UPDATES: Tucson area coronavirus developments, June 5: Here's what we know
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UPDATES: Tucson area coronavirus developments, June 5: Here's what we know

Bookmark this daily roundup of coronavirus news from the Arizona Daily Star.

  • Updated

A nurse holds swabs and test tube to test people for COVID-19 at a drive through station set up in the parking lot of the Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich.

Editor's note: With our coronavirus coverage, the Star is not trying to alarm the public but to provide up-to-date information so you can make educated decisions about your health. Because of this, we’ve made all coverage related to COVID-19 free. Help us continue this important work by subscribing to the Star.

As the spread of coronavirus continues, here are the latest updates from Southern Arizona.

Friday, June 5

7:00 a.m.: Even as the number of people being hospitalized with the coronavirus in Arizona is rising and the state being expected today to surpass 1,000 confirmed deaths from COVID-19, Gov. Doug Ducey says his decision to end the statewide stay-home order early last month was the right thing to do. Ducey says the increase in COVID-19 infections in Arizona was expected because more people are being tested. However, Cara Christ, the state health director, conceded Thursday she could not say how much of the ongoing increse in COVID-19 cases across Arizona is due to more testing and how much is due to 'community spread' — people infecting one another as they interact more. "The virus is not going away," Ducey said in a news conference Thursday afternoon. "We mourn every death in the state of Arizona."

Confirmed coronavirus cases in the state has reached 22,753, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Thursday in its daily tally. The state said 996 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,669 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 202 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 350,902 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.8% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says.

Rincon Market, the popular long-time grocer in Tucson's Sam Hughes neighborhood east of the University of Arizona campus, has been shut down over unpaid rent. The landlord posted a 'lock out' notice on the front door of the market at 2513 E. Sixth St. It says the market operators had failed to pay rent and did not respond to written demands for payment. Rincon Market, a Tucson landmark since it opened in the neighborhood 1926, announced on its Facebook page in April that it was taking a pause amid Arizona's stay-home order. A note on the door said it had planned to reopen in May.

Gov. Ducey's current curfew order has made life harder on some businesses in Tucson already fighting to recover from closures and restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic, writes Tim Steller, the Star's metro columnist. The week-long statewide curfew was instituted Sunday as a response to protests against police brutality in Tucson, Phoenix and other parts of the state. It was looting and heavy damage to a Scottsdale mall that, however, that is believed to have gotten the governor's attention. Arizona's curfew rules are supposed to keep life normal for businesses. The rules for the Arizona curfew specifically exempts private businesses from the 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew, along with people going to a private business, or those specifically going to get food. It didn't work. Many businesses are closing early anyway.

17 people have tested positive for the coronavirus at the department that handles the Tucson's 911 emergency calls. The ability to handle emergency calls is not expected to be affected.

Thursday, June 4

6:45 a.m.: Nearly 1.9 million people applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week, the ninth straight decline since applications spiked in mid-March at the start of shutdowns and restrictions across the country related to the coronavirus pandemic. The new data on unemployment filing could be a sign the gradual reopening of businesses has slowed the loss of jobs, the Associated Press reported Thursday morning. Passengers, employees and visitors to Tucson International Airport will be required to wear masks starting Saturday. Casino del Sol opened its doors Wednesday and Desert Diamond Casinos showed what it's doing in terms of cleaning and operating procedures as it too prepares to re-open after weeks of a shutdown prompted by the coronavirus pandemic. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 22,200, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Wednesday in its daily tally. The state said 981 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,627 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 196 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 345,044 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.8% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Go to This Is Tucson to search our updated summer camp guide.

Join the Star Opinion Reader Chat today to talk about topics that include protests over police brutality and killings of African American people, institutional racism, unemployment and the ever-present concerns about COVID-19 ramping up from the public gatherings. The chat begins at 2 p.m. Email Opinion editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for the invitation and meeting link.

Wednesday, June 3

3:00 p.m.: Tucson International Airport has joined many other airports by requiring passengers and other airport visitors to wear face coverings starting Saturday, June 6.

6:45 a.m.: The number of Arizonans hospitalized with positive or suspected cases of COVID-19 shot past 1,000 on Monday. The spike prompted the state's former health chief to questions whether Gov. Doug Ducey should have ended the state's stay-at-home order. There's been a steady upward trend since the Department of Health Services began tracking the numbers in early April. It also follows the setting of another record last week, with 635 positive cases reported from tests conducted on May 26. Amid concerns about the coronavirus outbreak, TUSD has canceled plans for an in-person graduation event later this month. The district said the Pima County Health Department could not support an in-person graduation at the end of June despite the precautions the district was planning. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 21,250, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Tuesday in its daily tally. The state said 941 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,496 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 191 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 336,589 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.7% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

COVID-19 hospitalizations in Arizona topped 1,000 Monday, bringing Ducey's order to end his stay-home order into question.

• Citing concerns about the spread of the coronavirus, TUSD cancels plans for an in-person graduation.

• Tucson-based Truly Nolen jumped into the fight vs. COVID-19, writes Ken Cook, in todays's Building Tucson Businesses column.

•  Join the Star Opinion Reader Chat to talk about topics that include protests over police brutality and killings of African American people, institutional racism, unemployment and the ever-present concerns about COVID-19 ramping up from the public gatherings. The chat begins at 2 p.m. Thursday. Email Opinion editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for the invitation and meeting link.

Search more than 100 Tucson-area summer camps with help from #ThisIsTucson.

These restaurants across Tucson are open for dine-in, pick-up or delivery.

Tuesday, June 2

7:00 a.m.: While acknowledging that it's virtually impossible to guarantee a risk-free environment, Arizona's top education official on Monday issued guidelines schools districts can use as they prepare to reopen. The 41-page 'road map' released Monday by Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman provides a series of options for local school districts to consider as they figure out the best course of action going forward for Arizona's 1 million schoolchildren and more than 2,000 school buildings. Pima County is moving forward with a plan to improve its contact tracing efforts to fight the spread if the coronavirus. It will add 127 full-time employees to assist in COVID-19 investigations. The cost of the expanded contact tracing effort is expected to be reimbursed through federal emergency funding, officials say. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona is 20,123, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Monday in its daily tally. The state said 917 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County 2,382 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 185 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. No new deaths were reported in Pima County today. There have been 321,926 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.6% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Arizona issues guidelines for school districts on reopening classrooms during virus pandemic.

• Pima County prepares to bolster COVID-19 contact tracing.

• Struggling during the pandemic, downtown restaurants now cope with vandalism from protests.

I, too, love America, but when will police brutality end?, writes Bobby Burns, an author and former educator who lives in Tucson.

Monday, June 1

6:45 a.m.: Gov. Doug Ducey on Sunday afternoon issued an unexpected statewide emergency order that mandated an 8 p.m. curfew. The week-long order, Ducey said on Twitter, is needed due to the "lawlessness" shown at police protests that started Friday night in cities like Tucson and Phoenix. There are several exceptions and loopholes. In Tucson, the curfew order will be used to target criminal behavior in areas where sometimes violent protests occurred over the weekend around downtown, along North Fourth Avenue and near the University of Arizona campus, Mayor Regina Romero said Sunday. The mayor said neither she nor Police Chief Chris Magnus were given advance notice of the curfew order by Ducey's office, which had said earlier Sunday that the order was made after consulting with local leaders across the state. Looting at a mall in Scottsdale Saturday seems to have been the incident that grabbed Ducey's attention. Later today, the state schools superintendent is expected to issue guidelines Arizona schools can follow to reopen. The guidelines will come about a week after Ducey said classrooms in the state will resume foe the fall semester. Tucson Unified School District is considering flexible learning options and new safety precautions amid concerns about returning to schools during the pandemic. A new poll shows that only a slight majority of Arizonans are ready to send their kids back to school. Just 52% of those questioned said they would allow children to go back to school, even though the governor allowed his stay-home order to expire earlier this month. In fact, the findings by HighGround, a political consulting firm, found that 29.5% said they would definitely permit kids to go to school, with the balance of that 52% in the 'probably yes' category. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 19,936, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Sunday in its daily tally. The state said 906 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,368 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 185 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 318,573 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.6% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Monday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Gov. Doug Ducey issues curfew order for all of Arizona after protests in Tucson, Phoenix. Here's the order.

TUSD forms reopening plan as parents seek choices for returning kids to school.

• A slight majority of Arizonans say they're willing to send kids back to school, a new survey shows.

• 8 people were arrested on second night of police protests in Tucson.

• The Arizona Daily Star Sportsmen's Fund, which raises money so children from low-income households and military families can attend overnight camps for free, makes adjustments due to the virus pandemic.

Testing, tracing and isolation will help Arizona defeat the coronavirus, writes Dr. Quinn Snyder, an emergency physician and public health advocate in Mesa, in a guest opinion signed by more than 100 Arizona doctors.

The Star's online chats showcase Tucson's humanity, writes Kathy Scott, the grants director for the Nogales Unified School District.

Sunday, May 31

6:45 a.m.: Evictions hearings in Tucson are set to resume Monday. With nearly 600 hearings scheduled over the next few weeks, it marks the end to a reprieve for most renters brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. People facing eviction due to COVID-19 hardships, which include financial and health-related issues, can ask the judge for a temporary reprieve based on Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey's March 24 executive order. But advocates say more needs to be done by the state to avoid a wave of debt to new debt and a spike in homelessness. Poverty — along with age and pre-existing medical conditions — is a leading risk factor for people to be affected the most by the coronavirus outbreak, a new report by the Pima County Health Department confirms. "Our health department fully recognizes the uneven medical and social vulnerability of segments of our community and is pledged to continue to address these unique needs," County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry said in a preface to the report, which was sent to the county Board of Supervisors. The report shows that 80% of deaths in Pima County related to COVID-19 were were people 65 years old or older. And those who died largely had one or more preexisting conditions such as diabetes, heart conditions, kidney disease or lung disease. A week ago, it appeared that new cases of COVID-19 in Arizona may have peaked. But an unexpected reporting lag backfilled enough new cases this week that it turns out there was no dip between May 10 and May 17 and any previous week's total. 'So what looked to be like a peak is no longer a peak, and the case counts continue to trend up,' said Dr. Joe Gerald, an associate professor with the University of Arizona's Zuckerman College of Public Health. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona is 19,255, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Saturday in its daily tally. The state said 903 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County 2,290 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 185 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 307,715 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.6% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Despite early indications, virus cases in Arizona are still rising.

Eviction hearings to resume in Tucson this week amid calls for more help for renters.

• Poverty, age and race all play roles in who gets hit hardest by the coronavirus.

• At Eloy immigration detention center, detainees must fight poor conditions along with the coronavirus.

• UA researchers express confidence that testing of sewage can predict outbreaks of COVID-19.

Judge rules against news agencies in releasing nursing home data.

• Tucson lab develops test to detect coronavirus on surfaces, in air.

Tucson dad seeks to bring joy with pandemic poems posted online daily.

• Southern Arizona Symphony Orchestra posts tribute to Tucson nurses.

Our buildings are closed, but the church is not, write 10 Tucson-area Protestant clergy members.

Saturday, May 30

6:45 a.m.: An outbreak of COVID-19 at a Tucson United Parcel Service distribution facility is more widespread than first thought, union leaders say. The number of employees who tested positive rose to 43 cases from 36 cases after additional testing last weekend, Teamster Local 104 said in a news release. The union has called for the facility to temporarily shut down to protect employees from exposure to the coronavirus. Pima County's nine major school districts will receive nearly $31 million in federal coronavirus relief funds, the Arizona Department of Education said Friday. The money is distributed to school districts based on their percentage of low-income children. Tucson's largest school district, TUSD, is receiving nearly $18.6 million. Tucson-area voters are being reminded that voting by mail is a safe option after President Trump said last week — without evidence — that mail-in voting leads to election fraud. Pima County Recorder F. Ann Rodriguez is providing information about joining the permanent early voting list to receive a ballot in the mail. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 18,465, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Friday in its daily tally. The state said 885 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,234 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 185 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 297,495 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.6% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments related to the coronavirus pandemic from Saturday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• More UPS employees test positive for coronavirus at Tucson facility.

• School districts in Pima County receive nearly $30M in federal COVID-19 relief funding.

• During virus pandemic, Pima recorder reiterates that vote-by-mail is safe.

Virus outbreak won't shut down 'world's oldest rodeo' in Prescott.

• UA says the football team will lead student-athletes' return to campus.

• The coronavirus pandemic further underlines America's issue with incarceration, writes Amanda Heffernan, a certified nurse midwife, Ph.D. student and parent.

Friday, May 29

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 18,465, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:30 a.m.: Arizona schools can reopen in August, summer day camps can open as early as next week and youth sports can restart immediately, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey announced Thursday afternoon. Summer schools — and schools that operate on a year-round basis — can open in June if ready to follow new guidelines, Ducey said. The governor's announcement comes as Arizona is still in what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls Phase 1. That is the earliest stage of reopening both the economy and public activity, which requires social distancing and limiting gatherings to no more than 10 people. Some details of how this all will work will come next week, Ducey said. Meanwhile, as stores reopen throughout Arizona following coronavirus restrictions, Macy's at Park Place mall is closing for good. A liquidation sale is underway. Macy's had said earlier this year that it would close about 125 stores across the country after years of struggling with slowing in-store sales. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 17,763, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Thursday in its daily tally. The state said 857 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,167 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 186 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 287,605 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.5% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Friday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

Thursday, May 28

6:30 a.m.: Gov. Doug Ducey on Wednesday allocated $441 million in federal funding to help Arizona cities and counties deal with budget issues stemming from the coronavirus outbreak. That's about a quarter of the more than $1.9 billion in federal coronavirus relief funding Ducey can spend at his discretion. Ducey said he's holding on to most of the money for future needs, including the possibility of having to replenish Arizona's unemployment insurance trust fund. Earlier this week the state reported that more than 600,000 unemployment claims have been filed in Arizona during coronavirus pandemic. Meanwhile, the Associated Press on Thursday reported that an estimated 2.1 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week despite the gradual reopening of businesses around the country. That brings the nation's running unemployment total since the coronavirus shutdowns took hold in mid-March to about 41 million. At a news conference later today, Ducey is expected to give an update on the state's efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus. He provided no details Wednesday, but told reporters that the news will be "good." Confirmed coronavirus cases in the state reached 17,262, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Wednesday in its daily tally. The state said 831 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,119 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 175 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 279,550 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 5.5% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

•  Ducey releases $441 million of US coronavirus relief money to small towns and cities.

•  Online coronavirus-traccking app likely to play role in reopening the UA campus in August.

•  Ex-Arizona Opera conductor Joel Revzen dies of COVID-19 complications.

•  Live music returns to St. Philip's Plaza after coronavirus outbreak ban.

•  The UA campus is a good place to take a walk among whimsical, abstract art.

•  Pima College thriving at recruiting athletes despite the coronavirus outbreak.

Wednesday, May 27

6:30 a.m.: University of Arizona researcher Jun Wang recently identified four compounds that can block the replication of the coronavirus within a cell, a promising starting point for the development of drugs that can treat the disease. Wang, an assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology at the UA, has spent much of his career studying respiratory viruses, including influenza A and B, and has directed his research toward developing antivirals that reduce the ability of a virus to spread. Meanwhile the UA is continuing with its student-housing applications for the fall semester despite the lack of a final decision about the rules regarding living arrangements. Whatever the final housing rules are, UA officials expect it will be more expensive. State lawmakers on Tuesday ended the legislative session without resolving whether businesses should get special protection from COVID-19 lawsuits. The surprise move came as three Republicans joined with all 13 Democrats to halt all further business and go home. Democrats had objected to lawmakers dealing with routine business while pandemic-related issues were left unresolved, including the question of aid to what may now be 600,000 Arizonans who have lost their jobs. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona neared 16,800 on Tuesday, according to new state figures. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 16,783, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Tuesday in its daily tally. The state said 807 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,075 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 173 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Wednesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• UA researcher Jun Wang finds compounds that can halt coronavirus.

Plan for on-campus housing at UA begins taking shape for next semester.

• Arizona Senate ends session without dealing with coronavirus liability issue.

• 2 immigrants released from Eloy detention center test positive for COVID-19.

Dine-in business makes slow return to Arizona restaurants.  

• Tucson students invited to talk virus' impact at virtual forum.

• The number of Arizonans filing for unemployment benefits tops 600,000.

• Industrial property occupancy in Tucson continues to remain robust.

• The Pac-12 will allow 'voluntary in-person athletic workouts' beginning June 15.

Join an online discussion with the Star's Opinion team at 2 p.m. Thursday. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation to join the talk on Zoom. John D'Orlando, the Star's president and publisher, is this week's guest.

Tuesday, May 26

6:15 a.m.: Nearly 25,000 more Arizonans filed first-time claims for unemployment benefits last week, bringing the total since the COVID-19 outbreak to 601,518, new state figures Monday showed. The total unemployment filings amount to about 17 percent of Arizona's workforce and might not reflect all of the people in the state who are out of work. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 16,561 cases on Monday, the Arizona Department of Health Services said in its daily tally. The state said 806 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 2,046 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 173 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Tucson Electric Power says residential use soared by 7 percent from mid-March to mid-April, the first month of the coronavirus pandemic. However, commercial and industrial use more than offset that by dropping 10 percent compared with the same period in 2019, TEP says. Tucson casinos are planning to reopen next week, more than two months after closing due to the coronavirus. Visitors should expect changes to help fight the spread of COVID-19. Here are the latest developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Another 25,000 Arizonans filed first-time unemployment claims last week.

Tucson's electricity usage fell 4% during first month of the virus shutdown.

• Tucson's Tumamoc Hill reopened on Monday morning following a two-month closure.

• Tucson casinos are set to reopen next week.

• A fundraiser to help workers who rely on tips raised $4,200.

• Tucson fundraiser to promote mental health awareness.

• Interfaith Community Services program can help pay utilities.

Bayer donates face shields to the Pima County Health Department.

Join an online discussion with the Star's Opinion team at 2 p.m. Thursday. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation to join the talk on Zoom. John D'Orlando, the Star's president and publisher, is this week's guest.

Monday, May 25

6:30 a.m.: A labor union is calling on United Parcel Service to temporarily close its distribution facility on Tucson's south side because of an outbreak of coronavirus. Teamster Local Union 104, believes at least 36 employees have tested positive for COVID-19, three of which were admitted to intensive care facilities, the organization said in a news release. “UPS workers at the facility are also concerned that the outbreak has transformed the distribution facility into a hub for spreading the virus through Arizona,” the union said.

On Sunday, the state health department reported 16,300 confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona and 2,027 confirmed cases in Pima County.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Monday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Preparing for a long hot summer at home with the kids? These tips and Tucson resources can help you all get through it.

• A campaign to raise money for Tucson workers who rely on tips has raised thousands.

Our coronavirus resource guide is packed with resources to help you get through this crisis whether you've lost your job, need a mask or just want an arts fix.

To mask or not to mask? That is the question Fitz asks in his daily cartoon.

• The Arizona Daily Star is profiling Southern Arizona high school athletes whose seasons were cut short by the coronavirus pandemic. Today: Sunnyside baseball player Gerardo Grijalva.

Sunday, May 24

6:30 a.m.:  New coronavirus cases in Arizona "could maybe possibly" have peaked, data suggests. The number of weekly coronavirus cases decreased from one week to the next for the first time in mid-May, But increases in diagnostic testing slowed that same week, so it's too early to say if that led to fewer diagnoses or if infections actually are going down, experts say. For Pima County, the numbers indicate much more clearly that new cases peaked around mid-April. These numbers are part of a new weekly series of charts the Star is producing that track weekly coronavirus spread statewide and locally.

On Saturday, the state health department reported 16,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona and 2,000 confirmed cases in Pima County. Here is a graphic showing cases in the state mapped by county.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Southern Arizonans are not ready ready to venture out of their homes just yet, a new poll from the Arizona Daily Star and NuPOINT Opinion Research shows. And when they do head out, they will wear masks, the poll shows.

