WASHINGTON — Here’s how area members of Congress voted on major issues last week.

House

New rules for green card allocations: The House on July 10 voted, 365-65, to start allocating “green cards” granting permanent legal status on a first-come, first-served basis to skilled immigrants who are in the United States on H1-B employment visas. This approach would replace per-country caps that disadvantage H1-B holders from populous countries. A yes vote was to send HR 1044 to the Senate.

Yes: Tom O’Halleran, D-1, Ann Kirkpatrick, D-2, Raul Grijalva, D-3, David Schweikert, R-6, Ruben Gallego, D-7, Debbie Lesko, R-8, Greg Stanton, D-9

No: Paul Gosar, R-4, Andy Biggs, R-5

Tracking U.S. military properties overseas: The House on July 11 voted, 219-210, to require the Pentagon to provide Congress with an inventory, including costs and national-security justifications, of U.S. military bases and other properties overseas. The department reportedly owns several hundred permanent bases and contingency facilities abroad, and the first-ever audit of Pentagon operations, released last November, was unable to locate many of them. A yes vote was to add the amendment to the fiscal 2020 military policy bill (HR 2500).

Yes: O’Halleran, Kirkpatrick, Grijalva, Schweikert, Gallego, Stanton

No: Gosar, Biggs, Lesko

Prohibition of presidential contracts: The House on July 11 voted, 243-186, to prohibit presidents, vice presidents and Cabinet members from holding contracts with federal agencies just as members of Congress are barred by federal law from doing. The rationale of the ban is that high federal officials, as insiders, could exert undue influence over the terms of the contract. A yes vote was to add the prohibition to HR 2500.

Yes: O’Halleran, Kirkpatrick, Grijalva, Schweikert, Gallego, Stanton

No: Gosar, Biggs, Lesko

9/11 victims’ compensation: The House on July 12 voted, 402-12, to reauthorize the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund for the next 70 years. The bill would ensure payment of damages to 9/11 first responders and cleanup personnel and their survivors for sacrifices at locations including the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and Shanksville, Pa. A yes vote was to send HR 1327 to the Senate.

Yes: O’Halleran, Kirkpatrick, Grijalva, Gallego, Stanton, Lesko, Schweikert

No: Gosar, Biggs

$733 billion for military in 2020: The House on July 12 approved, 220-197, a $733 billion U.S. military budget for fiscal 2020. The bill would require advance congressional approval of any use of force against Iran; set a 3.1% pay raise for uniformed personnel; address global warming as a national-security threat; establish 12 weeks’ paid family and medical leave for the federal workforce; require steps to counter Russian interference in U.S. elections; and allow military personnel who are victims of sexual assaults to receive emergency contraception at base clinics. A yes vote was to send HR 2500 to conference with the Senate.

Yes: O’Halleran, Kirkpatrick, Grijalva, Gallego, Stanton

No: Gosar, Biggs, Schweikert, Lesko

Developing low-yield nuclear weapons: The House on July 12 defeated, 201-221, a GOP bid to include funds in HR 2500 (above) for developing low-yield, or tactical, nuclear weapons for use on specific battlefields. They are different from long-range, or strategic, nuclear weapons, which use broader targeting at longer distances. Advocates say the U.S. needs these weapons to counter Russia’s low-yield nuclear arsenal. Critics say they heighten the risk of Armageddon because it is folly to think nuclear war can be waged on a limited basis. A yes vote was to adopt the amendment.

Yes: Gosar, Biggs, Schweikert, Lesko

No: O’Halleran, Kirkpatrick, Grijalva, Gallego, Stanton

Budget increase for pay raise, combat accounts: Voting 204-212, the House on July 12 defeated a Republican motion that sought to add nearly $3 billion to HR 2500 for purposes such as expanding combat accounts and increasing the bill’s pay raise for uniformed personnel from the 3.1% level requested by President Trump to 4%. A yes vote was to adopt the motion.

Yes: Gosar, Biggs, Schweikert, Lesko

No: O’Halleran, Kirkpatrick, Grijalva, Gallego, Stanton

Senate

John Pallasch, assistant labor secretary: Voting 54-39, the Senate on July 10 confirmed John P. Pallasch as assistant secretary of labor in charge of the Employment and Training Administration. Pallasch previously directed Kentucky’s employment and training programs. A yes vote was to confirm the nominee.

Yes: Martha McSally, R

No: Kyrsten Sinema, D

Robert King confirmation: Voting 56-37, the Senate on July 11 confirmed Robert L. King as assistant secretary of post-secondary education. A yes vote was to confirm the nominee.

Yes: McSally, Sinema

Voterama in Congress