Greece

Olympia theft worse than originally feared

ATHENS - Police in Greece said Monday that 77 artifacts were stolen by armed robbers last week at a small museum in ancient Olympia - the birthplace of the ancient games - revealing that the extent of the theft was worse than originally reported.

Police and the Culture Ministry had initially estimated that 65 objects up to 3,200 years old were taken in Friday's raid, when two masked gunmen tied up a museum guard and used a sledgehammer to smash display cabinets at the southern Greek museum. Most of the items on the list released Monday were bronze and pottery figurines, vases and lamps.

Iran

Nuclear inspectors from UN begin visit

TEHRAN - U.N. nuclear inspectors began a two-day visit to Tehran on Monday. They were seeking to meet Iranian nuclear scientists and visit a key military facility as they try to determine whether Iran is pushing toward making an atomic weapon.

The trip is the second in less than a month by the International Atomic Energy Agency team, reflecting growing concerns over alleged weapons experiments - something Iran has so far both denied and refused to discuss.

Honduras

Kin storm morgue, demanding remains

TEGUCIGALPA - Hundreds of relatives of inmates who burned or suffocated to death when a fire raged through a Honduran prison forced their way into a morgue Monday to demand the remains of loved ones.

The group of women and some men pushed into the morgue, broke into a refrigerated container and opened at least six body bags, officials said.

Police used tear gas to chase the people from the morgue, officials said. No one was injured during the confrontation in Tegucigalpa, although at least one woman fainted.

Somalia

EU said to be willing to boost peacekeepers

The European Union is willing to help pay for more African Union peacekeepers in Somalia in an effort to clear al-Shabab militants from the country, a senior official said Monday.

The official, who could not be named under EU rules, said the bloc is prepared to provide "significant new resources" to help fund the force, and to help Somalia's interim government return the nation to stability.

The U.N. Security Council is currently considering a new resolution that would authorize an increase in the AU force in Somalia from 10,000 to 18,000 troops.

The official did not specify a figure but said the cost of the current peacekeeping force was about $13 million a month. An expanded force would amount to nearly double that.

Wire reports