• The University of Arizona's choice of a conservative public relations firm to boost the president's visibility during the pandemic has ruffled feathers among some faculty.

Tucson restaurants cook up creative solutions to raise revenue to make up revenue declines related to COVID-19.

• Statewide COVID-19 testing blitz continues in Tucson today.

• The fate of the Arizona Wildcats football season remains unclear, but here's what you need to know if you're a season ticket holder.

• There are some positives from the shutdown, from its impact on the environment to its reminder of what really matters. Let's focus on the good stuff, Star Columnist Tim Steller says.

Arizona childcare centers are facing financial collapse, as less than one third remain open.

• The Arizona Daily Star is profiling Southern Arizona high school athletes whose seasons were cut short by the coronavirus pandemic. Today: Pueblo volleyball phenom Cameron Fimbres.

Tucson churches are in no rush to open, and when they do they're planning a long list of measures aimed at keeping parishioners safe. Nationwide, weekly worship services may be forever changed. To compare us to other cities, see this database of more than 70 communities served by Lee Enterprises, which owns the Arizona Daily Star in a joint agreement with Gannett.

• An Arizona program helps businesses avoid layoffs.

• Tucson theaters look to a future with smaller, "boutique audiences" and a hope that audiences wil return.

Saturday, May 23

7:30 p.m.: COVID-19 fees on restaurant bills aren’t a thing yet in Tucson, but they might become one as sit-down dining establishments search for ways to survive the pandemic. Arizona Attorney General's Office said COVID-19 surcharges need to be disclosed up front to customers.

6 p.m.: Arizona child care centers fight financial collapse. Less than one third of the state's preschools and centers are open, due in part to little demand from parents during the pandemic

4 p.m.: New coronavirus cases in Arizona may have peaked, data suggest. For the first time in Arizona, the number of weekly coronavirus cases decreased from one week to the next.

2 p.m.: A conservative PR firm landed University of Arizona president Robert Robbins on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC to help spread the message about the school's effort to re-open for classes in the fall. The agreement has irked some UA faculty members.

12 p.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 16,039, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Saturday in its daily tally.

6:30 a.m.: Tucson's theater scene faces an "existential crisis" because of COVID-19 that many many not survive. Tucson arts presenters and independent venues have been having hard conversations about how and when to reopen their doors and put artists on their stages. But with the need for capacity restrictions and the dire state of touring, some see an unsustainable situation. 'Everyone was talking about the restaurants, but the live event industry is taking it on the chin big time,' said Tucson Convention Center General Manager Glenn Grabski.

On Friday, the state health department reported 15,608 confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona and 1,974 confirmed cases in Pima County. Here is a graphic showing cases in the state mapped by county.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Saturday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

Fitz imagines his commencement address to the Tortilita Titans and their marching-in-place band. "The future is in your hands, class of 2020. With that in mind I want to remind you to be sure to wash your hands after handling the future. Also, scrub the future thoroughly with disinfectant. Set the future aside for at least three days before handling it again. Class of 2020, avoid mosh pits until 2025. Don’t drink bleach. Wear sunscreen. Wear sanitizer over your sunscreen. Titans, follow your passion. At a distance of 6 feet."

• Star editorial writer Edward Celaya takes on dating, in a time of coronavirus.

• Statewide COVID-19 testing blitz continues in Tucson today.

• The Pima County Board of Supervisors voted to amend a set of controversial regulations for businesses through the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic.

•  The fate of a bill that would protect Arizona businesses from liability should a customer get COVID-19 at their location is uncertain today.

• Tucson International Airport is recommending, but not mandating, that visitors wear masks.

• The Arizona Daily Star is profiling Southern Arizona high school athletes whose seasons were cut short by the coronavirus pandemic. Today: Cienega softball standout Blaise Biringer.

• The Pima County Board of Supervisors amends regulations for a wide swath of businesses reopening during the pandemic.

Friday, May 22

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 15,608, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:30 a.m.: The number of those tested locally during last weekend’s statewide testing blitz doubled from the week prior, as nearly 1,500 people received coronavirus diagnostic tests at 14 sites around Pima County last Saturday. The county said last week that it could provide more than 3,000 tests at its locations. Eligibility to participate differs at each site, but health officials said anybody who thinks they’ve been exposed, either by showing symptoms or by being in proximity to someone with the virus, can receive a test. Here is a list of the locations participating, as of Thursday afternoon. Meanwhile, Arizona’s jobless rate spiked to a potentially record high of 12.6% last month.

On Thursday, the state health department reported 15,315 confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona and 1,944 confirmed cases in Pima County.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• COVID-19 testing blitz continues in Tucson over the next two Saturdays.

• Arizona's jobless rate reached 12.6% as Republican legislators quashed efforts by Democrats to increase unemployment benefits.

• Tucson City Manager Michael Ortega apologized to city employees after he was caught on a “hot mic” disparaging concerns about paying for parking spots they’re not using while a large chunk of them are working from home. Read more in today's Political Notebook.

• The Pima County Board of Supervisors voted to amend a set of controversial regulations for businesses through the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic.

• Small businesses in Tucson can still get direct no-interest loans through a city of Tucson program, but time is running out as the application deadline is looming.

• State representatives voted along party lines to put new hurdles in the paths of people suing businesses, churches and schools over COVID-19 claims

• The Arizona Daily Star is profiling Southern Arizona high school athletes whose seasons were cut short by the coronavirus pandemic. Today: Palo Verde track and field Star Angel Addleman.

• Last Friday was a very good day for Adia Barnes. Her older sister, Candace Barnes, was healthy — again — after being diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease brought on by the coronavirus. The Shreveport, Louisiana, native tested positive for the virus a month earlier.

• "Above all else, we have the same traditions and the same campus to miss," writes local contributor and UA student Fiona Harrigan in an opinion column. "There’s a certain kind of comfort in collective grief."

• What's needed in a time like this is clear leadership — the kind displayed by young people the world over, writes local contributor Sofia Ramos in an opinion column.

Thursday, May 21

12:00 p.m.: Arizona's jobless rate reaches 12.6% as Republican legislators quashed efforts by Democrats to increase unemployment benefits.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 15,315, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:30 a.m.: Gov. Doug Ducey said he will not rescind his order that prevents Arizonans from using a drug in the experimental way President Trump is during the COVID-19 pandemic. The issue arose as the president said Monday he had started taking hydroxychloroquine. And the White House on Wednesday confirmed that Trump’s personal physician prescribed it to him as a preventive measure. That prescription could not be filled here in Arizona.

As of Wednesday, there have been 14,897 confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona and 1,903 confirmed cases in Pima County.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Gov. Doug Ducey said Wednesday he won't rescind his order that prevents Arizonans from using a drug in the experimental way President Trump is during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

• With coronavirus a continued threat, plans are being made for how on-campus housing and learning will look at the University of Arizona in August. 

• Some developed recreation sites in the Coronado National Forest will reopen today and be open for the Memorial Day weekend.

• House Republicans thwarted a bid by Democrats on Tuesday to shut down regular legislative business and focus only on issues related to COVID-19.

• The Star is profiling Southern Arizona high school athletes whose seasons were cut short by the coronavirus pandemic. Today: Amphi volleyball star Bryan Cruz.

• Delayed, modified, canceled: Here's the latest on Tucson’s Little Leagues amid the coronavirus pandemic.

 Tucson is home to a number of podcasters, so if you've run out of things to binge-watch while isolating from the coronavirus, tune in and give one a try. 

• Months of coronavirus quarantining calls for comic relief, but taking standup and improv shows virtual has proven to be challenging for Tucson comedians.

• Ryan Alfred and Gabriel Sullivan were supposed to introduce their musical collaboration Gnosis in early April. But then the pandemic happened and live concerts were shelved amid stay-at-home orders.

• When UA Presents called off the second half of its 2019-20 season in March, the folks at the University of Arizona arts presenting arm were at a loss of what to do next.

• "Traffic is down significantly. I’ve been sleeping with windows open since interstate noise is noticeably diminished," writes local contributor Kylie Walzak in an opinion column. "But reckless driving is up, especially on our wide arterial streets."

• We wanted to hear from high school seniors, in their own voices, about what it's like summing up a high school career and trying to prepare for whatever is next when everything has been turned on its head by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Wednesday, May 20

6:30 a.m.: Tucson is set to initiate discussions with other regional partners to see how it could leverage its CARES Act money to expand the region’s testing capacity, starting with city employees before eventually opening that up to the public. The City Council unanimously approved a motion during Tuesday’s council meeting to instruct City Manager Michael Ortega to meet with county officials, health-care providers, the University of Arizona and others to discuss a plan to test 1,000 people per day over a two-month period.

As of Tuesday, the number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 14,566, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services. Across Pima County, 1,888 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Wednesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

A city plan would test about 1,000 people a day for two months, starting with city employees, before expanding to public.

• Desert Diamond Casinos said on its website Monday, May 18, that it intends to stay closed through the end of the month, minimally. Meanwhile, Casino del Sol pushed back a May 21 opening announced last week to May 28.

• Tucson is full of people who, thinking back, speculate they might have had COVID-19 around the gem show. It's unlikely, writes the Star's metro columnist Tim Steller.

Here's a photo gallery of what it looked like when Park Place and Tucson malls reopened yesterday.

• The VA hospital in Tucson is gradually reopening its campus for nonurgent, in-person appointments and elective procedures since the coronavirus pandemic, officials announced Tuesday.

• The Pima County Board of Supervisors postponed a vote to amend a set of temporary health code regulations that have sparked controversy throughout the county and state. A decision will be made at an emergency meeting Thursday. 

• Tucson’s largest school district is forging ahead with plans for in-person graduation ceremonies this summer, but in the time of COVID-19, they will be anything but normal.

• Tucson Speedway will reopen Saturday as part of an Armed Forces Weekend Memorial Day Doubleheader.

• The Arizona Daily Star is profiling Southern Arizona high school athletes whose seasons were cut short by the coronavirus pandemic. Today: Sabino softball star Sydney Grey.

• Local contributor and former school principal Kathleen Bethel has a few tips for parents. "Reinforce the positive to reduce the negative. This is a teachers’ trick. Catch your kids doing something 'right' and thank them sincerely," she says.

Tuesday, May 19

6:30 a.m.: With some Arizona businesses fearful that reopening could expose them to lawsuits should a customer contract COVID-19, Republican lawmakers want to make it harder for customers to sue a business where they believe they were infected or a company that made a device that did not provide promised protection from the virus.

Customers would still be able to sue should the measure pass, but to prevail  they would have to prove gross negligence on the part of the business, which  means not only that the business didn't act to prevent the spread of the disease, but it did so with reckless disregard of the consequences.

As of Monday, the state health department reported 14,100 confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona and 1,815 cases in Pima County, up 11 from Sunday.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Bookmark this new guide to what Tucson grocery stores and restaurants are doing to protect customers during the coronavirus pandemic. It lists which stores offer senior hours, delivery and curbside pickup.

• As downtown Tucson's Fox Theatre waits out the pandemic, it prepares for a new normal with help from a benefactor.

One of Tucson's most famed Mexican restaurants was forced to close temporarily after an employee tested positive for COVID-19.

• Here's a look at yesterday's coronavirus cases, mapped by county.

•  A food pantry for students at the University of Arizona remains open even though campus is closed.

• A proposed state law would protect Arizonans who defy the governor's orders from being jailed.

Monday, May 18

6:30 a.m.: As Arizona’s stay-home order is lifted, long-term-care facilities are being told to prepare for what could be a surge of new COVID-19 cases. The Pima County Health Department is encouraging long-term-care facilities and other congregate settings to continue being aggressive in their actions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. As of last week, 84 long-term-care residents and one staff member have died from COVID-19, representing nearly 60% of the county’s total virus deaths.

As of Sunday, the state health department reported 13,937 confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona and 1,814 cases in Pima County.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Monday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Health experts say that facilities for seniors should keep their guard up for coronavirus as public life resumes.

• As thrift stores are beginning to open again, here are some places you can donate unwanted items to.

• Here's a look at yesterday's coronavirus cases, mapped by county.

• The Star is profiling Southern Arizona high school athletes whose seasons were cut short by the pandemic. Today: Ironwood Ridge softball star Shelby Thompson.

• One Tucson sixth grader is letting us into his quarantine world, including some ideas he thinks could make school a more well-rounded experience.

• Tucson City Councilman Richard Fimbres is advocating for a national, vote-by-mail system. "We cannot risk our citizens to the old practice of going to the polling places," he said.

Sunday, May 17

6:30 a.m.: Star Metro Columnist Tim Steller has an important message for us today: Wearing a mask isn't about you, it's about protecting everyone around you. That's especially true because testing is still low here despite the state's blitz the past two weekends. About 1,300 Pima County residents took part in the state's testing blitz through its first two weeks. The small numbers here were caused by a number of factors, including continued difficulties securing test kits, a lack of equity of test site locations, and remaining limitations of who can get tested, according to local officials, who said at least some of those issues are being addressed from week to week.

As of Saturday the state reported 13,631, with 679 deaths due to COVID-19. Pima County cases are at 1,781, an increase of 31 over Thursday.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

Don't worry about what that mask looks like, columnist Tim Steller advises. Put it on and feel good that you're doing your part to keep people around you safe.

• Fears of heading out of the house mean many Tucson kids are missing their well-child checks and vaccinations, a trend that has peditricians worried.

• A University of Arizona student shares the tragic grief of screaming, "I love you!" through the nursing home window as her beloved grandma laying dying.

• Tucson Mayor Regina Romero extended an emergency declaration keeping parks and city buildings closed at least through midnight on June 8.

Tucson families rely on summer day camps to keep their kids safe and entertained while parents work, but this year they have been thrown into turmoil by the coronavirus, with some cancelling, some going virtual and some still undecided what to do.

Coronavirus has given a boost to golf, which for sports enthusiasts has been the only game in town.

• Sports Columnist Greg Hansen poses eight questions that will determine whether fans return to Arizona Stadium this year.

Grandparents as teachers: just another way Tucsonans are getting through this together.

• Some Tucson business are reinventing and innovating to keep customers safe.

• Doing some coronavirus cleaning? Here's how to get rid of the clutter.

• Check out the coronavirus cases in Arizona, mapped by county for May 16.

Saturday, May 16

3:30 p.m.: Tucson Mayor Regina Romero has extended her emergency declaration related to the coronavirus at least until June 8.

p.m.: Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona topped 13,600 on Saturday, according to new state figures.

Check out the coronavirus cases in Arizona, mapped by county for May 16.

6:15 a.m.: Today is graduation day at the University of Arizona - and for the first time, all the festivities will be digital, not live. No word yet on whether tortillas will still be tossed like graduation caps, but we'll be watching. Also, Pima County will reconsider its temporary health codes aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19 after pushback from lawmakers. On Wednesday, the board voted 3-2 to adopt regulations for restaurants, pools, gyms and other facilities that includes occupancy limitations, protective-equipment requirements, social-distancing protocols, daily temperature checks and the public display of signage and cleaning logs. The move followed Gov. Doug Ducey’s announcement that Arizona’s stay-home order was going to be allowed to expire, and some lawmakers say it flies in the face of Ducey’s executive order forbiding counties, cities and towns from making rules and regulations inconsistent with those issued by the governor.

As of Friday the state reported 13,169, with 651 deaths due to COVID-19. Pima County cases are at 1,750, an increase over 54 over Thursday.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Saturday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

It's graduation day at the University of Arizona - and for the first time, all the festivities will be digital, not live.

Tucson restaurants are pivoting from buffets to keep patrons safe during coronavirus pandemic. On a related note, reporter Cathalena Burch discusses covering the local restaurant scene on The Point Being, a podcast by the Star's opinion writing team. You can listen in here.

• Critics say temporary county health regulations contradict Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey's executive order forbiding municipalities from making rules inconsistent with those of the governor.

• Ducey to Arizona businesses: "You have a patriotic duty to open up safely."

• The University of Arizona is opening new antibody testing sites.

Perfect forecasting isn't possible, a UA professor says, but models and experts are the best way forward.

• A parent group in Vail is giving seniors a graduation ceremony they will never forget.

• Find out what Tucsonans are talking about in our weekly roundup of letters to the editor.

• Border Patrol agents must wear masks during the coronavirus pandemic.

• Tucson's Roman Catholic churches can begin opening at the end of the month, but with safety protocols in place.

Friday, May 15

6:30 a.m.: As retail sales in the United States tumbled by a record 16.4% from March to April during the coronavirus pandemic, Gov. Doug Ducey told Arizona business owners that their ability to remain open — and the future of the state's economy — will depend on how well they follow the voluntary protocols designed to prevent a COVID-19 spike. 'I think you have a patriotic duty to open up safely and successfully," Ducey said in a conference call Thursday. "I know what you're doing is what's going to bring our economy back." And he went on to say that "positive peer pressure" is needed to avoid spreading the disease among customers. Meanwhile, theater operators in Arizona say they're not likely to reopen until summer, when studios have new content to show on their screens. On Thursday, the Arizona Department of Health Services released guidelines for how theaters should operate, covering everything from seating to butter dispensers for popcorn. Arizona Wildcats Athletic Director Dave Heeke on Thursday said he expects the 2020 college football season will happen in some fashion. A team is "evaluating and planning for the safe and healthy return of students, staff and visitors to our campus" he said. Ultimately, however, the decision on if and how football returns will be made by the NCAA, Pac-12 Conference,  government agencies and health and science experts, he said. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona were at 12,674, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Thursday morning in its daily tally. The state said 624 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 1,696 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 152 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department.

There have been 175,455 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 6.3% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Friday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

'You have a patriotic duty to open up safely,' Arizona Gov. Ducey tells business owners.

• Most Arizona theaters not ready to reopen until summer begins.

• A military flyover honored Tucson's healthcare workers.

• UA students' coronavirus awareness campaign in Spanish obtains funding

• UA Athletic Director Dave Heeke 'realistic and optimistic' that Wildcats will play football this season.

• Tucson Dragway's Hot Wheels racing is a social media hit.

• "I empathize with the high school and college graduates who are also missing out on a monumental rite of passage during this pandemic," Kristen Hoggatt-Abader, a lecturer in the UA Writing Program, writes to the Class of 2020.

• This is what the pandemic has taught us about K-12 schooling in Arizona, writes Judi Moreillon, a former teacher in both K-12 and the university level.

Thursday, May 14

10:00 a.m.: A community aircraft flyover will happen in Southern Arizona today to honor Pima County's first responders and health-care providers. 

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 12,674, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:45 a.m.: Some fitness centers across Tucson jumped at the chance to reopen after Gov. Doug Ducey on Tuesday eased statewide restrictions related to the cornovirus outbreak that allowed them to operate with some modifications. A few gyms opened early Wednesday morning while others set a timetable to do so later this month. On Wednesday, after many gyms and restaurants had already reopened, a set of temporary health-code regulations for them and other facilities was approved by the Pima County Board of Supervisors. The county says its measures are intended to help protect employees and customers from COVID-19. Also on Wednesday, Casino del Sol announced it expects to reopen at 8 a.m. May 21. Visitors will see several new safety measures. Those include fewer slot machines, disposing of playing cards at the end of each day and having the HVAC system replace the casino's air with outside air every 45 minutes. Confirmed coronavirus cases in the state has reached 12,176, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Wednesday morning in its daily tally. The state said 594 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 1,661 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 144 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. There have been 165,810 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with 6.4% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Some Tucson gyms jumped at chance to reopen under new virus rules.

• New county guidelines target virus spread at reopened gyms and restaurants.

Casino del Sol set to reopen next week with new safety modifications.

Tumamoc Hill reopens May 25, but visitors are asked to follow new guidelines.

Tucson's libraries re-open Monday. Patrons must wear masks, have temperature checks.

• Tucson venues plan tentative new dates for big shows.

• Avoid big crowds at these low-profile hiking trails.

• During the virus pandemic, virtual coaching has replaced in-person teaching and hands-on training across the PAC-12.

