Some illegal migrants getting OKs on deferred deportation requests

2012-09-12T00:00:00Z Some illegal migrants getting OKs on deferred deportation requestsThe Associated Press The Associated Press
September 12, 2012 12:00 am  • 

WASHINGTON - Just three weeks after the Obama administration started accepting applications from young illegal immigrants seeking to avoid deportation and get a work permit, the government already has approved some of the roughly 72,000 applications the government has received.

The Homeland Security Department said Tuesday that a small group of applications has been approved and those immigrants are being notified this week about the decision. The department did not say how many had been approved.

The first wave of approvals comes months ahead of DHS' own internal estimates of how long the application process for the administration's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program could take - and less than 60 days before the Nov. 6 elections.

The department's Citizenship and Immigration Services had estimated that each application could take several months to be completed from the program's Aug. 15 start.

"Following a thorough, individualized case review, USCIS has now begun notifying individuals of the determination on their deferral requests," DHS spokesman Peter Boogaard said.

President Obama and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced on June 15 that young illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. before they turned 16, are 30 or younger, are high school graduates or are in college or have served in the military would be eligible to apply to avoid deportation for up to two years and get a work permit. The immigrants also could not have a serious criminal record.

The policy change came just months before what is shaping up to be a tight presidential election. Wooing Hispanic voters has been considered key to helping Obama win a second term.

The new plan to halt deportations for as many as 1.7 million illegal immigrants closely mirrors the failed DREAM Act, a bill that would have provided a path to legalization for many of the same immigrants expected to benefit from the government's deferred action policy.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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