[ {"id":"56d96661-921e-5751-b0a0-76d92f0ceaa0","type":"article","starttime":"1488368173","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-01T04:36:13-07:00","lastupdated":"1488371440","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"10 Things to Know for Today","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_56d96661-921e-5751-b0a0-76d92f0ceaa0.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/things-to-know-for-today/article_56d96661-921e-5751-b0a0-76d92f0ceaa0.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/Among-10-Things-to-Know-Trump-heralds-new-chapter-of-American-greatness-suspects-in-death-of-Kim-Jong-Un-s-half-brother-charged-with-murder-tornadoes-kill-two-in-US-heartland-/id-be2d6b9d1b6d4a209680ed85a7c1af2c","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By The Associated Press","prologue":"Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","crime","violent crime"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"21535f53-0ba6-52e9-bd13-db052c742fed","description":"Water bottles belonging to Calgary Flames' players line the bench prior to NHL game action, in Calgary on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. The league is taking steps to avoid the transmission of mumps and asking player to use individual water bottles. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press via AP)","byline":"Jeff McIntosh","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"324","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/15/21535f53-0ba6-52e9-bd13-db052c742fed/58b6bbbd074d9.image.jpg?resize=512%2C324"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"63","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/15/21535f53-0ba6-52e9-bd13-db052c742fed/58b6bbbd074d9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C63"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"190","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/15/21535f53-0ba6-52e9-bd13-db052c742fed/58b6bbbd074d9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C190"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"648","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/15/21535f53-0ba6-52e9-bd13-db052c742fed/58b6bbbd074d9.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"7ba3b1c1-690d-5cc9-b99a-71f62f7d5ac9","description":"Taxis line up in front of the renowned Waldorf Astoria hotel, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in New York. The hotel, purchased by the Anbang Insurance Group, a Chinese company, is closing Wednesday for two to three years for renovation. Exact details of the renovation haven't been released, but its conversion into a hybrid of private residences and a smaller hotel follows a model set by another landmark New York City hotel, The Plaza. The exterior is protected by law as a New York City landmark, but some fans are still nervous about the future. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)","byline":"Kathy Willens","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"358","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/ba/7ba3b1c1-690d-5cc9-b99a-71f62f7d5ac9/58b66afa67cbe.image.jpg?resize=512%2C358"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/ba/7ba3b1c1-690d-5cc9-b99a-71f62f7d5ac9/58b66afa67cbe.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"210","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/ba/7ba3b1c1-690d-5cc9-b99a-71f62f7d5ac9/58b66afa67cbe.image.jpg?resize=300%2C210"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"716","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/ba/7ba3b1c1-690d-5cc9-b99a-71f62f7d5ac9/58b66afa67cbe.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"9ca0047c-0423-5fc0-9e1d-ce484b8d17e2","description":"This photo provided by Tim Creedon shows his baseball and a hailstone that fell in the backyard of Creedon's home in Ottawa, Ill., Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner has activated the state's emergency operations center as local officials reported damage from tornados spawned by a late-winter storm system. (Tim Creedon via AP)","byline":"Tim Creedon","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"357","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ca/9ca0047c-0423-5fc0-9e1d-ce484b8d17e2/58b62f01ac848.image.jpg?resize=512%2C357"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ca/9ca0047c-0423-5fc0-9e1d-ce484b8d17e2/58b62f01ac848.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"209","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ca/9ca0047c-0423-5fc0-9e1d-ce484b8d17e2/58b62f01ac848.image.jpg?resize=300%2C209"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"714","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/tucson.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ca/9ca0047c-0423-5fc0-9e1d-ce484b8d17e2/58b62f01ac848.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"56d96661-921e-5751-b0a0-76d92f0ceaa0","body":"

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. TRUMP HERALDS 'NEW CHAPTER OF AMERICAN GREATNESS'

The president, addressing Congress for the first time, calls for overhauling the nation's health care system and significantly boosting military spending.

2. PRESIDENT SALUTES WIDOW OF SLAIN SEAL IN EMOTIONAL MOMENT

The widow of William \"Ryan\" Owens, who was killed in Yemen, is saluted by Trump and applauded by Congress.

3. REVISED TRAVEL ORDER SPARES IRAQ

Trump's new immigration order will remove Iraq from the list of countries whose citizens face a temporary U.S. travel ban, U.S. officials say.

4. SUSPECTS IN NORTH KOREAN'S KILLING CHARGED WITH MURDER

Prosecutors lodge formal charges against two young women accused of smearing VX nerve agent on Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half brother of North Korea's leader.

5. WHAT'S CAUSING MIGRANT CRISIS IN AFRICA

More than half a million refugees have fled South Sudan amid civil war and warnings of genocide.