Journalism is not dead, and it's crucial during times like these, writes Mort Rosenblum, a reporter and author who divides his time between Arizona and France and runs www.mortreport.org.

Join an online discussion with the Star's Opinion team at 2 p.m. today about Arizona's effort to reopen the state's economy. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation to join the talk on Zoom.

Wednesday, May 13

6:45 a.m.: Pools, spas, gyms and fitness centers — those that are public or in hotels and apartment complexes — can reopen as early as today, Gov. Ducey announced Tuesday afternoon in a news conference. He also said the state's stay-home order will expire early Saturday. And Ducey put out the welcome mat for professional sports to resume in the state, but without fans for now. One key figure the governor is using to support his decisions is a decline in the percentage of tests for the virus coming back positive. At one point the rate was about 10 percent; the most recent figure was at 5 percent, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona was 11,736, the department said Tuesday morning in its daily tally. The state said 562 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County 1,623 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. The county Board of Supervisors today is expected to vote on new health guidelines that could affect how restaurants, pools and gyms operate during the coronavirus pandemic. Tim Steller, the Star's Metro columnist, says despite a push by County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry, employees should not be rushed back to their offices. Meanwhile, Tucson has been named among the top 10 big cities best positioned to thrive following the pandemic. A report from Moody's Analytics considers factors like population density and a community's share of jobs requiring a college or graduate degrees. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Wednesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Gov. Ducey dropped Arizona's stay-home order, allowing gyms and pools to reopen.

Tucson well positioned for fiscal revival after pandemic, a new reports says.

Pima County workers should not rush back to office, despite push by their boss, writes Tim Steller, the Star's Metro columnist.

• A campus-wide furlough plan at the UA is delayed until July.

• The coronavirus outbreak helps border arrests fall to three-year low.

1,400 meals going to TMC will be 'something special.'

Ending stay-at-home orders endangers Arizonans, writes Tucson City Councilman Steve Kozachik, a Democrat, who represents midtown Ward 6.

Count on local hospitals to help protect the community, write Jennifer Schomburg, CEO of Northwest Medical Center, and Erinn Oller, CAO at Oro Valley Hospital.

Join an online discussion with the Star's Opinion team at 2 p.m. Thursday about Arizona's effort to reopen the state's economy. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen @ sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation to join the talk on Zoom.

• Coronavirus puts Pac-12's new coaches further behind in recruiting.

Tuesday, May 12

11:00 a.m.: Bisbee Pride, Inc., the nonprofit behind the annual Bisbee Pride Parade and Festival that was scheduled for mid-June, has canceled its in-person events and is working with partners and sponsors to bring the event online.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 11,736, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:45 a.m.: Nearly two months after Gov. Doug Ducey's stay-home order forced restaurants across Arizona to convert to take-out service, eateries across Tucson reopened their doors Monday. Business was mostly light on the first day dine-in was available again, but owners said they were happy to be back at work. "Today was finally a breath of fresh air, to put on Dean Martin and say, 'All right, let's get back to it,''' said Michael Elefante, the chef at Mama Louisa's. Meanwhile, as many restaurants were preparing for their first day under relaxed state rules for operating, Pima County issued a list of 17 protective measures it says eateries should adopt during the pandemic. The county said the measures are intended to protect food service employees and customers as much as possible. Meanwhile, dozens of restaurants joined a campaign saying the number of known coronavirus cases in the state show it's too soon in the fight against the pandemic to reopen on-site dining. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 11,380, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Monday morning in its daily tally. The state said 542 people in Arizona are known to have died from COVID-19. In Pima County 1,602 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 134 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Tucson's restaurants have a slow start as doors reopen to customers.

• Pima County issues new guidelines to boost safety for restaurant patrons, employees.

• A campaign by some restauranteurs, "Too Soon Arizona," calls reopening premature.

Unemployment checks finally going out to Arizona independent, gig workers.

• Navajo lands, families ravaged as COVID-19 deaths keep mounting.

UA deploying resources to aid students with financial, other needs.

• UA Athletics Director Dave Heeke stands tall as virus 'inferno' rages across NCAA, write the Star's sports columnist Greg Hansen.

• Tucson diocese collecting food at various churches to help those in need.

• TIHAN continues to assist Tucsonans living with HIV/AIDS during the pandemic.

• Fed's Paycheck Protection Program isn't perfect but it's mostly working, writes Don Riegger, board member and treasurer of a Tucson-based nonprofit organization.

Join an online discussion with the Star's Opinion team at 2 p.m. Thursday about Arizona's effort to reopen the state's economy. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen @ sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation to join the talk on Zoom.

Monday, May 11

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 11,380, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:45 a.m.: Despite cutbacks in the number of vehicles on our roads due to the coronavirus shutdowns, Pima County's air exceeded the ozone standard from Saguaro National Park East up to the far northwest side last week. Tucson's setback Tuesday marked the first time air climbed above the federal standard regulating ozone levels in 2020. And some of the blame — among other factors — falls on our hotter-than-usual weather and smoggier air blowing down from the Phoenix area, a National Weather Service forecaster here said.

Yaqui and the Tohono O'odham leaders each took similar steps as most city, county and state governments in implementing activity restrictions to limit the coronavirus spread. But they also passed executive orders that included additional requirements, like curfews, to try to keep tribal members safe during the virus outbreak. The total number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 11,119, state Department of Health Services said Sunday in its daily tally. Here are news developments from Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Monday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Tucson air, with a likely assist from Phoenix, exceeded ozone standards last week.

• Yaqui and the Tohono O'odham leaders take extra steps to try to keep members healthy during the coronavirus outbreak.

A $5.5 million coronavirus grant to support local small businesses.

• A federal judge rejected a legal effort to halt Arizona's stay-home order.

• The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic also changed life in Tucson. Here's a more detailed story about life in the Old Pueblo during that outbreak a century ago.

• In a divided nation, it is no surprise that we are split on how to move forward in this pandemic, writes Peter Vernezze, a retired professor of philosophy and a Tucson resident.

• As Tucsonans living in poverty continue to be left behind as the community continues to rely on online access for daily living, it's time to push for digital equality, 18 nonprofit CEOs in Tucson write in a guest opinion today.

• Repeated testing, paid for by feds, is the only way to suppress the coronavirus pandemic, writes William Faris, a former math professor at the University of Arizona

Sunday, May 10

6:30 a.m.: On this Mother's Day, many Tucson moms who work in health care find themselves on the front lines fighting the coronavirus pandemic while worry about exposing their families to the disease. "It's emotionally draining to do all these things and do everything you can to help someone, but also at the same time, be a little bit fearful for yourself and your family," says Esther Kim, medical director of the ICU at Northwest Medical Center.

Lauren Brown and Rebekah Oosterbaan talk nearly every, day but they have never met in person. Most days the Tucson moms are busy discussing the production and distribution of fabric masks to health-care workers and others on the frontlines of the COVID-19 crisis. They talk about organizing the 75 volunteers they have recruited to make the effort happen and securing business sponsorships, which thus far include software maker Intuit, Goodwill Industries, fabric.com, Offray Ribbon, Bulldog Ink and Legacy Traditional School, where their children attend. In a few weeks, the pair has had more than 700 cloth masks made and distributed to places like Banner Health, Tucson Medical Center, El Rio Health and the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 10,960, the state Department of Health Services said Saturday morning in its daily tally. The state said 532 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County 1,554 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 133 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Many Tucson moms are on the front-line helping patients, and worrying about exposing their families to COVID-19.

• Tucson restaurant owners say reopening is tougher than flipping on 'open' sign.

Tucson churches weighing benefits, risks of reopening

• Meet Tucson educators going above and beyond to make sure students, families don't go without.

Sanitizing tunnels' await all travelers crossing into Nogales, Sonora from Arizona.

• Coronavirus to bring changes to Tucson work, retail spaces.

2 public firms in Tucson get federal loans to handle issues from pandemic.

• Tucson theater teachers take rehearsals online.

• Two Tucson moms who have never met team up to send masks to front line workers.

• Leslie Maier, who lost her 17-year-old son to meningococcal disease, writes about the importance of grieving together after a great loss.

• David Fitzsimmons, the Star's editorial cartoonist, shares detail about the Mother's Day shrine to his late mom that he fills with Polaroids, memories.  

• "It's important to remember that another group of workers are also working tirelessly to steer the nation back to normal: our government civil servants," writes Jim Kolbe, who represented southern Arizona in Congress from 1985 to 2007 as a Republican.

• Tucson writer Ryn Gargulinski pens an open apology to a grocery store clerk after her outburst over a lack of vegetables on the shelf.

• Renée Schafer Horton, a former journalist, writes about longing to get back to in-person church services.

These Tucsonans share their stories of kindness, community

• Read words that inspire, comfort in today's 'Keeping the Faith' series.

Saturday, May 9

7 p.m.: Opening restaurant dining rooms next week will take more than just flipping on the "Open" sign.

5 p.m.: Tucson churches, religious centers weigh benefits, risks of reopening during pandemic

3 p.m.: Tucson educators jump into action to keep families afloat during the coronavirus school closures and economic devastation.

11 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 10,960, according to new state figures. 

6:30 a.m.: DIY 'coronacuts" came to and end across Tucson Friday as barbers and stylists reopened. Both employees and clients wore face masks in shops with new safety procedures and social distancing rules to help fight the spread of the coronavirus. Ducey specifically allowed restaurants across the state to reopen on Monday, but breweries and wineries successfully lobbied to do so too. The Arizona Craft Brewers Guild said breweries and wineries were no different than restaurants. That means Arizona's bars, in theory, also can open so long as they have a menu of food and customers can dine in their establishments. A food truck nearby counts. Further, a state liquor official says technically, bars and alcohol-centric businesses were never excluded from Gov. Doug Ducey's May 4 executive order calling for reopening some businesses. "The order applies to all establishments that provide dine-in service and does not differentiate by license type," said Jeffery Trillo, assistant director of the State Department of Liquor Licenses and Control's Licensing and Administration Division. Tucson Premium Outlets, the open-air mall north of the city, became the first here to reopen Friday. It did so with new store occupancy limits and hand-sanitizing stations. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 10,526, the state Department of Health Services said Friday morning in its daily tally. The state said 517 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 1,520 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 131 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area. Friday's tally showed a spike in fatalities, with 67 new deaths being reported. However, the state noted that it reviewed death certificates, noting that "35 of the 67 new deaths reported today are from death certificate surveillance dating as far back as the week of April 12." There have been 119,907 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with about 7.4% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state said Friday. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Saturday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Tucson hairstylists, barbers reopen and put an end to DIY "coronacuts."

• Citing Gov. Ducey's relaxed virus rules, some Arizona bars, wineries to reopen Monday.

• Nearly two months after closing, a Tucson area mall reopened.

• A retired Tucson Fire paramedic was released to rehab after tough 6-week COVID-19 battle.

• Advocates call for probe of conditions at immigration facilities amid virus pandemic.

Arizona Legislature remains at odds over when to complete 2020 session.

"Thank you, dear subscriber, for supporting community journalism," writes David Fitzsimmons, the Star's editorial cartoonist as he begins another week of furlough.

• Here are photos from the first night of Tucson Dragway's drive-in theater.

Friday, May 8

9:00 a.m.: Confirmed coronavirus cases topped 10,000 on Friday, according to new state figures. 

6:45 a.m.: With the U.S. unemployment reaching 14.7% in April — the highest rate since the Great Depression — more Tucson businesses are reopening today under Gov. Ducey's relaxed activity restrictions due to the coronavirus outbreak. Hair salons and barber shops can open beginning today and restaurants follow on Monday, under the state's new guidelines. After growing criticism, the state reversed a decision earlier this week to pause the work of an Arizona team modeling the spread of the coronavirus. On Thursday the Arizona Department of Health Services announced it has established 'an ongoing partnership' with those university experts to continue providing their predictions. The group, in a model late last month, said reopening Arizona's economy at the end of May was the only way to avoid a rise in COVID-19 cases. Confirmed coronavirus cases has reached 9,945, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Thursday morning in its daily tally. The state said 450 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 1,465 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 118 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area. There have been 111,086 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with about 7.6% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says.

A plan to finally pull the plug on the 2020 legislative session due to the virus pandemic is now up in the air. Senate President Karen Fann said Thursday she has more than enough votes among Republican and Democratic lawmakers to formally wrap up the session that has been in recess since March 23. But the plan changed late Thursday and the status of the session is now up in the air. Fann and other lawmakers say safety during the virus outbreak means the session should end, but other lawmakers say there's too much left to do. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Friday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• After mounting pressure, Arizona health officials restored a partnership with virus modeling experts from the UA and ASU.

• Arizona lawmakers are unable to decide whether to pull plug in this year's session.

• Arizona drivers now face coronavirus "sanitizing tunnels" in Nogales, Sonora

• Tucson teens are still celebrating prom during coronavirus isolation.

We need COVID-19 convalescence centers, writes Dr. Charles Kaplan, a primary care internal medicine physician practicing in Tucson for the last 31 years.

Thursday, May 7

1:30 p.m.: In response to growing criticism over a decision to pause the work of an Arizona coronavirus modeling team, the state Department of Health Services announced Thursday that it has established "an ongoing partnership" with those university experts to continue to provide predictions of the spread of the virus locally.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 9,945, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

8:45 a.m.: Arizona legislative leaders are finally pulling the plug on the 2020 session. The move comes more than a month since lawmakers recessed due to the COVID-19 outbreak, with hopes at that time of returning to act on unfinished business once the pandemic had passed. 

6:45 a.m.: A team of scientists from the University of Arizona and ASU who were tasked with predicting the spread of the coronavirus under different scenarios to help Gov. Ducey and other leaders decide when to reopen the state has been disbanded. The move comes as Ducey eases social distancing orders allowing hair salons and restaurants to reopen, though with some restrictions. The group's most-recent model — released April 20 — showed that reopening Arizona at the end of May was the only scenario that didn't dramatically increase COVID-19 cases here. Arizona officials say they will instead rely on federal guidelines rather than local experts for modeling the virus spread. Those FEMA guidelines, however, are not shared with the public. After questions about the disbanding the group, Arizona Department of Health Services Director Dr. Cara Christ told the Arizona Republic the modeling team 'wasn't disbanded' but rather was asked 'to take a pause for a little bit.'  Also seeking a pause is a new campuswide coalition of UA grad students and professors who say the school's furlough planning process has not been transparent in its decision-making or implementation. They say the UA cost-cutting plan should shift more of the burden to employees making more than $150,000 a year and an independent audit is needed to see if alternative spending cuts can be made to save money. A memo from Pima County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry this week included bars as businesses that can reopen Monday. Dr. Francisco Garcia, the deputy county administrator and county's chief medical officer, later said that was a mistake. "There is no way to social distance from the bartender to the customer sitting at the bar," Garcia said. Confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 9,707, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Wednesday morning in its daily tally. The state said 426 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County 1,425 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 116 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

Arizona suspends its coronavirus modeling team that includes experts from UA and ASU just as businesses across the state reopen.

• A new coalition that includes graduate students and professors asks the UA to pause furloughs and consider alternatives.

• Tucson bars wonder why they can't join restaurants in reopening Monday.

• Restaurants here turn to family deals, meal kits during pandemic.

Bicycle shops are bustling as Tucsonans seek exercise during the pandemic.

• A driver who coughed in face of Nogales customs officer faces assault charge.

Tucson's city budget outlook dreary without some help from feds.

• A lawyer for Arizona news groups told a judge that Arizona's refusal to release more details on COVID-19 in care facilities affects public safety.

• A lawsuit over Arizona's stay-at-home order is set for court Friday.

• UA coaches say they will take pay cuts of up to 20 percent.

• Arizona needs to join other states in regulating the home-care industry, writes Judith B. Clinco, a registered nurse who is founder of Catalina In-Home Services Inc. and the CareGiver Training Institute.

Join Star's Opinion staff and Sports Editor Ryan Finley for online chat at 2 p.m. today. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for a Zoom invite.

Wednesday, May 6

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 9,707, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:45 a.m.: The majority of Pima County's COVID-19-related deaths continue to come from long-term-care facilities. During the Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday, Administrator Chuck Huckelberry said that of the 16 additional deaths reported in the county that day, 14 of them occurred in skilled nursing facilities. Pima County has 14 long-term-care facilities and 13 assisted-living facilities with confirmed coronavirus cases, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services. As of April 23, more than half of the county's COVID-19 deaths had occurred in nursing homes. The refusal of the Arizona Department of Health Services to tell the public how many residents of individual nursing homes are becoming ill with COVID-19 has prompted a lawsuit by several Phoenix-based news organizations. State health officials are releasing only information about the number of facilities in each county where the virus has appeared. The state claims additional information would be a breach of personal information.

But attorney David Bodney, representing the plaintiffs, pointed out that none of the records requested by news organizations seek information about individuals. And he said state health officials could redact specific information if, somehow, identifying a specific nursing home or other institution might lead someone to learn an individual's identity. Meanwhile, Tucsonans now have additional coronavirus antibody testing available to them through the University of Arizona. Antibody blood testing does not identify whether a person has COVID-19. Instead it detects if a person has antibodies that develop seven to 10 days after the virus has passed. UA researchers believe that a positive antibody test provides some degree of immunity, but more data is needed to determine for how long and how much protection is given against the coronavirus. There have been 88,260 coronavirus tests given across Arizona, with about 8% of them showing positive for COVID-19, the state says. Confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 9,305, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Tuesday morning in its daily tally. The state said 395 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 1,379 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed, and there have been 105 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Wednesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• University of Arizona opens antibody testing to all Tucsonans.

• A lawsuit by Arizona news groups seeks details on COVID-19 cases at nursing homes, care facilities.

• Tucson small businesses hit by coronavirus can get no-interest loans backed by city.

A blue 'A' Mountain is proposed to honor health-care professionals.

• Investments in Tucson apartment complexes are steady despite coronavirus pandemic.

• Stay-at-home orders leave abuse victims with nowhere to hide, writes Ed Mercurio-Sakwa is the CEO at Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse.

• There are some benefits from re-imagining schools in the wake of COVID-19, writes Heather Mace, a Beginning Teacher Mentor at TUSD, and a Public Voices Fellow with the OpEd Project.

Join Star's Opinion staff and Sports Editor Ryan Finley for online chat at 2 p.m. Thursday. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for a Zoom invite.

Tuesday, May 5

9:00 a.m.: Confirmed coronavirus cases topped 9,300 on Tuesday, according to new state figures. The state said 395 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19, up from 362 reported Sunday. There were 33 new deaths reported today. Across Pima County, 1,379 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed, up 33 cases from the day before.

6:45 a.m.: Arizona's barber shops and beauty salons can get back to work Friday, and restaurants can reopen their dining room on Monday, under new coronavirus guidelines Gov. Doug Ducey has announced. But there will be restrictions, including limits on capacity, physical distancing and wearing masks. And depending on the size of the business, appointments might be required. Ducey said he intends to allow other businesses like gyms and tattoo shops to reopen soon too, but he did not release a timeline for that to happen. His announcement came hours after the latest Arizona COVID-19 data showed 279 new coronavirus cases and no new deaths Monday morning. There are 8,919 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 362 deaths across the state, the Arizona Health Services Department reported Monday in its daily tally. In Pima County 1,346 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed, up 20 cases from the day before. There have been 89 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Ducey said Monday his decision to relax his emergency order to let more businesses in the state reopen was based on health data, not the increasing pressure among some state Republicans to reopen Arizona's economy. Ducey's announcement comes as another 43,087 Arizonans applied this past week for unemployment benefits. That brings the total number of people who have lost their jobs in the wake of the pandemic and the executive orders shutting down parts of Arizona's economy to more than 513,000 people. Meanwhile Tucson's City Council today will discuss what to do with a city budget hit hard by added expenses and a loss of revenue due to the coronavirus outbreak.  City Manager Michael Ortega has asked department heads to submit plans to cut their budgets 1% a month through June 2021, as well as analyses of what an overall 15% cut to their departments could look like should the economy continue to falter. Those cuts ranged from limitations in travel and training, to eliminating vacant positions and leaving posts unfilled after retirements — as well as layoffs or furloughs — according to documents prepared for today's meeting. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Gov. Ducey says it's OK to get your hair done starting Friday, and going out to dinner is fine beginning Monday.

