Jackie Robinson's immense importance hits home in '42" movie

2013-04-05T00:00:00Z Jackie Robinson's immense importance hits home in '42" movieThe Associated Press The Associated Press
April 05, 2013 12:00 am  • 

LOS ANGELES - There's a scene in "42" in which Jackie Robinson, the first black player in modern major-league baseball, endures intolerably cruel racial slurs from the Philadelphia Phillies' manager.

It's early in the 1947 season. Each time the Brooklyn Dodgers' first baseman comes up to bat, manager Ben Chapman emerges from the dugout, stands on the field and taunts him with increasingly personal and vitriolic attacks. It's a visible struggle, but No. 42 maintains his composure before a crowd of thousands.

As a viewer, it's uncomfortable to watch - although as writer-director Brian Helgeland points out, "If anything, the language we have in that scene was cleaned up from what it was."

Such hatred may seem archaic, an ugly episode in our nation's history that we'd rather forget. But remembering Robinson's accomplishments is more important than ever, say people involved with "42" and baseball historians alike. And because he was such an inspiring cultural figure, it's more important than ever to get his story right.

Helgeland said he felt "an enormous amount of pressure" to be faithful to Robinson's story, both because of his significance and because his life had been written about so extensively. That included re-creating games right from the box scores. So when Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) homers during a crucial pennant-race game off a pitcher who'd dinged him earlier in the year, it's a dramatic moment, but it also actually happened.

Helgeland began working on the film two years ago, with the blessing of Robinson's widow, Rachel, because he felt Robinson "deserves a great, big movie." Robinson himself starred in the 1950 biography "The Jackie Robinson Story," which also details how Brooklyn Dodgers President and General Manager Branch Rickey (played here by a feisty Harrison Ford) had the courage to sign the fleet-footed Negro League player.

"People would say to me, 'You're making another Jackie Robinson movie?' and I'd say, 'What was the other one you saw?' " Helgeland said. "(Racism is) always going to be a relevant thing. It's not a thing that's ever going to be eradicated. Society has to stay on guard about it and not get complacent about it."

Boseman, who bears a resemblance to Robinson, grew up playing basketball but said he learned of Robinson's importance around the same time he first learned of Martin Luther King Jr.'s crucial role in fighting for civil rights.

"The story is relevant because we still stand on his shoulders. ... He carried the torch."

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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