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Medical Research

Cancer: counting too much on bad luck theory

Cancer: counting too much on bad luck theory

Be smart about unnecessary risks. Nudge the odds in your favor.

17 hours agoLoading…

Medical pot only OK for sick kids failed by other drugs: MDs

CHICAGO — With virtually no hard proof that medical marijuana benefits sick children, and evidence that it may harm developing brains, the drug should be used only for severely ill kids who have no other treatment option, the nation’s most influential pediatricians group says in a new policy.

January 25, 2015 10:15 pmLoading…

Medical billing can vary widely in same market, study finds

Tucson prices don't vary much but Phoenix-Mesa's do for knee and hip replacements.

January 25, 2015 6:00 amLoading…
The deadly truth about 'healthy obesity'

The deadly truth about 'healthy obesity'

Here’s a cold dose of reality for people telling themselves that their extra pounds aren’t harming them: Contrary to 2013 research linking extra weight to a lowered risk of mortality, there’s really no such thing as “healthy obesity.”

January 19, 2015 6:30 pmLoading…

Study: Facebook 'likes' more accurate at judging personalities

They say you can’t judge a book by its cover, but a new study suggests a computer can accurately judge your personality by the things you “like” on Facebook.

January 16, 2015 7:16 pmLoading…
Clinical trial seeks answers to sudden deaths of healthy young people

Clinical trial seeks answers to sudden deaths of healthy young people

Jonathan Lucas, chief deputy medical examiner with the San Diego County medical examiner’s office,in an autopsy exam room where he’s now collecting autopsy samples for genome sequencing to reveal causes for some unexplained deaths, on December 8, 2014. (Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

December 10, 2014 5:26 pm
Innovative Ebola treatment has ASU roots

Innovative Ebola treatment has ASU roots

ASU's Charles Arntzen pioneered the plant biotechnology that led to an Ebola treatment.

August 06, 2014 12:00 amLoading…

Doctors use immune therapy against cervical cancer

CHICAGO (AP) — Two years ago, Arrica Wallace was riddled with tumors from widely spread cervical cancer that the strongest chemotherapy and radiation could not beat back. Today, the Kansas mother shows no signs of the disease, and it was her own immune system that made it go away.

June 02, 2014 6:00 pmLoading…

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