FILE - In this Wednesday, March 2, 2016, file photo, Target Chairman and CEO Brian Cornell speaks to a group of investors at the company's annual meeting in New York. Target Corp. is raising its minimum hourly wage for its workers to $11 starting in October 2017 and then to $15 by the end of 2020 in a move it says will help it better recruit and retain staff and provide a better shopping experience for its customers. “We see this not only as an investment in our team but an investment in an elevated experience for our guests and the communities we serve,” Cornell told reporters on a call Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

By Tracy Jan, (c) 2018, The Washington Post  

The economy's booming. Some states have raised minimum wages. But even with recent wage growth for the lowest-paid workers, there is still nowhere in the country where someone working a full-time minimum-wage job could afford to rent a modest two-bedroom apartment, according to an annual report released Wednesday by the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

Not even in Arkansas, the state with the cheapest housing in the country. One would need to earn $13.84 an hour - about $29,000 a year - to afford a two-bedroom apartment there. The minimum wage in Arkansas is $8.50 an hour.

Even the $15 living wage championed by Democrats would not make a dent in the vast majority of states.

In Hawaii, the state with the most expensive housing, one would have to make $36.13 - about $75,000 a year - to afford a decent two-bedroom apartment. The minimum wage in Hawaii rose to $10.10 an hour this year.

It gets worse in many metropolitan areas. San Francisco, Marin and San Mateo counties top the list of most expensive jurisdictions, where one would need to make $60.02 an hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment.

"The housing crisis is growing, especially for the lowest-income workers," said Diane Yentel, president of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. "The rents are far out of reach from what the average renter is earning."

Downsizing to a one-bedroom apartment will only help so much.

According to the report, a one-bedroom is affordable for minimum-wage workers in only 22 counties in five states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon and Washington. Those states all set their minimum wages higher than the federal minimum of $7.25.

Nationally, one would have to earn $17.90 an hour to afford a modest one-bedroom apartment or $22.10 an hour for a two-bedroom rental. That's based on the common budgeting standard of spending a maximum of 30 percent of income on housing.

The report estimates that renters nationally make an average of $16.88 an hour. That means even those making above minimum wage struggle to afford rent.