Mental-health resource guide

2011-04-17T00:00:00Z 2011-04-27T14:51:55Z Mental-health resource guide Arizona Daily Star
April 17, 2011 12:00 am

About serious mental illness

Each mental illness has its own symptoms, but there are general warning signs that might alert you that someone needs professional help.

A person who shows any of these signs should seek help from a health professional:

• Marked personality change

• Inability to cope with problems and daily activities

• Strange or grandiose ideas

• Excessive anxieties

• Prolonged depression and apathy

• Marked changes in eating or sleeping patterns

• Thinking or talking about suicide or harming oneself

• Extreme mood swings - high or low

• Abuse of alcohol or drugs

• Excessive anger, hostility, or violent behavior.

Source: National Institutes of Health

COMING SOON

A new Pima County Crisis Response Center is planned to open in the late summer or early fall adjacent to the University of Arizona's hospital at the Kino campus at East Ajo Way and South Country Club Road. The center will have a separate area for children and adolescents in crisis. A new psychiatric emergency department will be in the same complex, along with inpatient units for people who need hospitalization.

The center will treat everyone regardless of insurance status or enrollment in AHCCCS (Arizona's form of Medicaid) but it will also have staff to assist people in determining whether they are eligible for benefits that would pay for treatment. You will be able to bring someone to the center or go there yourself and be evaluated and given guidance for future medical and behavioral care.

STIGMA

Sometimes people are hesitant to seek help or acknowledge they or a loved one has a serious mental illness because of negative stereotypes about what the illness is or what they think it means. These stigmas are usually based on false information. For instance, according to the National Institutes of Health:

"Very few people who have a mental illness are dangerous to society. Most can hold jobs, attend school, and live independently. A person who has a mental illness cannot simply decide to get over it any more than someone who has a different chronic disease such as diabetes, asthma, or heart disease can. A mental illness, like those other diseases, is caused by a physical problem in the body."

BIPOLAR DISORDER

www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/bipolar-disorder/what-is-bipolar-disorder.shtml

"Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe. They are different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through from time to time. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives.

"People with bipolar disorder experience unusually intense emotional states that occur in distinct periods called 'mood episodes.' An overly joyful or overexcited state is called a manic episode, and an extremely sad or hopeless state is called a depressive episode. Sometimes, a mood episode includes symptoms of both mania and depression. This is called a mixed state. People with bipolar disorder also may be explosive and irritable during a mood episode.

"Extreme changes in energy, activity, sleep and behavior go along with these changes in mood. It is possible for someone with bipolar disorder to experience a long-lasting period of unstable moods rather than discrete episodes of depression or mania.

"A person may be having an episode of bipolar disorder if he or she has a number of manic or depressive symptoms for most of the day, nearly every day, for at least one or two weeks. Sometimes symptoms are so severe that the person cannot function normally at work, school or home.

"Bipolar disorder often develops in a person's late teens or early adult years. At least half of all cases start before age 25. Some people have their first symptoms during childhood, while others may develop symptoms late in life."

Source: National Institute of Mental Health

DEPRESSION

www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression/complete-index.shtml

"Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad, but these feelings are usually fleeting and pass within a couple of days. When a person has a depressive disorder, it interferes with daily life, normal functioning, and causes pain for both the person with the disorder and those who care about him or her. Depression is a common but serious illness, and most who experience it need treatment to get better.

"Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the vast majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment.

Symptoms include:

• Persistent sad, anxious or "empty" feelings

• Feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism

• Feelings of guilt, worthlessness and/or helplessness

• Irritability, restlessness

• Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex

• Fatigue and decreased energy

• Difficulty concentrating, remembering details and making decisions

• Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness or excessive sleeping

• Overeating or appetite loss

• Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts

• Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment."

Source: National Institute of Mental Health

SCHIZOPHRENIA

www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/schizophrenia/complete-index.shtml

"Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling brain disorder that has affected people throughout history. About 1 percent of Americans have this illness.

"People with the disorder may hear voices other people don't hear. They may believe other people are reading their minds, controlling their thoughts or plotting to harm them. This can terrify people with the illness and make them withdrawn or extremely agitated.

"People with schizophrenia may not make sense when they talk. They may sit for hours without moving or talking. Sometimes people with schizophrenia seem perfectly fine until they talk about what they are really thinking.