6. 'SENSE OF HUMANITY DRIVES ME TO COME HERE'

A small group of former addicts is trying to help drug users in Afghanistan, a country where addiction rates are among the highest in the world.

7. WHERE TWISTERS ARE SPREADING HAVOC

Tornadoes in the upper Midwest and northern Arkansas kill at least two people as a spring-like storm system poses a risk to 45 million people.

8. BIG EASY CELEBRATES FAT TUESDAY

After a day of parades, blaring marching bands, elaborate costumes and crowds screaming for beads, another Mardi Gras celebration in New Orleans is over.

9. HOW WALDORF IS REGAINING ITS WONDER

The word \"grand\" matched no hotel in the world better than New York's Waldorf Astoria \u2014 a bastion of gilded splendor now closing for massive renovations.

10. MUMPS THE WORD: FRESH OUTBREAK IN NHL

So far, players in Vancouver and Minnesota have fallen ill in the second such outbreak of the highly contagious disease in the league in a little over two years.

"} ]
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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Virginia school board that wants to keep a transgender teen from using the boys' restroom at his high school is calling on the Supreme Court to delay consideration of the case to allow the Trump administration to weigh in.

A delay also could allow time for Senate confirmation of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.

The Gloucester County school board said in a letter to the court Wednesday that the justices should decide whether the federal anti-sex discrimination law for education applies to high school senior Gavin Grimm and other transgender students. But the board also says the court should get more input from the Trump administration before it hears the case.

Argument currently is scheduled for March 28. The school board suggests a delay of at least a month.

Gorsuch's Senate hearing is scheduled to begin March 20 and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he wants a vote on Gorsuch's confirmation before the second week in April.

In a separate letter to the court Wednesday, the American Civil Liberties Union said on behalf of Grimm that the court should decide the reach of the anti-discrimination law known as Title IX.

The court filings were prompted by the administration's decision last week to withdraw an Obama administration directive to schools across the country that children should be allowed to use bathrooms that match their gender identity. The administration said the decision should be left to state and local officials.

The Obama era guidance was the basis for an appeals court ruling in Grimm's favor. No appeals court has yet addressed the issue in the absence of the guidance.

The justices could hear the case in March and then figure out what to do. Or they could postpone it to April or even the fall. They could also scratch the case from their calendar and return it to the lower court.

There's a good chance Grimm will graduate from high school in early June before the final resolution of his case, even if the high court hears it and rules in his favor.

Grimm's is not the only case making its way through the courts that deals with the rights of transgender students under federal law or the Constitution.

Among the others:

\u2014Illinois: In a pending case, a federal magistrate has recommended denial of a request by a group of parents to bar a transgender student from full access to the girls' restrooms and locker rooms at a high school in the Chicago suburb of Palatine.

\u2014Wisconsin: A federal judge in Milwaukee ruled last year that the Kenosha Unified School District must allow a transgender student to use bathrooms consistent with his gender identity while his lawsuit progresses through the courts.

\u2014Ohio: A federal judge ruled last year against a school district in Morrow County, saying a transgender student who identifies as female should be treated \"like the girl she is.\" Judge Algenon Marbley said the district failed to provide a persuasive argument that giving the student access to the girls' restroom would jeopardize other students' privacy or safety.

\u2014North Carolina: In a pending case, the ACLU is representing three transgender plaintiffs challenging House Bill 2, the North Carolina law that requires transgender people to use restrooms in schools and many other public buildings that correspond with the sex on their birth certificate, not their gender identity. Passed in March 2016, the law also limits other antidiscrimination protections for LGBT people.

\u2014Pennsylvania: A federal judge ruled Feb. 27 that three transgender students at a Pittsburgh-area high school, including the sister of a singer who performed at Trump's inauguration, can use bathrooms that correspond to their stated gender identities while their lawsuit challenging the school district's policy continues

\u2014Texas: Along with 12 other states, Texas filed a lawsuit last year challenging an Obama administration directive advising public schools to let transgender students use bathrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender identity. A federal judge in Texas temporarily blocked the directive nationwide in August; the directive has now been revoked by the Trump administration.

__

Crary reported from New York.

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President Donald Trump has ordered federal agencies to rewrite an Obama administration rule that would shield many wetlands and small streams from development and pollution. Trump promised during his campaign to withdraw the measure, describing it as a classic case of federal overreach. Environmental groups say they'll fight in court to protect the rule. The likely outcome is years of continued political and legal wrangling over a long-contested issue.

Some basics on the regulation and the debate:

___

WHAT IT'S ABOUT

The Clean Water Act of 1972 empowers the federal government to protect the \"waters of the United States,\" but which waters are under the government's jurisdiction is a fiercely contested question. Everyone agrees that navigable waters such as large rivers and lakes are covered. But the status of headwaters, streams that flow only part of the year, and wetlands that aren't directly connected to large waterways is less certain. Supreme Court rulings in 2001 and 2006 that sought to clarify the matter only added to the confusion. Under President Barack Obama, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers crafted a regulation that was promptly challenged by more than two dozen states and business groups. The rule establishes a legal definition of protected tributaries, saying they must have physical features of flowing water such as a bed, bank and ordinary high water mark.

