April 22: Today in Arizona history

2013-04-22T07:00:00Z 2013-04-22T13:21:15Z April 22: Today in Arizona historyArizona Daily Star Arizona Daily Star

1871: The Tucson Police Department is founded with one marshal. At the time, the city of Tucson was one square mile in size, with a population of 3,200 people. Today, the police force has more than 1,000 sworn-in officers responsible for a city of more than 200 square miles and 500,000 people.

1919: Contracts are signed by Pima and Pinal County authorities and the U.S. Forest Service for the construction of a road from Oracle to Soldier's Camp in the Catalina Mountains.

1920: Prominent society and club women start a boycott on potatoes to protest the price. Housewives in Phoenix are called and asked to support the boycott and tell five friends to do the same.

1924: Arizona Gov. George W.P. Hunt rules that California rail passengers may not alight here without a certificate from the Arizona Board of Health because of a quarantine resulting from cattle disease in California.

1937: The Sundt-built University of Arizona Auditorium — now known as Centennial Hall — is dedicated.

Want to share an important event from Tucson's history? Email it to krumore@azstarnet.com.

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