"Families and society are affected by schizophrenia, too. Many people with schizophrenia have difficulty holding a job or caring for themselves, so they rely on others for help.

"Treatment helps relieve many symptoms of schizophrenia, but most people who have the disorder cope with symptoms throughout their lives. However, many people with schizophrenia can lead rewarding and meaningful lives in their communities. Researchers are developing more effective medications and using new research tools to understand the causes of schizophrenia. In the years to come, this work may help prevent and better treat the illness.

"Schizophrenia affects men and women equally. It occurs at similar rates in all ethnic groups around the world. Symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions usually start between ages 16 and 30. Men tend to experience symptoms a little earlier than women. Most of the time, people do not get schizophrenia after age 45. Schizophrenia rarely occurs in children, but awareness of childhood-onset schizophrenia is increasing.

"It can be difficult to diagnose schizophrenia in teens. This is because the first signs can include a change of friends, a drop in grades, sleep problems, and irritability - behaviors that are common among teens. A combination of factors can predict schizophrenia in up to 80 percent of youth who are at high risk of developing the illness. These factors include isolating oneself and withdrawing from others, an increase in unusual thoughts and suspicions, and a family history of psychosis. In young people who develop the disease, this stage of the disorder is called the 'prodromal' period.

"People with schizophrenia often resist treatment. They may not think they need help because they believe their delusions or hallucinations are real. In these cases, family and friends may need to take action to keep their loved one safe. But when a person becomes dangerous to himself or herself, or to others, family members or friends may have to call the police to take their loved one to the hospital."

Source: National Institute of Mental Health

Who does what

Figuring out where to begin can be daunting. So many agencies are referred to by acronyms or weird-sounding names that it can be hard to keep track of who does what and what everything means. Here is an overview:

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE PUBLIC BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SYSTEM (ALSO KNOWN AS MEDICAID, AHCCCS OR TITLE 19, WHICH IS OFTEN WRITTEN TITLE XIX)

AHCCCS, short for the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, is Arizona's Medicaid plan that covers low-income people.

To qualify for AHCCCS (Title 19), a family's household income cannot exceed the federal poverty level, which for an individual is $10,890 annually and for a family of four is $22,350.

People can see whether they qualify for AHCCCS by going to www.healthearizona.org or calling the Department of Economic Security, Family Assistance Administration at 1-800-352-8401.

Also, for persons seeking behavioral health services, the CPSA Comprehensive Service Providers can help screen for AHCCCS eligibility and help complete the application.

If you do not qualify, you are referred to as "non-Title 19" (or N-TXIX) because you are not eligible for many of the public health system's ongoing care - but you can receive crisis care and generic medications.

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA (CPSA)

This private, nonprofit agency manages Arizona's publicly funded services for behavioral health (which includes mental illness and substance abuse) for people who live in Pima County. CPSA receives money from the Arizona Department of Health Services' Division of Behavioral Health Services, which receives it from AHCCCS and from state government.

CPSA then distributes the money to what are known as "comprehensive service providers." These are the agencies that actually see and treat people with mental illness. If you use the public behavioral health system, this is the network you are a part of and CPSA refers to the people who use the mental health services as "enrolled members."

LEARN MORE

Community Partnership of Southern Arizona

www.cpsa-rbha.org

Contact member services at 1-520-318-6946 or 1-800-771-9889 to discuss your needs. Translation services are available. Individuals with a hearing impairment may call 1-866-318-6960 for TTY.

CPSA member services is available 24 hours a day, but the best time to call is Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

FACT: In 2010, CPSA had 46,373 enrolled members, which was about 20 percent of all Arizonans enrolled in the the state's Medicaid behavioral health services.

ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES: DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES

The Arizona Department of Health Services oversees the Division of Behavioral Health Services. They're commonly referred to as "ADHS/DBHS" or "the division" and it's the agency that AHCCCS/Medicaid pays to oversee the state's behavioral health services. ADHS/DBHS in turn pays the Regional Behavioral Health Authorities (RBHAs) and Tribal Regional Behavioral Health Authorities (TRBHAs) to oversee the system in their areas and pay agencies and individuals to take care of people with mental illness.

