Britain's Iron Lady laid to rest with full pomp

Her place in history brings out supporters, opponents at funeral
2013-04-18T00:00:00Z Britain's Iron Lady laid to rest with full pompThe Associated Press The Associated Press
April 18, 2013 12:00 am  • 

LONDON - Margaret Thatcher was laid to rest Wednesday with prayers and ceremony, plus cheers and occasional jeers, as Britain paused to remember a leader who transformed the country - for the better according to many, but in some eyes for the worse.

Soaring hymns, biblical verse and fond remembrances echoed under the dome of St. Paul's Cathedral, as 2,300 relatives, friends, colleagues and dignitaries attended a ceremonial funeral for Britain's only female prime minister.

Queen Elizabeth II, current and former prime ministers and representatives from 170 countries were among the mourners packing the cathedral, where Bishop of London Richard Chartres spoke of the strong feelings Thatcher still evokes 23 years after leaving office.

"The storm of conflicting opinions centers on the Mrs. Thatcher who became a symbolic figure - even an -ism," he said. "It must be very difficult for those members of her family and those closely associated with her to recognize the wife, the mother and the grandmother in the mythological figure."

"There is an important place for debating policies and legacy … but here and today is neither the time nor the place," he added.

Security for the funeral - the largest in London for more than a decade - was tightened after bombings at the Boston Marathon on Monday.

More than 700 soldiers, sailors and air force personnel formed a ceremonial guard along the route taken by Thatcher's coffin to the cathedral, and about 4,000 police officers were on duty.

But while thousands of supporters and a smaller number of opponents traded shouts and arguments, there was no serious trouble. Police said there were no arrests, and the only items thrown at the cortege were flowers.

Before the service, Thatcher's coffin was driven from the Houses of Parliament to the church of St. Clement Danes for prayers.

From there the coffin - draped in a Union flag and topped with white roses and a note from her children Mark and Carol reading "Beloved mother, always in our hearts" - was borne to the cathedral on a gun carriage drawn by six black horses.

Spectators lining the route broke into applause as the carriage passed by, although a few demonstrators staged silent protests by turning their backs on Thatcher's coffin. One man held a banner declaring "rest in shame."

An honor guard of soldiers in scarlet tunics and bearskin hats saluted the coffin as it approached St. Paul's, while red-coated veterans known as Chelsea Pensioners stood to attention on the steps.

Guests inside the cathedral included Thatcher's political colleagues, rivals and her successors as prime minister: John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron.

Former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and former Vice President Dick Cheney were among the American dignitaries.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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