These are basically free UA classes without the homework. 

A.E. Araiza / Arizona Daily Star

Oh, the humanities. 

When you you hear about the Tucson Humanities Festival, you might think the University of Arizona's College of Humanities picked this year's theme to comment on the world we live in. 

But, no. They sure didn't. 

"We landed on Resistance + Revolution mainly because even though it sounds like — in today's political climate — we're making a statement, if you look at the lectures, they're actually historical looks at various cultures and events across the world," said Helen Gomez Bernard, the director of external and alumni relations for the College of Humanities. 

You can catch lectures throughout October and into November on topics ranging from freedom in Africa, international space efforts and the Protestant Reformation. There's a lot there. 

The college wants this month of lectures to convince you why humanities matter in our modern world. 

"It's about intercultural competency and looking at an entire culture and literature and language and traditions ... through a global lens..." Bernard said. "Right now, people aren't taking the time to understand other cultures, and that's what we really do in humanities. We look at other cultures as a whole." 

These lectures — which, bonus (!) have no homework — examine how even small moments of resistance lead to massive cultural changes. 

The college started what was then called Humanities Week in 2011 with lectures organized around a theme. This is the first year the newly-named Tucson Humanities Festival has expanded to fill a month. Conveniently, October is National Arts and Humanities Month. 

Here is the information about the lectures. Lectures are free unless otherwise noted. Visit humanitiesfestival.arizona.edu for more detailed information. 

What: The speaker is Nadya Tolokonnikova of the Russian punk rock band Pussy Riot. Tolokonnikova advocates for human rights and creative expression. She spent two years in a Russian prison for an anti-Putin performance. 

When: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 3.

Where: Rialto Theatre, 318 E. Congress St. 

Cost: $11 at rialtotheatre.com

What: This lecture will discuss the struggle of African nations to throw off colonial rule and the mess imperial nations left behind. 

When: 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 4.

Where: The UA Poetry Center's Helen S. Schaefer Building, 1508 E. Helen St., in the Dorothy Rubel Room. 

What: A look at how religious minorities such as Jews and Christians resisted and survived repression by the Roman Empire. 

When: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 10. 

Where: The UA Poetry Center's Helen S. Schaefer Building, 1508 E. Helen St., in the Dorothy Rubel Room. 

What: This discussion will explore the poetic response to SB 1070 in support of human rights, specifically the anthology "Poetry of Resistance: Voices for Social Justice" by the UA Press. 

When: 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12. 

Where: The UA Poetry Center's Helen S. Schaefer Building, 1508 E. Helen St., in the Dorothy Rubel Room. 

What: Humanities students and professors who studied abroad this summer captured scenes from around the world with 360-degree cameras. 

When: 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 13. 

Where: The Owls Club, 236 S. Scott Ave. 

What: The Spanish Civil War preceded World War II and impacted Spanish society politically, socially and artistically. 

When: 7 p.m Tuesday, Oct. 17. 

Where: The UA Poetry Center's Helen S. Schaefer Building, 1508 E. Helen St., in the Dorothy Rubel Room. 

What: Martin Luther's writings on Christianity caused centuries worth of turmoil. This discussion will explore how he is and has been used as a symbol in German politics. 

When: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 24. 

Where: The UA Poetry Center's Helen S. Schaefer Building, 1508 E. Helen St., in the Dorothy Rubel Room. 

What: The OSIRIS-REx mission's principal investigator Dante Lauretta will discuss how having a degree in Japanese as well as math and physics has helped him in his career as space exploration inspires collaboration among nations. 

When: 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 27. 

Where: Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium, 1601 E. University Blvd

What: The speaker Diana Taylor, founding director of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics at New York University, will discuss how mothers of disappeared Central American migrants wear photographs of their missing children — a meme that allows their children to reappear and make a political statement. 

When: Lecture at 5:30 p.m.; exhibit and reception follow at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 1. 

Where: UA Museum of Art, 1030 N. Olive Road

What: This film chronicles the recovery of 4,500 negatives 70 years after they were taken during the Spanish Civil War. 

When: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 7. 

Where: The Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway

Tickets: Get them starting at noon on Nov. 7. They're free. Two available per person. 

Writing about Tucson's heart and soul — its people, its kindness, its faith — for #ThisIsTucson.