LEARN MORE

Arizona Department of Health Services/ Division of Behavioral Health Services

www.azdhs.gov/bhs/index.htm

Behavioral Health Services:

150 N. 18th Ave., No. 200

Phoenix, AZ 85007

Phone: 1-602-364-4558

Fax: 1-602-364-4570

PRIVATE INSURANCE PLANS

If you have private health insurance, whether purchased by an individual or through an employer or family member, you are most likely not eligible to enroll in the public behavioral health network that's managed by CPSA. You are what people in the field call a "non-Title 19" person.

Private insurance companies do not have to cover mental health services, but federal law requires "parity" so that if your plan does cover mental health and substance abuse treatment, the co-pays and number of allowed visits must be the same as if you are seeking medical or surgical services. Contacting your insurance company and looking at the "explanation of benefits" is the best way to figure out what behavioral health services are covered.

If you are "non-Title 19" you can still get help if you are found to have a serious mental illness or are in a crisis or emergency, and your medications may be paid for, but only if they're generics.

ARIZONA STATE HOSPITAL (AZSH - PRONOUNCED "ASH")

If a judge decides that a person is so impaired by mental illness that he or she cannot function or be psychiatrically stabilized with treatment in the community, the person can be ordered to the Arizona State Hospital in Phoenix. It's the most restrictive environment in the state for adults and it's a last resort. The hospital has a secure forensic ward for people who are involved in criminal proceedings or have been convicted of a crime but have a serious mental illness, as well as a separate area for people a civil court judge has determined need such intensive care. According to the AzSH website, courts usually require a person to have spent at least 25 days in a hospital to attempt psychiatric stabilization before sending the person to AzSH.

LEARN MORE

Arizona State Hospital (ASH)

www.azdhs.gov/azsh/about_azsh.htm

Arizona State Hospital:

2500 E. Van Buren St.

Phoenix, AZ 85008

Phone: 1-602-244-1331

Fax: 1-602-220-6292

www.azdhs.gov/azsh/index.htm

COMPASS BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE (DETOX)

Compass is where to go for help with substance abuse. Call 1-520-624-5272 anytime, 24 hours a day.

Compass provides services for a variety of substance addictions, including alcohol, opiates, cocaine, meth, marijuana, benzodiazepines and amphetamines.

Detoxification facilities are at 2950 N. Dodge Blvd. (between East Glenn Street and East Fort Lowell Road). Compass is part of the public behavioral health system and some of its services are also available on a sliding scale for those who don't qualify for AHCCCS.

SOUTHERN ARIZONA MENTAL HEALTH CORPORATION (SAMHC, PRONOUNCED SAM-HACK)

SAMHC is where to go if you are having a mental health crisis and need immediate help. SAMHC will see you no matter how old you are, whether or not you have insurance or can pay.

SAMHC is open 24 hours every day. It's at 2502 N. Dodge Blvd. (the entrance is on Flower Street, a couple blocks north of Grant Road). The staff will help you figure out what's going on, evaluate your situation, help with crisis counseling, drug/alcohol assessment, figure out if you are eligible for AHCCCS /Medicaid and help you get connected to services.

If you can't get to SAMHC but are having a mental health emergency, call the Community-Wide Crisis Line at 1-520-622-6000 or 1-800-796-6762. They may be able to send a mobile team to you. Learn more at www.samhc.com

Public forum

The free and public forum "A Delicate Balance: Creating a better, post-Jan. 8 system to protect the public and help the seriously mentally ill," will be held April 27 at Centennial Hall on the University of Arizona campus.

The event will include a forum with experts followed by a Q&A session.

The Star is partnering with the Schorr Family Award organization on the event in the shared belief that mental illness is a paramount issue in our community. Go to www.cpsa-rbha.org and click on the "Schorr Family Award" link for more information.

The event begins at 1:45 p.m. and ends at 5. Translation services will be available upon request.

Dr. Thomas R. Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, will give the keynote talk, "Trying to Understand Serious Mental Illness after January 8th."

Insel is the recipient of The Schorr Family Award For Distinguished Contribution In Furthering Public Understanding of Mental Illness.

A discussion panel of local and national experts will be led by Nicholas Breitborde, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the UA.

Panelists will be:

• Neal Cash, president & CEO, Community Partnership of Southern Arizona

• Dr. Ken Duckworth, assistant professor, Harvard Medical School; medical director, National Alliance on Mental Illness

• Joel Dvoskin, assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the UA College of Medicine

• Laurie Flynn, executive director, TeenScreen National Center, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center

• John J. Pedicone, superintendent, Tucson Unified School District

• Clarke Romans, executive director, National Alliance on Mental Illness of Southern Arizona

After the panel discussion participants will answer questions from the public.

