Heat know mentally-tough Spurs won't roll over

2014-06-10T00:00:00Z Heat know mentally-tough Spurs won't roll overThe Associated Press The Associated Press
June 10, 2014 12:00 am  • 

MIAMI — Dwyane Wade thinks there’s no one better than the Miami Heat at dealing with the mental challenge of the playoffs. In his eyes, only one other team might compare.

He’s talking about the San Antonio Spurs.

That’s why Wade believes these NBA Finals are just getting started.

When he looks at the Spurs, he sees qualities his own team has, including an ability to break down a loss and quickly correct things. It’s what Miami did before Game 2 of the finals and it’s what Wade expects the Spurs to do before the title series resumes with Game 3 in Miami tonight.

“You never put them away,” Wade said. “I think they always believe and it’s the same with us. You can’t, you won’t, put us away because we’re always going to believe. That’s why this is a perfect, different animal, kind of series. They’re the other team like us. They don’t lose much and when they do they come back and be better in the next game. So we’ve got to come out and do the same thing.”

That would explain why on Monday, instead of a day off, the Heat gathered to watch video of Game 2.

By winning in San Antonio to even the finals at 1-1, home-court advantage now belongs to the Heat. But no one in their locker room thinks it will be easy now.

“They came out great. They played a great game,” Spurs guard Tony Parker said after Miami’s 98-96 win in Game 2, the 13th straight time the Heat immediately followed a postseason loss with a victory. “Now it’s our turn to go over there and get one. We played pretty well all season long on the road and so we’re going to have two great opportunities.”

Miami has won a franchise-record 11 straight postseason games at home.

The last team to win a playoff game in Miami was the Spurs, winning Game 1 of last season’s finals.

Sterling changes mind

Donald Sterling’s attorney said Monday his client would not be dropping his billion-dollar lawsuit against the NBA.

Last week Maxwell Blecher said Sterling had agreed to a deal in which he would sign off on the $2 billion sale of the Clippers to Steve Ballmer and agree to drop his suit. The league, in turn, would agree not to sue Sterling and would drop the charges against him. Sterling’s legal team interpreted that to mean the league was rescinding its lifetime ban and $2.5 million fine.

To the NBA, however, the only charge they were dropping was the “charge to terminate ownership.”

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