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University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona students on the steps of Old Main in 1896.

August 18, 2014 12:00 am
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

Old Main, the original building on the campus of the University of Arizona. Courtesy University of Arizona

August 18, 2014 12:00 am
1921 East-West Christmas Classic: Centre (Ky.) 38, UA 0

1921 East-West Christmas Classic: Centre (Ky.) 38, UA 0

Dec. 26, 1921: The Wildcats start their first-ever bowl game in a deep — and muddy — hole, trailing Centre of Danville, Ky., 18-0 at halftime en route to a 38-0 loss at San Diego's rain-soaked Balboa Stadium. In the first half, Centre All-Americans Red Roberts (end) and Alvin "Bo" McMillin (…

December 15, 2013 11:31 pm
St. Joseph's Orphanage

St. Joseph's Orphanage

St. Joseph’s Orphan House was on what is now South 12th Avenue.

December 09, 2013 3:19 pm
Fred Ronstadt

Fred Ronstadt

Fred Ronstadt, ca. 1880. 

November 22, 2013 12:48 pm
Speedway's sports racing roots

Speedway's sports racing roots

Part of a 1906 city of Tucson map bears the name The Speedway on it.

July 02, 2013 12:00 amLoading…
Once member of Confederate army, Drachman prospered as tobacconist

Once member of Confederate army, Drachman prospered as tobacconist

Sam Drachman, left, with cigarette, in front of Drachman Tobacco shop. When his business grew, Drachman opened up a shop in Phoenix.

May 21, 2013 12:00 amLoading…
European-educated Philip Contzen surveyed land across Southern Arizona

European-educated Philip Contzen surveyed land across Southern Arizona

After extensive travels throughout Europe, Philip Contzen returned to Tucson in 1891. Contzen was a surveyor, a three-term Tucson city councilman and a captain in the National Guard.

May 07, 2013 12:00 amLoading…
Street Smarts: NY salesman's jesting may have inspired Tucson's Broadway

Street Smarts: NY salesman's jesting may have inspired Tucson's Broadway

Fred Ronstadt's Store

February 12, 2013 8:22 am
Street Smarts

Street Smarts

Fred Ronstadt, ca. 1880. Courtesy University of Arizona Special Collections

February 11, 2013 8:21 pm
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona Old Main 1891. University of Arizona Library Special Collections. HP-165

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University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

McKale Center under construction dated September 1971, courtesy of the University of Arizona Special Collections.

August 18, 2012 2:01 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

U.S. Navy occupied Bear Down Gym during WWII. University of Arizona Library Special Collections. HP-173

August 18, 2012 2:00 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

The Steward Observatory circa 1928. Courtesy University of Arizona special collections.

August 18, 2012 1:58 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

The Old University of Arizona Library. Photo courtesy of University of Arizona Special Collections

August 18, 2012 2:01 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona students on the steps of Old Main. 1896. HP-168

August 18, 2012 2:00 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

Old Main, the original building on the campus of the University of Arizona. Courtesy University of Arizona

August 18, 2012 2:01 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

A 1929 view of the square outside the University of Arizona Main Gate looking towards downtown Tucson. The photo was taken from the library's upper floor. Photo courtesy of UA Library Special Collections.

August 18, 2012 1:58 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

The beginning of construction of McKale Center dated January 1971, courtesy of the University of Arizona Special Collections.

August 18, 2012 2:01 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

The Steward Observatory, July 1920. Courtesy University of Arizona library special collections department.

August 18, 2012 1:58 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

McKale Center under construction dated June 9, 1971, courtesy of the University of Arizona Special Collections,

August 18, 2012 2:01 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

McKale center from the air, dated 1976, courtesy of the University of Arizona Special Collections.

August 18, 2012 2:01 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

The University of Arizona cavalry. Photo courtesy of University of Arizona Special Collections

August 18, 2012 2:01 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

A 1927 view of the square outside the University of Arizona Main Gate. The drug store stands on the corner of University and Park Avenue. Photo courtesy of the UA Special Collections.

August 18, 2012 1:58 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

Students in 1968 exit the UA's infirmary, which underwent a "face lift" the year before that included a new emergency room and accommodations for 50 beds. The building now houses the Sonett Space Sciences Building. (Photo courtesy of University of Arizona Special Collections.)

