School closures add new uncertainty to fading Chicago areas

2013-08-11T00:00:00Z School closures add new uncertainty to fading Chicago areasThe Associated Press The Associated Press
August 11, 2013 12:00 am  • 

CHICAGO - To Carolyn Lang, West Pullman Elementary is more than the school across the street her children attended a quarter-century ago.

It's where she turned for help when the lock on her front door froze and where school workers watch from their windows to make sure she doesn't fall victim to crime in an impoverished corner of the city wracked by violence, including two men found shot to death in a car just days ago.

But no more. West Pullman is one of nearly 50 Chicago schools the city closed last spring as part of aggressive cost-cutting that calls for the single largest closing of schools in any American city in years.

Critics of the closures have protested that children will be forced to cross gang boundaries to get to new schools. Largely overlooked are the worries of thousands of people like Lang who have relied on the schools to help safeguard poor neighborhoods. Soon, many of those buildings will go as dark and quiet as the boarded-up houses that dot their struggling communities.

"I used to come home late from prayer meetings at my church, and just seeing the light on and knowing the engineers and the janitors were working, I felt safe because they were there," said Lang, 58. "Now it won't be a safe haven anymore."

What will happen to Pullman and other schools is unclear. In recent years, most of the relatively few schools that have closed have reopened as charter, magnet, military, alternative or other kinds of schools.

Chicago schools spokeswoman Becky Carroll said the district is "serious about making sure these buildings have a useful purpose, whether they are sold to a private entity (or used as) some kind of community center."

But the district has never had to find new uses for so many vacant schools at once.

Nobody is saying that the closed schools will cause the neighborhoods to decline. That has been happening for years. But the concern is that the sight of shuttered schools will accelerate that decline.

"It is a signal that resources are leaving the community," said Deborah Moore, director of neighborhood strategy at Neighborhood Housing Services of Chicago, a nonprofit group that helps people buy homes and keep them out of foreclosure. "There is no way I can market the community to young families. They aren't going to move into a community with a closing school."

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