Ron Barber, district director for Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, will speak after the Q&A. He was seriously injured in the Jan. 8 attack.

After the forum there will be a public reception at the Women's Plaza of Honor (directly west of Centennial Hall).

Ask a question

Panelists will take written questions from the audience during the event.

You also can submit a question in advance by emailing it to mentalhealth@azstarnet.com before Friday, April 22.

Moderator Nicholas Breitborde will pose a mix of questions that come in during the event and those sent in advance.

If there are too many questions to pose at the forum, we plan to continue to answer them in the Star and on our website, azstarnet.com

Crisis help

Emergency/Crisis/Need to Talk

If you or someone you know is having a life-threatening mental-health emergency (if, for example, thoughts of suicide or weapons or a potential overdose are involved) always call 911. Tell the dispatcher and responders if mental illness or substance abuse is involved.

If your crisis is urgent but not immediately life-threatening, call the Community-Wide Crisis Line at 1-520-622-6000 or 1-800-796-6762. The Crisis Response Network will answer the phone and help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including holidays.

If you need to talk to someone but aren't having a crisis, try the HOPE Inc. Warm Line at 1-520-770-9909. It's operated from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. every day. HOPE Inc. is a peer-support organization that focuses on recovery and mental illness.

DRUGS OR ALCOHOL CRISIS

Compass Behavioral Health Care (Detox) at 1-520-624-5272, Option #1.

OTHER CRISIS CONTACTS

24-Hour Crisis National Hotlines:

• 1-800-SUICIDE - HopeLine Suicide Hotline

• 1-800-273-TALK - National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

SUICIDE/CRISIS HOT LINES BY LOCATION

• Pima, 1-800-796-6762 or 1-520-622-6000

• Maricopa, 1-800-631-1314 and 1-602-222-9444

• Graham, Greenlee, Cochise and Santa Cruz, 1-866-495-6735

• Gila River and Ak-Chin Indian communities, 1-800-259-3449

• Yuma, LaPaz, Pinal and Gila, 1-866-495-6735

• Mohave, Coconino, Apache, Navajo and Yavapai, 1-877-756-4090

Definitions, terminology and jargon

TITLE 19/NON-TITLE 19 (TITLE XIX/N-TXIX)

A person whose income does not exceed the federal poverty line can qualify for the public behavioral health system and is called a "Title 19" client. Someone who does not is referred to as "non-Title 19."

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

This includes mental health, mental illness and substance abuse.

SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS

This is when a person's emotions or behaviors, because of a mental disorder, are so affected that he or she has a hard time living day to day without ongoing support and treatment. It has a long-term impact on the person's relationships, employment and ability to get along with others, and makes it harder to function in other aspects of life. The term generally applies to persons age 18 or older, but research has shown some serious mental illnesses begin before that. Disorders such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and some types of depression are considered serious mental illnesses.

MEDICAL V. LEGAL COMPETENCE

Assessing a person's mental competency means different things in different venues.

In the medical or psychiatric arena, such as determining if a person with a serious mental illness should be hospitalized even against his will, the measure is if the person is a danger to self or others, persistently or acutely disabled, or gravely disabled.

These are civil actions involving the court. Terms such as "Civil Commitment Petitions," "Title 36," "pre-petition hearing," and "emergency petition" are all part of the process that allows a person who has a mental illness to be hospitalized if a judge, relying on expert and witness testimony, decides it's in the person's best interest.

That's different than determining competency in the context of a criminal proceeding. "Rule 11" is the short-hand for the need to figure out if a person who has been charged with a crime has the ability to understand the charge and the trial process and can assist his defense attorney.

After a person is evaluated under Rule 11, a judge must decide if the person is competent (which does not mean the person is not mentally ill), incompetent but restorable (with psychiatric medication or other treatment the person can be made to understand and assist in his own defense), or if the person is incompetent and not-restorable. This last category means the person cannot legally be tried for a crime, because he is not now, and never will be, in a mental condition to understand the legal system and assist in his defense. When that happens, if the person is diagnosed as having a serious mental illness he may end up being civilly committed to a hospital under Title 36. If the incompetency is caused by brain damage, for example, he will be released from jail but not necessarily hospitalized.