August 18, 2012 1:57 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

The University of Arizona's second official infirmary was a low-slung red-brick building constructed in 1936 on the site of a former military barracks. (Photo courtesy of University of Arizona Special Collections.)

August 18, 2012 1:57 pmLoading…
University of Arizona in history

University of Arizona in history

Soldiers training for World War I were among the first to use the University of Arizona's first official infirmary. Started in 1919, the infirmary occupied the former home of Reuben R. Schweitzer. Today, the site is occupied by the Koffler Building. (Photo courtesy of University of Arizona S…

August 18, 2012 1:57 pmLoading…
Centennial Hall

Centennial Hall

Centennial Hall (originally called the University of Arizona Auditorium) on the University of Arizona campus. Photo date unknown. Built by Sundt Construction Inc.

April 20, 2012 6:17 pm
Steward Observatory

Steward Observatory

Steward Observatory, about 1921.

April 20, 2012 6:12 pm
Neto's Tucson: Mining's history interwoven with Arizona's

Neto's Tucson: Mining's history interwoven with Arizona's

Miner Alfred T. (Torres) Diaz. He was born in Jerome.

February 12, 2012 12:00 amLoading…
Flow of Anglos had reshaped the city by statehood

Flow of Anglos had reshaped the city by statehood

The first Tucson depot was this 200-foot-long Victorian structure built in 1880 as the Southern Pacific Railroad reached town. The depot accommodated passenger and freight trains. The photograph is not dated.

February 12, 2012 12:00 amLoading…
Towns split asunder

Towns split asunder

An open dirt street is all that marked the U.S.-Mexico line in June 1890. That's Nogales, Sonora, on the left, and Nogales, Ariz., on the right, similar to the situation that existed between Douglas and Agua Prieta, Sonora. The informal divisions are long gone, replaced today with imposing b…

December 13, 2011 12:00 amLoading…
Nov. 29, 1956: Fire breaks out at Cele Peterson's store in downtown Tucson

Nov. 29, 1956: Fire breaks out at Cele Peterson's store in downtown Tucson

Cele Peterson's downtown Tucson women's store burned in November of 1956. Cleo Chilikas and Alex Simons were within the building at the time, however, both of them and five other persons survived the blaze. Chilikas's husband, William, and Simons's wife, Emma were at the scene.

November 25, 2011 4:53 pm
70s chic

70s chic

You can't see it here — black-and-white photo — but Arizona wore electric blue jerseys during the funky 1970s. Quarterback Bruce Hill led Arizona’s “1-2-3” offense to one of the best seasons in school history. Hill finished the 1975 season with 1,747 passing yards and 18 touchdowns. Courtesy…

September 08, 2011 4:52 pm
Basic blue

Basic blue

Back when uniforms were, well, uniform, Fred W. Enke led the Wildcats' single-wing attack under coach Miles W. Casteel’s single-wing attack.  Courtesy of University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections, University of Arizona Photograph Collection

September 08, 2011 4:23 pm
Fred W. Enke

Fred W. Enke

Fred W. Enke led the Wildcats' single-wing attack under coach Miles W. CasteelCourtesy of University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections, University of Arizona Photograph Collection

September 08, 2011 4:23 pm
Mary 'Mamie' Bernard Aguirre: Headed two UA departments; her diary told of Old West

Mary 'Mamie' Bernard Aguirre: Headed two UA departments; her diary told of Old West

Mary spoke no Spanish and her husband, Epifanio, spoke no English when they met in Missouri. He held freighting contracts along the Santa Fe Trail and brought Mamie west in 1863. She kept a detailed diary of their journey. Epifanio and three others were killed by Indians near Sasabe in 1870…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Dr. James & James Stuart Douglas: Father and son built mining empires, towns, schools & more

Dr. James & James Stuart Douglas: Father and son built mining empires, towns, schools & more

Canadian-born James Douglas got into mining when he was called to help — unsuccessfully — save his father’s mine from financial ruin. He learned, though, and with a partner developed the first commercial electrolytic copper refining process. His expertise earned him a job as consultant to Ph…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Charles Trumbull Hayden: Early trader, probate judge and founder of Tempe

Charles Trumbull Hayden: Early trader, probate judge and founder of Tempe

As early as 1848, Hayden left Independence, Mo., with wagons full of goods he planned to sell in New Mexico. He soon operated shops in Santa Fe, south of Tubac and in Tucson. The governor appointed him Tucson’s first probate judge in 1864, and he heard a grand total of one criminal case in h…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Henry Clay Hooker: Selling turkeys helped his business, ranches

