FILE - In this July 27, 2017, file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Legislative budget analysts say a possibly doomed Republican health care bill would mean a first-year loss of $1.7 billion of funding for Arizona for the Medicaid eligibility expansion and the health exchange. McCain says on Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, he won't vote for the Republican bill repealing the Obama health care law. His statement likely deals a fatal blow to the last-gasp GOP measure in a Senate showdown expected next week. The Arizona Republican says he can't back the partisan GOP measure because "we could do better working together, Republicans and Democrats." (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

Cliff Owen

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Sen. John McCain says doctors have given him a "very poor prognosis" as he battles brain cancer.

McCain underwent surgery in July for a brain tumor that was later found to be a form of glioblastoma, the same type of cancer that took the life of his former Senate colleague Edward M. Kennedy in 2009. McCain tells CBS' "60 Minutes" in an interview that aired Sunday night that he thinks about Kennedy a lot. He says Kennedy continued to work despite the diagnosis and "never gave up because he loved the engagement."

McCain says he has "feelings sometimes of fear of what happens," but counters that with gratitude for having lived "a great life."

He adds: "it's not that you're leaving, it's that you — that you stayed."

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