INVOLUNTARY COMMITMENT/HOSPITALIZATION

A person must be found by a court, which relies on psychiatric professionals, to be a danger to himself or others, gravely disabled or "persistently or acutely disabled" before he can be hospitalized (committed) against his wishes.

COURT ORDERS FOR MENTAL HEALTH EVALUATION AND TREATMENT/TITLE 36/EMERGENCY PETITION/CIVIL COMMITTMENT

In the Tucson area, seeking a court-ordered psychiatric assessment starts with a call to the 24-hour Community-Wide Crisis Line at 622-6000 or 1-800-796-6762 or visiting the midtown offices of the Southern Arizona Mental Health Corp., 2502 N. Dodge Blvd. Any responsible person may apply for a court-ordered evaluation of a person who isn't willing or able to be evaluated voluntarily.

Southern Arizona Mental Health helps people through the process, which varies based on whether the need is urgent. After paperwork is completed and notarized, the agency sends a team to evaluate the person. If there is reason to believe the person needs more evaluation, SAMHC works with the County Attorney's Office to ask the court for an order for evaluation, and then notify law enforcement to pick up the person and transport him or her to an evaluation hospital.

Once a petition is filed, law enforcement has 10 days to get the person to the hospital. If they are unable, the petition expires and the process starts again.

Hospitalized patients are evaluated by two psychiatrists within 72 hours to find out whether a petition for treatment is needed. If so, there is a hearing before a judge, with testimony from the psychiatrists and at least two other witnesses. The person chooses whether to testify, and a lawyer is appointed to represent the person's interests.

The result could be a court order for treatment, which typically involves a hospital stay until the person is stabilized, followed by outpatient care. If the person doesn't comply with treatment - by not taking medication, for example - the court can order the person back into the hospital.

The court order, which is good for one year, includes a certain number of days available for inpatient treatment. But the periods differ depending on whether people are deemed a danger to themselves (90 days), to others (180 days), "persistently and acutely disabled" (180 days) or "gravely disabled" (365 days).

Calls can be made anonymously to a crisis line to report concerns about someone's mental health. However, those who make formal petitions to the court are identified once the case is in the legal system.

If a person needs immediate evaluation because he might be a danger to himself or others, call 911.

DANGER TO SELF OR OTHERS

Under Arizona law (A.R.S. 36-501), a person is considered a "danger to others" if a mental disorder affects his judgment so much that he can't understand that he needs treatment, and if the person continues to go without treatment it "can reasonably be expected" (based on medical opinion) to result in "serious physical harm."

A person with a mental disorder is considered a "danger to self" if she has attempted or makes a serious threat of suicide; and, given the person's history and the circumstances, the threat seems likely to be carried out; and that the person needs to be hospitalized to prevent serious harm or serious illness.

"Gravely disabled" means the person is likely to experience serious physical harm or serious illness because he is unable to provide for his own basic physical needs.

Being unable to provide yourself a place to live or being homeless may be an indication of grave disability, but it does not mean a person is a "danger to self" under the law.

According to the law, "persistently or acutely disabled" means a severe mental disorder that meets all of the following criteria:

(a) If not treated has a substantial probability of causing the person to suffer or continue to suffer severe and abnormal mental, emotional or physical harm that significantly impairs judgment, reason, behavior or capacity to recognize reality.

(b) Substantially impairs the person's capacity to make an informed decision regarding treatment, and this impairment causes the person to be incapable of understanding and expressing an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of accepting treatment and understanding and expressing an understanding of the alternatives to the particular treatment offered after the advantages, disadvantages and alternatives are explained to that person.

(c) Has a reasonable prospect of being treatable by outpatient, inpatient or combined inpatient and outpatient treatment.

DECOMPENSATE (OR "DECOMP")

"Decompensate" describes what happens when the condition of a person with mental illness who has been stable and functional, often on medication or other therapies, deteriorates and the person shows worsening symptoms of his illness. A decompensating person is likely to end up in a mental illness crisis if he's unable to get treatment.

RHBA (PRONOUNCED REEBA)

Arizona is divided up into geographical areas and a "Regional Behavioral Health Authority" or RBHA is the agency the state puts in charge of managing services for people who live in that area and qualify for public services. In Pima County, that's Community Partnership of Southern Arizona, or CPSA.

