his office, manning the phones, wheeling and dealing and trying to sneak every one of his players up the board.

He has cultivated relationships with the biggest movers and shakers in the NFL.

He spent part of Wednesday on the phone with an NFL general manager who called to inquire about a player. Zuckerman told the GM that the player should go somewhere between picks No. 30 and No. 45, and the GM sneered. They made a dinner bet, and then the GM started prying

\u201cWell, why do you think so?\u201d

Zuckerman starts listing the mechanics of the thing. \u201cThese teams are at 41 and 42, and he\u2019s not gonna get past them,\u201d he said. \u201cThis team said unless something changes, they want him here. \u2026\u201d

\u201cAnd the GM says, \u2018Wow, that really makes a lot of sense.\u2019 I\u2019m having this conversation, and it doesn\u2019t go in one ear and out the other. That team is only talking to themselves and I\u2019m talking to multiple teams, and it\u2019s that experience and relationships that are important to these kids.\u201d

It was to Asiata.

\u201cIt was big for me to see his track record,\u201d he said. \u201cHe did a good job with a lot of guys I knew, and they vouched for him. Other agents I asked about, and they said they were a joke. It was refreshing to hear that what he told me was true \u2014 it wasn\u2019t like he had a script for me. He was being honest, and that set him apart.\u201d

Asiata and his wife, Angel, did extensive research trying to find the best fit .

They know what this one day can mean.

\u201cHe\u2019s sensitive to that,\u201d Asiata said. \u201cI know draft day is going to be emotional. It could be bad emotions, and it could be good emotions. I\u2019ve had guys tell me their agent tells them one thing just to not **** them off. It\u2019s every football player\u2019s dream to get drafted. That\u2019s like the ultimate goal. That\u2019s like an exclamation point on everything I\u2019ve done. That\u2019s how I\u2019ve looked at it. \u201d

Zuckerman will be by his phone, ready to celebrate or soften the blow.

He\u2019s begun to give back to football in other ways, too, starting a 501(c)3 youth football program in Los Angeles five years ago to help usher in the next generation of players.

On Wednesday, he posted an article for parents about the recruiting practices of Kansas State Wildcats coach Bill Snyder.

\u201cThis is one the best articles you can read as a youth football parent,\u201d he wrote in the post on the Los Angeles City Ducks Youth Football page. \u201cDon\u2019t get caught up in the hoopla. Keep your kid grounded and focus on the task at hand. No college can measure what\u2019s in a child\u2019s heart and his head. Those two things are probably the most important aspects of finding solid football players.\u201d

For now, he hopes to help some of his players get into college ball. Maybe some day, he hopes, he\u2019ll be able to represent one who came up through the ranks.

And on draft day, he\u2019ll be there for them.

\u201cFootball is really an inexact science,\u201d he said. \u201cWhere you\u2019re drafted, more than ever, is no precursor to the career you\u2019ll have. The two things you have to measure is what is in the heart and what is in the head, and they haven\u2019t found a tool to measure that yet.\u201d

