May 1: Today in Arizona history

2013-05-01T07:00:00Z May 1: Today in Arizona historyArizona Daily Star Arizona Daily Star

1859: Father Joseph P. Machebeuf is named the first American Catholic priest in Arizona.

1880: The Tombstone Epitaph is established by former Arizona Citizen publisher John P. Clum, who said, "every tombstone needs an epitaph." As an indian agent, he was known to be the only person to capture Geronimo at gunpoint without a single shot being fired.  He became the first mayor of Tombstone in 1881.

1914: The funeral of Mrs. Sara Sorin takes place. Sorin was the first woman to be admitted to the Arizona Bar Association and she had practiced before the U.S. Supreme Court. She specialized in mining law.

Also in 1914: The University of Arizona is the site for a demonstration of the new "four-wheel drive" truck, which had been successfully tested by the National Guard.

1930: Major copper companies throughout Arizona announce a 5 percent cut in wages because of a four cent per pound reduction in copper prices.

1986: Eight of 11 defendants in a Tucson courtroom are found guilty of crimes related to bringing Salvadorans and Guatemalans into the United States. They are given suspended sentences and probation. The defendants are part of the “sanctuary movement” to give safe haven to Central American refugees.

1992: An Air Force reorganization results in a new philosophy of "one base, one boss." The commander of the 355th Wing becomes commander of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. Previously, there was a separate commander for the base. Some squadrons and groups at D-M are reassigned to the 355th Wing.

Want to share an important event from Tucson's history? Email it to krumore@azstarnet.com.

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