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Photographer Will Seberger, 1981-2014

Photographer Will Seberger, 1981-2014

Stormy skies and a rainbow make for a dramatic background as the Arizona Heat stand for the Star Spangled Banner preceding their game against Texas on June 3, 2006 at Hi Corbett Field.

Tucson freelance photographer Will Seberger died on Aug. 17 in Tucson. He was 33 years old. Will was a University of Arizona graduate who became a ubiquitous presence at major news and sports events in Southern Arizona and Phoenix. His work was featured in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Time, Newsweek, Mother Jones and Sports Illustrated.

Will worked for the Arizona Daily Star in 2006-07, as he was establishing himself as a working freelance photojournalist. (Click the photo above for a gallery of his work for the Daily Star.)

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Throwback Thursday: Devastating floods of 1983

Throwback Thursday: Devastating floods of 1983

The old lighthouse and adjacent building were ravaged by the adacent Rillito River on Oct. 3, 1983. Photo by Joy Wolf / Arizona Daily Star

The October 1983 flood was the largest flood of record in the Tucson area.

Between 6 ½ to 7 ½ inches of rain fell across the area in five days. The devastation stretched to Clifton/Morenci, Willcox, Safford and Nogales. More than a dozen people died.

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Throwback Thursday: Blue Oyster Cult in Tucson

Throwback Thursday: Blue Oyster Cult in Tucson

Lead vocalist Eric Bloom during the Blue Oyster Cult concert at Tucson Community Center on Aug. 7, 1979. Riding the wave of songs like “Don’t Fear the Reaper” and “Godzilla” and a live album that sold 2 million copies, the group rode into Tucson in August 1979 for a concert at what was then called the Tucson Community Center.

B.O.C. and Godzilla destroy Tucson during a 1979 concert at the TCC.

August 14, 2014 12:00 am Photos

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Gallery show features images just before Old Tucson fire

Gallery show features images just before Old Tucson fire

Platinum photograph of Richard Dean Anderson (MacGyver) in the bar at the Old Tucson Sound Stage during the filming of 'Birth of Legends'. Last photograph taken on the set before it burned down one week later. (April, 1995) 8x10 negative, Paramount Pictures). Photo by Gary Auerbach

Tucson photographer Gary Auerbach will have a solo exhibition covering 30 years of work at the Rancho Linda Vista Gallery in Oracle. Opening reception is 1 – 5pm, Sunday, Sept. 7. Exhibit runs Sept. 1 – 30.

Subjects include some of the last photographs taken on the sound stage and sets at Old Tucson before many of the original buildings at the historic movie studio burned in a massive fire in 1995. 

The images showcase a variety of printing methods from 8x10 and 11x14 large format negatives. Auerbach says they include platinum/palladium, Cibachrome, cyanotype, gum bichromate and even stereoscopic platinum among others.

August 12, 2014 9:26 amLoading…

Moonrise over Monsoon

Moonrise over Monsoon

Moonrise from behind gathering monsoon clouds at sunset on Saturday, Aug. 9. 

Moonrise from behind gathering monsoon clouds at sunset on Saturday, Aug. 9. Taken with a Canon SX260 point and shoot camera on automatic while standing on a picnic table in my backyard. Thanks to my five-year-old son for pointing out the scene from his chair at dinner!

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Photos: Resignation of Pres. Richard Nixon

Photos: Resignation of Pres. Richard Nixon

Richard M. Nixon waves a final farewell from a helicopter as he leaves the White House for the last time in the August 9, 1974.

Nixon stopped in Tucson during his political career. He was forced to resign on Aug. 8, 1974 due to the Watergate scandal.

August 08, 2014 10:30 am Photos

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Throwback Thursday: Mount Lemmon Air Force Station

Throwback Thursday: Mount Lemmon Air Force Station

Sitting at 9,150 feet, the Mount Lemmon Air Force Station was said to be the world’s highest radar installation in 1957. It was manned by the 684th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron, whose motto was “Who goes there?” Along with dozens of similar stations, it watched for Soviet aircraft before the advent of satellite surveillance. Nearly 250 officers staffed the 25-acre base, which featured a barracks with a “modern, electrically equipped kitchen.” For pictures of the base in 1957, go to tucson.com/retrotucson

"Who goes there" was the motto of the 684th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron manning the Mt. Lemmon Air Force Station in 1957. The installation, at 9,150-feet, was said to be the world's highest radar installation. Along with dozens of other similar stations, it watched for enemy Soviet aircraft approaching the U.S. before the advent of satellite surveillance.