A Tribal Regional Behavioral Health Authority (TRBHA) does the same thing for eligible people who are residents of a tribal nation, like Pascua Yaqui. Members of the Tohono O'Odham Nation are served by CPSA.

CRISIS INTERVENTION TEAM TRAINING (CIT)

This trains law enforcement officers to help them identify when mental illness could be involved in a police call, defuse potentially dangerous situations and keep all parties safe.

RECOVERY

Recovery begins as soon as a mental illness is diagnosed and continues as the person's illness is managed. Education, support and, in some cases, medication help the person be responsible for his or her own progress. It includes overall health and wellness, relationships and opportunities to hold a job, help others with a mental illness and/or be active in the community.

How to help yourself or someone else

As others have said, if you see someone having a heart attack on the sidewalk you'd not hesitate to call 911 for help. But if someone is visibly agitated or displaying signs of serious mental illness, we aren't so quick to act - or to know what to do.

There is a process by which CPSA's Comprehensive Service Providers and SAMHC may make a determination about whether a person has a serious mental illness (SMI) and qualifies for the support offered to those individuals. It includes an evaluation by a licensed professional qualified to make a clinical determination of SMI. The licensed professional will use specific criteria to determine if a person meets requirements for SMI, including a qualifying diagnosis and how significantly the person's ability to function in daily life has been affected by that diagnosis.

We've tried to make the following list as comprehensive and up-to-date as possible, but you may be referred to a different agency or office, depending on your circumstances:

Our Family Services' Information & Referral Helpline (I&R) works in partnership with Community Information & Referral in Phoenix to collect the most up-to-date information available on community services all over Arizona, available free to the public. Call 1-800-352-3792 (available 24 hours a day) or go to the searchable online database at www.cir.org

CPSA Member Services can help you figure out whether you are eligible for services in the public behavioral health-care system and learn how to get such services. Member services is available 24 hours a day. Staff members speak both English and Spanish and have access to a telephonic interpretation service in 150 other languages. Call 1-520-318-6946, option 2, or 1-800-771-9889, option 2. Hearing-impaired individuals may call the TTY line at 1-866-318-6960. The website, www.cpsa-rbha.org, has regularly updated information on the CPSA system of care and community resources, presentations on mental health topics and links to other trusted sites.

The Health-e-Arizona website, www.healthearizona.org, can help you find out whether you are eligible for behavioral health benefits under the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, the state's Medicaid system. You also can call the Department of Economic Security's Family Assistance Administration at 1-800-352-8401. Other information is available at www.myazhealthandwellness.com or 1-602-417-7000.

NAMISA: National Alliance on Mental Illness of Southern Arizona (referred to as "na-mee-sa")

www.namisa.org

NAMI of Southern Arizona

6122 E. 22nd St.

Tucson, AZ 85711

1-520-622-5582

This is a place for people with serious mental illness, their families and friends to learn more about what's going on, talk to people who've been through similar experiences and find support.

They offer support groups, have a lot of information online and can help figure out the world of mental illness, treatment and services.

HOPE Inc.

1-520-770-1197

www.hopetucson.org

This is a "consumer-run, consumer-driven" agency that provides a variety of services to adults in Pima County who have a mental illness or substance use disorder. HOPE oversees the Nueva Luz Recovery, Wellness Reintegration Center, which provides recovery support including how to advocate for yourself and navigate the public behavioral health system. A "warm line" for non-crisis support is staffed by adults diagnosed with mental illness and is available from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.

Coyote Task Force

1-520-884-5553

www.opclubhouse.org and www.cafe54.org

Coyote Task Force helps individuals with serious mental illness re-enter the work community through pre-vocational and vocational rehabilitation. Coyote Task Force operates Our Place Clubhouse, which includes the Re-Threads Recycled Fashion thrift store, and a consumer-run restaurant/training program, Café 54.

