Boehner: It's up to Dems to stop cuts

Speaker pessimistic on averting automatic spending reductions
2013-02-14T00:00:00Z Boehner: It's up to Dems to stop cutsThe Associated Press The Associated Press
February 14, 2013 12:00 am  • 

WASHINGTON - House Speaker John Boehner said Wednesday it's unlikely the Republican-controlled House and Democratic-led Senate will prevent a wave of automatic spending cuts from beginning to strike the economy in two weeks.

Yet he sounded hopeful about avoiding a partial shutdown of the government when a temporary spending bill expires next month.

Boehner said in an interview with The Associated Press that he was skeptical of many of President Obama's plans, laid out Tuesday in the State of the Union address.

Boehner voiced doubts about Obama's proposal for taxpayer-funded help for preschool education for all 4-year-olds, and would not commit to passing a pathway to citizenship for the nation's 11 million illegal immigrants, though he said doing so would be "somewhat helpful" to members of his party as they seek to regain support among Hispanics. "There's no magic potion that's going to solve our party's woes with Hispanics," he said.

Boehner also refused to swing behind any of Obama's gun-control proposals and said he opposed the president's plan to raise the minimum wage to $9 an hour.

The Ohio Republican said he gets along well with Obama but admits their relationship hasn't generated much in the way of results, pointing to two failed rounds of budget talks in 2011 and at the end of last year. Boehner is frustrated that spending cuts Obama signaled he would agree to in 2011 have been taken off the table since the election.

"It hasn't been real productive the last two years, and frankly every time I've gotten into one of these high-profile negotiations, it's my rear end that got burnt," Boehner said. "It's just probably not the best way for our government to operate."

Obama stumped Wednesday in support of his minimum-wage plan, his calls for a manufacturing revival and his other State of the Union proposals in a trip to Ashville, N.C., where he said: "If you work full time, you shouldn't be in poverty." He takes his case to Georgia today and his hometown of Chicago on Friday, all part of his effort to build popular support for an agenda facing stiff resistance back in Washington.

"It's not a Democratic thing or a Republican thing," Obama said of his initiatives. "Our job as Americans is to restore that basic bargain that says if you work hard, if you meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead."

The immediate agenda, though, is dominated by $85 billion in automatic, across-the-board spending cuts - called a sequester in Washington-speak - set to slam the Pentagon and domestic programs over the coming seven months. Boehner said he has no plans to resurrect legislation passed by Republicans last year to block this year's sequester.

The speaker said that until Obama puts forward a plan to avoid the sequester and Senate Democrats pass it, "we're going to be stuck with it. It's going to be a little bleak around here when this actually happens and people actually have to make decisions."

Boehner noted that while plenty of GOP defense hawks are anxious about the automatic cuts, Democrats concerned with cuts to domestic programs have a lot on the line, too.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Follow the Arizona Daily Star