Letters to the editor

2013-07-20T00:00:00Z Letters to the editorArizona Daily Star Arizona Daily Star Arizona Daily Star
July 20, 2013 12:00 am  • 

Listen up: The F-35 is a noisy mistake

Re: the July 10 letter to the editor "F-35 assignments a victory for Arizona."

As a resident of Tucson for over 40 years I have no expectation of quiet skies. Our city has long grown past the size that depends on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for survival. Imagining our hotels full of Air Force families and friends is an amusing fantasy, along with the idea that those who do dare to visit after the F-35s are flying over Tucson's highly populated areas will love the roar of the planes.

So much money has been squandered on the development of these untested monsters that no one will own up to the gigantic mistake. Profits before people is the motto, or to heck with health and safety.

When the letter writer goes to see the F-35s, hopefully without earplugs, they can bask in the deafening "sound of freedom."

Su Egen

Tucson

Without a new plane, what's D-M's future?

Re: the July 10 letter to the editor "F-35 assignments a victory for Arizona."

Too bad more Tucsonans do not feel as the writer does, that Davis-Monthan Air Force Base should join the list of air bases getting the new F-35 fighter.

The steady drumbeat of opposition to any jet fighters at D-M by the Tucson Forward organization drowns out any favorable comments. And without a military reporter, the Arizona Daily Star is completely out of the picture.

At the present time the Air Force is looking at sending its entire fleet of A-10 aircraft to the boneyard. Absent the A-10, D-M's flight line would just about be empty. So far Congress has put the brakes on any base closings, but wait until we go into the second year of sequestration. Without a new airplane an air base does not have a future.

With every business in Tucson deriving some amount of income from the base, Tucson needs D-M more than D-M needs Tucson.

Vern Pall

Retired, Tucson

Let police, fire workers pay their fair share

Re: the July 7 article "Pension-system claims disputed."

The council continues to kowtow to the public service unions when they are the top reason for pension underfunding. The latest proposal excludes public service workers from the new revised pension plan.

The last years of an employee's career are traditionally the highest paid. Yet in years past the city got talked into allowing public safety personnel to have a five year end-of-service plan by which they did not pay into their retirement pension fund prior to retirement. Other city workers were given a one-year reprieve. Public service workers also receive a higher rate for unused sick and vacation days at retirement.

The latest proposal wants the rank-and-file city worker to accept the brunt of that non funding and take a reduced pension plan from which public service workers will be exempt.

Five of the top 10 highest paid city employees last year were police or fire - let them pay their fair share.

Susan C. Dabbs

Retired, Tucson

Outlawing behaviors just doesn't work

Haven't we learned anything from the long history of failures of supply-side legislation to control unwanted activities? Alcohol prohibition didn't work. The drug war was been a complete failure.

So long as there is demand for cheap labor to exploit, there will be a workers willing to climb over, dig under or otherwise circumvent any obstacle we throw massive amounts of money at to create.

Demand-side effort is the only approach that will be effective in controlling undesirable behavior.

Robert Enyeart

Student, Tucson

Banning traffic cameras would be a mistake

Re: the July 6 article "Drive to ban traffic cameras takes off."

John Kromko's petition to place a measure banning traffic cameras on the ballot infers an actual police officer must witness each infraction. Get real Mr. Kromko. How many more officers would be required if the cameras are banned? Where would that money come from? Don't forget, these cameras work 24/7/365.

Yes, the services and equipment are provided by a for-profit-making company, but how many companies do you know of that work for nothing?

Since the camera program was initiated, I pass through camera intersections at least twice a day and have never gotten a ticket. One only needs to approach the camera intersections the same way you approach a light controlled intersection without cameras: with caution, ready to stop should the light change - and don't try to beat the yellow.

To eliminate the cameras from intersections would be a stupid, dangerous mistake.

Henry J. Selfridge

Retired, Tucson

Columnist was right about national anthem

Re: the July 4 column " 'Star-Spangled Banner' needs no embellishment."

Thank you, Esther Cepeda, for your column on the mutilations of our national anthem by so many famous singers. Renditions requiring the use of the mute button. Ironically, performed admirably by a sweet boy in a mariachi suit. And, if I ever hear the beautiful Amazing Grace tampered with by a piper at a memorial service, I will put a hole in his pipe bag!

Christine Scharf

Tucson

Getting p.m., a.m. straight is simple

TV and radio advertisements, movie schedules, airline schedules, restaurant openings, etc. all refer to noon as 12 p.m. and midnight as 12 a.m. This is incorrect!

P.M. stands for post meridian, which means after midday, and A.M., before midday. P.M. begins immediately after noon and A.M. after midnight.

I compare this error with those many persons who believed that the 21st century began with the year 2000. There was no year zero. The new century began with January 1, 2001.

Sheldon I. Clare,

Chemistry instructor, Tucson

Copyright 2014 Arizona Daily Star. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Latest Fitz Report video

More

Fitz studio: How to draw the President

In this video tutorial, Star cartoonist and columnist David Fitzsimmons teaches you how to draw the Preside…

Latest Newsmakers video

More

Sarah interviews Dr. Peter Rhee, part 2 of 3

Dr. Peter Rhee discusses mental health and other issues surrounding gun violence.

Deals, offers & events

View more...