Pima County Human Rights Committee

1-520-770-3100

The Pima County Human Rights Committee provides independent oversight of the public heavioral health system in Pima County. It receives complaints from mental-health consumers, reviews the actions of providers, and makes recommendations to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

PIMA COUNTY ADULT COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE PROVIDERS

CODAC Behavioral Health Services

Administration site

1650 E. Fort Lowell, Suite 202

Tucson, AZ 85719

1-520-327-4505

www.codac.org

CODAC

Intake site

3100 N. First Ave.

Tucson, AZ 85719

1-520-202-1840

CODAC

Intake site

4901 E. Fifth St.

Tucson, AZ 85711

1-520-202-1840

CODAC

Intake site, West Adult Services site

1671 W. Grant Road

Tucson, AZ 85745

1-520-202-1840

COPE Community Services

Administration site

82 S. Stone Ave.

Tucson, AZ 85701

1-520-792-3293

www.copebhs.com

COPE Community Services

Intake site, La Cholla case management

1501 W. Commerce Court

Tucson, AZ 85746

1-520-205-4732

COPE Community Services

Intake Site, Mesquite case management

2435 N. Castro Ave.

Tucson, AZ 85705

1-520-205-4732

COPE Community Services

Intake site, Mary Ann Coady, M.D. Clinic

8050 E. Lakeside Parkway

Tucson, AZ 85730

1-520-205-4732

COPE Community Services

Intake site

4601 E. Broadway

Tucson, AZ 85711

1-520-205-4732

COPE Community Services

Intake site, Green Valley/Villa Verde

170 S. La Canada Drive, Suite 90

Green Valley, AZ 85614

1-520-622-3835

La Frontera Center

Administration and intake site

502 W. 29th St.

Tucson, AZ 85713

1-520-838-3804

www.lafrontera.org

La Frontera Center

Intake site

2222 N. Craycroft Road, Suite 120

Tucson, AZ 85712

1-520-838-3804

La Frontera Center

Intake site, PPEP Behavioral Health

111 La Mina Ave., Suite 5

Ajo, AZ 85321

1-520-387-5232

La Frontera Center

Intake site

1141 W. Grant Road, Suite 100

Tucson, AZ 85705

1-520-206-8600

MHC Healthcare Behavioral Health Services

(Marana Health Center, The Hacienda)

13644 N. Sandario Road

Marana, AZ 85653

1-520-616-4976

maranahealthcenter.org/our-services/behavioral-health

MHC Healthcare Behavioral Health Services

Intake site, Marana Health Center, The Ranch

13549 N. Sanders Road

Marana, AZ 85653

1-520-682-4111

Pantano Behavioral Health Services

Intake site, Sells, AZ

Tohono Plaza, BIA Route 19, Suite 207

Sells, AZ 85634

1-520-623-9833

www.pantanobh.org

CHILD/ADOLESCENT COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE PROVIDERS

Casa de los Niños

Intake site

140 N. Tucson Blvd.

Tucson, AZ 85716

1-520-881-1292

www.casadelosninos.org

La Frontera Center

Administration and intake site

502 W. 29th Street

Tucson, AZ 85713

1-520-838-3804

www.lafrontera.org

La Frontera Center

Intake site, PPEP Behavioral Health

111 La Mina Ave., Suite 5

Ajo, AZ 85321

1-520-387-5232

La Frontera Center

Intake site

1141 W. Grant Road, Suite 100

Tucson, AZ 85705

1-520-206-8600

MHC Healthcare Behavioral Health Services

(Marana Health Center, The Hacienda)

13644 N. Sandario Road

Marana, AZ 85653

(520) 616-4976

maranahealthcenter.org/our-services/behavioral-health

MHC Healthcare Behavioral Health Services

Intake site, Marana Health Center, The Ranch

13549 N. Sanders Road

Marana, AZ 85653

1-520-682-4111

Pantano Behavioral Health Services

Administration and intake site

5055 E. Broadway, Suite C104

Tucson, AZ 85711

1-520-623-9833

www.pantanobh.org

Pantano Behavioral Health Services

Intake site

1477 W. Commerce Court

Tucson, AZ 85746

1-520-623-9833

Pantano Behavioral Health Services

Intake site, Sells, AZ

Tohono Plaza, BIA Route 19, Suite 207

Sells, AZ 85634

1-520-623-9833

Providence Service Corporation

Administration and intake site

620 N. Craycroft Road

Tucson, AZ 85711

1-520-748-7108

Crisis Hotline: 1-800-489-0064

www.provcorp.com/Locations/Arizona.asp

Providence Service Corporation

Intake site

3295 W. Ina Road, Suite 150

Tucson, AZ 85741

1-520-748-7108

Crisis Hotline: 1-800-489-0064

 

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