Nearly 250 officers staffed the 25-acre base, which featured a barracks with a "modern, electrically equipped kitchen," according to a Tucson Citizen story in 1957.

For pictures of the base in 1957, go to tucson.com/retrotucson

August 07, 2014 12:00 am Related Loading…

Throwback Thursday: A new teacher's first day in 1960

Throwback Thursday: A new teacher's first day in 1960

“I tossed and turned all night,” said Virginia Woodard about the night before her first day teaching at TUSD’s Mission View Elementary School in 1960. But she was able to make it through the day, managing the mental fatigue of dozens of little people. More photos at tucson.com/retrotucson

Virginia Woodard's first day of teaching first grade at TUSD's Mission View Elementary School in 1960 was no different than a new teacher in 2014. "I tossed and turned all night thinking about it, and was too nervious to eat any breakfast," she said in an interview published in the Tucson Citizen on Sept. 2, 1960. The report wrote "she almost decided to turn back after getting within a block of the school."

But she made it through the day despite running out of planned activities, getting more students than desks and managing the mental fatigue of dozens of little people.

See photos of Virginia Woodard's first day of teaching in 1960 at tucson.com/retrotucson.

July 31, 2014 12:00 am Related Loading…

Throwback Thursday: Old RR bridge replaced in 1968

Throwback Thursday: Old RR bridge replaced in 1968

The twisted remains of the Southern Pacific Railroad bridge over Cienega Wash after the suports were dynamited southeast of Tucson on March 12, 1968.

An elegant steel span 1903-vintage Southern Pacific Railroad bridge over the Cienega Wash was so badly damaged after a derailed freight crashed into it in 1968 that Sundt construction crews demolished and replaced the bridge. Less elegant, but much safer.

July 23, 2014 9:45 pm Photos

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Photos: 44 years of Benjie Sanders

Photos: 44 years of Benjie Sanders

Benjie Sanders, Arizona Daily Star photographer in 2013.

Arizona Daily Star photographer Benjie Sanders retires this month after 44 years at the newspaper.

July 02, 2014 10:39 am Photos

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Photos: Vietnam War training at Ft. Huachuca

Photos: Vietnam War training at Ft. Huachuca

Simulated Vietnam village for training at Ft. Huachuca on Oct. 5, 1966. 

Tucson Citizen photographers Mark Godfrey and Dan Tortorell documented soldiers training for deployment to Vietnam at Ft. Huachuca in 1966 and 1967. Training included a simulated Vietnamese village.

May 22, 2014 12:15 am Photos

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Photos: Tucson streets through the years

Photos: Tucson streets through the years

Traffic on East Grant Road in Feb., 1981. Arizona Daily Star file

A collection of photos of Tucson streets through the years from the archives of the Arizona Daily Star.

May 01, 2014 12:00 am Photos

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Photos: Old Tucson Studios before the fire

Photos: Old Tucson Studios before the fire

Much of Old Tucson Studios was destroyed in this 1995 fire.

Nearly 40-percent of Old Tucson, including many of the most-famous wood structures, was destroyed by fire on April 24, 1995. The park was rebuilt for tourists, but never regained the magic of its heyday as a Old West filmmaking mecca.

April 24, 2014 12:15 am Photos

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Photos: Linda Ronstadt in Tucson

Photos: Linda Ronstadt in Tucson

Linda Ronstadt arrives at Tucson International Airport on Sept. 16, 1976 for a benefit concert for the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

Some Star/Citizen file photos of Tucson native Linda Ronstadt, one of the most popular female vocalists of all time. She is to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

April 10, 2014 12:05 am Photos

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This Is Tucson Instagram project: Numbers

This Is Tucson Instagram project: Numbers

Via Paul Ingram on Instagram

The assignment for our Instagram project, This Is Tucson in March was "numbers." 

We challenged you to be literal about it, or not. Here is what you came up with using the hashtag #thisistucson_numbers

Click through to the end to see April's assignment.

April 07, 2014 11:30 am Photos

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Photos: Sunday morning – religion in Tucson

Photos: Sunday morning – religion in Tucson

Rev. Lee Norris May starts up the two hour service by helping sing one of the many songs sung by the "Praise Team" and the church goers at the Prince Chapel, an African Methodist Episcopal church on February 12, 2006 in Tucson, Ariz. The African Methodist Episcopal was the first church I went to in this project.

In 2006, Arizona Daily Star staff photographer Dean Knuth set out to show religion in Tucson through a series of single images – one a week. It covers many, though not all, denominations.