"}, {"id":"da512c1b-a35e-596d-ad90-b2a78ae87737","type":"article","starttime":"1492907400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-22T17:30:00-07:00","lastupdated":"1492926423","priority":41,"sections":[{"football":"sports/arizonawildcats/football"}],"flags":{"editors_pick":"true","top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Arizona Wildcats coach Rich Rodriguez would appreciate an indoor practice facility","url":"http://tucson.com/sports/arizonawildcats/football/article_da512c1b-a35e-596d-ad90-b2a78ae87737.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/sports/arizonawildcats/football/arizona-wildcats-coach-rich-rodriguez-would-appreciate-an-indoor-practice/article_da512c1b-a35e-596d-ad90-b2a78ae87737.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/sports/arizonawildcats/football/arizona-wildcats-coach-rich-rodriguez-would-appreciate-an-indoor-practice/article_da512c1b-a35e-596d-ad90-b2a78ae87737.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Michael Lev\nArizona Daily Star","prologue":"Both RichRod and new AD Dave Heeke believe a facility would benefit the UA. Making it happen remains a huge challenge.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#top5sports","#editorspick"],"customProperties":{"arm_id":"75915"},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"5a42b4ba-3497-5f7b-a854-cae5a38158cd","description":"University of Arizona offensive linemen Bryson Cain, standing, and Jon Jacobs get inventive to overcome a lack of tables while signing autographs during a meet-the-fans day.","byline":"Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1690,"hiresheight":1226,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a4/5a42b4ba-3497-5f7b-a854-cae5a38158cd/58fc097facb0b.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1048","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a4/5a42b4ba-3497-5f7b-a854-cae5a38158cd/58fc097faba95.image.jpg?resize=1048%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a4/5a42b4ba-3497-5f7b-a854-cae5a38158cd/58fc097faba95.image.jpg?resize=100%2C73"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"218","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a4/5a42b4ba-3497-5f7b-a854-cae5a38158cd/58fc097faba95.image.jpg?resize=300%2C218"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"743","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a4/5a42b4ba-3497-5f7b-a854-cae5a38158cd/58fc097faba95.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C743"}}},{"id":"1f65d070-0068-55a6-b2dd-d1883e44b57b","description":"Arizona quarterbacks Brandon Dawkins, background, and Khalil Tate sign autographs for the few hundred to brave the heat for a meet the fans day at Arizona Stadium, Saturday, April 22, 2017, Tucson, Ariz. Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star","byline":"Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":1869,"hiresheight":1109,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f65d070-0068-55a6-b2dd-d1883e44b57b/58fc098019870.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1170","height":"694","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f65d070-0068-55a6-b2dd-d1883e44b57b/58fc098018894.image.jpg?resize=1170%2C694"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"59","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f65d070-0068-55a6-b2dd-d1883e44b57b/58fc098018894.image.jpg?resize=100%2C59"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"178","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f65d070-0068-55a6-b2dd-d1883e44b57b/58fc098018894.image.jpg?resize=300%2C178"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"608","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f6/1f65d070-0068-55a6-b2dd-d1883e44b57b/58fc098018894.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C608"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"da512c1b-a35e-596d-ad90-b2a78ae87737","body":"

As Arizona\u2019s \u201cFan Appreciation Day\u201d began on a warm, sunny Saturday afternoon, Wildcats coach Rich Rodriguez wisely found a shady spot to sign autographs.

With temperatures climbing into the 90s, Rodriguez sat under a tent next to the entrance to the UA locker room at Arizona Stadium. His players were scattered about the field, baking on the artificial turf but happily signing team posters, jerseys, hats and mini-helmets.

The event drew several hundred fans, but it might have attracted more if Arizona had an indoor facility in which to hold it.

Rodriguez reiterated his desire for an enclosed practice facility in an interview with the Star, repeating a familiar line: \u201cIt\u2019s not just a want. It\u2019s a need.\u201d

New athletic director Dave Heeke shares Rodriguez\u2019s view that a multipurpose training facility would benefit all UA student-athletes. But building one falls firmly in the category of easier said than done.

Costs vary widely on such facilities depending on their size and other bells and whistles, but even a minimalist version likely would exceed $10 million. The Arizona Board of Regents recently approved a $100 per-student athletics fee, which won\u2019t come close to covering the costs of the various facility upgrades the UA needs.

As Heeke wrote in a recent \u201cWildcat Wednesday\u201d newsletter: \u201cThe expected revenue produced by the student fee, along with a generous, private $5 million donation, will make it possible for athletics to borrow approximately $75 million to get started on some, but not all, of our various infrastructure projects.\u201d

An indoor training facility would give the football team a place to escape the heat and avoid monsoons during summer workouts and training camp. It also would provide a venue for other student-athletes to train and for fans to gather before football and basketball games.

\u201cIt would be a great place to get out of the heat, to be in an air-conditioned place to tailgate,\u201d Rodriguez said. \u201cOther sports could use it. It would be the only one in Southern Arizona. That thing would be used more than probably any facility on campus.\u201d

\u201cLast year wasn\u2019t
what we want\u201d

Heeke was working at Central Michigan when Arizona endured a 3-9 season last fall, the worst of Rodriguez\u2019s tenure.

Heeke understandably is taking a wait-and-see approach with Rodriguez and all of the Wildcats coaches.

\u201cI\u2019m the new guy,\u201d said Heeke, who has been on the job for three weeks. \u201cI\u2019m trying to listen a lot and learn.\u201d

Regarding Rodriguez and the football program specifically, Heeke said: \u201cIt\u2019s no secret. Rich and I have talked. Last year wasn\u2019t what we want. It wasn\u2019t what they expected, what Rich expects or wants.\u201d

Heeke believes Rodriguez is doing the right thing by recommitting to recruiting, although it remains to be seen when those efforts will pay dividends in the win-loss column.

