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Big Jim Griffith's history and folklore blog, "Our Storied Desert Land," continues today at azstarnet.com/bigjim

  • Jim Griffith Special to the Arizona Daily Star

In the 1960s, a large chunk of what had been downtown Tucson was swallowed up by a huge Urban Renewal project. Old businesses and residential …

  • Jim Griffith Special to the Arizona Daily Star

In the 1920s, our shrine, El Tiradito, which had been downhill from its present location, was moved because of a street-widening project, and …

  • Kelly Presnell/Arizona Daily Star file photo

A sculpture of sand trout in the Rose Hill Wash on Tanque Verde Road, Tues. July 5, 2011.

  • Doug Kreutz/ARIZONA DAILY STAR

No fishing for sand trout at the Atturbury-Lyman Bird and Animal Sanctuary loop trail. Photo taken 12/11/09.

  • Jim Griffith Special to the Arizona Daily Star

It all began when the Sonoran Desert started drying up, to become what it is today.

  • Jim Griffith Special to the Arizona Daily Star

Jokes are a part of any culture’s folklore and can serve as a kind of salve or ointment that we can slather over the raw places in our consciousness.

  • Jim Griffith Special to the Arizona Daily Star

Let’s start with a river – The Santa Cruz River. We have to start there, because that’s where human settlement in this area started.

  • JEFFRY SCOTT/ARIZONA DAILY STAR file photo

Members of the Lajkonik Polish Folk Ensemble perform for the Tucson Slavic Festival Saturday, Oct. 2, 2010 at St. Melany Byzantine Catholic Ch…

  • Jim Griffith Special to the Arizona Daily Star

True to my promise, I’m alerting you to events related to the subject of this blog, the living cultural traditions of Tucson.

  • Illustration by David Fitzsimmons, Arizona Daily Star
  • Illustration by David Fitzsimmons, Arizona Daily Star
  • Jim Griffith Special to the Arizona Daily Star

There are many ways in which one can describe Tucson. It’s a place of Sunbelt sprawl and rapid growth. It’s the home of Davis-Monthan, Raytheo…

There's no place in the world where Big Jim Griffith would rather live than in the borderlands of Southern Arizona and northern Mexico.