March 27, 2014 12:00 am Photos

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Photos: Trinity Poire

Photos: Trinity Poire

Playing a video game to help distract her, Trinity Poire, 4, sits in a car seat during one of multiple daily breathing treatments at her grandmother's house in Tucson in 2010.

Born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, which is essentially half of a heart, Trinity Poire and her family have been on one long roller coaster ride. Arizona Daily Star photographer Greg Bryan spent time with the family in 2010 prior to one of her surgeries at age 4.

March 20, 2014 12:00 am Photos

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The 12 best Instagram photos of Tucson from February

The 12 best Instagram photos of Tucson from February

The Arizona Daily Star is launching a monthly Instagram photo project called #ThisIsTucson.

Your first assignment: Capture the culture of Tucson in February. This is the Old Pueblo's (and our photograph staff's) busiest month of the year with gem show, rodeo and Match Play. Be creative and show us a sense of place.

Tag your photos with #thisistucson_feb. At the end of the month we'll pick our favorites to share.

We asked you to capture the culture of Tucson in Feburary on Instagram last month. We received 150 submissions using the hashtag #thisistucson_feb. Here are our favorites, including three "top picks" chosen by the Star's photo editor.

March 07, 2014 12:30 pm Photos

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Photos: Tucson Rodeo Parade

Photos: Tucson Rodeo Parade

A sticky-fingered Almalissa Capple, 6, who is dressed up as Jesse from Toy Story, takes her time eating cotton candy along the parade route on South Park Avenue as she watched the 89th annual Tucson Rodeo Parade. The photo was taken on Thursday, February 20, 2014, in Tucson, Ariz.

A great day for the Rodeo Parade as Tucson celebrates its cowboy heritage. 

February 20, 2014 10:53 am Photos

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Photos: Tucson Rodeo through the years

Photos: Tucson Rodeo through the years

John Kowskal holds on tight to his horse during the La Fiesta de los Vaqueros Tucson Rodeo in 1973.

Photos of the Tucson Rodeo, La Fiesta de los Vaqueros, from the archives of the Tucson Citizen and Arizona Daily Star.

February 13, 2014 12:01 am Photos

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John Dillinger's Tucson escapades

John Dillinger's Tucson escapades

Booking mug of John Dillinger, ca. 1930. 

The nation was going through an economic crisis of terrible proportions. Banks were failing, robbing people of their savings, and the surviving banks were foreclosing on homes right and left. It's no wonder that a man who hurt the hated bankers was a folk hero during the Great Depression. John Dillinger's string of bank jobs in the Midwest also made him one of the most-wanted men in America. When he was captured near the University of Arizona on Jan. 25, 1934, it put the Old Pueblo on the front page of newspapers across the country. Somehow, 75 years ago on Sunday, Tucson police (average salary: $140 a month) did what so many other agencies could not. They collared the notorious Dillinger and his gang - and they did it without firing a shot.

The gang arrived in Tucson in January 1934, just a few weeks after the end of Prohibition, hoping to escape the Midwest cold (and the heat). The Old Pueblo, home to about 30,000 people, which had three houses of prostitution and a police force that numbered 35.

Russell Clark and Charles Makley, along with Clark's girlfriend, were the first to arrive in town. Using fake names, they checked into the Congress Hotel.

On Jan. 22, 1934, a fire broke out in the hotel's basement and quickly spread to the third floor.

Makley reportedly gave firefighters a $12 tip to retrieve some heavy luggage from the flames (full of guns and cash, as it turned out).

Dillinger and his girl, Billie Frechette, drove into Tucson the next day, accompanied by their Boston terrier. They got a room at the Close-Inn Motel on South Sixth Avenue. Purely by chance, Harry Pierpont, later described as the real leader of the gang, checked into an adjoining room with his gal.

The gang members agreed to meet the next morning near the veterans' hospital south of Downtown. At that meeting, on Jan. 25, a day that would end with all of them in jail, they agreed to stay here for a while, pretend to be tourists and rent separate houses.

Meanwhile, one of the firefighters who helped save Makley and Clark's trunks from the flames saw their picture in True Detective magazine.

Tucson police, acting on this and another tip, tracked them down, along with their girlfriends. Makley was arrested at an appliance store, while Clark was caught at a house they had rented on North Second Avenue. Pierpont was arrested at the South Sixth Avenue motel.

Dillinger, unaware that the others were in jail, was nabbed at sundown as he and his girlfriend strolled into the house on Second Avenue.

In total, police seized three Thompson submachine guns, two Winchester rifles mounted as machine guns, five bulletproof vests and more than $25,000 in jewelry and cash, part of it taken in an East Chicago robbery.