___

WHO OPPOSES THE RULE

Organizations representing farmers, builders and property-rights advocates contend the 2015 rule imposes unfair limits on use of private lands. \"A breathtaking power grab,\" says the Pacific Legal Foundation, which has represented opponents in lawsuits. \"The rule is so broad and vague that federal regulators would be licensed to micro-manage property owners who are far away from genuinely navigable waters such as rivers, lakes or the ocean.\"

Farm groups say it gives regulators nearly unlimited power over virtually any wet spots, from ditches to farm ponds, leaving producers uncertain about what they can do without obtaining government permits and risking fines. When the rule was issued, the EPA said it would not extend federal control over any waters that hadn't historically been covered by the Clean Water Act and would add no new requirements for agriculture.

___

WHO SUPPORTS IT

The EPA says about 60 percent of the river and stream miles in the Lower 48 states \u2014 about 2 million miles \u2014 are headwaters or have only intermittent flows. Environmentalists, and some hunting and fishing groups, say keeping those humble waterways intact and clean is essential to the larger downstream waters they feed. Also protected under the Obama rule are some 20 million acres of wetlands that don't have a visible connection to other waters but are vital for storing floodwaters, filtering pollutants and hosting wildlife. Among them: \"prairie pothole\" wetlands in the Upper Midwest that Ducks Unlimited calls \"the most important and threatened waterfowl habitat in North America.\"

___

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT

Trump instructed the EPA and the Army Corps to \"rescind or revise\" the rule, which can't be done quickly or easily. The Obama rule hasn't taken effect because of the dozens of lawsuits pending in the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati. Separately, the Supreme Court is considering whether the 6th Circuit should have jurisdiction over those cases. Legal experts say the Trump administration likely will attempt to have the suits dismissed while it crafts a new regulation.

The president's executive order requires the agencies to follow the guidance of the late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia in producing a new definition of protected waters. In a 2006 opinion, Scalia interpreted federal jurisdiction narrowly, saying only \"relatively permanent, standing or continuously flowing\" waters or wetlands with a surface connection to navigable waterways were covered.

After proposing a new rule, the agencies would have to take public comments and consider them when putting together a final version. Environmental groups would be certain to challenge a rule based on the Scalia standards, saying it ignores scientific evidence.

\"This is likely to take years,\" said Jan Goldman-Carter, an attorney for the National Wildlife Federation.

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Green was sentenced to at least 47 years in prison Wednesday for the attack, that also nearly killed his wife. 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DETROIT (AP) \u2014 A Detroit-area man who served 16 years in prison for killing his first wife was locked up Wednesday for nearly 50 more for the carbon-monoxide deaths of his two young children and fatal shootings of two stepchildren, an attack that also left his second wife barely alive.

\"Your justice will come when you burn in hell for eternity,\" said Faith Green, who survived with a box-cutter scar visible from ear to chin.

She wanted a no-parole sentence for Gregory Green. But Wayne County Judge Dana Hathaway said she would stick with the plea deal reached with prosecutors, including a minimum prison sentence of 47 years. The judge suggested that Green, who's 50, likely won't live long enough to see his first opportunity for parole at age 97.

Hathaway said it's the worst case she's seen.

\"Fathers are supposed to protect their children. Husbands are supposed to protect their wives,\" the judge said.

Police say Gregory Green called 911 last September to report the deaths of his daughters, ages 4 and 5, and stepchildren, ages 19 and 17, at their Dearborn Heights home.

Faith Green, who had filed for divorce at the time, was bound, cut in the face with a box cutter and forced to watch as her teenage children were shot in front of her, police said. Their two daughters were asphyxiated through carbon monoxide poisoning.

Faith Green said she sometimes wakes up \"screaming and sweating,\" thinking she can save her children.

\"Then I realize that the nightmare is actually reality and my children are really gone,\" she said.

Assistant prosecutor Trisha Gerard said Gregory Green had planned the killings for days.

\"Honestly, judge, there just aren't any words,\" Gerard said. \"It is tragic. It is heinous. It is beyond evil.\"

When it was his turn to speak, Green said he was sorry and that he thinks about his daughters every day. But he also seemed to offer an excuse, saying all he wanted was a \"God-fearing\" spouse who would support him.

\"God knows the heart,\" Green said. \"He knows how regretful and how sorry I am. Even now, after all this, He still has a plan.\"

The Greens married in 2010, two years after Gregory Green left prison on his fifth request for parole. He had pleaded no contest to killing his first wife, who was pregnant, in 1991.

