Lori Adkison, 51, retired

Why are you going?

“I am going to the Women’s March on Washington because I know that narrative and imagery are important. By coming together and marching, we will present an amazing image of the majority of Americans who voted for a different outcome. The destructive narrative of the election, particularly to women, will not be tolerated. We will remind our representatives, by a very real presence that we are the majority and they will be held accountable to us, their constituency. By coming together, we will also see as participants that we do not stand alone in our fight for a more equitable society.”

What would you say to Trump if you met him face-to-face?

“This question makes me uncomfortable as one of the reasons I am personally marching is to show that the PEOTUS does not have widespread support and really isn’t legitimate. I’d rather direct my energy on how to thwart his agenda. If I bumped into him, I would remind him that he lost the popular vote by almost 3 million votes and there is widespread opposition to his agenda as evidenced by the Historic Women’s March on Washington.”

What do you hope this will accomplish for future generations of women?

“I hope this march will reenergize grassroots activism. There are amazing people already doing great work here in Tucson and I only see that growing. I’m sure that this march will join together a large cross-section of our country to work together to ensure women’s equality and civil justice.”

Melissa Bufford, 44, teacher

Why are you going?

“I was motivated to protest my feelings of disgust and shame that Donald Trump was elected.”

What would you say to Trump if you met him face-to-face?

“Regardless of working the system to get in, you are still the minority. You can try to see how far denying that takes you, but eventually you’re going to see that it matters.”

What do you hope this will accomplish for future generations of women?

“I hope future generations will feel proud of what we’ve done, and a sense of duty to carry it on.”

Marcy Albert, 63, retired social worker

Why are you going?

“I am going to the march because I felt compelled to do something — to act. I don’t agree with most, if not all of Trump’s policies, but his personal ethics and behavior have me very concerned, sad, angry and I must speak out. His blatant disregard for others — women, minorities, Muslims, Hispanics, anyone who does not agree with him is simply not acceptable.

What would you say to Trump if you met him face-to-face?

“If I could say anything to him I would ask him to model the respectful behavior we want all children and adults to use when interacting. As president his behavior is closely watched, and others will take a lead from him. You can disagree without disrespecting and name-calling.”

What do you hope this will accomplish for future generations of women?

“I am hoping the march will show all, girls and boys, that it is important to speak up when you disagree and we are all in this together and need to take care of each other.”

Carolyn Stewart, 73, retired psychotherapist and social worker

Why are you going?

“I am marching because I, as a woman, am still here and am not forgetting the divisive and offensive campaign that Trump ran. This lack of empathy and civility to any number of groups is truly frightening.”

What would you to say to Trump if you met him face-to-face?

“If given a chance, that is what I’d say to him, though it’s probable it would fall on deaf ears anyway.”

What do you hope this will accomplish for future generations of women?

“My hope is that the marginalized and disenfranchised will see that taking to the streets is but one way to express fears and distress to Congress and the president.”

Diana Rhoades, 49, public policy and community engagement strategist

Why are you going?

“I’m going because I want to support women and women’s rights. I want to continue to do my part to make feminism a proud, powerful movement.”

What would you say to Trump if you were to meet him face-to-face?

“Dear Mr. President, don’t make women go back to the Dark Ages. Appoint a Supreme Court justice who will support Roe v. Wade.”

What do you hope this will accomplish for future generations of women?

“I want to make sure we keep abortion safe and legal. Abortion is the ultimate right for women’s freedom. If you can’t control your own body then you have no freedom.”

Karin Rainesalo, 50-something, sales engineer

Why are you going?

“I’m marching because of the outcome of the election. Specifically, we had a candidate who by his own words and actions is a bigot, a racist, a misogynist, a tax cheat. He insulted a war hero, got into a tiff with a Gold Star family, made fun of a disabled reporter, bragged about grabbing women by their genitals. The list goes on and on. Yet we, as a nation, elected him to the most powerful position in the world. Any of those actions would have been disqualifying to any other candidate — I’d like to think both Democrat and Republican. We, as a nation, did not care. That is truly alarming to me and I am truly fearful for our nation.”

What would you say to Trump if you were to meet him face to face?

“This is a tough one. I expect he wouldn’t give me the time of day, nor would he give a crap about what I have to say, but if I could get one sentence out, it would be, ‘Please don’t get us all killed.’”

What do you hope this will accomplish for future generations of women?

“I was the beneficiary of women that marched before me for any number of causes. My grandmother was a feminist back in the 1920s. But this march isn’t about just women’s issues. There are plenty of groups of people who want simply to enjoy the same privileges that straight, white, Protestant, wealthy men have enjoyed since the dawn of our country. I want younger women, as well as any other group of people whose rights are now in jeopardy, to be the beneficiary of work I am doing and will do. We’ve fought too hard for the last 100 plus years to have all the gains — or any of the gains — wiped out by a tyrant and his band of merry men in Congress.”

Maya Asher, 31, mental and behavioral health therapist and poet

Why are you going?

“I am going because I couldn’t stop thinking about being in D.C. I thought about my nieces and my mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, and all the work generations before me had done as well as all the work needed going forward. Everything in my bones pulled me in this direction. ... I want to model for my nieces empowerment and solidarity (fighting for morals and ethics especially with how others are treated) even when faced with such hateful and willful ignorance.”

What would you say to Trump if you were to meet him face to face?

“When you reach the end of your life / get to the other side (whatever afterlife you believe in) and you realize you can’t take fame, power, or money with you ... will you still think it was worth it? Will you feel your life contributed to those you leave behind?”

What do you hope this will accomplish for future generations of women?

“It will show our solidarity and our ability to rise up against oppression, power, greed, hate, and absolute social regression. Many people would throw their hands up and surrender and we will not. Even if we are not this time successful — I’d rather fight for this cause to set an example of what’s important and what is really worth fighting for rather then be complacent”

Nancy Avery, 51, retired fire captain

Why are you going?

“I bought my ticket three days after the election to settle my stomach. My immediate reaction was fight and flight! Fly to D.C and fight for the rights of my children, family and everyone’s future. I need to go to the capital and make a presence, be a voice and tell anyone and everyone that we as a country must not retreat. We must continue to push forward for women’s/family issues and rights. That human equality is a must and that racism will not be tolerated. I was taught that actions speak louder than words and that I needed to ‘show up!’ I can make a difference. We all can.”

What would you say to Trump if you were to meet him face to face?

“If I had a word with DT, I would just say, ‘I oppose you and am willing to take you on.’”

What do you hope this will accomplish for future generations of women?

“What we will accomplish by marching in D.C. and all marches being held across the country and the world is to show unity. It shows that by investing money, time and hard work in a cause, that change can be made. By thousands, no hundreds of thousands marching on the 21st of Jan., show DT and the votes in government that we are watching, taking notes and putting on our gloves. We are here to fight for our democracy and willing to risk it all. Then we are going back to our homes and communities to protect our neighbors from the vile hatred that has reared its ugly head.”

These interviews were conducted by Arizona Daily Star reporter Angela Pittenger.