• Tucson's City Council will discuss what to do with a budget hit hard by the coronavirus.

• The Community Food bank moved its distribution to Kino stadium and shortened hours.

• These T-shirts honor Tucson's front-line workers, help kids.

• Neighbors in Tucson's Sam Hughes create chalk art, 'bear hunt' for kids on walks.

• Greg Hansen writes about Tim Derksen, a star basketball player at Amphi High, who is back in Tucson waiting to see if he'll get to play again in the EuroLeague after the virus shutdown.

• Now is a great time to grow food, learn to conserve at home writes Lisa Shipek, executive director and co-founder of local nonprofit Watershed Management Group.

• Little acts of kindness, compassion and love are more important than ever, writes Chaplain Patrick Sheridan Cunningham, a grief and loss authority.

Join Star's Opinion staff and Sports Editor Ryan Finley for online chat at 2 p.m. Thursday. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for a Zoom invite.

Monday, May 4

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 8,919, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:30 a.m.: Tucson has received $95 million in federal funding to help cover expenses related to the coronavirus pandemic. But officials say limits on how the money can spent can get complicated. The funding cannot be used for revenue replacement, only for coronavirus-related expenditures incurred by the city. That includes expenses like acquiring medical and protective supplies; improving telework capabilities for employees; providing paid sick and family leave to employees; and caring for homeless individuals, according to a memo sent to Tucson City Council members this month that was obtained by the Star. Nearly two dozen Tucson police officers have volunteered to deliver meals to the city's vulnerable adults during the pandemic. Mobile Meals of Southern Arizona lost about 40% of its volunteer drivers during the coronavirus outbreak. The state has stepped in to give a $3.6 million boost to the only hospital in Green Valley, which says the virus pandemic has added to it financial woes. Confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 8,640, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Sunday morning in its daily tally. The state said 362 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. Across Pima County, 1,326 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 89 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Monday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Tucson must 'get creative' in allocating $95M in federal coronavirus funds.

Tucson police officers volunteer to take meals to the city's vulnerable residents.

• Arizona will give Green Valley's hospital a $3.6 million boost to help keep it going.

• Emissions testing, still required in Arizona, helps fight the coronavirus, officials say.

• A new UA financial plan exempts some workers from virus-related furloughs.

• Lower-income tax filers in Tucson have options for free help.

COVID-19 should change the way we see public health, writes Douglas Taren, a professor of public health at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health.

Sunday, May 3

6:45 a.m.: On Monday Arizona joins other states in loosening restrictions on businesses and other daily activities intended to help limit the spread of the coronavirus. Those decisions in Arizona, however, are being made as the number of COVID-19 cases are widely undercounted, infectious disease experts say. Reported cases by local and state health officials don't reflect the true number of infections in the community. "We're probably missing 90% to 95% of cases currently with the amount of testing that's going on," says Michael Worobey, an infectious disease expert who heads the University of Arizona's department of ecology and evolutionary biology. It will be difficult to reopen society so long as there's a dearth of testing, said Dr. Joe Gerald, an associate professor with the UA's Zuckerman College of Public Health. "I don't think there's any evidence that we actually have sufficient testing," he said, adding that the number of daily tests has hovered around 2,000 for the last several weeks. "That just doesn't seem near enough." Arizona has launched a "testing blitz" over the next three weekends. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 8,364, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Saturday morning in its daily tally. The state says 348 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. Across Pima County, 1,300 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 89 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department.  Adair Funeral Homes temporarily closed its Dodge Chapel after 'a number' of staff members fell ill and were sent home to recover in self-quarantine, according to a written statement from the company. The incident highlights lingering questions about how the virus is transmitted, and it underscores the essential work still being done by so-called 'last responders' in the Tucson's morgues and mortuaries. "They really are heroes, but they don't get the recognition they deserve, because it's death and nobody wants to talk about that," said Judith Stapley, executive director of the Arizona State Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers. Tucson families with children in the hospital face unbearable isolation during changes prompted by the coronavirus outbreak. For example, only one parent or caregiver can be with a child at a time, and no other visitors are allowed. And there are no more volunteer therapists who often help comfort children with a massage or help getting a child to sleep. That's why now, after weeks of not being able to go into the hospital, Integrative Touch for Kids is launching Telehealth Programs, which will provide families and children with online therapy, support and touch-training, as well as friendship connections. Tucson children 10 and older who wish to volunteer will be paired online with a child who has special health or medical needs. Tucson-area school districts acknowledge that some kids have gone missing in action during school closures ordered during the coronavirus pandemic. There's no exact count of how many kids are MIA or disengaged in remote learning. Districts say they are just now working to track that data. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• The lack of COVID-19 testing here hinders efforts to safely ease coronavirus rules.

• The coronavirus pandemic robs kids in Tucson hospital of healing touch.

• Meals on Wheels driver Brenda Merino Alvarez travels a 70-mile route to deliver food to Tucson's homebound residents.

• Many Tucson schoolchildren have dropped off the radar since the coronavirus forced schools to close.

• High school graduation ceremonies for TUSD are set for mid-June.

• Tucson's 'last responders' also face risks during pandemic.

• An Arizona man who has helped organize protests over virus restrictions has launched a recall effort against Gov. Doug Ducey.

Unemployment benefits for Arizona's self-employed workers who don't normally qualify, including contract and gig workers as well as sole-proprietors, are coming.

• Senior living residents in Tucson are finding new ways to stay connected during the pandemic.

• These Tucson teens banded together to help others amid the coronavirus crisis.

Tucsonans share what they're up to during the virus pandemic.

• Find inspirational messages from local religious leaders in today's "Keeping the Faith" feature.

How do you guess the next move of an opponent you've never fought before and have very little information about, Dr. Matthew G. Heinz, a hospitalist at Tucson Medical Center who is running for the Pima County Board of Supervisors in District 2, asks about the coronavirus.

• It turns out Tucson's social-distancing form isn't nefarious after all, writes Star guest columnist Jonathan Hoffman.

• Dr. Chad Whelan, CEO of Banner-University Medical Center Tucson, writes about creating a 'new normal' after the pandemic.

• Together, we will prevail over COVID-19, writes Repblican Sen. Martha McSally.

Saturday, May 2

10:30 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 8,364, an increase of 402 cases from Friday. There were 18 new deaths reported.

Violating local stay-home orders due to coronavirus outbreak is a misdemeanor offense, but an Arizona Daily Star survey of Pima County municipalities found that not a single citation has been issued under those orders. That's because education rather than citations is the preferred method to deal with people violating social distancing and other emergency order mandates, officials say. Orders limiting activities to fight the spread of COVID-19 forced the closure of schools across Arizona last month, but Tucson Unified School District announced late Friday that it plans to hold in-person graduation ceremonies in June. Televised ceremonies for individual high schools will be held later this month. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 7,962 on Friday, the Arizona Department of Health Services said in its daily tally. The state said 330 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 1,267 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 81 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Saturday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star.

• Despite hundreds of tips, an Arizona Daily Star survey of Pima County municipalities found no citations for violating local and state emergency orders to limit the coronavirus outbreak.

• TUSD plans to hold in-person graduation ceremonies in June.

• Mayor Regina Romero urges Tucsonans to wear masks in public.

Arizona issues new guidelines as more businesses set to reopen.

• Discounted gift cards support Main Gate Square businesses.

• 'Groceries to Go' program, arts care packages help ease virus isolation.

• The Star's editorial cartoonist David Fitzsimmons shares his guide to surviving the hunker bunker together.

Direct-care workers deserve respect, gratitude during virus crisis, writes W. Mark Clark is president & CEO of the Pima Council on Aging.

Friday, May 1

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 7,962, the Arizona Department of Health Services said.

6:45 a.m.: Tucson diners should expect big changes at restaurants under new state guidelines that could allow them to reopen dining rooms. For example, everyone from the person who seats you to the waiters and the kitchen staff will be wearing masks and gloves. And fewer tables will be available to limit the number of diners. Such social-distancing limits, however, aren't required at churches or political rallies under the new coronavirus guidelines issued this week by Gov. Doug Ducey. Attorney General Mark Brnovich said Thursday that Arizonans who assemble to worship or protest don't have to keep six feet apart. That's because Ducey's order specifically permits people to engage in 'constitutionally protected activity,' including religion and speech, Brnvocich says. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona hit 7,648 on Thursday, the Arizona Department of Health Services said in its daily tally. The state says 320 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. Across Pima County, 1,241 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 80 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area. A new video produced by the Pima County Health Department illustrates the spread of COVID-19 across metro Tucson over the last two months. The video posted to the Pima County Health Department's Facebook page this week uses red dots on a map showing the general location of positive cases in Pima County over time. As each cases ages beyond 15 days, a red dot falls off the map to show the cases that are no longer infectious. New red dots surface on the map as quickly as others disappear. University of Arizona President Robert Robbins says the campus will be reopened this fall and that in-person classes will resume.  However, Robbins noted some classes will be smaller, students might need to wear masks and the UA will be ready to quickly revert to online courses if the coronavirus spreads again. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Friday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

Expect big changes when Tucson restaurants reopen later this month.

Video shows spread of coronavirus across metro Tucson.

Critics question language of Ducey's virus order when it comes to social distancing guidelines.

• UA President Robert Robbins: campus to reopen this fall, including in-person classes.

• Tucson Mayor Regina Romero urges Tucsonans to wear masks in public to fight spread of COVID-19. You can listen to Romero talk about the virus outbreak on the Star's podcast, The Point Being.

• Sen. Martha McSally has spent much of the past month blasting China over coronavirus.

• Tucson cruise ship doctor returns home after 6-week sea ordeal.

COVID-19 testing sites are needed on Tucson's south, west sides, writes Adelita Grijalva, a members of the Tucson Unified School District Governing Board and Democratic candidate for the Pima County Board of Supervisors in District 5.

Thursday, April 30

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 7,648, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Thursday.

6:45 a.m.: Gov. Doug Ducey on Wednesday extended his his stay-at-home order into May after saying there's no data from the state Department of Health Services to show the state has beaten back the COVID-19 outbreak enough to allow it to expire as scheduled Thursday night. "There is not a trend," Ducey said during a news conference announcing the order extension. Still, Ducey went on to say he does feel comfortable enough with the pandemic rates in the state to allow some retail businesses to open their doors — gradually. Effective Monday, businesses not listed as 'essential' under his emergency order will be able to sell items out the front door. That includes retailers for everything from furniture stores and jewelers to beauty salons that will be able to offer products for drive-up pickup and delivery. Ducey said his decisions to continue his stay-at-home order rather than allow Arizona businesses to operate as usual should not have been a surprise. "I don't think anybody ever believed that on May 1 we would have a return to normalcy in Arizona," he said. Confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 7,202, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Wednesday morning in its daily tally. The state said 304 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 1,215 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed as of Wednesday. There have been 80 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department. Here are news developments from Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Gov. Doug Ducey extends his stay-at-home order, but some businesses to open sooner.

• The county's health department released a video showing COVID-19's spread across Tucson.

Marana teen's social distance survey receives 1,200 replies.

• Be cautious: Rattlesnakes are out enjoying the warm weather too.

• Tucsonans turn to gardening during coronavirus quarantine.

Lifting Arizona's stay-home order too soon jeopardizes the gains Arizona has achieved, write Virologists Felicia Goodrum Sterling and James Alwine.

Tucson's nonprofits need help to serve in new ways, writes Kurtis Dawson, president and CEO of the YMCA of Southern Arizona.

Wednesday, April 29

3:50 p.m.: Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey announced Wednesday that he is extending his stay-at-home order through May 15, "with modifications," to continue to slow the spread of COVID-19.

3:00 p.m.: Ducey's stay-home order is working against COVID-19, and rushing to lift it is dangerous, say two UA virus experts in an opinion column.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 7,202, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Wednesday.

6:45 a.m.: 52,350 more Arizonans filed for first-time unemployment benefits last week, bringing the total number of workers in the state who have sought help during the coronavirus pandemic to more than 470,000 people. That's about 13% of the state's workforce of nearly 3.6 million people, a state record. The economic picture in Arizona and across the US is expected to get bleaker in the GDP report to come on the current April-June period, during the peak of virus-related shutdowns and layoffs. The newest numbers from the Commerce Department show the gross domestic product — the total output of goods and services — posted a quarterly drop for the first time in six years, the Associated Press reports. It was the sharpest fall since the economy shrank at an 8.4% annual rate in the fourth quarter of 2008 in the depths of the Great Recession. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that GDP will plunge this quarter at a 40% annual rate, the AP reports. That would be the bleakest quarter since such records were first compiled in 1947. It would be four times the size of the worst quarterly contraction on record set in 1958, the AP says. In Pima County, Administrator Chuck Huckelberry and Supervisors Chairman Ramon Valdez say they expect increasing public pressure to quickly reopen closed or restricted businesses here quickly. "But we pledge that public health data and health-care infrastructure will drive our decisions," they write in a guest opinion today discussing a task force created to help decide the best way to reopen the local economy. "Some communities may open more quickly than ours, and, conversely, we may outpace others. It's all a matter of the data and the facts," the pair say. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 6,948 on Tuesday, the Arizona Department of Health Services said. The state said 293 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County there were 1,188 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 78 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area as of Tuesday. Meanwhile, Tucson Medical Center has found a way to use its 30 patios and mostly ground-level rooms to allow family visits, from outside and through the window. And a new video produced by NüPOINT, a marketing agency in Tucson, shows empty parking lots, people walking wearing face masks, an emptier than usual downtown and Fourth Avenue as it encourages Tucsonans to stay resilient in the face of the pandemic. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Wednesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• More than 470,000 Arizona workers have sought unemployment aid during the pandemic.

This new video uses empty Tucson streets, landmarks to encourage resilience during the virus crisis.

• TMC has found a way to let patients have visitors without virus exposure.

• Pima County hires Dr. Theresa Cullen to lead its office of public health.

UA's development of antibodies test comes amid immunity contentions.

• UA researchers will use $500,000 in new funding to address virus challenges.

• Public health data will dictate the pace of recovery and reopening of the local economy, write Ramón Valadez, chair of the Pima County Board of Supervisors, and Chuck Huckelberry, the county administrator.

• Sebastian Janik, a UA student, describes catching one of the last flights out of Japan as the coronavirus pandemic spread across that country.

Tuesday, April 28

8:30 a.m.: Pima County has hired a new public health director. She will take over coronavirus efforts starting June 1. 

7:30 a.m.: Saguaro National Park puts fire restrictions in place to protect public lands and resources during the coronavirus pandemic. 

6:30 a.m.: A 'blitz' to test up to 60,000 Arizonans for COVID-19 in the next three weekends was announced Monday by Gov. Doug Ducey. The goal: test 10,000 to 20,000 people in the state each Saturday, beginning May 2. The testing push comes as Ducey has to decide whether his executive orders limiting individual and business activity due to the coronavirus pandemic should continue beyond April 30, the day they are set to expire. Tucson Unified School District says it's facing about $8.5 million in added expenses due to the virus outbreak closures. Meanwhile, both the University of Arizona and Pima Community College say big graduation ceremonies will be replaced this year with live-streaming events. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 6,716 on Monday, the Arizona Department of Health Services said in its daily tally. The state said there were no new deaths to add to the 275 people in Arizona known to have died from COVID-19. Across Pima County, 1,164 cases of coronavirus were confirmed Monday. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

Gov. Doug Ducey orders testing 'blitz' as he weighs lifting coronavirus restrictions in Arizona.

• TUSD says it faces an extra $8.5M in virus-related expenses.

Virtual graduation ceremonies to replace big celebrations at UA and Pima.

• PCC is sending nearly $5 million in emergency federal aid to some students.

• TEP customers on track to get credits to help make payments.

• Tucson Collaborative Community Care — known as TC-3 — is a group of community partners dedicated to reducing reliance on the emergency medical system. It has been offering expanded services during the pandemic to its clients, like food, medication and wellness checks.

Mail-in voting works, writes Alison Jones, chair of the Pima County Democratic Party.

Monday, April 27

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 6,716, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Monday.

6:30 a.m.: Forced at-home learning due to the coronavirus pandemic has forced school districts across Tucson to make a huge effort to narrow the digital divide among students. For example, Tucson Unified School District invested $3.5 million in Chromebooks, emptied empty schools of laptops and tablets to distribute to kids and walked many families through accessing free and affordable internet. With more people staying home, Tucson police say there's been a significant drop in some crimes as well as traffic collisions. There was a nearly 17% decrease in serious crimes from March 1 to April 16 compared with the same time last year, Tucson police say. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 6,526, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Sunday morning in its daily tally.

The state said 275 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. Across Pima County, 1,136 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed. There have been 76 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area, according to the state health department on Sunday. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona from Monday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Shutdowns related to the coronavirus outbreak lead to drop in crimes, crashes across Tucson.

• Forced at-home schooling pushed Tucson school district to confront the digital divide.

• Citing the virus pandemic, Village Inn in Marana closes.

No slowdown on major road projects here due to coronavirus shutdowns.

• Democrats in Arizona and other states are calling for the Trump administration to stop spending billions of dollars on the border wall during the coronavirus pandemic.

Food banks are key to our survival as we navigate the COVID-19 crisis, writes Samantha Turner, the administrative coordinator to the CEO and chief programs officer at the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona.

•  To college seniors, graduation means more than just 'a walk,' writes Briannon Wilfong, an Arizona Daily Star apprentice for the Spring 2020 semester.

Sunday, April 26

9:45 a.m.: Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona are at 6,526 with 1,136 cases across Pima County, state health officials reported Sunday.

6:45 a.m.: Thirty-eight long-term-care residents in Pima County are known to have died from the coronavirus — more than half of the county's known deaths related to COVID-19 — according to an analysis of local virus data obtained by the Arizona Daily Star. With at least 58 residents and 36 staff members testing positive for the virus as of Friday, Sapphire of Tucson,  accounts for about a third of Pima County's known COVID-19 cases at long-term-care facilities. Despite a number of long-term-care facilities across Arizona — including 25 assisted living and long-term-care facilities in Pima County — having reported outbreaks, the state has refused to provide specific data about known COVID-19 cases at nursing homes. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 6,280 on Saturday, the Arizona Department of Health Services said in its daily tally. The state said 273 people in Arizona have died from COVID-19. In Pima County, 1,090 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed, the state said.There have been 76 known COVID-19 deaths in the Tucson-metro area.

Being "blue-collar" has changed over the years in Tucson. The 'new blue-collar workforce,' the working-class sector of the economy that typically includes traditional blue-collar jobs, like manual labor, now also includes members of the gig economy, such as retail and service workers, musicians and artists. And while the vast majority of the Arizona's workforce has been affected in some way, shape or form by business closures and social changes spawned by the coronavirus, that sector has been hit a little harder — at least in Tucson and Pima County.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus crisis from Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Nursing homes in Pima County are hotbeds for COVID-19 deaths.

• Tucson's 'new blue-collar workforce,' has been hit harder by the pandemic.

'Feels like we're in combat,' says Amy Burke, a Tucson respiratory therapist who traveled to New York City to help fight the coronavirus.

• Surplus produce from Mexico is being directed to southern Arizona food banks.

Tucson Cancer Conquerors is a peer support group that's keeping its members positive, moving during the pandemic.

• Tucson's Chinese-American community brings masks to the front lines.

• Responsibility for the collective good is more important than individualism, writes Tim Steller, the Star's metro columnist.

• Tucson Boys & Girls clubs need activity supplies; back city's essential workers.

• Large gatherings by protesters will only prolong lockdown, says the Arizona Daily Star's Editorial Board.

• A history lesson could help Trump solve the virus crisis, writes Michael Schaller, an author and regents professor emeritus of history at the University of Arizona.

• Pima County Superior Court strives for a safe, healthy environment, write Kyle A. Bryson, its presiding judge, and Ronald G. Overholt, the court administrator.