___

Follow Ed White at http://twitter.com/edwhiteap

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Latest on President Donald Trump (all times local):

3:05 p.m.

The top White House ethics attorney says counselor Kellyanne Conway \"acted inadvertently\" and \"without nefarious motive\" when she promoted Ivanka Trump's fashion line during a television interview at the White House.

Stefan Passantino, deputy counsel to the president on compliance and ethics, wrote in a letter to the Office of Government Ethics that he met with Conway and resolved the matter.

Administration employees are subject to rules that prohibit them from using their official position to endorse products or services. In the Feb. 9 interview, Conway said to \"go buy Ivanka's stuff.\"

Conway was reacting to reports that Nordstrom had dropped the line, which the president believes was a political move. The store says it was a business decision. Republican and Democratic lawmakers have condemned Conway's behavior.

__

1:20 p.m.

President Donald Trump says he and top congressional Republicans are meeting to \"start the process.\"

Trump commented about his agenda during a White House lunch with GOP House and Senate leaders, including Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The meeting follows Trump's first address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night that appeared well-received by Republicans.

In the speech Trump called for a replacement for the Obama-era health care law as well as a significant boost in military spending, among other initiatives.

Ryan has said the president's speech was a \"home run.\"

___

12:20 p.m.

President Donald Trump invited the widow of Navy SEAL killed during a raid in Yemen to attend Tuesday night's speech when he telephoned to offer his condolences.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer says Trump called Carryn Owens on Jan. 30 and invited her and her three children to attend the speech.

The family visited the White House on Tuesday and met with Trump.

Spicer says the kids ate lunch in the Navy-run cafeteria in the White House and toured the building. They did not attend Trump's speech.

Spicer brushed aside criticism that Trump used Carryn Owens as a prop, saying she accepted the invitation and has the right to honor her husband's legacy.

Senior Chief William \"Ryan\" Owens was killed in January in a raid approved by Trump.

___

8:45 a.m.

Vice President Mike Pence is denying reports that a U.S. military raid in Yemen that led to the death of a Navy SEAL yielded no significant intelligence.

In an interview Wednesday with CBS \"This Morning,\" Pence noted that Defense Secretary Jim Mattis confirmed again Tuesday that \"significant intelligence was gathered\" in the January military operation.

William \"Ryan\" Owens, 36, a married father of three, was the first known U.S. combat casualty since President Donald Trump took office. His widow, Carryn Owens, was a guest at Trump's address to Congress Tuesday, prompting an extended standing ovation from the joint chamber.

But Owens' death, as well as the killing of several civilians, has raised questions about the effectiveness of the raid. Pence said the data that Owens died helping to collect will \"lead to the safety and security of the American people.\"

__

8:30 a.m.

Vice President Mike Pence says the Trump administration is still determined to defend its original travel ban that was blocked by the federal courts.

In an interview with CBS \"This Morning,\" Pence said Wednesday a variety of agencies are putting the \"final touches\" on a revised executive order that temporarily bans travelers from certain countries and restricts refugees from entering the U.S.

Trump's original order, signed in January, sparked immediate confusion, panic and outrage as some travelers were detained in U.S. airports and prompted federal courts to intervene.

Pence says that the administration will defend President Donald Trump's original ban which, he says, \"we fully believe is in his presidential authority.\"

Pence would not address details of the revised ban, saying he doesn't want to get \"ahead of the deliberation.\"

__

8:20 a.m.

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi called President Donald Trump's first speech to Congress a \"bait-and-switch\" speech, with little legislation from the White House to match the president's stated goals.

\"All we have is rhetoric,\" the California congresswoman said.

Appearing on MSNBC's \"Morning Joe\" Wednesday, Pelosi said House Democrats will eventually release their own legislative plans in the absence of direction from the president.

She said \"when we believe the time is right we will put forth our positive agenda, but not while people are still enamored by what could be viewed as a snake-oil salesman by some and a messenger of hope by others.\"

__

7:40 a.m.

Vice President Mike Pence says \"no one is going to fall through the cracks\" as a result of Republican plans to replace the nation's health care law. Pence was referring to people on Medicaid, the federal-state program for low income Americans that is managed by the states.

As part of the Affordable Care Act, 31 states and the District of Columbia accepted an optional Medicaid expansion, which increased federal funding for health care. Many governors from those states are now concerned about the loss of funds if \"Obamacare\" is repealed.

Asked about the consequences of repealing the health law, Pence told ABC's \"Good Morning America\" on Wednesday that \"we don't want anyone to fall through the cracks,\" especially not \"the most disadvantaged citizens among us.\"

Pence was making a round of morning television appearances following President Donald Trump's address to Congress on Tuesday night.

___

6:40 a.m.