Henry Clay Hooker: Selling turkeys helped his business, ranches

A fire at Hooker’s Placerville, Calif., hardware store nearly wiped him out in 1866. He got the idea to recover by buying 500 turkeys for $1.50 each and driving them across the mountains to Carson City, Nev. It worked. Hooker sold them for $5 each, then took the money and came to Arizona to …

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
John Lorenzo Hubbell: Most famous of the Indian traders, family operated 30-plus trading posts

John Lorenzo Hubbell: Most famous of the Indian traders, family operated 30-plus trading posts

He was born near Albuquerque in 1853 and took off by himself for Utah in 1870. He found employment as a clerk at a trading post but didn’t last there long. Over the next five years, he traveled around the region, meeting many Indians. He opened his own trading post near Ganado in 1876. It pr…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Louis C. & Josephine Brawley Hughes: Tucson’s power couple of the late 19th century

Louis C. & Josephine Brawley Hughes: Tucson’s power couple of the late 19th century

It was the desert climate and a budding law career that lured Louis, a sickly Civil War veteran, to Tucson in 1871. For the rest of the century, Louis, Sam Hughes’ younger brother, had his hand in almost all things Tucson. He founded the Arizona Daily Star, sat on the university Board of Reg…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Samuel Hughes: He came in search of health

Samuel Hughes: He came in search of health

Lung problems brought Hughes to Tucson in 1858, but he soon had a “spoon in every soup.” The older brother of Louis Hughes, he was a butcher and Army contractor, then branched out to real estate, lending, ranching and mining. He supplied carbines and ammunition for the Camp Grant massacre. H…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Judge Joseph H. Kibbey: Ruled on water law, fought school segregation

Judge Joseph H. Kibbey: Ruled on water law, fought school segregation

The son and grandson of judges, Kibbey came to Florence in 1888 and served the territory as a legislator, governor, attorney general and supreme court justice. As chief justice, he ruled in 1892 that water belongs to the land where it is used and that first users have priority. These ideas c…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Jacob Mansfeld: He opened the first public library and helped found the University of Arizona

Jacob Mansfeld: He opened the first public library and helped found the University of Arizona

Mansfeld came to Tucson in 1870 and started the Pioneer News Depot and Bookstore. By the next year, he opened the territory’s first public library. It took two weeks for newspapers to arrive by mail via Yuma. Once, his Christmas merchandise arrived in February. Mansfeld’s greatest contributi…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Charles Debrille Poston: He called himself the Father of Arizona

Charles Debrille Poston: He called himself the Father of Arizona

Poston was living in San Francisco when he heard about the Gadsden Purchase and set off in 1853 for what would become Arizona. He soon settled in the abandoned fort at Tubac and began mining for silver in the Santa Rita Mountains. Apaches destroyed the fort in 1861, but Poston did not give u…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Anson Pacely Killen Safford: Arizona’s 3rd territorial governor and the father of our schools

Anson Pacely Killen Safford: Arizona’s 3rd territorial governor and the father of our schools

From the moment he was appointed governor by President Ulysses S. Grant, Safford was determined to establish public schools. He wrote a bill, introduced by Tucsonan Estevan Ochoa, in 1871. Legislators were not sympathetic, arguing that the Apaches and criminals were much bigger problems than…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Federico José María Ronstadt: Tucson’s music maker

Federico José María Ronstadt: Tucson’s music maker

Ronstadt, whose business acumen is described in the introduction to this section, also left his mark on entertainment. In 1889 he and several buddies formed Club Filarmónico Tucsonense, a band that for nearly a decade performed once a week in the plaza, as well as at everything from church s…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Bishop John Baptist Salpointe: The cleric who built things

Bishop John Baptist Salpointe: The cleric who built things

There was no operating church in Arizona when Salpointe’s party of four — three priests and a teacher — came from New Mexico in 1866. Salpointe, newly named vicar general of the Arizona missions, was their leader. He was a Frenchman who had arrived in America as a missionary six years earlie…

February 16, 2011 12:00 am
Reflecting on past - looking to great future

Reflecting on past - looking to great future

Steward Observatory, seen here in the late 1920s, has been astronomy central at the university for nearly a century. UA research in the field began in 1909, when the university borrowed a telescope from Harvard.

October 21, 2010 12:00 amLoading…

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