We must speak with precision about COVID-19, says Michael Badowski, who has a doctorate in microbiology and immunology, is an associate research scientist at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Biorepository.

• Star Editorial Page Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen explains how letters are separated among those with opinion based on facts and those that mislead on COVID-19.

• Today's Keeping the Faith installment features inspiring messages from: Rabbi Samuel M. Cohon, founding rabbi of Congregation Beit Simcha; Steven Broadbent, president of the Tucson Arizona North Stake for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and Kelly Bauer, a religious educator on the UA campus for the LDS Church; and Carolyn Ancell, an ordained interfaith minister and certified therapeutic harpist whose parish is wherever she is playing.

Saturday, April 25

6:45 a.m.: Weeks after federal approval, the state has hired a firm to process the jobless claims for Arizonans who qualify only for special federal aid. Those workers include part-timers, independent contractors and others ineligible for the regular state unemployment benefits. Checks won't be in the mail, however, until mid May. Local banking and small-business officials say they hope smaller businesses will get a bigger share of the second-round funding from the federal Paycheck Protection Program. In Arizona as of April 16, funding for 19,280 PPP loans had been approved by the Small Business Administration, totaling $4.8 billion. Too much of that money, critics say, has gone to big companies. In the midst of the economic turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic, three Tucson restauranteurs have decided to open their doors anyway. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 6,045 Friday, the Arizona Department of Health Services said. It said 266 people in Arizona are known to have died from COVID-19. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus crisis from Saturday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Some unemployed workers in Arizona might need to wait several more weeks get federal unemployment benefits.

• Business owners across Arizona say they hope a new round of loans will help soften the economic blow from the coronavirus pandemic.

New restaurants continue to open across metro Tucson amid the virus outbreak.

• The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is using an online auction, programs to offset the financial impact from the coronavirus outbreak.

• A UA garden program goes online and provides produce to Tucson families.

• Immigration detention centers in Arizona report 28 confirmed cases of coronavirus.

• A local doctor who took a 5-day fill-in job on a cruise ship has spent the last six weeks trying to get home.

• Canceled seasons due to the virus outbreak mean several Arizona Wildcats coaches will miss out on bonuses.

• A once-in-a-century health crisis is no reason to permanently change the voting system to mail-in only, writes David Eppihimer, chairman of the Pima County Republican Party.

• The coronavirus crisis shines a light on social and economic injustice, writes Kelly Griffith, the executive director of the Southwest Center for Economic Integrity.

• David Fitzsimmons, the Star's editorial cartoonist, heads into the desert wilderness to seek refuge from the virus.

Friday, April 24

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 6,045, the Arizona Department of Health Services said Friday morning in its daily tally.

6:45 a.m.: Arizonans who believe they have been exposed to the coronavirus should now have an easier time getting tested after state health officials widened criteria for health professionals to do so. A restaurant in Oro Valley has had its liquor license suspended by the state after officials say it was allowing diners to eat and drink on the patio despite Arizona's emergency order requiring take-out only. A Tucson company has agreed to pay an employee sick leave — required under the newly passed Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act — after refusing to do so for the worker who was under a doctor's order to self-quarantine with potential COVID-19 symptoms. Confirmed coronavirus cases in Pima County topped 1,000 Thursday, according to the Arizona Health Services Department. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona reached 5,769, with 249 known deaths. Gov. Doug Ducey still has not said whether he will allow his stay-at-home orders to expire April 30. The decision to reopen the state's economy will depend on virus modeling which show a wide range of dates and situations when it will be safe to do so. Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus crisis from Friday's Arizona Daily Star:

• A Chuy's in Oro Valley had its liquor license pulled for serving during shutdown.

• A Tucson contractor agrees to pay disputed sick leave to an employee under a newly passed law.

How close is Arizona to hitting a peak in COVID-19 cases? That depends on whose numbers — and whose virus models — you believe.

• Arizona expects a severe wildfire season, and the coronavirus pandemic will make it harder to fight them.

• Arizona's health director ordered broader testing of those suspected of COVID-19 exposure.

• A Pima County task force is being set up to devise a plan to reopen local businesses.

• "We certainly continue to explore all options regarding football for next year, " says Wildcats athletic director Dave Heeke. "Everything's on the table as far as how we would restart it."

The Supreme Court needs to delay its DACA decision till fall or later, writes Maurice 'Mo' Goldman, an immigration attorney in Tucson and a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association.  

Thursday, April 23

6:30 a.m.: Some 26 million people across the US have now filed for unemployment benefits in the five weeks since the coronavirus outbreak began forcing businesses to close. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey said Wednesday he won't be rushed into lifting his statewide executive orders limiting what's open across the state. His orders closing businesses he's deemed non-essential — like gyms, bars, and salons — are set to expire April 30. Ducey said he's asking for patience from Arizonans as he contemplates whether the orders will be continued, lifted or modified. Ducey did decide Wednesday to allow nonessential surgeries to resume May 1, after hospitals across the state complained the prohibition was a major financial hardship. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona rose to 5,459 on Wednesday, state health officials said. In Pima County there were 973 known cases of coronavirus. There have been 68 known coronavirus deaths in the county, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services. Statewide, there have been 229 known deaths. Meanwhile, with fewer people driving to school or the office, air pollution noticeably dropped across the Tucson area in the past two months compared to years past.

Here are new developments from Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus outbreak from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Gov. Ducey says he's in no rush to lift ban on public activities. Ban on some surgeries ends May 1.

• Tucson's traffic and air pollution levels plunge during the pandemic.

• Giffords, Flake joining virtual panel to discuss healthy political give-and-take dealing with the coronavirus crisis.

• 40 students from the University of Arizona's Colleges of Medicine are graduating early to help fight the coronavirus pandemic.

• Literacy Connects is holding three days of drive-thrus to collect school supplies.

• Tucson outfitter says fishing is the ultimate social distancing sport.

• We know pantry staples are hard to come by and the Star's food columnist, Robin Mather, wants to help. She'll take items you have and come up with dishes to make. Send your ingredient list to caliente@tucson.com. Today's recipe: Shrimp (frozen after a trip to Rocky Point) and grits, with a desert twist.

• Coronavirus is influencing Tucson artists' creative process.

• Tucson musicians respond musically to the coronavirus pandemic.

• Tucsonans can explore the world of art from home.

Get artistic with classes offered by Tucson businesses.

Aid isn't reaching the truly small firms that need it, writes Scott Blades, director of a Tucson nonprofit.

• Water uncertainty raises the risk of catching COVID-19 on the Navajo Nation, writes Gillian Bowden, an ASU student studying urban planning and sustainability.

Releases from jail will let nonviolent offenders help their families during the virus crisis, write Sarah Kostick and Jenna Johnson, assistant Pima County public defenders.

Join Star Opinion staffers on video chat at 2 p.m. today. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation and Zoom link to join the call.

Wednesday, April 22

11:32 a.m.: McDonald's is now offering all first responders a free meal as a small way of saying thank you. That includes healthcare workers, police, janitors and anyone else on the front lines.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 5,459, state health officials said Wednesday.

6:30 a.m.: Arizona's legislative leaders are planning to pull the plug on the 2020 session, which was cut short due to the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent statewide shutdown. State lawmakers will vote May 1 to end the session and return in January to deal with unsettled financial and policy issues. There were 21 additional coronavirus deaths reported in Arizona Tuesday, the most in a single day since the the outbreak began. There were 208 known deaths related to COVID-19 and at least 5,251 coronavirus cases across the state, the Arizona Department of Health Services reported on Tuesday. Gov. Doug Ducey's stay-at-home order expires late next week, but the Republican governor hasn't said yet if he'll extend it. Pinal Airpark north of Tucson is filling up with jets from airline fleets being grounded because so few people are flying. Earlier this week, 268 aircraft were sitting in storage at the airpark.

Here's are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus crisis from Wednesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Arizona lawmakers are to vote on ending the 2020 legislative session.

• Instead of blaming China for the coronavirus pandemic, Sen. Martha McSally should apply her past doctrine, says Tim Steller, the Star's Metro columnist.

• As airlines suffer, some send their unneeded planes to storage in Marana.

• El Charro and radio station KDRI are helping feed Tucson's front-line workers.

• Arizona authorities warn about scammers during coronavirus pandemic.

• Imagine what our 2035 climate could look like if Congress acts, write Jane Conlin and Ed Beshore, leaders of the Tucson chapter of Citizens Climate Lobby, a nonprofit volunteer organization that advocates for carbon pricing.

• Trump's assault on environment casts long shadow over Earth Day, writes Roger McManus, a biologist on the board of directors of the Friends of the Sonoran Desert.

Join Star Opinion staffers on video chat at 2 p.m. Thursday. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation and Zoom link to join the call.

Tuesday, April 21

3:00 p.m.: The coronavirus pandemic has influenced the creative process of Tucson artists.

1:00 p.m.: Here's a look at photos of medical students from the University of Arizona and other universities volunteering to help the homeless population with the growing concerns of COVID-19. 

10:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 5,251 — an increase of 187 cases from the prior day, state health officials reported Tuesday.

6:45 a.m.: Nearly 420,000 Arizonans have lost their jobs due to the coronavirus pandemic, new state unemployment figures show. Another 72,103 people filed first-time claims for unemployment benefits in the week that ended April 17. That's 418,016 new unemployment filings in the past five weeks, or 11.6% of Arizona's total workforce. Meanwhile, hundreds of protesters gathered at the Capitol Monday to object to Gov. Doug Ducey's stay-at-home orders, which closed schools and businesses he deems nonessential, like gyms, hair salons and tattoo shops to help slow the spread of the coronavirus. The protest was held on the same day that the number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona topped 5,000, the Arizona Department of Health Services reported Monday. In Pima County there are now 941 known cases of coronavirus. There have been 58 known coronavirus deaths in the Tucson area and 187 in the state.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus crisis from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

•  Nearly 420,000 workers in Arizona have lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

• University of Arizona researchers launched a texting tool to collect and share COVID-19 information.

Hundreds of protesters gathered at the state Capitol Monday to demand an end to stay-at-home orders.

• More coronavirus cases have been reported at Arizona immigration facilities.

• Some Tucsonans are donating their government stimulus check to those in need.

• Tucson's Botanical gardens and Tohono Chul face economic hardships.

• All six members of UA Softball team's 2020 senior class — Alyssa Palomino- Cardoza, Reyna Carranco, Jessie Harper, Alyssa Denham, Malia Martinez and Mariah Lopez — announced Monday that they will be returning next season, under an NCAA rule that allows spring-sport seniors the right to another year of eligibility due to the pandemic.

• Nonbelievers find their own comfort in this crisis, says Gil Shapiro, a Tucsonan who is a former spokesman for Freethought Arizona.

Join Star Opinion staffers on video chat at 2 p.m. Thursday. Email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation and Zoom link to join the call.

Monday, April 20

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 5,064, Arizona health officials said Monday.

6:15 a.m.: Members of Tucson's homeless community who might be showing coronavirus symptoms or are at risk of contracting COVID-19 are being moved into a pair of hotels under a new program initiated by city officials. So far, 33 people — 22 falling into the at-risk category and 11 who were displaying symptoms — were moved out of homeless shelters or off the streets and into the two hotels on Friday in an effort to try to slow the spread of the virus. On Sunday the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 4,929 cases, up 210 from the previous day, according the the daily tally from the Arizona Department of Health Services. In Pima County, 913 cases of coronavirus had been confirmed Sunday, it said. The outbreak is keeping some snowbirds in Southern Arizona. Many are putting off heading back home until long roads trips are safer. Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Monday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Tucson puts some high-risk homeless people in hotels in bid to decrease the coronavirus spread

• Some snowbirds are staying perched in Tucson to wait out the pandemic

Tucson arcade D&D Pinball closes to avoid racking up debt during mandated closure. On Sunday, Tim Steller, the Star's Metro columnists, wondered how many of Tucson's popular hangouts will survive the virus crisis.

• The University of Arizona's Biosphere 2 to commemorate Earth Day with a virtual EarthFest.

Mind-set is key to navigating uncertain reality, writes Amy Hirshberg Lederman, a Tucson author and attorney.

Kindness rocks spread joyful messages across Tucson. Here's more about rocks, chalk art and other small efforts to spread hope and kindness across the community.

This is Tucson has these helpful lists: Resources for Tucson-area families impacted by COVID-19 closures; Where to find free food, emergency assistance and grocery resources in Tucson; and 8 Tucson organizations taking story-time online.

Sunday, April 19

6 p.m.: The Pima County Dislocated Worker Hotline — 520-724-5735 — was established March 26 to respond to the surge in unemployment due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, the hotline is helping direct those who were recently laid-off to other resources, including from the Pima County Community Action Agency, which offers assistance with rent, utilities and other basic needs for low-income individuals and families.

10:15 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona is now 4,929, and in Pima County, 913 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services. 

6:45 a.m.: Nearly half of Arizona's licensed early childhood care and education providers have closed during the coronavirus crisis. That's more than 1,200 facilities across the state, including public and private preschools, Head Start facilities, in-home providers and child-care centers that are casualties of the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak. Meanwhile, a pause in elective surgeries and rise in people avoiding emergency-room visits are combining to put significant financial pressure on Tucson hospitals. The result: furloughs and cuts in staff work hours as hospitals combat COVID-19.

Federal relief packages passed last month to cover coronavirus testing for everyone do not prohibit out-of-network labs from billing insured patients directly, Tucsonans have learned. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona climbed to 4,719, a rise of 212 cases in a day, the Arizona Department of Health Services reported Saturday. Across Pima County, 856 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed Saturday. There have been 56 known coronavirus deaths in the county as of Saturday.

Here are news developments related to the coronavirus pandemic in Tucson and Arizona from Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

1,256 schools and centers for young children have closed across Arizona during the coronavirus outbreak.

• Congress moved to cover coronavirus testing for everyone by passing government relief packages, but neither insured nor uninsured patients are fully protected from having to pay for a test.

• As Arizona struggles to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, the state stands to lose nearly half a million jobs by the fall, according to a new forecast by the University of Arizona economists.

• Educators across Tucson still don't know when, or how school will reopen. Some are trying to plan for what the start of a new school year like no other.

• A pause in some surgeries and more people avoiding emergency rooms have combined to hit the finances of Tucson hospitals.

Drug smugglers have lost their cover at Arizona border entry ports during severe restrictions on legal border crossings.

The places we hang out are not just closed, many are endangered if the shutdown goes on too long says Tim Steller, the Star's Metro columnist.

Help Tucson's health-care workers keep their loved ones safe, write Brad Dreifuss and Duke Duncan, who are with the University of Arizona colleges of medicine and public health; Mark Nichter, with the UA school of anthropology and the colleges of medicine and public health; and Katherine Ellingson, of the the UA college of public health. They represent the HCW HOSTED Tucson Working Group.

• The pandemic has pushed back needed repairs at a senior housing complex downtown.

• To protect elections, send mail ballots to everyone, writes Bonnie Saunders, interim president, and Pinny Sheoran, state advocacy chair, of the League of Women Voters of Arizona.

• Key trauma principles can help you navigate the COVID-19 crisis, write Cassandra Loller and Lourdes Lopez-Escobar, child and family therapists with Casa de los Niños.

• Coronavirus cut short studying abroad, but friendships endure, writes Noah Cullen, a student in the UA's school of journalism.

• Officials from Pima County and Visit Tucson have contacted Major League Baseball representatives in recent weeks, wanting to be part of any plan to start the season in Arizona.

Sunnyside wrestling phenom Audrey Jimenez keeps her focus on training during the pandemic shutdown.

•  Cancellations prompted by the coronavirus leaves father and son missing baseball games in Tucson.

• George Arias, a former pro baseball player, says closing his Centerfield Baseball & Softball Academy is financially and emotionally painful.

Today's "Keeping the Faith" series includes uplifting messages from Rev. Michael T. Bush, senior minister of Casas Adobes Congregational UCC in Tucson; Andy Tracy, lead pastor at Lifepoint Church; Father Robert Hendrickson, rector of St. Philip's in the Hills Episcopal Church in Tucson; and Jeff Logsdonwas, founder of Tucson's Hope City Church.

Saturday, April 18

Furloughs and pay cuts are central to a massive financial plan the University of Arizona released on Friday that details its effort to deal with the fallout from the coronavirus crisis. The cuts could affect workers for one of Pima County's top two employers through June 2021. Later in the day, the UA released a tuition plan for the upcoming school year that includes no increase in base tuition for incoming students. With the known cases of COVID-19 in the state reaching 4,500 Friday morning, new projections from a health-tracking firm suggest Arizonans could start going out and socializing by early June. The Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation sharply lowered its projections of how many people in the state it expects will die from COVID-19. The projections went from 1,005 earlier in the week to 267 by late Friday afternoon. There were 169 known deaths from coronavirus in Arizona on Friday morning, the state Health Services Department reported.

Here are news developments related to the coronavirus outbreak in Tucson and Arizona from Saturday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• The University of Arizona is implementing furloughs and pay cuts for nearly all of its employees that are set to last through June 2021.

• The UA's athletic department is not immune from planned UA salary cuts

• New numbers from a health tracking firm suggests that Arizonans could start going out and socializing by the end of the first week in June.

• A federal judge tossed out a bid to allow Arizona initiative organizers to get the signatures they need through an online portal.

• Don't need your stimulus check? Donate it to a needy family

• Though marketing was put off during the pandemic, a new Tucson Electric Power Co. program offers business customers and local nonprofits incentives of up to 85% of the cost of installing electric vehicle charging stations.

Tippy taps are low-tech and simple hand washing stations set up to help homeless people.

• El Grupo, a Tucson cycling organization, is shifting gears to ride out the coronavirus pandemic.

Consuming news responsibly and rationally is vital during the virus crisis, writes Ross Carroll, a Tucsonan and professor emeritus of communication at Oregon Institute of Technology.

• To take care of the public, we must protect essential workers, writes Peter Dooley, a certified industrial hygienist, and Steve Valencia, chair of Tucson Jobs with Justice.

Friday, April 17

1:10 p.m.: Jean Fedigan has been handing out food and sanitary supplies to the homeless, but like many other shelter workers, she can't allow anyone in the doors during the day at the Sister Jose Women's Center. That, coupled with the fact that public restrooms in Tucson parks have shuttered their doors, has left the city's homeless population with limited places to wash their hands.

Local city officials and outreach groups have come up with a low-tech and simple solution: Tippy taps.

1:00 p.m.: Here's a daily map of coronavirus cases in Arizona, broken down by county. 

11:00 a.m.: The University of Arizona, one of Southern Arizona's two largest employers and responsible for more than $4 billion in economic impact, is implementing furloughs and pay cuts for nearly all of its employees that are set to last through June 2021.

10:00 a.m.: A gift card program designed to help downtown Tucson businesses weather the coronavirus crisis has raised more $105,000 in just three weeks. 

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 4,507, Arizona health officials said Friday.

6:45 a.m.: Arizona shed about 7,400 jobs last month. How unusual is that during this time of year? Employers in Arizona typically add 10,700 workers between February and March, state officials say. Fallout from the coronavirus pandemic pushed the jobless rate in Arizona a full point in March, the first of what could be worsening numbers going forward. New figures released Thursday, show that in March the state set its seasonally adjusted unemployment rate at 5.5%. Nationally, there were 5.2 million new applications for unemployment benefits last month. The total number of laid-off American workers in the month since the virus all but shut down the economy is at 22 million.

Known COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 4,234, with 760 in Pima County, according the the Arizona Health Services Department. There have been 150 confirmed coronavirus-related deaths in the state, and 37 known deaths in Pima County. As the coronavirus numbers continue to rise in Arizona, hospitals in the state appear to have enough beds and ventilators to handle an anticipated surge in COVID-19 patients.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona about the coronavirus pandemic from Friday's Arizona Daily Star:

• Arizona's jobless rate jumped a full point last month, shedding some 7,400 jobs in March.

• Hospitals in Arizona appear to have enough beds and ventilators to handle an anticipated surge in COVID-19 patients.

