Report: 1 senior in 3 dies with dementia, Alzheimer's

2013-03-19T00:00:00Z Report: 1 senior in 3 dies with dementia, Alzheimer'sThe Associated Press The Associated Press
March 19, 2013 12:00 am  • 

WASHINGTON - A staggering 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia, says a new report that highlights the impact the mind-destroying disease is having on the rapidly aging population.

Dying with Alzheimer's is not the same as dying from it. But even when dementia isn't the direct cause of death, it can be the final blow - speeding someone's decline by interfering with care for heart disease, cancer or other serious illnesses. That's the assessment of the report released today by the Alzheimer's Association, which advocates for more research and support for families afflicted by it.

"Exacerbated aging" is how Dr. Maria Carrillo, an association vice president, terms the Alzheimer's effect. "It changes any health-care situation for a family."

In fact, only 30 percent of 70-year-olds who don't have Alzheimer's are expected to die before their 80th birthday. But if they do have dementia, 61 percent are expected to die, the report found.

Already, 5.2 million Americans have Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Those numbers will jump to 13.8 million by 2050, today's report predicts. That's slightly lower than some previous estimates.

Count just the deaths directly attributed to dementia, and they're growing fast. Nearly 85,000 people died from Alzheimer's in 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated in a separate report today. Those are people who had Alzheimer's listed as an underlying cause on a death certificate, perhaps because the dementia led to respiratory failure. Those numbers make Alzheimer's the sixth leading cause of death.

That death rate rose 39 percent in the past decade, even as the CDC found that deaths declined among some of the nation's other top killers - heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. The reason: Alzheimer's is the only one of those leading killers to have no good treatment. Today's medications only temporarily ease some dementia symptoms.

But what's on a death certificate is only part of the story.

Consider: Severe dementia can make it difficult for people to move around or swallow properly. That increases the risk of pneumonia, one of the most commonly identified causes of death among Alzheimer's patients.

Likewise, dementia patients can forget their medications for diabetes, high blood pressure or other illnesses. They may not be able to explain they are feeling symptoms of other ailments such as infections. They're far more likely to be hospitalized than other older adults. That in turn increases their risk of death. The Chicago Health and Aging Project tracked the health of more than 10,000 older adults over time. The data were used to track how many will die with Alzheimer's this year.

On StarNet: Find more science, technology and health stories at azstarnet.com/news/science

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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