With mood shifting, Congress may move to limit NSA spying

2013-07-21T00:00:00Z With mood shifting, Congress may move to limit NSA spyingDavid Lightman, Kate Irby and Ben Kamisar Mcclatchy Washington Bureau Arizona Daily Star

WASHINGTON - Congress is growing increasingly wary of controversial National Security Agency domestic surveillance programs, a concern likely to erupt during legislative debate - and perhaps prod legislative action - as early as this week.

Skepticism has been slowly building since last month's disclosures that the super-secret NSA conducted programs that collected Americans' telephone data. Dozens of lawmakers are introducing measures to make those programs less secret, and there's talk of denying funding and refusing to continue authority for the snooping.

The anxiety is a sharp contrast to June's wait-and-see attitude after Edward Snowden, a government contract worker, leaked highly classified data to the media. The Guardian newspaper of Britain reported one program involved cellphone records. The Guardian, along with The Washington Post, also said another program allowed the government access to the online activity of users at nine Internet companies.

Obama administration officials quickly provided briefings about the programs, and they continue to have strong defenders at the Capitol. "People at the NSA in particular have heard a constant public drumbeat about a laundry list of nefarious things they are alleged to be doing to spy on Americans - all of them wrong," House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich., said last month. "The misperceptions have been great, yet they keep their heads down and keep working every day to keep us safe."

Most in Congress remain reluctant to tinker with any program that could compromise security, but lawmakers are growing frustrated. "I think the administration and the NSA has had six weeks to answer questions and haven't done a good job at it. They've been given their chances, but they have not taken those chances," said Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash.

The House of Representatives could debate one of the first major bids for change soon. Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., is trying to add a provision to the military spending bill, due for House consideration next week, that would end the NSA's mass collection of Americans' telephone records. It's unclear whether House leaders will allow the measure to be considered.

Other legislation could also start moving. Larsen is pushing a measure to require tech companies to publicly disclose the type and volume of data they have to turn over to the federal government. Several tech firms and civil-liberties groups are seeking permission to do so.

Other bipartisan efforts are in the works. Thirty-two House members, led by Amash and Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., are backing a plan to restrict Washington's ability to collect data under the Patriot Act on people not connected to an ongoing investigation. Also active is a push to require the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which rules on government surveillance requests, to be more transparent.

Late Friday, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court reauthorized collection of telephone and online data by the federal government, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper revealed. He said the administration was "undertaking a careful and thorough review of whether and to what extent additional information or documents pertaining to this program may be declassified, consistent with the protection of national security."

"It is incredibly difficult, if not impossible, to have a full and frank discussion about this balance when the public is unable to review and analyze what the executive branch and the courts believe the law means," said Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., who has asked the administration to make the opinions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court public.

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