Go underground for a look at the past

Titan museum is sobering reminder of Cold War days
2013-06-06T00:00:00Z 2013-06-06T16:06:28Z Go underground for a look at the pastArizona Daily Star Arizona Daily Star Arizona Daily Star
June 06, 2013 12:00 am  • 

Now's a great time to get out and see some Southern Arizona sights.

One local attraction is a particularly good choice this weekend. The Titan Missile Museum, which is in Sahuarita, is hosting a "Moonlight Madness" event Saturday.

The seven-story rocket will be lighted, kids can launch seltzer rockets and visitors can sample space food and even take the astronaut test and enter the control room.

The event, from 5 to 9 p.m., with the last tour starting at 8, is $7 for adults and free for kids younger than 13, but reservations are required. If you can't make it to Saturday's Moonlight Madness, three more are planned - they'll be July 13, Aug. 10 and Sept. 14.

Call 625-7736 or email info@titanmissilemuseum.org to make reservations.

How to get there

To get to the museum, travel south on I-19 to Exit 69, which is the Duval Mine Road exit, then west to the museum.

Open nearly every day

The museum is open 8:45 a.m.-5 p.m. every day except Thanksgiving and Christmas. Hourlong tours are held on the hour starting at 9 a.m., with the last tour at 4 p.m.

Regular admission during nonspecial events is $9.50 for adults, $8.50 for senior citizens and groups, $6 for children 7-12, and free for children under 6.

For more information, go to www.titanmissilemuseum.org online.

About the museum

From the Titan Missile Museum's website:

"The Titan Missile Museum is the only remaining Titan II site open to the public, allowing you to relive a time when the threat of nuclear war between the U.S. and the former Soviet Union was a reality.

"The Titan II was capable of launching from its underground silo in 58 seconds and could deliver a 9-megaton thermonuclear warhead to its target more than 5,500 miles away in less than 30 minutes.

"For more than two decades, 54 Titan II missile complexes across the United States stood 'on alert' 24 hours a day, seven days a week, heightening the threat of nuclear war or preventing Armageddon, depending upon your point of view."

Copyright 2014 Arizona Daily Star. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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