Native American mascots: Offensive mascot names still dot sports landscape

2013-02-08T00:00:00Z Native American mascots: Offensive mascot names still dot sports landscapeThe Associated Press The Associated Press
February 08, 2013 12:00 am  • 

WASHINGTON - Hurtful names and racial stereotypes of all types were discussed and dissected Thursday in a daylong symposium at the Smithsonian, and the Washington Redskins were at the top of the list for nearly all those who spoke.

"I can only imagine what it would be like to be at a football game at FedEx Field in a crowd of close to 90,000, all screaming at the top of their lungs, when what they are screaming is a racial slur," said Judith Bartnoff, a deputy presiding judge in District of Columbia Superior Court.

By the time the day was over, they had a convert.

Unaware of what the presentation was all about, Andre Holland wore his burgundy and gold Redskins hat, ear muffs and key chain to the National Museum of the American Indian. He was on a field trip with his Sports in America class from Anne Arundel Community College.

When the sessions ended, the 20-year-old student had removed the hat and disavowed the nickname of his lifelong favorite NFL team, having been persuaded that it's as racist as the worst names he might be called as an African-American.

"I really don't feel right wearing this stuff now," Holland said. "And now I can't even say 'HTTR' - which is 'Hail to the Redskins' - because that's chanting something racist. I'm going to be a fan of Washington - a 'Washington football team.' Not the 'Washington Redskins.'"

Panelists and audience members explained why they felt the name was offensive and offered all sorts of ideas - including a protest at training camp and the need to get franchise quarterback Robert Griffin III to speak out - that might persuade team owner Dan Snyder that a change is needed.

Organizers say the Redskins did not respond to an invitation to participate, and no one stood up to defend the Redskins name when the audience was invited to participate.

In 2005, the NCAA announced it would ban the use of American Indian imagery and nicknames at postseason tournaments. Some schools have since been granted exceptions with the support of tribes, such as the Florida State Seminoles.

The latest to make the switch are the students at Cooperstown high school in upstate New York, who voted this week to ditch their "Redskins" nickname. The school is considering "Deerslayers," "Hawkeyes" and "Pathfinders" as alternatives.

Suzan Shown Harjo, president of the Washington-based Morning Star Institute, an advocacy group, said there are some 900 troublesome nicknames and mascots across the country, down from a peak of more than 3,000 in the early 1970s.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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