Super Bowl XLVII: One last ride for Lewis, man of many sides

2013-02-03T00:00:00Z 2013-02-03T20:19:34Z Super Bowl XLVII: One last ride for Lewis, man of many sidesThe Associated Press The Associated Press
February 03, 2013 12:00 am  • 

NEW ORLEANS - In the final week of his career, we got to see the many sides of Ray Lewis.

There was Reverend Ray - reciting Bible verses and recalling singing in the church choir as a child, talking passionately about his relationship with God, the voice rising like a revival-tent preacher as he warned everyone that "the trick of the devil is to kill, steal and destroy. That's what he comes to do. He comes to distract you from everything you're trying to do."

There was Revered Ray - one of the fiercest linebackers in NFL history, universally praised by teammates and opponents alike for his emotion on the field, his leadership in the locker room, for being an example of how the game should be played.

"I will probably be most proud of the impact I've had on so many men's lives," Lewis said. "The game will fade one day, numbers will fall, accolades will wash away, but there is nothing better than changing someone's life."

Some even wondered if there was a Roided-Up Ray - taking some sort of strange wildlife byproduct containing a banned substance.

Of course, there's Ragin' Ray.

That one comes out for the last time today, when Lewis' last ride ends on the biggest stage of all.

The Super Bowl.

The Ravens linebacker gets a shot to go out a champion in the title game against the 49ers. A few great players have managed to do it this way - John Elway, Jerome Bettis and Michael Strahan come to mind - but it rarely happens in football or any sport.

"I'm jealous," Hall of Famer Marshall Faulk said. "Ask any player, 'How do you want to end your career?' You want to tell your team, 'This is it.' You want to play in a Super Bowl and have a chance to win it. Very few guys get to leave the game with a storybook ending."

It didn't go quite as planned.

The report that the 37-year-old Lewis had purchased deer-antler spray from a quirky company in Alabama to help recover from a triceps injury - it contains a naturally occurring substance on the banned list - revived doubts about the character of the man. Some of these doubts had lingered since he was accused of covering up a double slaying in Atlanta the night after the 2000 Super Bowl.

Super Bowl week revealed there are so many Rays, it's impossible to wrap him up in a tidy package.

Even Lewis will admit that the guy he professes to be most of the time - deeply religious, a caring mentor, a humble leader - is not the one you see when he puts on his helmet and pads. The one who dances out of the tunnel before home games, swaying this way and that, as if pleading to the whole world: "Look at me!" The one who plays with fury and arrogance, fully intent on breaking lesser men and lording it over them.

"I turn into a different person on the field," Lewis said. "I am a totally different person off the field. But on the field, I'm driven to do whatever it takes for my teammates. There are so many of my teammates here today who I've honored and told them that I would do anything in my power so we can feel that confetti drop together, because that is the ultimate. For me being a leader of this team, I owe that to them."

No one can question Lewis' contributions to the game as a player - a two-time defensive player of the year, a seven-time All-Pro, a 13-time Pro Bowl player, a linebacker who defined the very essence of his position.

Yet he spent a great deal of time in the days leading up his final game talking about the role of faith in his life. He described himself as non-denominational but made it clear he relies heavily on a power beyond this world.

"God has always been a part of my life," he said. "Faith is accepting things unseen. It's hard to believe in sometimes. … My relationship with God is the ultimate. I don't claim a religion. I claim there is a higher power. There is a higher power I go to. And I'm emotional when I go to him."

"He taught me how to be a pro," Baltimore running back Ray Rice said. "He's also taught me how to be a man as well."

No matter which Ray walks off the field for the final time today, Lewis is content with his legacy.

"I get to leave on my terms," he said. "That's the ultimate."

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