US orders diplomats out of Pakistan city

2013-08-10T00:00:00Z US orders diplomats out of Pakistan cityThe Associated Press The Associated Press
August 10, 2013 12:00 am  • 

ISLAMABAD - The U.S. has warned Americans not to travel to Pakistan and evacuated most government personnel from the country's second largest city because of a threat to the consulate there, a U.S. official said Friday, the latest example of the danger facing diplomats operating in volatile parts of the Muslim world.

The action came amid a flurry of deadly militant attacks in Pakistan. It also followed an al-Qaida threat to U.S. diplomatic posts in the Middle East and North Africa that American officials said was unrelated to the situation in Pakistan.

U.S. consulates have been attacked previously in different parts of Pakistan, and Washington is still scarred by the memory of the attack last year on a diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. The U.S. is shifting nonessential staff from the eastern Pakistani city of Lahore to the capital, Islamabad, after a specific threat to the consulate there, said U.S. Embassy spokeswoman Meghan Gregonis. Emergency personnel will stay in Lahore, and embassy officials do not know when the consulate will reopen, she said.

"We received information regarding a threat to the consulate," said Gregonis. "As a precautionary measure, we are undertaking a drawdown of all except emergency personnel."

She did not provide any details on the nature of the threat or the evacuation of U.S. personnel, including exactly when it occurred. The consulate in Lahore was already scheduled to be closed for the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr from Thursday through Sunday.

The Pakistani Taliban carried out a car bomb and grenade attack against the U.S. consulate in the northwest Pakistani city of Peshawar in 2010 that killed four Pakistanis. The consulate in the southern city of Karachi has also been attacked several times.

Earlier this week, 19 U.S. diplomatic outposts in 16 countries in the Middle East and Africa were closed to the public through Saturday and nonessential personnel were evacuated from the U.S. Embassy in Yemen after U.S. intelligence officials said they had intercepted a recent message from al-Qaida's top leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, about plans for a major terror attack.

None of the consulates in Pakistan nor the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad was affected by the earlier closures.

On Thursday, the State Department advised U.S. citizens not to travel to Pakistan, saying the presence of several foreign and indigenous terrorist groups posed a potential danger.

The country has faced a bloody insurgency by the Pakistani Taliban and their allies in recent years that has killed more than 40,000 civilians and security personnel, and is also believed to be home base for al-Zawahiri, although his exact whereabouts are unknown. Al-Qaida's founder, Osama bin Laden, was killed in a raid by U.S. commandos in the Pakistani city Abbottabad, about a two-hour drive north of Islamabad.

Most militant attacks in Pakistan have been in the northwest and southwest along the border with Afghanistan.

Gunmen killed six people and wounded 15 others Friday in an attack on a former lawmaker outside a mosque in Quetta, the capital of southwest Baluchistan province, said police officer Bashir Ahmad Barohi. The lawmaker escaped unharmed.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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