Georgia town: Every household must own a gun

Measure exempts some people and has no penalties
2013-04-02T00:00:00Z Georgia town: Every household must own a gunThe Associated Press The Associated Press
April 02, 2013 12:00 am  • 

NELSON, Ga. - The City Council in a small north Georgia town voted Monday night to make gun ownership mandatory - unless you object.

Council members in Nelson, a city of about 1,300 residents that's 50 miles north of Atlanta, voted unanimously to approve the Family Protection Ordinance. The measure requires every head of household to own a gun and ammunition to "provide for the emergency management of the city" and to "provide for and protect the safety, security and general welfare of the city and its inhabitants."

Not that every household must go out and purchase a firearm.

The ordinance exempts convicted felons and those who suffer from certain physical or mental disabilities, as well as anyone who objects to gun ownership. The ordinance also doesn't include any penalty for those who don't comply.

But backers said they wanted to make a statement about gun rights at a time when President Obama and some states are pushing for more restrictions in the wake of the Connecticut elementary school massacre in December that left 20 children and six educators dead.

Councilman Duane Cronic, who sponsored the measure, said he knows the ordinance won't be enforced but he still believes it will make the town safer. "I likened it to a security sign that people put up in their front yards. Some people have security systems, some people don't, but they put those signs up," he said. "I really felt like this ordinance was a security sign for our city. Basically it was a deterrent ordinance to tell potential criminals they might want to go on down the road a little bit."

The City Council's agenda says another purpose of the measure is "opposition of any future attempt by the federal government to confiscate personal firearms."

Nelson resident Lamar Kellett was one of five people who spoke during a public comment period and one of two who opposed the ordinance. Among his many objections, he said it dilutes the city's laws to pass measures that aren't intended to be enforced.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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