• Tucson consumers don't have to worry about their electric or natural-gas rates increasing anytime soon.

• A group of well-wishers gathered at Tucson's Triple T Truck Stop to hand out free lunches to commercial drivers.

• McSally, Ducey have been eagerly thanking President Trump for ventilators.

• Being pregnant during the pandemic can be especially stressful for new, and soon-to-be Tucson moms.

• Home isolation from the pandemic is "allowing the earth to heal almost before our eyes in the form of cleaner skies, clearer water and less atmospheric carbon," writes David A. Schaller, a retired EPA environmental scientist and Tucson native who writes on regional energy, water and climate security.

• "I challenge you to consider one daily act of service, and I promise that you will be as blessed as those you serve," writes Jim Click Jr., president of the Jim Click Automotive Team and president of the Click Family Foundation.

• The timing of the pandemic in Tucson hits a local uniform company hard.

• Dave Heeke, the University of Arizona's athletic director, talks about the impact the pandemic is having on Wildcats sports.

Thursday, April 16

3:30 p.m.: Here's a look at a map of coronavirus cases broken down by county.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 4,234, Arizona health officials said Thursday.

6:30 a.m.: With more than 5 million Americans fling for unemployment benefits in the past week and a total of 22 million since last month, city workers could face furloughs and layoffs as Tucson deals with steep, unexpected revenue losses as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. City Manager Michael Ortega says it's still too early to know exactly what steps the city will take to weather the financial impact from the pandemic, but he told City Council members this week that jobs could be affected. Similarly, the financial hit from the coronavirus is hitting hospitals across the country hard. In Arizona, hospitals are reporting financial losses of 30% to 40% a month. To help their bottom line, Gov. Doug Ducey says he is looking to restore the ability of hospitals in the state to again do elective surgeries. As part of his emergency orders last month, Ducey halted selective surgeries to help ensure an adequate supply of personal protective equipment — masks, gowns and gloves — to handle what is expected to be a surge in the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19. There were 3,963 confirmed cases of coronavirus across the state and 700 in Pima County, the Arizona Department of Health Services reported Wednesday. There have been 142 known COVID-19 deaths.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus crisis from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• City workers could face furloughs and layoffs as Tucson deals with huge revenue losses from the coronavirus pandemic.

• Elective surgeries might be allowed again in Arizona to help hospitals cope with mounting financial losses.

• Gov. Doug Ducey said this week that he will be the one to decide when to reopen Arizona's economy, not President Trump.

• Tucson organizations that support women and girls are being offered the chance to win a $500 grant through the Women's Foundation of Southern Arizona.

• A gift card program designed to support downtown Tucson businesses is launching a third fundraising round.

• Music education in Tucson goes virtual during the pandemic.

• Use Tucson's Loop to cycle, hike back in time.

• With pantry staples hard to come by on Tucson grocery shelves, food columnist Robin Mather is offering recipes for readily available ingredients: This week: How best to use a bag of dry navy beans.

• It's possible to maintain social distancing at Sabino Canyon. That makes talk about closing the popular site for hikers, bikers and nature lovers unnecessary, writes Glen Jaquette, an engineer in Tucson and frequent Sabino visitor.

• Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen is inviting readers to join a video chat with her staff at 2 p.m. today. Email her at sgassen@tucson.com for an invitation with the proper Zoom link to join the call.

Wednesday, April 15

2:32 p.m.: Tucson organizations that support women and girls here are being offered the chance to win a $500 grant through the Women's Foundation of Southern Arizona and its after-school program for teen girls, Unidas. The girls in Unidas have shifted their focus this semester to support COVID-19 relief work and to help local organizations.

2:30 p.m.: Here's a daily map of coronavirus cases in Arizona, broken down by county. 

2:00 p.m.: A gift card program designed to support Downtown Tucson businesses is launching a third fundraising round, which if successful would raise a grand total of $105,000 for restaurants, museums, boutiques, breweries and more in just three weeks.

11:10 a.m.: City workers could face furloughs and layoffs as Tucson deals with steep, unexpected revenue losses as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, Michael Ortega, the city manager says.

11:00 a.m.: Gov. Doug Ducey says he will be the one to decide when to reopen Arizona's economy, not President Trump. In a wide-ranging news conference on COVID-19 Tuesday afternoon, the governor said that, for the moment, he is still using May 1 as a target date to start removing restrictions he placed on both what businesses can operate and the personal movement of Arizonans.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 3,962, Arizona health officials said on Wednesday.

6:45 a.m.: Faculty, staff and students at the University of Arizona will be tested to see if they have antibodies showing they have had COVID-19, President Robert Robbins said Tuesday. The tests won't be mandatory and no one will be denied admission or access to classrooms depending on the test results, Robbins said. However, he says, widespread campus testing will help the university determine what sort of protective measures need to be taken, if any, when classes resume. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona Tuesday rose to 3,806, state health officials said on Tuesday. In Pima County, there were 685 known cases of coronavirus, according to Arizona Health Services. Low testing numbers and inconsistent tracking of cases across the state is holding back Arizona's ability to safely reopen its economy, writes Tim Steller, the Star's metro columnist. UA Athletics could lose $7.5 million this spring due to the coronavirus outbreak, Dave Heeke, the school's athletic director told boosters and fans in an open letter Tuesday.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Wednesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• The University of Arizona will be testing its faculty, staff and students to see if they have antibodies showing they have had COVID-19.

• Limited testing and tracing resources are making it hard for Arizona to find a way to safely re-open the economy without having unmanageable spikes in COVID-19, says Star Metro Columnist Tim Steller.

• An effort to release some inmates and put fewer people behind bars for minor offenses has significantly reduced the jail population in Tucson.

• Funeral restrictions in COVID-19 era compound grief, hardship for Tucson families.

• The Tucson unit at Raytheon won't be affected by company salary cuts and furloughs related to the coronavirus pandemic.

• Here is the latest on where Star readers can receive help and give help.

• Telemedicine can't replace in-person visits, but it's an invaluable tool during the coronavirus outbreak, writes Dr. Lisa Soltani, a primary care physician and a medical director at El Rio Community Health Center.

• There's another opportunity to take part in a Star Opinion Reader Chat. Send an email to Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com to get the invite and Zoom link to join the call at 2 p.m. Thursday.

• Dave Heeke, the UA's athletic director, told boosters and fans the school could lose $7.5 million this spring due to spring sports being canceled.

• Brent Dennis, Tucson's parks and recreation director, says he's eager for city facilities to reopen to the public.

Tuesday, April 14

8:29 p.m.: Tohono Chul is requesting donations to help support the botanical gardens. The family foundation of a friend of Tohono Chul has agreed to match gifts up to $150,000. To make a donation, visit tohonochul.org or send it to Tohono Chul, 7366 N. Paseo del Norte, Tucson, AZ 85704. 

Tohono Chul has had to cut expenses and furlough some workers after the gardens closed to the public, according to a news release.

6:32 p.m.: Pima Community College students and staff are donating personal protective equipment to healthcare workers and making masks to donate to help the community during the coronavirus pandemic. 

10:30 a.m.: Tucson International Airport will get a $22.6 million emergency federal grant under a Federal Aviation Administration program to help airports respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, part of $225 million in aid to 59 Arizona airports.

9:25 a.m.: In Pima County, there were 685 cases of coronavirus confirmed on Tuesday, with 32 known coronavirus deaths.

8:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 3,806, up from 3,702 the day before, state health officials said on Tuesday, April 14. 

6:30 a.m.: Newly released data from the state showing coronavirus cases by ZIP code should be 'cautiously' interpreted, health officials say. They warn the numbers don't accurately reflect where people contracted the virus and are skewed by testing availability. Seven more deaths from the coronavirus were reported for Arizona Monday, bringing the statewide total to 122. There were more than 3,700 cases of COVID-19 in the state, according to Arizona Health Services. Those numbers are updated daily. Meanwhile, some 350,000 unemployment claims have been filed in Arizona since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, new state figures show. Gov. Doug Ducey said Monday he wants to reopen the economy as soon as possible – but not until it is 'safe and healthy for people to do so.'

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• The state released data this week that includes ZIP codes where people infected with COVID-19 live, but health officials warn that it's too little information to draw conclusions about the spread of the coronavirus.

• Some 350,000 new unemployment claims have been filed in Arizona since the start of the coronavirus outbreak.

• Gov. Ducey says reopening economy must be done in 'safe, healthy' manner.

• There are eight confirmed cases of the coronavirus in Immigration detention centers in Arizona.

• Arizona processed a record 82,771 background checks on would-be gun buyers in March, as fears of the coronavirus drove people to gun shops.

• The Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona has an interactive map that shows were emergency food boxes and community meals are being distributed in the region. The map can be accessed at www.communityfoodbank.

• The Tucson Sugar Skulls cancel their season.

• It's time for Americans to seriously evaluate health coverage proposals like Medicare For All, writes Dr. Charles Katzenberg, a cardiologist who retired from Banner University Medical Center in 2019.

• Trump touting hydroxychloroquine as a virus cure puts lives at risk, writes Dr. Carlos C. (Kent) Campbell, who served 23 years as chief of the malaria branch at the CDC and led the effort to create the Arizona College of Public Health; and Richard C. Collins, who worked on parasitic disease epidemiology and control for the CDC.

 Monday, April 13

4:30 p.m.: The Women of Quail Creek, an active retirement community in Green Valley are making masks for their neighbors and for hospitals and essential workplaces. The ladies have sewn 400 masks this week and 1,380 masks in the past four weeks. The masks have been donated to The National Guard, Tohono Nation Health Center, Green Valley home health aides, Banner Diamond Children's Center, Santa Cruz Hospital, Santa Rita Nursing Home, Banner's Respiratory department, Banner-Diamond Children's Center and Arizona Oncology. Some masks have also gone to friends and family. 

2:00 p.m.: Throughout Tucson, folks who teach music are taking their lessons to a virtual realm, holding classes and one-on-one instrument lessons with students of all ages now that schools and public spaces have been closed.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona is 3,702, up from 3,539 the day before, Arizona health officials said on Monday. 

6:30 a.m.: Tucson's coronavirus hot spot is ZIP code 85714 — a swath loosely between Ajo Way and Irvington Road, west from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base to just west of Interstate 19. So far, it has 64 confirmed cases of COVID-19, according to expended COVID-19 data released Sunday by Arizona Health Services that includes the ZIP code of where patients live. The state health agency on Sunday also raised the number of confirmed cases across the state to 3,539. There are 622 cases in Pima County, the agency said Sunday.

Here are the latest news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus from Monday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• New data released by the state Sunday shows at least 10 confirmed cases of COVID-19 inmost ZIP codes in metro Tucson. The 85714 ZIP code along Tucson's south side is the area's relative hot spot.

• UA President Robert Robbins says the 'full spectrum of options' is being discussed as the school looks for ways to cope with the financial fallout of the pandemic. Options include a temporary stop in hiring that's already been implemented to salary freezes and furloughs.

• The University of Arizona's administration is 'cautiously optimistic' the fall semester will resume in-person.

• A system that allows people in Arizona to sign petitions online — the same one used by political candidates — is 'highly susceptible to fraud,' says the attorney for the Arizona Republican Party says in arguing in court against letting initiative backers collect signatures online to get measures on the ballot.

• We're staying home and we're doing our best to stay 6 feet away from everyone we meet, but here are tips for when going out is required.

• The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected how Pima County Attorney's Office advocates provide services to crime victims, writes Jonathan Mosher, Democratic candidate for Pima County Attorney.

• Also recently in the Star:  Buy Local is a new partnership connecting all of us to these vitally important Southern Arizona businesses through an online marketplace.  Go to tucson.com/giftcards to see who is offering gift cards on Buy Local, says John D'Orlando, president and publisher of the Arizona Daily Star;  A new job-matching website is now available to Pima County residents; Here are groups across Tucson offering free food and services to those in need; and our coronavirus resource guide has ways to find and get help in Tucson.

Sunday, April 12

10:16 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona reached 3,539, with 115 reported deaths as of Sunday morning. 

7:15 a.m.: Arizona's death toll from coronavirus topped 100 Saturday, doubling in about a week, according to figures from the state Health Services Department. The agency reported 3,398 known coronavirus cases in the state and 591 confirmed cases in Pima County, where 29 people are known to have died from COVID-19. By Saturday, 5,320 people in Pima County had been tested for coronavirus, with 40,530 tests being conducted across Arizona. The health agency numbers are expected to by updated Sunday morning. Later in the day, the state also says it plans to release more detailed information about COVID-19 patients here, including the ZIP code where they live.

Tracking coronavirus patients is critical to helping fight the spread of the disease. But contact tracing is a challenge, local officials say, as COVID-19 cases continues to swell since March 9, when the first case was identified here. COVID-19 survivor Glen Reed is back home after three weeks in ICU and over two weeks on a ventilator.

Home isolation and social distancing is making this Easter weekend like no other. Still, Tucson families continue to find ways to stay connected to each other, their neighbors and the community. Tucson's faith  leaders also are finding new ways to stay connected, read their uplifting messages today.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic in Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Pima County health officials say they’re reaching out to every COVID-19 patient to potentially identify any outbreak clusters and overcome limited testing here for the virus.

• Glen Reed, 57, was admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 on March 11. After three weeks in ICU and over two weeks on a ventilator, he's back home and negative for COVID-19.

• Across Mexico, a largely Catholic country where for many, faith and family are paramount, social distancing during one of the religion's most important holidays is painful.

• Here are five messages from faith leaders across Tucson:  Most Rev. Edward J. Weisenburger, Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tucson;  David Gainey, founding and lead pastor of the Oasis at Rita Ranch;  Rabbi Sanford Seltzer, who lives in Oro Valley who has held a variety of positions on the regional and national staff of the Union For Reform Judaism; Pastor Adam Mueller, senior pastor at Redeemer Lutheran Church in Marana; and Rabbi Helen Cohn, the spiritual leader of Congregation M'kor Hayim in Tucson.

• Children who have special needs face greater challenges after school closures forced learning at home.

"Imagine if no one could explain to you why you suddenly couldn't see your family — or were stuck with them 24/7," writes Amy Silverman, an Arizona journalist whose teen daughter has Down syndrome.

• To recover, resorts here need to rewrite their marketing playbook.

• Stay-at-home orders and social distancing are leading Tucson families to find creative ways to celebrate birthdays and other milestones.

• Tucson families are staying connected to their neighbors by using painted rocks, teddy bears and positive messages.

• In a restricted world, Tucson's golf courses remain busy.

• Tucson Mayor Regina Romero writes about Tucson's economic recovery, including the establishment of the We Are One/ Somos Uno Resiliency Fund. It's a partnership with the Community Foundation of Southern Arizona that will support nonprofits, workers, families and small businesses hurt by the pandemic.

• Judy Rich, CEO of Tucson Medical Center, describes what the hospital is doing to ensure patients and staff are safe during the coronavirus pandemic.

For foster families, society's upheaval is magnified, writes Sandy Walters, a program supervisor with the Casa de los Niños foster care program.

• A positive COVID-19 side effect is renewed teacher appreciation, says  Renée Schafer Horton a writer living in Tucson.

Sunny Tucson is a prime place to be during pandemic, says Ryn Gargulinski, a writer and artist in Tucson.

• Thank Gov. Ducey for including gun stores as 'essential products and services' under his state of emergency declaration, writes Jonathan Hoffman, a local gun advocate.

Buy Local is a new partnership connecting all of us to these vitally important Southern Arizona businesses through an online marketplace.  Go to tucson.com/giftcards to see who is offering gift cards on Buy Local, says John D'Orlando, president and publisher of the Arizona Daily Star.

Saturday, April 11

9:00 a.m.: The Arizona Department of Corrections is posting its COVID-19 data on its website. The dashboard provides statistics for Arizona's prisons and is set to be updated daily. Find it here.

8:00 a.m.: Students in the Fashion Design Program at Pima Community College are making face masks to raise funds for the program after its largest fundraiser of the year — the FashionArte 2020 spring runway show — was canceled due to coronavirus. A student-made mask comes with each $25 donation to the fashion program. Find more information here or call 520-206-4646.

6:30 a.m.: Tucson families are finding ways to stay connected to elderly relatives and friends who are in lockdown in care facilities during the coronavirus pandemic. A Tucson activist is calling on Gov. Doug Ducey to release Arizona's ill and elderly prison inmates during the pandemic. And a retired Tucson-area doctor who accepted a five-day assignment on a cruise ship is entering his fifth week stuck on board during a search for an open port to eventually get him and the rest of the ship's crew home. There were 3,112 known COVID-19 cases in the state and 97 deaths, the Arizona Health Services Department reported on Friday. In Pima County there were 543 known coronavirus cases and 26 deaths, state figures showed Friday.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona from Saturday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• As elderly relatives and friends in care facilities find themselves in lockdown to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus, Tucsonans are finding ways to stay connected.

• What was supposed to be a five-day assignment for Dr. Joseph Rizz, a 72-year-old retired doctor from SaddleBrooke, is about to enter its fifth week as the crew looks for an open port and a way home.

• BK Carne Asada & Hot Dogs deployed meals to Carondelet St. Mary's Hospital Friday, while Eegee's fed police and fire crews.

• One of two companies participating in the city of Tucson's e-scooter pilot program temporarily pulled its scooters off the streets as a way to help curb the spread of the coronavirus

• Arizona food-stamp recipients will soon be able to buy their groceries online.

• Here is the latest on where Star readers can receive help and give help.

• The Christian Tax Credit Alliance a collaborative nonprofit group that supports the efforts of seven Tucson-based nonprofits that serve the needs of the most vulnerable needs help helping others.

• Gov. Ducey should release Arizona's elderly, sick prisoners during virus pandemic, writes Lillian Coppess, president of the START Project, a nonprofit organization that mobilizes families of incarcerated people to advocate sentencing and prison reform.

• David Fitzsimmons, the Star's editorial cartoonist, writes about the effort to keep up with those we know from a distance.

• "Arizonans are resilient - and we will get through this, together," writes U.S. Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick.

Friday, April 10

3:50 p.m.: Photo gallery: Benny Galaz, owner of BK Carne Asada & Hot Dogs, is giving 2 free Sonoran hot dogs to healthcare workers at Tucson area hospitals for the next several weeks as a way to say thank you for their hard work during the coronavirus disease outbreak. 

3:00 p.m.: As elderly relatives and friends are in lockdown in care facilities as a security measure against the coronavirus pandemic, Tucson families are finding ways to stay connected.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases statewide has increased to 3,112, Arizona health officials said Friday.

8:45 a.m.: Southern Arizona officials created a public service announcement, urging the public to not congregate at public parks for upcoming Easter and Passover celebrations.

8:00 a.m.: Nearly a month after turning off the lights and closing the doors in reaction to the coronavirus health crisis, Club Congress at Hotel Congress is back in the concert biz — virtually.

6:30 a.m.: Some 775 Arizonans are likely to die from the coronavirus pandemic by the end of May, according to a new economic forecast that also says the outbreak is going to blow a billion-dollar hole in state finances. There were 3,018 known COVID-19 cases across Arizona and 89 deaths as of Thursday, the state Health Services Department reported. In Pima County there were 512 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 20 deaths, county health officials said Thursday.

Also Thursday, Gov. Doug Ducey said that by Easter Sunday, the state will provide information on location — by ZIP codes — of Arizona patients with confirmed diagnoses of COVID-19. Health Services also will also start listing race and ethnic information about coronavirus patients in the state. Meanwhile, the Tucson Convention Center and a closed hospital near Tucson Mall have been identified as locations here that could potentially be used as alternate care facilities should the state see an extreme surge of hospitalizations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.  Researchers, including a UA professor, are analyzing genomes to track the spread of COVID-19 across the state. One finding: someone arrived in Arizona with the virus in late February or early March and the infection spread.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Friday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star.

Some 775 Arizonans are likely to die by the end of May from the cornavirus, says a new budget report to the state that goes on to say the outbreak will result in a billion-dollar hole in state finances.

• Arizonans will soon know more about whether their neighbors are getting sick and dying from COVID-19.

