Deadly '63 sub disaster is recalled at ceremony

Friends, relatives remember 129 lost aboard Thresher
2013-04-07T00:00:00Z Deadly '63 sub disaster is recalled at ceremonyThe Associated Press The Associated Press
April 07, 2013 12:00 am  • 

PORTSMOUTH, N.H. - Family and friends who lost loved ones when the USS Thresher sank 50 years ago joined in tossing wreaths into the water Saturday in an emotional service in remembrance of the 129 Navy crew members and civilian technicians who lost their lives in the deadliest submarine disaster in U.S. history.

Hundreds gathered for the memorial service at Portsmouth High School that concluded with a small group tossing three wreaths into the Piscataqua River. During the service, a bell tolled 129 times.

The event, along with the dedication of a flagpole Sunday in Kittery, Maine, aimed to call attention to the tragedy 220 miles off Cape Cod, which became the impetus for submarine safety improvements.

Vice Adm. Michael Connor, commander of the Navy's submarine forces, said Saturday that the safety upgrades came at a steep cost to Thresher families.

"I've talked a lot about the good that comes from the Thresher and the Thresher's loss, but that's probably not a consolation to the families who've lost a father or a son," Connor told a packed high school auditorium.

The USS Thresher, built at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and based in Connecticut, was out for a routine deep-diving test when it ran into trouble on April 10, 1963.

The Navy believes the failure of a brazed weld allowed seawater to spray onto an electrical panel, causing an emergency shutdown of the sub's nuclear reactor. The ballast system also failed, preventing the sub from surfacing.

Filling with water, Thresher descended deeper and disintegrated under the crushing force of the ocean. Its remains at rest on the ocean floor at a depth of 8,500 feet.

Don Wise Jr., 59, of Plaistow, N.H., whose lost his dad, said the Thresher crew members were doing something special, serving on what was a technological marvel, the Navy's fastest and deepest-diving nuclear submarine.

"They were going deeper and faster than anyone. I always considered my dad a hero and an adventurer," Wise said Saturday. "These memorials are how I connect my children and grandchildren with my dad."

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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