With Halloween approaching, the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center said parents should be aware of some risks to children this time of year:

Glow sticks

The liquid in glow sticks is low on toxicity scale, the center said. If ingested it could cause minor stomach and mouth irritation, but is unlikely. The liquid can also irritate eyes. If your child is exposed to the liquid, you can call the center at 1-800-222-1222 for instructions on what to do.

Tampered treats

The center said the number of cases of children harmed by tampered treats is relatively small. Parents and guardians, though, should thoroughly inspect the treats a child gets from trick-or-treating. Throw out anything that looks like it has been tampered with. If a child eats something that may have been tampered with, call the poison control center.

Any treats that have been altered with glass, razor blades or other foreign objects, should be reported to your local police department.

Parents should also be on the lookout for any edible marijuana treats. The edible marijuana can look like a regular treats, and if you have any suspicions that your child has ingested edible marijuana, call the center.

Medication

Some candy looks like medication, which can be deadly to children. Again, consult the poison control center if you think your child has ingested medication.

Liquid candles

The liquid candles sometimes used in jack-o-laterns can look like fruit juice to children. If ingested, they can cause a potentially like-threatening condition. Warning signs including coughing, wheezing, choking or breathing difficulty. Some of these symptoms can be delayed up to eight hours after ingestion. If this is a concern, contact the poison control center immediately.

The poison control center, located at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, is available every day for any type of accidental poisoning incident or for more information. The number is 1-800-222-1222. This center serves 14 of Arizona's 15 counties. Maricopa County is handled by Banner Good Samaritan Poison and Drug Information Center.