Vice President Mike Pence is giving President Donald Trump high marks for his speech to a joint session of Congress, saying he showed his \"broad shoulders, big heart, reaching out, focusing on the future.\"

Pence, who sat behind Trump in the House chamber Tuesday evening with House Speaker Paul Ryan, said the president was directly involved in crafting the hourlong talk.

Appearing on MSNBC's \"Morning Joe\" Wednesday, Pence said Trump \"was literally rewriting the speech on the afternoon\" of his appearance on Capitol Hill.

Asked which White House aides played major roles in writing the speech, Pence replied, \"This was all him. The president stepped up and told America where he wants to go and many Americans said yes.\"

___

3:30 a.m.

President Donald Trump gave Republican congressional leaders a rallying cry and even a roadmap as they try to push through a sweeping and divisive agenda on health care, taxes and more.

In his first address to a joint session of Congress, Trump said largely what GOP leaders were hoping to hear Tuesday night, staying on-message and talking in optimistic tones, even weighing in at one point to settle a brewing dispute over how to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

House Speaker Paul Ryan declared the speech a \"home run,\" pointing to Trump's embrace for the first time of tax credits \u2014 a central element in the Republican plan to replace former President Barack Obama's health care law.

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BOISE, Idaho (AP) \u2014 The investigation into the sexual assault of a disabled black football player by his white teammates at a small-town Idaho high school showed that crucial evidence was collected by school employees, not law enforcement officials, and that the culture that led to the attack stretched far beyond the locker room.

John R.K. Howard and two teammates were charged with sodomizing the victim with a clothes hanger in 2015 in the locker room at the high school in the tiny farming village of Dietrich. The sex assault charge against Howard, who was 18 at the time of the incident, was later dropped. He was sentenced last week to probation for felony injury to a child. The other two cases are sealed because they are being handled in juvenile court.

An Associated Press review of roughly 2,000 pages of documents from the Idaho Attorney General's office found that school officials did not immediately report the crime. Instead, Superintendent Ben Hardcastle gathered key evidence, including the hanger, and began interviewing the suspects and some of the 27 potential witnesses before notifying the sheriff's department.

Fellow students, neighbors and even football coaches were allowed to pressure the 17-year-old victim about his testimony, in some cases telling him that the case could bring the town to ruin and send friends to jail.

Like most of his classmates, the victim grew up in Dietrich, though he was one of just a few black children in the community. He also struggled with mental illness and a developmental disability that made it hard for him to describe timelines or immediately recognize the racial implications of the teasing he endured.

The teen ultimately had a breakdown from the stress and had to be institutionalized for a time, according to his mother.

In the village of about 300 people, the school is the main public gathering space. The athletics programs are \"pretty much the only community activity,\" especially during cold winter days, said Roy Hubert, a Lincoln County commissioner who has lived there since 1943.

The school locker room was ruled by a so-called \"bro code\" that forbid students to share what happened there with anyone outside, according to the attorney general's documents. Coaches were reluctant to be in the room when the boys were changing or showering, an absence that may have allowed the code to thrive.

Racial harassment was common, though some claimed it was unintentional: The victim was nicknamed \"grape soda,\" ''fried chicken\" and \"Kool-Aid\" by his teammate and coaches. The coaches later said they did not know the nicknames were based on racial stereotypes. School officials knew that a student had drawn a cartoon of the victim sitting in the back of a bus on a classroom whiteboard, and the victim later reported that Howard frequently called him a racial slur and showed him a KKK song.

Locker-room bullying escalated in the months before the attack, according to the documents. Some players showed dominance by \"dry humping\" teammates. Teammates occasionally tried to hit each other in the testicles. Wedgies \u2014 a prank in which the fabric of a boy's underwear is yanked up into his buttocks \u2014 were commonplace.

The coaches knew about at least some of the behavior. At least one player, Howard, had previously lost playing time as a penalty for aggressively humping other students.

Before practice on Oct. 22, 2015, one player gave the victim a wedgie that ripped the waistband of his underwear and exposed his buttocks. Then a teammate shoved him into a bathroom and humped him so hard that students outside heard banging.

After practice, things escalated. Witnesses gave conflicting statements, but the documents suggest one suspect asked the victim for a hug and then held the victim while another shoved a coat hanger between the boy's buttocks. A third player, Howard, kicked the hanger at least once and possibly as many as three times, according to witness reports.

After the victim screamed in pain, a teammate pulled the hanger out and flung it aside before a coach walked into the room. The coach did not ask the victim why his underwear was ripped or what happened, the documents said.

The assault went unreported until the next day, when the victim's brother told their mother about it. She immediately contacted the superintendent before taking her son to a hospital for an exam.

Hardcastle began interviewing team members and, based on their statements, took two coat hangers from the locker room.

