A Feb. 23, 1956, Arizona Daily Star ad for Terra Del Sol.

You’ve heard of a playground to the stars. How about a neighborhood to the stars — and to the constellations and planets as well?

Street names in the Terra Del Sol subdivision highlight the objects in the night skies, and their often Latin, Greek or Roman names.

From 1955-57, developer Marvin Volk developed the 640-acre project bounded by South Wilmot Road, East 22nd Street, East Golf Links Road and South Kolb Road.

He employed Bill Armstrong, a professional engineer and surveyor, to survey the property. Armstrong was joined by Jack Lamb, who had been an Air Force navigator in the Korean War, to come up with the names.

The subdivision name itself might be a misspelling of “Tierra Del Sol,” Spanish for “Land of the Sun,” or it might have been an intentional combination of Latin and Spanish.

The street names — some of which are misspelled — and their origins are listed below:

Calle Altair: Also called Alpha Aquilae, Altair is Arabic for “flying eagle.” It is the brightest star in the Aquila constellation and the 12th-brightest star in the night sky.

Calle Alkaid: Also known as Eta Ursae Majoris, this blue star is the third-brightest star in the Ursa Major constellation.

Calle Bootis: Also known as Alpha Bootis or Arcturus. Orange in color, it’s one of the five-brightest stars in the sky and the brightest star in the Bootes constellation.

Calle Bellatrix: Bellatrix is a star in the Orion constellation. According to one source, Bellatrix means “female warrior.”

Calle Betelgeux: Also written Betelgeuse and also called Alpha Orionis, it is the second-brightest star in the Orion constellation. Its derivation is from the Arabic word “bat al-jawza,” which means “the giant’s shoulder,” referring to the shoulder of Orion, the mythological Greek hunter.

Calle Castor: Also called Alpha Geminorum, it is a multiple star comprised of six component stars in the Gemini constellation.

Mars, the namesake of Calle Marte. Photo taken in 2007.

Calle Cappela: The street name, recorded as Cappela, is a misspelling of “Capella,” also known as Alpha Aurigae. Capella is Latin for “she-goat” and is the sixth-brightest star in the night sky and the brightest in the Auriga constellation. It lies 42.2 light-years from Earth. Street signs along this alignment are currently spelled both ways, Cappela and Capella.

Calle Canis: This street likely derives its name from the Canis Major (Greater Dog) and Canis Minor (Lesser Dog). Canis Major is a constellation in the southern sky; Canis Minor is a constellation in the northern sky.

Calle Centuri: This street name was recorded as “Centuri” but is likely a misspelling and named for several stars that bear the name “Centauri” in their name, including Alpha Centauri, Beta Centauri and Omega Centauri.

Calle Crusis: This street name was recorded as “Crusis,” but is likely a misspelling and named for several stars that bear the name “Crucis” in their name, including Alpha Crucis, Beta Crucis, Delta Crucis, etc.

Calle Dened: Recorded as “Dened,” but is likely a misspelling and named for “Deneb,” also called Alpha Cygni. It is the brightest star in the Cygnus constellation and the 19th-brightest star in the sky.

Calle Denebola: Also designated Beta Leonis, it is the second-brightest star in the Leo constellation.

Calle Herculo: Herculo is Latin for Hercules. This constellation in the northern sky is also known as Engonasin.

Calle Ileo: This street name was recorded as “Ileo” but is likely misspelling and named for “Leo” (Latin for lion), a constellation located in the northern sky with its brightest star being Regulus.

Calle Jupiter: Jupiter is the most massive planet in our solar system and is fifth in distance from the sun. It is bigger than all the other planets combined and was named by ancient astronomers in honor of Jupiter, the Roman ruler of the gods.

Calle Luna: Luna means moon in Latin and Spanish. It is the Earth’s only natural satellite and closest large celestial body. It is the second-brightest object in the sky after the sun.

Calle Marte: Marte is Spanish for Mars. It is the fourth planet in our solar system in order of distance from the sun and the seventh-largest planet in our solar system. It derives its name from the Roman god of war.

Calle Mercurio: Mercurio is Spanish for Mercury. It is the innermost planet of our solar system and the eighth-largest in size. Mercury in the Roman religion is the god of merchants, travelers, transporters of goods, thieves and tricksters, and is the messenger of the gods.

Calle Neptuno: Neptuno is Spanish for Neptune. It is the eighth and outermost planet from the sun in our solar system. It was named for the Roman god of the sea. This planet wasn’t discovered until 1846.

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 Calle Orion: Orion in astronomy is a major constellation and is named for the mythological Greek hunter. It contains three very bright stars: Bellatrix, Rigel and Betelgeuse (Betelgeux).

Calle Osito: Osito in Spanish means “little bear” and might refer to Ursa Minor, a constellation of the northern sky. Polaris is the brightest star in this constellation.

Calle Pegaso: Pegaso is Spanish for Pegasus. It is a constellation in the northern sky and its brightest star is Enif. In Greek mythology, this constellation is identified with the winged horse of the same name.

Avenida Polar: This street name may refer to the term “polar distance,” used in astronomy, but it is likely a misspelling of Polaris, also known as the North Star.

Avenida Planeta: Planeta is Spanish for planet. The word planet is derived from the Greek “planetes,” or “wanderers.” There are eight planets in our solar system: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

Avenida Regulo: Regulo is Latin for Regulus. It is also called Alpha Leonis and is the brightest star in the Leo constellation and one of the brightest in the entire sky. The word Regulus takes its name from a Latin word for king.

Calle Cappela, aka Capella 

Avenida Sirio: Sirio is Spanish and Latin for Sirius, which is also referred to as Alpha Canis Majoris or the Dog Star is the brightest star in the night sky. It is the double star in the Canis Major constellation. It derives its name from a Greek word meaning “sparkling” or “scorching”.

Avenida Del Sol: The sun is a star around which Earth and other planets in our solar system circle. It is the source of a huge amount of energy, a portion of which provides our planet with heat and light needed to sustain life.

Avenida Ursa: Ursa is Latin for bear or female bear. This street name likely derives its name from Ursa Major (Great Bear) and Ursa Minor (Little Bear). Ursa Major is a constellation of the northern sky. It is mentioned in the Old Testament (Job 9:9; 39:32) and referred to by Homer in the “Illiad.” Ursa Minor is also a constellation in the northern sky, and seven of its stars outline the Little Dipper.

Avenida Vega: Vega, also known as Alpha Lyrae, is the brightest star in the Lyra constellation and the fifth-brightest in the night sky.

Note: Calle Silvosa is believed to have been named in the Golf Links Addition subdivision and later extended in Terra Del Sol; its name origin is unknown.

Special thanks to Wayne of the Pima County Public Library “ask a librarian” service for research assistance.

David Leighton is a historian and author of “The History of the Hughes Missile Plant in Tucson, 1947-1960.” He has been featured on PBS, ABC, Travel Channel and many radio shows. If you have a street to suggest or a story to share, email him at azjournalist21@gmail.com