We're telling the story of Tucson in 100 objects.

A committee of writers and editors chose the list of 100 objects, and we consulted with local historians and asked readers online to send in additional suggestions.

We tried to choose objects that personified Tucson in the “greater Tucson” sense of that word, which allows us to venture beyond the city limits.

Check back daily to see a new object. 

  • ()

We're telling the story of “Tucson in 100 objects.”

  • ()

This is it — last one — we're riding off into another beautiful sunset.

  • ()

Tucson is the only city that can lay claim to being the home of the saguaro.

  • ()

Out here in the Old Pueblo, the boys don't just sing, they do rope tricks.

  • ()

Tucson's "Made in America" streetcar was designed to lure federal grants.

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at tucson.com/100objects

  • ()

You wouldn't think a ski lift belonged in this list, but it does.

  • ()

Once a year, the El Hoyo neighborhood becomes Bethlehem.

  • ()

You don't have to be a "stupid motorist" to get in trouble when it rains in Tucson.

  • ()

Hundreds of Tucsonans "Rock the 'Moc" each day, walking by plants that have been scientifically monitored for 109 years.

  • ()

The Arizona Daily Star has chronicled life in Tucson for 137 years.

  • ()

They're an artistic twist on a Mexican tradition.

  • ()

Steward Observatory is a bigger tribute to her husband than Lavinia Steward ever imagined.

  • ()

If a cholla comb isn't uniquely Tucson, we don't know what is.

  • ()

A river runs through Tucson, but it seldom holds water.

  • ()

Creating a memorial for the 2011 shootings will remind us who we are.

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects in this series.

  • ()

The staples of Tucson's Chinese-run groceries are tortillas, chiles and chorizo.

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects

  • ()

Arizona's underground miners wielded tools heavier than Paul Bunyan's ax.

  • ()

The oldest building on the UA campus is new again.

  • ()

Basketball is very, very important to Tucson 

  • ()

Proclaim it from the roof top: Bear Down

  • ()

Tucson and Pima County are "bike-friendly" places

  • ()

The retro sign at "the Bone" fits its business model

  • ()

It's where sentinels from the Spanish presidio kept watch for Apache raids.

  • ()

When it arrives, you'll feel it.

  • ()

Yes, we believe that is an index finger raised in our direction

  • ()

The allure of living on the links is dimming.

  • ()

Why do you think they call it Orange Grove Road?

  • ()

Shade — it's a life-saver in the land of hot asphalt parking lots

  • ()

Speedway was never ugly, simply loathsome

  • ()

You might not find a hotel room in February in Tucson, but you can find a gem of a deal.

  • ()

Cele Peterson was always on the cutting edge.

  • ()

The winter visitor flocks around golf courses and RV parks.

  • ()

We wear sandals here — got a problem with that?

  • ()

Gambling is illegal in Tucson but available nearby

  • ()

Tucson was once home to the $10 lid — not that we're proud of that

  • ()

Our trail-crossed mountains are beckoning.

  • ()

The Chicano movement brought colorful murals to the walls of Tucson's buildings

  • ()

It's our Mardi Gras. With horses.

  • ()

Futbol — it's not just a bar game in Tucson

  • ()

Guarding the border has become one of the area's biggest job sectors

  • ()

Discards in the desert tell a sad tale

  • ()

Holders of "green cards" outnumber "unauthorized" residents in the United States.

  • ()

Happy Flag Day: Five flags have flown over Tucson

  • ()

The javelina is not a pig and, believe me, it doesn't taste anything like pork

  • ()

These beans are truly magic

  • ()

Here's a story for all you drug-store cowboys

  • ()

Ted DeGrazia, painted, sculpted, wrote, played trumpet, designed buildings and built them

  • ()

Tucson's literary scene has been as varied as its Sonoran Desert setting.

  • ()

Rosemary Drachman Taylor wrote about her family because she knew they wouldn't sue

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at: azstarnet.com/100objects

  • ()

There is no Joesler style — he mastered them all

  • ()

If your diploma is from ASU, keep it to yourself

  • By Tom Beal Arizona Daily Star
  • ()

Tucson is a major provider of wartime "shock and awe"

  • ()

Some precious historical artifacts had very simple uses

  • ()

The Arizona Inn was built to supply a market of Isabella Greenway's furniture factory.

  • ()

The restored Fox Theatre is once again the grandest movie house in town.

  • ()

They should write a novel called "The Bridges of Sabino Canyon."

  • ()

When Geronimo surrendered, Tucson breathed a big sigh of relief

  • ()

Having the cavalry nearby at Fort Lowell brought a sense of safety for Tucsonans moving beyond the walls of the presidio.

  • ()

Calendar sticks tell a community and regional history

  • ()

The prickly pear is a source of sustenance, not to mention martinis

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at: azstarnet.com/100objects

  • ()

Its real name is a mouthful, but we all know it simply as "the boneyard"

  • ()

You can eat like the president at one South Tucson restaurant, but you really shouldn't

  • ()

We really, truly, sincerely love those little yellow mouse cars

  • ()

It's fitting that Father Kino's statue sits astride a busy boulevard — he was a traveling man

  • ()

You can get a really nice tan in Tucson — if you have a death wish

  • ()

Tucsonan's have been saying "make mine an Eegee's for 44 years

  • ()

The ribs of the saguaro came in handy when early Tucsonans needed a roof over their heads

  • ()

Tucson did not invent the mariachi sound, but it has become its capital.

  • ()

It's a dry heat — an infernal, deadly dry heat

  • ()

Everybody in town has a bit of silver-and-turquoise jewelry for those especially Tucson occasions

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at: azstarnet.com/100objects

  • By Tom Beal Arizona Daily Star
  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects

  • ()

Graffiti is a blight on the natural world, unless it's really old

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects

  • ()

Old Tucson shaped our image in the heyday of Western movies and TV shows

  • ()

Refrigerated air made it possible for non-desert rats to stay in place during our brutally hot summers.

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at: azstarnet.com/100objects

  • ()

The arsenal taken from the Dillinger gang is a prized keepsake of the Tucson Police Department

  • ()

The outline of Tucson's presidio lies beneath the asphalt downtown

  • ()

Increased commerce required delivery wagons and trucks wouldn't arrive for decades.

  • ()

Tucson has always squeezed every last drop from its rivers

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects/

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects/

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects/.

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects

  • ()

As objects go, this is a bit large, but it's pretty much the most important one. 

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects/

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects/

  • ()

We’re defining Tucson in 100 objects. The daily series began April 20. Follow along at azstarnet.com/100objects/

  • ()

Arrival of the Southern Pacific Railroad eased Tucson's connections to the East and West coasts.

  • ()

The region was cooler, wetter and filled with giant beasts 13,000 years ago

  • ()

We're talking the plane, not the animal.

  • ()

Tucson learned how to dress up without neckties

  • ()

The smell of moist aspen pads was once a universal olfactory experience for Tucsonans.

  • ()

Discovering the Old Pueblo through 100 iconic objects 

Tags