Then, deciding that the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office would be too busy because a deputy had recently died and believing that the boy's mother would report the incident, Hardcastle opted to wait. He reported the allegations to police the following Monday, four days after the assault, in a phone message.

Idaho law requires school officials to report suspected crimes against children, including abuse, within 24 hours.

Hardcastle declined to comment to The Associated Press, citing ongoing litigation.

Almost a week after the assault, the sheriff's office notified the school that a criminal investigation was underway. The same day, the county prosecutor asked Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden to take over the case, noting the many personal relationships between the school and law enforcement in the small community.

Wasden agreed. A week later, he sent an investigator to collect interview records, surveillance videos, the hangers and other evidence from the school. That was on Nov. 10, 2015, nearly three weeks after the assault.

The attorney general's office declined to comment.

Many people pressured the victim not to talk about the assault. Fellow students told him the town \"would be destroyed\" and they would \"lose their farms\" if a lawsuit filed by the victim's family went forward, according to the documents.

Even the football coaches attempted to manipulate the victim, according to the documents, approaching him along with teammates when his parents were not present and recording the conversation.

On the recordings, the coaches urged the victim to \"tell the truth,\" and his teammates told him how much he was loved. At one point, the victim acknowledged that he was not absolutely sure which way he was facing when the assault occurred, a statement later used to suggest he lied under oath.

The boy's doctors were worried that being forced to testify could affect his mental health. The prosecutor said that concern in part prompted him to offer a plea deal to Howard. In exchange for his guilty plea to a different felony, prosecutors dropped the sex-crime charge.

The family's lawsuit alleges that school officials knew about the racial harassment and bullying but failed to take action. The complaint is pending.

The family's attorney, Keith Roark, told the judge in Howard's criminal case that the family was outraged by the plea deal.

The outcome of the case has drawn criticism from across the country from people who think the judge went too easy on Howard, perhaps because he was white and the victim was black.

The judge insisted neither sex nor race was behind the crime and that out-of-towners did not understand the case, referring to news reports.

\"People from the East Coast have no idea what this case is about,\" Judge Randy Stoker said. But \"I'm not going to impose a sentence that is not supported by the law.\"

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RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) \u2014 The Latest on a small plane that crashed into homes in California (all times local):

11:45 a.m.

A woman says her sister-in-law was one of two survivors of a fiery small plane crash in Riverside, California, and her sister-in-law's parents were among those killed.

KNTV reports Wednesday (http://bit.ly/2mddQCk ) that Christy Crown identified plane owner Nouri Hijazi and his wife Dana as two of the three people killed in the crash.

Crown says their daughter, Stacey, is in critical condition.

The family and two others were returning to San Jose on Monday from a trip to a cheerleading competition in Southern California when their plane plummeted into a neighborhood in Riverside.

6:45 a.m.

A San Jose man says his 22-year-old sister was killed and his mother survived when a small plane crashed into homes in Southern California on Monday.

Brandon Fareles tells KGO-TV (http://abc7ne.ws/2lTn1XM ) that his mother, Sylvia, called him before Monday's flight and said she was worried about the rainy weather. The plane crashed shortly after takeoff from an airport in Riverside.

The crash of the Cessna killed a man, a woman and a teenager. Two other women were ejected. The women were hospitalized with critical injuries. Authorities have not identified them. No one on the ground was hurt.

Fareles says his 22-year-old sister, Adine, is among the dead. He says his mother is recovering from surgery after suffering severe burns.

They were returning from a cheerleading competition in Southern California where Adine's younger sister competed.

KGO says the Union Middle School student arrived safely back in San Jose by bus with the rest of her team.

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 President Donald Trump is spotlighting violence committed by immigrants, announcing the creation of a national office that can assist American victims of such crimes. He said during his address Tuesday night that the Homeland Security Department's Victims Of Immigration Crime Engagement office will provide a voice for people ignored by the media and \"silenced by special interests.\"

Critics of the president's approach to immigration say the proposal is misguided, in part because studies show immigrants are less likely to commit crime than native-born U.S. citizens.

A look at the proposal and what it aims to do:

WHAT IS THE 'VICTIMS OF IMMIGRATION CRIME ENGAGEMENT OFFICE'?

Trump's plan to create VOICE as an office to advocate for victims of immigrant crime continues a dramatic overhaul of immigration policies.

The new office would run counter to the Obama-era public advocate within Immigration and Customs Enforcement. ICE created that position in 2012 in the midst of an overhaul of policies about which immigrants in the country illegally should be targeted for deportation.

ICE said at the time that its first public advocate, Andrew Lorenzen-Strait, would be the person at ICE who advocates, and immigrants facing deportation and others could call to complain or get explanations about how the agency was conducting its work.

Launched and shuttered by the Obama administration, the office was bashed by critics of President Barack Obama's immigration enforcement policies.

