Sorting out the pluses and minuses of the proposed Rosemont Mine has taken the federal government nearly six years and filled thousands of pages. Below we highlight key issues still facing this project which would create at least 400 long-term jobs but destroy dozens of cultural resources, hundreds of thousands of trees and thousands of acres of grasslands and woodlands in the Santa Rita Mountains southeast of Tucson.

■ Disturbing more than 5,400 acres of grasslands, woodlands and riparian areas could take a significant toll on plants and wildlife, the Rosem…

■ Impacts on historic and prehistoric properties will be “severe, irreversible and irretrievable,” the EIS says. The tentatively approved Barr…

■ Rosemont will spend $25 million to buy about 4,500 acres of land and more than 1,700 acre-feet of annual water rights to compensate for impa…

■ The mine would brighten dark skies over most of the Santa Ritas, but not as much as originally thought. A lighting reduction plan would use …

■ The National Park Service is concerned about pollution from mine vehicles, dirt roads, crushers and conveyors. But the Forest Service says t…

■ The mine would permanently damage the area’s "scenic integrity,” the EIS says. That means “forest landscapes that appear extremely altered.”

■ The U.S.' only known wild jaguar, a male, has been photographed just west of the mine site three times since October 2012. As recently as Oc…

■ The mine would generate 55-88 round-trip truck shipments daily, the EIS says. The Barrel Alternative plus expected population growth would g…

■ Coleman’s coral root, a rare orchid, lives in four colonies on or near the mine site. At least two colonies could be severely impacted by th…

■ Dry stack tailings, which use far less water than conventional mine tailings, lie at the heart of the Forest Service’s view that the mine wo…

■ EPA, which has veto power over a Clean Water Act permit for the mine, warned in a Nov. 7 letter that the mine would cut off water running th…

■ The mine would employ an average of 434 people a year and generate 512 to 1,260 indirect jobs, the EIS says, citing different studies. A 200…

■ After the mine closes, water will slowly fill the open pit, forming a pit lake the EIS predicts will cover 213 acres and rise 1,229 feet aft…

■ The mine could hurt nearby property values and tourism, the EIS says. It projects dust pollution and impact on views will lower property val…

■ Rosemont would start to restore the mine site to desert the first year of operations. It would build huge rock buttresses over waste rock an…

■ East of the Santa Rita Mountains, a falling groundwater table due to digging the open pit would cause the closest household wells to drop mo…