• A new job-matching website is now available to Pima County residents.

• Some county employees who have unavoidable contact with the public — putting them at greater risk for developing coronavirus — are getting a temporary pay increase.

Two locations in Tucson have been identified as sites that could be used as care facilities if there's a huge surge of hospitalizations due to the outbreak.

• Researchers are analyzing genomes to track the spread of COVID-19 across Arizona.

• Some e-scooters are pulled off Tucson streets to help curb coranavirus spread.

• This is what you need to know about adopting, fostering and caring for pets during COVID-19.

• How to make, buy or find a cloth face mask in Tucson.

Why we do what we do, even when it's not smart, during the pandemic is a topic tackled today by Kathryn Reed, a retired professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the UA, and Erin Harvey, an associate professor in the UA's Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science.

Thursday, April 9

3:00 p.m.: Pima County has reported 512 confirmed coronavirus cases and 20 deaths as of Thursday. 

1:30 p.m.: Downtown Tucson Partnership will launch a second round of offering free money to patrons who buy gift cards for their favorite downtown Tucson businesses starting Friday.

12:38 p.m.: A job matching website is now available to Pima County residents, the Tucson Metro Chamber of Commerce said. 

11:52 a.m.: Cartoonist David Fitzsimmons created a video for Tucsonans. "We're Tucson. We're tough as saguaros. We got this."

11:40 a.m.: A decline in state revenues plus additional costs to the state should leave Arizona with a $1.1 billion budget deficit by the end of the coming fiscal year, new figures today from the Joint Legislative Budget Committee show.

10:30 a.m.: One of the companies participating in the city of Tucson's e-scooter pilot program temporarily pulled its scooters off the streets as a way to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.

10:00 a.m.: Tucsonans have spotted chalk messages written on sidewalks across the city, giving an extra boost of encouragement to those who walk by. Here's a look at some of the drawings people have seen.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases across Arizona has reached 3,000, with 3,018 cases confirmed, state health officials said Thursday.

6:30 a.m.: Seniors in Tucson's largest k-12 school district, TUSD, who were on track to graduate before the sudden switch to online-learning have assurances from district leaders that they are guaranteed to get their diploma at the end of the school year. Similarly, grades for all students in Tucson Unified School District can be raised, but not lowered, during this period of forced remote learning due to the coronavirus outbreak, district officials said. Confirmed COVID-19 cases in the state reached 2,726 Wednesday, with 80 known coronavirus deaths, according to Arizona Health Services. In Pima County, there were 464 known cases Wednesday and 16 deaths, county health officials reported. Gov. Ducey's order this week that he says requires visitors to Arizona from areas having 'substantial community spread' of COVID-19 is murky when it comes to the do's and don't for out-of-town guests. Restaurants in Tucson and the state can now sell groceries, and a local radio station has started a GoFundMe campaign to help feed health-care workers and first responders. Here are news development about the coronavirus pandemic in Tucson and across Arizona from Thursday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• TUSD students can use grades earned in the third quarter of the school year, before schools were closed, as their final grades. And high school seniors on track to graduate before schools were ordered closed will get their diploma, TUSD says.

• Restaurants in Tucson are temporarily allowed to act as pop-up grocery stores, selling packaged food, fresh produce, paper goods and cleaning supplies.

• If out-of-town visitors come from areas with 'substantial community spread' of COVID-19, Gov. Doug Ducey says they're subject to self-quarantine for 14 days after arrival.

• The legal counsel for the Arizona Board of Regents says there is 'no factual basis' for the attorney general's assertion that state universities must release more information about students, faculty and staff who contract COVID-19.

• Tucson independent radio station The Drive has launched a GoFundMe campaign to help feed health-care workers and first responders.

• You can use Zoom to join the Star's opinion team meeting today at 2 p.m.

Use this link: https://arizona.zoom.us/j/475812065 and it should take you to the meeting. If that does not work, email Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen at sgassen@tucson.com to get an invite.

• The inability to properly social distance means it's time to shut down overcrowded Sabino Canyon, writes Melissa Rubalcava, a Tucson native and graduate student pursuing her master's degree in international relations at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs in Syracuse, New York.

• Robert Matte Jr., a local writer and a retired college teacher, shares some light-hearted observations about living through the coronavirus pandemic in Tucson.

• "It wouldn't hurt to go back polish my game and most importantly get a master's (degree). Going back seemed like a smart decision," Arizona Women's Basketball star Aari McDonald says in explaining her decision to return the the Wildcats next season.

• Tucson will have its own virtual country music festival on Friday, April 10, courtesy of Jessica Northey-Shaw. A nationally- known country music social media influencer from Tucson, Northey-Shaw put together a solid lineup of local country talent for a daylong virtual festival from noon to 9 p.m. Friday, to be broadcast on her Country Sway Facebook page (facebook.com/CountrySway).

• North Fourth Avenue's popular Made in Tucson Market was set for April 18, but can now be found online.

• Here are some Tucson titles, and actors with Tucson ties to check out on your next streaming-service binge.

Wednesday, April 8

2:00 p.m.: Amid the rapid spread of coronavirus, we want to hear what's on your mind: What questions, concerns and news tips do you have about the coronavirus outbreak in Southern Arizona? Click here to submit any questions you may have.

1:30 p.m.: Tucson independent radio station The Drive has launched a GoFundMe campaign to help feed healthcare workers and first responders.

1:04 p.m.: There are now 464 known coronavirus cases in Pima County and 16 deaths have been reported as of Wednesday morning, up one from Tuesday.

12:29 p.m: With a rise in fake COVID-19 medical product scams, consumers can report fraudulent products to the FDA online.

10:00 a.m.: Authorities in northern Arizona have arrested a man for writing a racist social media post accusing Navajo people of carrying the coronavirus and calling for their deaths.

9:30 a.m.: Two Arizona inmates have tested positive for the coronavirus in the first cases of infected prisoners reported since the beginning of the outbreak, officials said.

9:00 a.m.: Confirmed coronavirus cases across the state now sit at 2,726, Arizona health officials said Wednesday.

8:00 a.m.: Browse through any streaming service during quarantine and it won’t take long to find an actor, actress, director or producer with ties to Tucson. Here are a few to get your search started.

6:50 a.m.: Tucson school closures prompted by the coronavirus outbreak won't hurt student grades in TUSD, the governing board decided Tuesday night. And seniors on track to get their diploma before schools closed will still do so, regardless of grades during forced online classes.

6:30 a.m.: As confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona topped 2,500 Tuesday, beach towns in Sonora spread a message to American tourists who normally crowd its hotels and sandy shores during the days leading up to Easter: stay away. Known COVID-19 cases in Pima County were at 415 Tuesday, including 15 coronavirus-related deaths, county health officials reported. Six border officers in Arizona have tested positive for COVID-19, U.S. Customs and Border Protection reports. And Gov. Doug Ducey says he wants visitors to Arizona from the New York City area — and anywhere else there is 'substantial community spread' of the coronavirus — to quarantine themselves for two weeks after arrival.

Here are news developments in Tucson and Arizona related to the coronavirus pandemic from Wednesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star.

• As community transmission of the novel coronavirus accelerates in Mexico, prompting widespread beach closures, roadblocks and curfews, state and local law enforcement officials are cracking down. Still looking to go to Sonora this week? Travel restrictions along the border remain in place as Easter approaches.

• 6 border officers in Arizona have tested positive for COVID-19, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said this week.

• Gov. Doug Ducey wants visitors arriving from the New York area or other places where coronavirus is widespread to self-quarantine for two weeks.

• At least four residents and two staff members have tested positive for the coronavirus at a Green Valley nursing home.

• These SaddleBrooke residents teamed up to make face masks for health-care workers.

• Tucson restaurant and bar workers displaced by the coronavirus are getting a hand up from Tucson's Barrio Brewing Co. It is donating $25,000 toward grocery gift cards.

• Tucson's food community comes together to help a charismatic chef who opened during the coronavirus outbreak.

• Here are groups across Tucson offering free food and services to those in need.

• Give trials a chance to gauge effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine in fighting COVID-19, says Dr. Timothy C. Fagan, a professor emeritus of internal medicine at the University of Arizona.

• The Star's Opinion team meets every weekday via Zoom video conference call.  Opinion Editor Sarah Garrecht Gassen set up a Zoom meeting that is open to the public. One rule: no shouting. Join the team Thursday, April 9, at 2 p.m.

• David Fitzsimmons, the Star's editorial cartoonist, visits Arroyo Cafe for a big serving of human contact.

Tuesday, April 7

6:14 p.m.The Pima County jail has added more measures to try to prevent a coronavirus outbreak, including checking employees for symptoms and isolating inmates that come in to the jail. 

4:53 p.m.: Starting April 9, the Marana Unified School District will expand its free grab and go meals to include 14 bus routes making stops at 270 locations. 

2:15 p.m.: At least four residents and two staff members have tested positive for the coronavirus at Santa Rita Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Green Valley, an official confirmed Tuesday.

1:44 p.m.: A local nonprofit — Make Way for Books — has launched a bilingual app for families to access books and activities and to tune in to storytime online while following stay-at-home orders. 

12:30 p.m.: There are 415 known coronavirus cases in Pima County and 15 deaths have been reported as of Tuesday morning, up two from Sunday.

12:00 p.m.: Six border officers in Arizona have tested positive for the coronavirus, Customs and Border Protection said this week. 

11:30 a.m.: The Tucson Police Department recently posted a new public service announcement surrounding social distancing — and an Easter egg hunt — amid the coronavirus pandemic.

9:00 a.m.: Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona now surpass 2,500, with 2,575 cases statewide, officials said Tuesday.

6:30 a.m.: The number of out of work Arizonans seeking unemployment benefits amid the coronavirus crisis set a new record this week. There were nearly 130,000 new claims filed by the end of last week, state numbers released Monday show. The week before there were nearly 89,000 claims. How much higher than normal for Arizona are those numbers? Fewer than 3,000 new unemployment filings were submitted the last week of February.

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona topped 2,400 on Monday, according to the Arizona Health Services Department. There were 415 known COVID-19 cases in Pima County. Across the state, there have been 65 known coronavirus deaths, including 14 in Pima County, officials said Monday.

Today is Arizona Gives Day and area nonprofits say the economic fallout of the coronavirus outbreak makes the massive online fundraising effort especially crucial to their ability to help others.

Here are local and state developments related to the coronavirus pandemic from Tuesday's Arizona Daily Star:

129,215 initial claims for unemployment benefits were filed by the end of last week in Arizona, setting another new record for the state.  

• Today is Arizona Gives Day, the ultimate 'social distancing' fundraiser for nonprofits. The 24-hour online campaign can be found at AZGives.org.

• Gov. Doug Ducey on Monday ordered judges in Arizona to suspend evictions for commercial tenants affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

• Tucson's Thunder Canyon Brewery has teamed up with Elgin Distillery to use their equipment to make much-needed hand sanitizer, a trend seen here and elsewhere.

• Arizona's chief elections officer said she won't oppose legal efforts to allow initiative drives to gather needed signatures online.

• FC Tucson Youth Soccer has found a way to keep some 2,000 young players engaged, writes Greg Hansen, the Star's sports columnist.

• Brittany L. Uhlorn, a doctoral candidate in cancer biology at the University of Arizona, writes about the importance of taking care of your mental health during the sometimes overwhelming stress brought on by the pandemic.

• Tucson couples postpone their weddings amid mounting social restrictions prompted by the coronavirus outbreak. High schoolers across Tucson are coping with the loss of prom and graduation ceremonies.

• New to online grocery shopping? Here's a guide to doing it in from Tucson stores during the coroavirus outbreak.

• Share random acts of kindness and your stories of coping with this time of social isolation with other Star readers.

• The Star wants to be your connection point to helping others and getting help. Here are the latest requests from nonprofits across Tucson. Here's our resource guide to help you get through the pandemic. Here's a list of Tucson restaurants, updated daily, offering special deals for takeout and delivery.Pima County’s WIC program is helping local families amid the coronavirus pandemic. Hundreds of Tucson restaurants are open for takeout, delivery or both.

• The Star has compiled a big resource guide to help Tucsonans with an assortment of issues affecting daily life during the coronavirus outbreak. Among the topics covered: getting help covering the rent; buying groceries; and keeping the kids busy. The guide will be updated regularly.

 

Monday, April 6

12:00 p.m.: Four Tucson chefs are featured in a new video asking the community for their support. 

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona is now at 2,456, with 415 in Pima County, officials said on Monday.

6:30 a.m.: There have been 13 known deaths in Pima County related to the coronavirus, the county health department reported Sunday afternoon. Since Jan. 22, 81 people here have been hospitalized with COVID-19, including 24 people admitted into intensive care units, the department said Sunday. Meanwhile, confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona are now at 2,269, with 372 of them in Pima County, according to the statewide tally released earlier Sunday by the Arizona Department of Health Services. It said there were 64 known COVID-19 deaths in Arizona as of Sunday morning. The state tally also said the deaths in Pima County numbered 14, one more than the county reported in its tally later Sunday.

The state does not release data on the number of patients in Arizona who have recovered. For most people, the virus causes mild or moderate symptoms but can be deadly, especially for older people and those with underlying health conditions. Here are the latest local and state developments related to the coronavirus pandemic from Monday's issue of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Long-haul drivers at Tucson's TTT Truck Stop shared some of the difficulties they're facing staying on the road: a lack of rest; finding food; and too few places still open for showers and other necessities.

•The Roman Catholic Diocese of Tucson and other local congregations are live-streaming religious services this Holy Week.

• During this time of isolation and social distancing, there are still ways to be a good neighbor.

• Share random acts of kindness and your stories of coping with this time of social isolation with other Star readers.

Former Arizona Wildcat track star Sage Watson is working to maintain her training for the 2021 Olympics between chores at the family farm in Medicine Hat, Alberta.

• The Star wants to be your connection point to helping others and getting help. Here are the latest requests from nonprofits across Tucson. Here's our resource guide to help you get through the pandemic. Here's a list of Tucson restaurants, updated daily, offering special deals for takeout and delivery.Pima County’s WIC program is helping local families amid the coronavirus pandemic. Hundreds of Tucson restaurants are open for takeout, delivery or both.

• The Star has compiled a big resource guide to help Tucsonans with an assortment of issues affecting daily life during the coronavirus outbreak. Among the topics covered: getting help covering the rent; buying groceries; and keeping the kids busy. The guide will be updated regularly.

Sunday, April 5

8:00 a.m.: Downtown Tucson Partnership said Sunday that all 1000 gift cards it was selling for $25 apiece to help businesses sold out. The effort raised $35,000 in just over 24 hours, the group said.

6:30 a.m.: An expected surge in COVID-19 cases is expected to hit here later this month, and Tucson hospitals are doing what they can to prepare for it. However, the preparation is being slowed by a sizable lack of supplies, medical devices and personal protective equipment. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona have been rising daily. There were 2,019 known COVID-19 cases in Arizona, with 326 of them in Pima County, according to the statewide tally released Saturday by the Arizona Department of Health Services. There have been 52 known COVID-19 deaths in Arizona, the department said, including 12 in Pima County. The statewide pandemic numbers are expected to be updated later Sunday. The number of people infected in the U.S. has exceeded 300,000. The nationwide death toll surpassed 8,400, with more than 3,500 of those deaths in the state of New York, according to reporting from the Associated Press. For most people the virus causes mild or moderate symptoms. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, COVID-19 can be more severe or fatal.

Here are news developments related to the coronavirus outbreak across Tucson and the state from Sunday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Lacking supplies, medical devices and personal protective equipment, Tucson's hospitals are doing what they can to prepare for an expected surge in COVID-19 cases here later this month. Here are what some hospitals are doing and what they need.

• Tucson's class of 2020 headed to spring break a few weeks ago not knowing it would be the last time on their high school campus. Now they're realizing coronavirus likely means no prom, no graduation ceremonies, no saying goodbye to classmates and the loss of other rites of passage for teens.

• This long period of self-isolation, which began more than two weeks ago and is scheduled for another month at least, is taking a toll on Tucson's mental health, writes Tim Steller, the Star's Metro columnist.

• In 1918 Tucson was a dusty desert town that some 20,000 people called home. When residents started to die that spring from a devastating new strain of the flu, the virus didn't even have a name yet. This is how the Arizona Daily Star reported on the Spanish flu when it marched through Tucson a century ago.

• Staying home helps reduce the spread of coronavirus, but some advocates say it also could lead to a rise in domestic abuse and violence that would is more likely to go unseen and unreported.

• The Border Patrol has been quickly expelling migrants apprehended along the U.S.-Mexico border in an effort they say is intended to help fight the spread of coronavirus in federal facilities here.

• Tucsonans have more options for COVID-19 testing: one local lab has developed a test for the disease; another lab is offering a simple blood test to confirm that COVID-19 sufferers have recovered.

• University of Arizona President Robert C. Robbins shares how researchers and students are working to help suppress COVID-19.

• It is a scary time in America due to coronavirus, especially if you are pregnant. Nancy Mellberg and Teresa Wilson, registered nurses in the Nurse-Family Partnership at Casa de los Niños share tips for staying safe and healthy.

• Looking for a silver-lining during this time of isolation? Deena Harris, who is active in Sun City's Institute of Learning in Retirement, says it's a good time to slow down and help others.

• Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the Class of 2020 should focus on the good, writes Adrian Ford, a student at the UA's School of Journalism.

• Today's collection of sermons and messages from Tucson's religious community includes: Rabbi Yehuda Ceitlin, the outreach director at Chabad Tucson; Pastor Roy Tullgren, who oversees Donor and Church Engagement at the Gospel Rescue Mission; and Rabbi Thomas Louchheim, of Congregation Or Chadash in Tucson.

Saturday, April 4

5:30 p.m.: Pima County health officials identified another coronavirus-related death and an additional 46 cases Saturday afternoon.

3:30 p.m.: Governor Doug Ducey announced President Trump approved of Arizona's Major Disaster Declaration that will provide additional resources in fighting the coronavirus. 

12:30 p.m.: Downtown Tucson Partnership is adding $10 free to 1,000 gift cards to support businesses during the pandemic. It'll provide a $35,000 investment to the area.

9:30 a.m.There are now 2,019 confirmed cases in Arizona and 52 known coronavirus-related deaths.

6:30 a.m.: Gov. Doug Ducey on Friday widened Arizona's mandated business closures to help fight the spread of the coronavirus, adding barbershops, beauty and nail salons, spas, tattoo shops and similar services. He also ordered swap meets, playgrounds and public pools to close. Friday's order came nearly two weeks after mounting criticism that his earlier emergency orders didn't go far enough to limit social contact during the pandemic and that they were used specifically to prohibit Arizona's 91 cities and towns and 15 counties from using local powers to shutter businesses he had deemed "essential." Tucson Mayor Regina Romero was among the first local leaders in the state to institute wide-ranging limits and closures on an assortment of businesses in the city and had been urging Ducey to declare at statewide stay-at-home order.

Ducey's new order takes effect at 5 p.m. today.

Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona were at 1,769, with 280 in Pima County, state officials said Friday. Across the state, there have been 41 known coronavirus deaths as of Friday morning, the daily count issued by the Arizona Department of Health Services showed. That number includes 11 known coronavirus deaths in Pima County, according to the county Health Department's website Friday.

Here are the latest local and state coronavirus developments from today's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Gov. Doug Ducey on Friday ordered barbershops, beauty and nail salons, spas and similar services, as well as swap meets, playgrounds and public pools to close, conceding they can't be operated safely during the coronavirus pandemic.

• Instead of attending open houses, many Tucson homeshoppers are opting for virtual home tours.

• Health-care workers in Tucson are getting much-needed protection during the COVID-19 pandemic thanks to a local effort to make face masks and shields with 3D printers and laser cutters.

• The Pima County Sheriff's Department has seen a spike in calls for help from hikers hitting the trails without taking basic safety measures.

• Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich says it's up to Gov. Ducey to make the first decision on whether to let initiative circulators gather signatures online, despite a state law to the contrary.