Trump's VOICE would take a much different role, advocating for victims of crimes committed by immigrants, including those in the country illegally. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly detailed the office's planned work in a memo last month explaining how his agency would carry out Trump's immigration enforcement policies.

Kelly said in the memo that ICE was previously blocked from doing this work because it extended privacy protections to immigrants, a policy that left \"victims feeling marginalized and without a voice.\"

ARE LOTS OF CRIMINALS IMMIGRANTS?

Multiple studies have concluded that immigrants are less likely to commit crime than native-born U.S. citizens. A 2014 study published in the journal Justice Quarterly concluded that immigrations \"exhibit remarkably low levels of involvement in crime across their life course.\"

Trump pointed to some high-profile examples in his Tuesday night speech to Congress, including a man whose son was shot by a gang member in Los Angeles and the wives of police officers who were killed on duty.

The new office fits into his hard-line stance on immigration that includes a proposal to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and new guidance that Homeland Security would subject any immigrants in the country illegally to deportation if they are charged or convicted of any offense, or even suspected of a crime.

\"This office has to do with keeping the promises and maintaining the pressure on the issue on criminal aliens and putting a human face to it,\" said Doris Meissner of the Migration Policy Institute.

Frank Sharry, founder and executive director of America's Voice, a liberal-leaning organization that advocates for immigrants, said, \"Trump continues to tag immigrants as criminals, a charge as false as it is cruel.\"

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says it is rearranging existing personnel to support the new office and is \"currently drafting outreach materials for victims and families impacted by immigration crime.\"

___

This story has been corrected to show that Trump's guests included the wives of two officers killed in the line of duty, not two married police officers.

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WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 President Donald Trump surprised congressional leaders when he suddenly suggested he was open to broad immigration reform. But while there is appetite on Capitol Hill for legislation, there is also skepticism, and the president's hard-line rhetoric over the past two years could make a compromise bill much harder.

Trump signaled a potential shift on Tuesday in a private meeting with news anchors. The president told them he was open to legislation that would give legal status to some people living in the U.S. illegally and provide a pathway to citizenship to those brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

Those private comments raised expectations that he might make a similar call in his prime-time address. And he did say in his speech that \"real and positive immigration reform is possible.\" But he also pledged to vigorously target people living in the U.S. illegally who \"threaten our communities\" and prey on \"innocent citizens,\" words similar to his campaign speeches.

His mixed message was a prime topic Wednesday.

\"I hope that it opens the door for comprehensive immigration reform, which we obviously feel is vital,\" said Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona, who was a member of the so-called Gang of Eight that spearheaded a 2013 immigration bill that ultimately failed after passing the Senate.

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., another Gang of Eight member, said he was encouraged by Trump's remarks \u2014 less in the speech than what came out earlier. He said the time was ripe for action, despite Trump's past rhetoric denouncing \"illegal amnesty.\"

\"Only Nixon could go to China, I think there are parallels there,\" said Flake. That was a reference to President Richard Nixon's 1972 meeting with Mao Zedong, now a political metaphor for a leader taking an action that his supporters would typically condemn if taken by someone from another party.

Flakes suggested that Trump could \"come out and say, 'All right, we've got to solve this. We're not going to deport 11 million people. There are people out there afraid. ... Why don't we get something we can agree on? Now's the time.\"

But White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said Wednesday that any legislation would have to be on Trump's terms.

\"He recognizes that a solution, a comprehensive solution, has eluded our nation for a long time. And it's a big problem. And if he can get it consistent with his principles he will,\" Spicer said.

Trump campaigned as an immigration hard-liner, vowing to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and step up deportations. Since taking office, some of his policy moves have hewed closely to those promises, including new guidance from the Department of Homeland Security that would subject any immigrants in the country illegally to deportation if they are charged or convicted of any offense, or even suspected of a crime.

But the president also has suggested he is open to finding a solution for the so-called Dreamers \u2014 those who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. Although he railed against President Barack Obama's executive actions to protect those immigrants from deportation during the campaign, Trump has not rolled back Obama's safeguards and has said he will deal with the Dreamers with \"great heart.\"

Trump did say during the campaign that he was open to \"softening\" his position. But he ultimately landed where he started, declaring in September that under his presidency there would be \"no legal status or becoming a citizen of the United States by illegally entering our country.\"

\"People will know that you can't just smuggle in, hunker down and wait to be legalized,\" he said then. \"Those days are over.\"

Trump's own mixed thinking has taken center stage. In his lunch with news anchors ahead of his address to Congress, he said, \"The time is right for an immigration bill as long as there is compromise on both sides.\" A person with knowledge of the discussion confirmed his comments to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity.

In his address, Trump called on Republicans and Democrats to \"work together to achieve\" progress on immigration legislation.