Walker needed
\u201cfresh start\u201d

Rodriguez said offensive tackle Keenan Walker, who recently announced plans to transfer, \u201cneeds a fresh start somewhere.\u201d

Walker, a former four-star recruit from Scottsdale Chaparral, redshirted last season as a freshman. His time at Arizona was marred by injuries and off-the-field issues.

\u201cI always tell the players: All I do is enforce the decisions that they make, right or wrong,\u201d Rodriguez said. \u201cMore than anything, he\u2019s got to get himself committed academically and to the game of football if he wants to have success anywhere.\u201d

Extra points

"}, {"id":"28dd38f9-3975-5bf1-9a54-f381ca9175fe","type":"article","starttime":"1492905600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-22T17:00:00-07:00","sections":[{"gassen":"news/opinion/columnists/gassen"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Sarah Gassen: High school journalists can be 'real' journalists","url":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/columnists/gassen/article_28dd38f9-3975-5bf1-9a54-f381ca9175fe.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/columnists/gassen/sarah-gassen-high-school-journalists-can-be-real-journalists/article_28dd38f9-3975-5bf1-9a54-f381ca9175fe.html","canonical":"http://tucson.com/news/opinion/columnists/gassen/sarah-gassen-high-school-journalists-can-be-real-journalists/article_28dd38f9-3975-5bf1-9a54-f381ca9175fe.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Arizona Daily Star","prologue":"It's the work, not the age, that counts.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["gassen","high school","journalism"],"internalKeywords":["#latest","#columnist","#columnists"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32","description":"","byline":"Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star","hireswidth":2400,"hiresheight":1600,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/58e1bd47d5e96.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"413","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/5733bb60f1eb9.image.jpg?resize=620%2C413"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/5407ce6c40533.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/5407ce6c41878.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d9/cd99ecfa-2f11-54ea-9495-7f42c39edb32/53ff79ac9aae6.preview-1024.jpg"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"28dd38f9-3975-5bf1-9a54-f381ca9175fe","body":"

We knew something was up the moment we walked into our classroom for The Call, the student newspaper at Kirkwood High School in suburban St. Louis. It was January 1988.

Taped on the walls was a paper banner with scrawled words to the effect of I\u2019m in charge now and You must obey me and No more press freedom. It was signed by Principal Franklin McCallie.

He and our newspaper adviser, Mr. H.L. Hall, explained: The U.S. Supreme Court had just handed down a decision in a case that originated a few towns over, at Hazelwood East High School. The court gave administrators the right to censor student journalists\u2019 work.

Mr. McCallie didn\u2019t believe those things he\u2019d written. He\u2019d wanted us to experience, momentarily, what other student journalists were facing, the kids in schools whose principals were more concerned with their school\u2019s image than with educating students.

Mr. McCallie and Mr. Hall wanted us to appreciate the immense responsibility we held. They expected us to ask questions, to dig for answers, to be accurate and thoughtful. They expected us to honor and exercise our First Amendment rights.

We were luckier than we knew.

Arizona student journalists have a champion in Sen. Kimberly Yee, a Phoenix Republican. She worked on her school newspaper, the Demon Dispatch of Greenway High School, as a cartoonist and reporter in 1992. She witnessed censorship by administrators, and sponsored an excellent bill, SB 1384, that would prevent school administrators from interfering with student publications \u2014 with limited exceptions, such as libel.

The bill was pulled from the floor last week, after more than an hour of debate that included Sen. Rusty Bowers, R-Mesa, a self-employed artist, likening students learning journalism to people who can fingerpaint and call themselves artists.

Some lawmakers don\u2019t think students can handle freedom of expression. Others don\u2019t think they need it.

What a dispiriting underestimation of students, and their teachers. We should want more for, and from, young people.

Across the country, student journalists are doing incredible work. A staff in Kansas revealed that a new principal lied about her qualifications, and she resigned. A staff in the Bronx is reporting on the chaos and questionable decisions by an interim principal.

Legitimacy as a journalist is in the work you do, not a lawmaker\u2019s opinion of you \u2014 or your age.

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