Stephen Hawking: Explore space for humanity's sake

2013-04-11T00:00:00Z Stephen Hawking: Explore space for humanity's sakeThe Associated Press The Associated Press
April 11, 2013 12:00 am  • 

LOS ANGELES - Stephen Hawking, who spent his career decoding the universe and even experienced weightlessness, is urging the continuation of space exploration - for humanity's sake.

The 71-year-old Hawking said he did not think humans would survive another 1,000 years "without escaping beyond our fragile planet."

The British cosmologist made the remarks Tuesday before an audience of doctors, nurses and employees at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he toured a stem-cell laboratory that's focused on trying to slow the progression of Lou Gehrig's disease.

Hawking was diagnosed with the neurological disorder 50 years ago while a student at Cambridge University. He recalled how he became depressed and initially didn't see a point in finishing his doctorate. But he continued to delve into his studies.

"If you understand how the universe operates, you control it in a way," he said.

Renowned for his work on black holes and the origins of the cosmos, Hawking is famous for bringing esoteric physics concepts to the masses through his best-selling books, including "A Brief History of Time," which sold more than 10 million copies worldwide. Hawking titled his hour-long lecture to Cedars-Sinai employees "A Brief History of Mine."

Hawking has survived longer than most people with Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. ALS attacks nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control the muscles.

There's no cure and no way to reverse the disease's progression. Few people with ALS live longer than a decade.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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