• The Star wants to be your connection point to helping others and getting help. Here are the latest requests from nonprofits across Tucson. Here's our resource guide to help you get through the pandemic. Here's a list of Tucson restaurants, updated daily, offering special deals for takeout and delivery.Pima County’s WIC program is helping local families amid the coronavirus pandemic. Hundreds of Tucson restaurants are open for takeout, delivery or both.

• "We may be living in the last days of 'America First.' The idea that we could wall ourselves off from trouble has been forever defeated by this virus," Tucsonan Terry Bracy, who has served as a political adviser, campaign manager, congressional aide, sub-Cabinet official and adviser to presidents, writes in a guest opinion today.

• David Fitzsimmons, the Star's editorial cartoonist, is going online to stay in touch with his pals at Arroyo Cafe.

Friday, April 3

3:05 p.m.: Here's a list of Tucson restaurants, updated daily, offering special deals for takeout and delivery. 

3:00 p.m.: Pima County announced Friday that it will close its shooting ranges for the duration of the COVID-19 outbreak due to extreme staffing shortages.

2:55 p.m.: Gov. Doug Ducey today ordered the shuttering of barbers, beauty parlors, nail salons and spas, conceding there's no way to operate them safely. 

The edict, which takes effect at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 4, also further narrows his original list of "essential services.'' He will now require the closure of any amenities at public parks "that do not allow for recommended physical distancing or proper hygiene.'' That includes everything from basketball courts and playgrounds to public restrooms.

12:00 p.m.: Pima County’s WIC program is helping local families amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Women, Infants and Children Program, offered through the Pima County Health Department, provides healthy food, nutrition tips, breastfeeding support and helps guide families toward other resources in the community. 

10:30 a.m.: Fort Huachuca officials have confirmed its first coronavirus case, making it the fifth case in Cochise County.

9:00 a.m.: Confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona now sit at 1,769, with 280 in Pima County, state officials said Friday. 

6:30 a.m.: Employees still working for a company with two call center locations in Tucson say they worry about their health because its too crowded to apply social distancing guidelines and avoid colleagues who are ill. Meanwhile, the number of people in the state who have already lost their jobs keeps growing. Arizona had more than 28,000 unemployment claims filed in the week ending March 21. There were 89,000 last week and another 100,000 people are expected to file soon. What's typical for Arizona? Normally about 3,500 claims are filed a week in the state. Coronavirus is widespread in the state, which on Thursday reported 1,598 known COVID-19 cases and 32 deaths. In Pima County there were 237 confirmed coronavirus cases, the Arizona Health Services Department reported. On Thursday Gov. Doug Ducey issued an order that put the brakes in Arizonans getting the malaria drug chloroquine to avoid getting COVID-19, at least without a prescription. Here are coronavirus developments in Tucson and Arizona from today's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Tucson call center employees still clocking into the office say they worry cramped workspaces and sick colleagues put their health at risk.

• The Star has compiled a big resource guide to help Tucsonans with an assortment of issues affecting daily life during the coronavirus outbreak. Among the topics covered: getting help covering the rent; buying groceries; and keeping the kids busy. The guide will be updated regularly.

• Arizonans hoping to avoid contracting COVID-19 won't be able to do so legally by getting their hands on the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, or chloroquine — at least not without a prescription.

• Groups trying to put measures on the November ballot are asking the Arizona Supreme Court to let them gather the remaining signatures they need online. Meanwhile, some Pima County candidates are still going door-to-door to collect signatures despite Gov. Doug Ducey's statewide stay-at-home order.

Abortions remain available in Arizona the order by Gov. Doug Ducey to halt all 'non-essential or elective' surgeries.

• The stay-at-home order issued this week by Gov. Doug Ducey has left some Arizonans confused about what they can — and cannot — legally do.

• Mobile home residents across Tucson — especially those living in old, substandard units — are likely to be particularly hard hit by COVID-19, say Mark Kear and Margaret Wilder, faculty members in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona.

• Without gigs to play, Tucson country singer Angel Perez is set perform a concert later today from his balcony. The performance of his second concert this week begins at 5 p.m. It will help raise money for the staff of Wisdom's Cafe, a Mexican restaurant in Tumacacori. The concert is being livestreamed on his Facebook page: https:// tinyurl.com/wu8hulk.

• As we do what we can to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, the Star wants to hear about what you are doing to help each other.

Thursday, April 2

5:13p.m.: Pima County launched a new webpage that connects its residents to local restaurants that are open for takeout during the coronavirus pandemic. Pima Eats, links residents to the Daily Star's restaurant guide which lists more than 500 restaurants that are open for pickup or delivery. The county has also created a Pima Eats Facebook page where they will also share food promotions from area restaurants. 

1:30 p.m.: The Desert Diamond Casino in Sahuarita is postponing its May Diamond Center shows.

12:16 p.m.: The Pima County Health Department is consolidating its clinics and has suspended walk-in services in response to the COVID-19 virus. 

11:30 a.m.: Taking a walk in your neighborhood? Here's a guide of common wildflowers and birds you may encounter.

10:00 a.m.: Whether you need help paying the rent, getting groceries or keeping the kids busy, the Arizona Daily Star's resource guide — updated daily — is here to help.

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed cases in Arizona now sits at 1,598, with 237 in Pima County.

6:30 a.m.: With mass layoffs across the country — US unemployment claims hit a record 6.6 million claims last week — a number of the thousands of Tucsonans who are among the newly unemployed say they can't reach DES customer service centers for help filing for benefits. There were more than 1,400 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona Wednesday, according to the state Health Services Department's daily count. In Pima County, 217 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed, with 10 deaths. Thirty-five of the Pima County patients have been hospitalized and 13 have been in the ICU. The number of known COVID-19 deaths rose to 29.

Here are local and state developments related to the coronavirus outbreak from today's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Arizona's Department of Economic Security has been having ongoing problems this week that prevent clients from calling DES customer service centers.

• When it comes to deporting migrants, everything old is new again for the Border Patrol. The agency is taking 'unprecedented measures' to quickly expel migrants from southern Arizona into Mexico as a precaution against the coronavirus.

• Families say uncertainty from Arizona leaders over the best practices for protecting the intellectually disabled from COVID-19 has led some providers to close programs or divert aides from providing home visits.

• Chinese-American business owners here first noticed a drop in customers during the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show, typically one of the busiest times of the year. Soon regulars disappeared, many saying they were scared to go outside to eat. Then business restrictions from the city and state to fight coronavirus hit. These Tucson restaurants are open for take-out, delivery or both. While many Tucson restaurants have closed to ride out the pandemic, Govinda's Natural Foods and Brother John's Beer, Bourbon & BBQ reopened on Wednesday to offer takeout.

• "These are some of the hardest decisions I've had to make in my more than four decades with Pima County," County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry said about putting an unspecified number of it's 7,000 employees on leave to help reduce the spread of coronavirus. "But they are necessary. I, and every member of the Board of Supervisors, understand that these actions will cause financial hardships for some employees if this order lasts more than a few weeks. We are doing everything we can to assist our workers through this difficult time."

• Technology invented at the University of Arizona could potentially help people who are having trouble breathing due to coronavirus complications.

• Megan A. Carney, an assistant professor in the School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona, says there 3 lessons about what we can do to curb the COVID-19 catastrophe by learning from other countries, like Italy, that have been fighting the coronavirus longer than the United States.

• The doors are closed for live performances by Tucson musicians, but many of them aren't letting the coronavirus stop the music.

Wednesday, April 1

2:00 p.m.: Two Tucson restaurants that had been sitting out the coronavirus pandemic have reopened to offer takeout.

11:41 a.m.: Two women who were members of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe died last weekend due to coronavirus, tribe officials said.

11:30 a.m.: Tucson Parks and Recreation has temporarily closed all city park playgrounds and other equipment to help curb the spread of COVID-19 in the community. 

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona is inching toward 1,500, with 1,413 cases currently confirmed statewide, officials said Wednesday.

8:10 a.m.: The University of Arizona is launching a series of webinars to address coronavirus pandemic issues. The first one, about best practices to control the spread of the virus, will be held today.

6:45 a.m.: After word of two big house parties this weekend near the University of Arizona campus, police said officers are ready to enforce social distancing orders mandated during the coronavirus outbreak. Chris Magnus, Tucson's police chief, says party-goers could be charged with a misdemeanor. Meanwhile, an unspecified number of "non-essential" Pima County employees ended their shift Tuesday with a notice that they're being put in leave until the statewide stay-at-home order issued this week by Gov. Ducey is rescinded. On the same day, the county asked for an army of volunteers — especially people with medical experience — to help fight the pandemic. The economic fallout from the virus crisis hit the Star on Tuesday too, with its parent company Lee Enterprises ordering furloughs at all of its properties. Here's a roundup of local and state developments related to the coronavirus outbreak from today's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Tucson police say the party's over during the coronavirus pandemic. And Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich said police and sheriffs deputies are legally entitled to enforce emergency proclamations and orders issued by state and local officials.

• An unspecified number of "non-essential" Pima County employees are now on leave.

A call for volunteers, especially people with medical backgrounds, was issued by the county to help fight the coronavirus.

• The state Board of Education adopted an emergency rule Tuesday that bars Arizona public schools from withholding academic credit or a diploma "solely because the student missed instructional time due to a school closure issued by the governor." That means Arizona's estimated 86,000 high school seniors won't be prevented from graduating because of the virus shutdown.

• Tim Steller, the Star's Metro columnist, says people who don't need the federal stimulus money that's on its way should give it to, or spend it on, those who do.

• Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona's signature attraction, remained open to the public Tuesday, despite growing calls for it to close to protect visitors, vendors and staff from coronavirus.

• Lee Enterprises, which owns the Arizona Daily Star in cooperation with Gannett, has instituted temporary pay cuts and furloughs due to coronavirus-related revenue declines. All employees either will have reduced pay or take unpaid time off from April through June. Gannett instituted similar cost-savings measures on Monday, but the Star is following Lee's plan.

• Bianchi's Italian restaurant closed its Marana location at the end of business Tuesday in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Some Tucson restaurants that were open and trying to ride out the coronavirus pandemic have thrown in the towel for now. Here's a list of nearly 500 restaurants that are open for pickup and delivery.

• Anika Pasilis, a UA journalism student who lost her retail job and her internship on the same day due to the pandemic, writes about the stress she and other young people are facing, including worrying about their future employment.

• The Arizona Daily Star wants to be your connection point to helping others and getting help. Here are the latest requests from nonprofits here.

• A 7-year-old boy in Oro Valley was surprised with a birthday car-parade from his first-grade classmates. Tucson teachers are finding creative ways to stay connected with their students.

• Star Sports Columnist Greg Hansen says the financial ramifications of the coronavirus pandemic means, "the model for college athletics is likely to be turned inside out."

Tuesday, March 31

2:00 p.m.: Several Tucson restaurants are temporarily closing to ride out the coronavirus pandemic. 

12:45 p.m.: The state's estimated 86,000 high school seniors won't be prevented from graduating just because the governor shut down Arizona schools through the end of the academic year.

10:30 a.m.: A health clinic on Craycroft Road is offering coronavirus tests to adults who meet CDC criteria. 

10:00 a.m.: A third COVID-19 cases has been confirmed in Santa Cruz County, health officials there said in a news release Tuesday morning.

"The investigation found that the person had traveled to an area where community transmission is present," said the news release from Santa Cruz County Health Services, without providing additional detail about the trip. "The person is recovering well at home."

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona is now at 1,289, officials said Tuesday.

8:30 a.m.: Tucsonans who attend large gatherings during mandated social distancing requirements prompted by COVID-19 could be charged with a misdemeanor, Police Chief Chris Magnus said in a statement Tuesday.

6:15 a.m.: With coronavirus continuing to spread across Arizona, Gov. Doug Ducey on Monday issued an order saying people who don't need to be out to stay home. It takes effect today at 5 p.m. However, there are several exceptions for 'essential activities.' Those can include everything from grocery shopping to getting your hair or nails done (assuming those businesses haven't already closed under local emergency orders). Ducey's order came on the same day a Tucson nursing home and rehab facility said it has a major coronavirus outbreak, with 27 patients and staff testing positive for COVID-19. At least one patient has died. There are 20 known coronavirus deaths in the state among 1,157 confirmed COVID-19 cases, the Arizona Health Services Department reported on Monday in its daily count. Earlier in the day, Ducey said there was no reasonable way to have schools in Arizona reopen safely this spring. That means k-12 students will end their school year online.

Here's a roundup of local and state coronavirus developments from Tuesday's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• "He was a great man, very smart, very intelligent," Scott Franklin said through tears about of his dad, who died Saturday of COVID-19. Lloyd Franklin, 64, a resident at Sapphire of Tucson for six years, was one of 27 patients or staff members there who've contracted the disease.

• Starting at 5 p.m. today, Arizonans must 'limit their time' away from their homes except to participate in 'essential activities,' says an order to limit the spread of coronavirus issued Monday by Gov. Doug Ducey.

• Ducey and Kathy Hoffman, the state superintendent of public instruction, also announced Monday that there is no reasonable way to have schools reopen safely this spring. Meanwhile, the Arizona Interscholastic Association said all games through the end of the school year have been canceled because of the coronavirus pandemic.

• Gospel Rescue Mission now has a free drive-through to help supplement basic needs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

88,592 initial unemployment claims were filed in Arizona in the week ending Friday, according to the state Department of Economic Security. That compares with 29,333 claims the week before — and fewer than 3,000 at the end of February.

• Tucson's Reed's Compounding Pharmacy is doing its part to help keep the coronavirus at bay by mixing its own, high-quality hand sanitizer.

• Banner Health is accepting donations of medical supplies and personal protective equipment.

• In an effort to reduce the jail population, about a dozen inmates are being released from the Pima County jail, and other inmates set to go to state prison will instead be transferred to the Pinal County jail.

• These simple actions can stop this coronavirus pandemic, according to Dr. Allan Hamilton is a regents professor of surgery, professor of neurosurgery, psychology, radiation oncology, and electrical and computer engineering at the University of Arizona.

Monday, March 30

2:50 p.m.: Gov. Doug Ducey issued an executive order today telling Arizonans to stay home during the coronavirus crisis.

2:20 p.m.: Banner Health is accepting donations of medical supplies and personal protective equipment, officials announced Monday. Donations are being accepted at the Banner Home Health Office at 575 E. River Road on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

1:54 p.m.: The Postal History Foundation is accepting entries for the 13th Annual Tucson Birthday Stamp Design Contest for Kids 2020. Tucson-area children ages five to 17 can enter the contest. There are three age groups. The winner will have their design made into a custom U.S. postage stamp, and the top five winners from each age group will receive awards and prizes.  The contest deadline is July 31. Entry forms and rules can be downloaded at www.postalhistoryfoundation.org. Entries should be mailed in as the Postal History Foundation is temporarily closed to the public due to the coronavirus.

1:50 p.m.: There are 27 confirmed cases of COVID-19 at a Tucson nursing and rehab facility, according to a statement today by the business.

1:15 p.m.: Bianchi's Italian restaurant is closing its Marana location at the end of business Tuesday, March 31, in response to the coronavirus.

11:18 a.m.: Agua Caliente Park, a popular site for Easter celebrations will be closed Easter Sunday this year. 

9:00 a.m.: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases has reached 1,157 statewide, Arizona health officials said.

8:30 a.m.: Arizona schools will remain closed through the end of the school year, Governor Doug Ducey and state Schools Chief Kathy Hoffman announced Monday morning. 

6:30 a.m.: Wendy Smith-Reeve, director of the Arizona Division of Emergency Management, resigned over the weekend. She complained to Gov. Doug Ducey that she was being sidelined as a leader in the state's response to the coronavirus pandemic, the Associated Press reports. Arizona's confirmed COVID-19 cases climbed to 919 Sunday. In Pima County the number of known cases rose to 153, according to Sunday's daily coronavirus count by the Arizona Health Services Department.

Here's an update of coronavirus developments in Tucson and the state from today's edition of the Arizona Daily Star:

• Add guns and ammo to the list of items like toilet paper and rice that Tucsonans are stocking up on during the virus crisis.

• Stores with padlocked doors is what visitors will find along the nearly empty streets of downtown Nogales. U.S. officials started blocking non-essential travel from Mexico last week as a precaution against the coronavirus. It blocked Mexican shoppers from coming into Arizona, slamming businesses in the state's border communities.

• Home refinancing jumped 479% so far in March, according to Zillow economists. Is taking cash out of your home a good idea right now?

• Tucson Electric Power and Uni-Source Energy Services are donating a combined $1 million to bill payment assistance and other coronavirus relief efforts across Arizona. Pima Community College's Small Business Development Center is offering help to Tucson businesses that are applying for low-interest federal disaster loans. Allied Universal is holding a virtual hiring events until April 23 to fill more than 300 security-related positions in Tucson, Phoenix and Mesa. Go to jobs.aus.com to apply. Pima County has a jobs hotline. Here are some resources for the newly unemployed.

• The coronavirus pandemic means the world will never look the same, says Brian David Johnson, a futurist in residence at Arizona State University's Center for Science and Imagination.

• Sunday afternoon turned into a watch party for Arizona Wildcat basketball fans. CBS replayed the "milestone victory for Arizona" when the fourth-seeded UA held off No. 1 seed Kentucky 84-79 in overtime to win Arizona's first and only national championship. If you're still feeling nostalgic, check out photos and coverage of the Wildcats' 1997 championship season here.

• Help Tucson restaurants stay open, order delivery or takeout today. Find free meals for kids and others in need here.

• Coronavirus isolation in Tucson opens a virtual world of fitness, art, culture. Here are 8 at-home fitness classes. Relax with a stress-free list of local businesses offering at-home workouts, meditation and stress management exercises. Here are a few ways you can help Tucson weather the virus outbreak.

Sunday, March 29

6:47 p.m.: The Arizona Department of Health Services launched a new dashboard Sunday on its website to include more data on confirmed cases and on commercial testing to better track how the outbreak is evolving, the department said in a news release. 

3 p.m.: Desert Diamond Casinos and Entertainment announced it's postponing April events. This affects the Rocketman — A Tribute to Elton John and country singer Jimmie Allen shows originally scheduled for April 11 and April 24 respectively. 

12:23 p.m.: A sixth coronavirus patient died in Pima County as of Sunday morning. The man is between 41 and 65 years old and had underlying conditions that made him high risk for severe illness, the Pima County Health Department said in a news release Sunday. 

11 a.m.: Confirmed cases of COVID-19 continue to rise, topping 150 in Pima County and getting close to 1,000 statewide.

6:30 a.m.: Despite the ongoing spread of coronavirus, many Tucsonans have found creative ways to maintain a sense of community during a time of isolation. Known cases of COVID-19 in Arizona saw a triple-digit increase overnight Friday, reaching 773 confirmed cases Saturday, according the daily tally kept by the state Department of Health Services. As the  weather here warms, many hope higher temperatures will help tamp down the coronavirus. Though viruses are known to be seasonal — studies say COVID-19 seems to have spread faster in areas with cool or cold temperatures — the behavior of coronavirus in warmer climates isn't certain. Some experts say if a warm-weather break happens, the virus can come back with a new punch in the fall.

Here are local and state developments related to the coronavirus outbreak from today's Arizona Daily Star:

• Tucson's warming weather might help slow the spread of the virus, but some experts also expect it will pounce again starting in the fall.

• Tucsonans are finding creative ways to reach out to their neighbors during mandates that require social distancing and encourage isolation.

• "Turns out that a lot of grocery workers always knew their job was important. It's the rest of us who didn't realize it," Star columnist Tim Steller writes in his column.

• Law enforcement agencies across metro Tucson are cutting the number of people taken to jail as part of their effort to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

• A lawsuit seeks refunds for students in all three Arizona universities for fees — things like living in a dorm and parking — that were paid before the schools went mostly online.

• Some Tucson school districts are launching day care for children of first responders.

• Tucson Police Chief Chris Magnus describes the ways his department is keeping officers and the public safe during the virus outbreak.