Surcharge to fund Ariz. parks won't make ballot

2012-07-04T12:05:00Z Surcharge to fund Ariz. parks won't make ballotBy Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services Arizona Daily Star

PHOENIX — Arizonans are not going to get a chance to vote on whether they want to fund state parks with a surcharge on vehicle registration fee.

Bill Meek, president of the Arizona Parks Foundation, said Tuesday the initiative campaign ran out of money about two weeks ago to hire paid circulators.

“We had a really good army of volunteers,” he said. But Meek said that was insufficient to gather the 172,809 valid signatures needed by today to put the question on the ballot.

Meek said, though, that is not the end of the issue. He said supporters of the plan will ask lawmakers next year to refer the issue to voters in 2014, bypassing the need to circulate petitions.

The question of funding remains significant because lawmakers, looking for ways to balance the state budget in prior years, have refused to provide tax dollars to support the parks system. Complicating matters, legislators even took some of the money that had been raised from admission and other fees.

A 2009 task force report to Gov. Jan Brewer concluded that the parks system “is threatened with extinction and cannot survive under a roller-coaster system of financial support.”

The initiative had two key provisions.

One would have imposed a $14 surcharge added to the cost of each vehicle registration fee. That fee would be voluntarily — but motorists would have to affirmatively opt out by checking a box on the renewal form to avoid paying it.

Meek said states with similar systems manage to get anywhere from 40 to 80 percent of drivers agreeing to the additional fee.

While Meek had no specific figures of what the fee might raise, that 2009 report estimated that even if half of motorists opt out, that could still raise $40 million a year.

The second half would make anything the parks system raised, whether from the vehicle license surcharge or admission fees, off limits to legislative raiding.

Meek said he had hoped to line up sufficient major donors to get the signatures.

The idea of the registration fee is not new. In fact, it was part of the recommendations in that 2009 report to Brewer.

Meek conceded there is probably no way lawmakers themselves would ever approve the plan — even with the opt-out provision — as many have taken a “no tax hike” pledge. Meek disputed, though, that it is a tax.

But he said they might be willing to give voters a chance to weigh in by simply voting to put the issue on the ballot.

Copyright 2014 Arizona Daily Star. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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