Not all Republicans are answering that call. Rep. Steve King of Iowa has cautioned Trump against pursuing broad immigration legislation, calling it a \"trap.\"

\"Comprehensive is the code word for amnesty, and everyone knows that by now,\" King said. He also said going in that direction could swiftly alienate core GOP supporters.

\"If it's not going to be a promise kept on immigration, the base will be gone.\"

Indeed, most of Trump's speech comments on immigration struck a tough tone, citing steps his administration has taken in its first month to crack down on people living in the country illegally and painting an image of a country besieged by \"lawless chaos.\"

\"As we speak, we are removing gang members, drug dealers and criminals that threaten our communities and prey on our very innocent citizens,\" he said. \"Bad ones are going out as I speak tonight and as I promised throughout the campaign.\"

The message was underscored by the administration's decision to invite family members of people killed by immigrants living in the U.S. illegally to sit in first lady Melania Trump's box.

___

AP White House correspondent Julie Pace contributed to this report.

"}, {"id":"74ad5a33-4cb4-558a-b8a1-a473834aedaf","type":"article","starttime":"1488398629","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-01T13:03:49-07:00","lastupdated":"1488400299","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Prosecutors: Sheriff's officer stole cocaine from department","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_74ad5a33-4cb4-558a-b8a1-a473834aedaf.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/prosecutors-sheriff-s-officer-stole-cocaine-from-department/article_74ad5a33-4cb4-558a-b8a1-a473834aedaf.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-New-Jersey-officer-is-accused-of-stealing-cocaine-the-department-used-for-training-purposes-and-using-it-himself/id-4a5aec1592aa496fb88f0bfae681e987","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TOMS RIVER, N.J. (AP) \u2014 A New Jersey officer is accused of stealing cocaine the department used for training purposes and using it himself.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","theft","drug-related crime","crime","police","law enforcement agencies","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"74ad5a33-4cb4-558a-b8a1-a473834aedaf","body":"

TOMS RIVER, N.J. (AP) \u2014 A New Jersey officer is accused of stealing cocaine the department used for training purposes and using it himself.

County prosecutors say Lt. John Adams surrendered Wednesday. The 40-year-old Adams has been suspended and is charged with official misconduct, theft and cocaine possession.

Authorities say Adams was assigned to the Ocean County sheriff's department's canine unit, working as a certified dog handler and instructor. They say he legitimately obtained cocaine in May 2015 so dogs could be trained to detect it.

From May 2015 and February 2017, cocaine was determined to be missing from the department. Authorities say a subsequent investigation found Adams had taken the cocaine for his personal use.

Adams has worked with the department since 2000. It wasn't known if he's retained an attorney.

"}, {"id":"c16ac581-4159-5954-814d-cfd84cb2fa52","type":"article","starttime":"1488398766","starttime_iso8601":"2017-03-01T13:06:06-07:00","lastupdated":"1488400297","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Deputy: Multiple people dead, injured in Oregon house fire","url":"http://tucson.com/news/national/article_c16ac581-4159-5954-814d-cfd84cb2fa52.html","permalink":"http://tucson.com/news/national/deputy-multiple-people-dead-injured-in-oregon-house-fire/article_c16ac581-4159-5954-814d-cfd84cb2fa52.html","canonical":"http://www.apnewsarchive.com/2017/A-sheriff-s-spokesman-says-multiple-people-are-dead-and-others-seriously-injured-after-a-house-fire-broke-out-overnight-in-a-small-town-in-Oregon/id-3a8c792520ef4919ab7dcae13fc732bd","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"RIDDLE, Ore. (AP) \u2014 Multiple people were killed and others seriously injured when a house fire broke out overnight in a small town in Oregon, authorities said Wednesday.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","residential fires","fires","accidents and disasters"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#ap"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"c16ac581-4159-5954-814d-cfd84cb2fa52","body":"

RIDDLE, Ore. (AP) \u2014 Multiple people were killed and others seriously injured when a house fire broke out overnight in a small town in Oregon, authorities said Wednesday.

There were less than 10 people in the home when the fire broke out around 2 a.m.in the town of Riddle, Douglas County Deputy Dwes Hutson said.

He declined to say if any children were among the dead or injured.

South Umpqua School District Superintendent Tim Porter told The News-Review in Roseburg (http://bit.ly/2lXmx0V) that students in his district were involved in the fire but he didn't know their names or ages.

The district was prepared to provide grief counseling, he said.

Those who were injured were transported to Legacy Emmanuel Medical Center in Portland.

\"The injured are very seriously injured,\" Hutson said at a news conference.

Hutson couldn't provide more information about the numbers of people killed in the blaze or their identities until relatives had been notified of the deaths.

Riddle is about 200 miles south of Portland in a rural and heavily forested county.

Authorities remained on scene to begin an investigation. The cause does not appear to be suspicious, Dwes said.

.

"} ]