Pockets of protest in US remain after years of war

2013-03-22T00:00:00Z Pockets of protest in US remain after years of warThe Associated Press The Associated Press
March 22, 2013 12:00 am  • 

MONTPELIER, Vt. - The protesters gather at noon every Friday in front of the Montpelier post office, sharing signs made up years ago to tell their little part of the world why they oppose the latest war involving the United States.

There might be as few as two people in the midwinter cold, or as many as 20 at the height of summer. But a decade after the invasion of Iraq, protesters there and at similar demonstrations coast to coast still show up, determined to remind people that the U.S. is at war.

"I believe there are many, many people who know in their conscience that we are at war, that we aren't really in any danger of being invaded by the terrorists," said David Connor, 76, of East Montpelier, a Vietnam-era objector who's been a Montpelier protest regular for years. "There's more terror in the world for fear of what we can do and have done than there is fear that there are terrorists going to take over countries like this."

While the war in Iraq is over for the United States, the war in Afghanistan continues, largely off the public radar as it fades from front pages and the top of television newscasts. In a way similar to how U.S. service members continue to fight overseas, the small groups of protesters still regularly protest, their voices all but lost in the chatter of a country focused on other things.

"It's a constant reminder that we are still fighting in various countries. We haven't really come out of Iraq and Afghanistan," said Scilla Wahrhaftig, the Pennsylvania program director for the American Friends Service Committee in Pittsburgh, where there are two regular protests every Saturday. "These little vigils around the country do have that impact of reminding people that this is still going on."

Most of the time, the protesters generate few comments from passers-by, but occasionally people object. During Friday's Montpelier protest, businessman Henry Partlow stopped and talked to the protesters. He didn't like one of the signs that used the phrase "We demand peace."

"A demand is something that you hear from a terrorist or a dictatorship: You will meet my demands or there will be consequences," said Partlow, who noted their right to protest was won by people who put their lives on the line and sometimes gave them up. "It seemed like such an oxymoron. Why would you put that on your sign, 'We demand peace'?"

Randi Law, spokeswoman for the 1.6 million-member Veterans of Foreign Wars, said veterans across the country notice the protests and respect the rights of the protesters to do so.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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