At the Downtown police station, Dillinger insisted that his name was Frank Sullivan.

William R. Mathews, the editor and publisher of the Star, was in the small police office when Sgt. Mark Robbins identified the gangster from a distinctive scar on his left wrist and another under his moustache.

"This man is John Dillinger," the cop said with utter confidence.

Mathews opened the door, where one of his reporters, Dave Brinegar, was waiting. In a whisper, he said: "They've got John Dillinger."

Under banner headlines, the Star's story about the arrests began with this sentence:

"In a series of breath-taking captures, each of which might have at any moment culminated in a stream of lead and death, which included lightning displays of gangsters armament and as sudden squashing of murderous hopes by officers, Dillinger himself, Charles Makley, 50, Russell Clark, 39, and Harry Pierpont, 31, the 'trigger-man' of the gang, were apprehended, were stripped of a small arsenal apiece, subdued, identified and locked up in the county jail for safekeeping."

The jail at police headquarters wasn't big enough for the men and their molls, so they had been moved under heavy guard to the jail at the Pima County Courthouse, the building with the tiled dome that still has courtrooms on the second floor.

Pima County Sheriff John Belton decided one night to throw an open house at the jail and let curious Tucsonans "come in and see Dillinger and the boys." His undersheriff didn't think that was such a hot idea, given the gang's history of escape.

But the doors were flung open anyway and 415 people paraded through to gawk at the gangsters. About 1,000 more Tucsonans got a good look the next morning.

The nation's media rushed to Arizona as authorities in three other states licked their lips and started fighting over extradition rights.

In the end, Dillinger was flown to his native Indiana. The others were put on a train bound for Ohio.

Headline in the Star: "Tucson sighs as gangsters leave Arizona."

Dillinger was locked up in the "escape-proof" Lake County jail in Crown Point, Ind. He escaped on March 3, using a fake gun carved out of wood. Less than five months later, he was shot to death by FBI agents as he left a movie theater in Chicago.

According to most accounts, Public Enemy No. 1 was betrayed by Anna Sage, a Romanian prostitute who became famous as "the woman in red."

Fred Finney, an Arizona Daily Star reporter, summed up the gang's impact on Tucson: "The Dillinger gang brought a lifetime of excitement and tension to the Old Pueblo," he wrote. "Tucson was on the map of the country's front pages, but Tucson also had the tiger by the tail, and the tiger was a sinister animal."

Sources: Arizona Daily Star archives, "John Dillinger: The Life and Death of America's First Celebrity Criminal" by Dary Matera (Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2005) and "The Dillinger Days" by John Toland (Da Capo Press, 1995).

January 23, 2014 12:01 am Related Loading…
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Photos: Waylon and Willie in Tucson

Photos: Waylon and Willie in Tucson

Willie Nelson performs with his band at the Tucson Community Center on September 6, 1976. 

Country music superstars Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson at their peak together in September, 1976 at the Tucson Community Center.

January 16, 2014 12:01 am Photos

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Photos: SWAT situation in S. Tucson

Photos: SWAT situation in S. Tucson

Tucson Police and S.W.A.T. personnel lead a K-9 unit through yards as they lock down and search a neighborhood for possible home invasion suspects in the area of Seventh Avenue and 30th Street on Friday, Jan. 10, 2014, in South Tucson, Ariz. 

Tucson Police patrol and SWAT officers responded to the area of 30th Street and 7th Avenue to help a home that may have suspects from an armed home invasion on Friday.

January 10, 2014 2:31 pm Photos

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Photos: No. 1 Arizona vs. UCLA

Photos: No. 1 Arizona vs. UCLA

The Wildcat bench is on their feet after Arizona Wildcats guard Nick Johnson (13) scores another basket in the second half during a game at Pauley Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. Arizona won 79-75 Photo taken Thursday January 09, 2014 Photo by: Mamta Popat / Arizona Daily Star

Catch some of the better moments of the Arizona Wildcats' game against UCLA in our gallery.

January 09, 2014 9:00 pm Photos

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Photos: Downtown Tucson then and now

Photos: Downtown Tucson then and now

Citizen Photo S.H. Kress Co. 44 N. Stone temporary location while construction of new Kress store at 97 E. Congress. Formerly Montgomery Ward Store. No information on Langers Florists picture taken 1955.

Photos of downtown from the Tucson Citizen from the 1960s are compared with photos taken recently by Arizona Daily Star photographer A.E. Araiza.

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About this blog

Thanks for visiting the Arizona Daily Star's photography blog. Our dedicated staff of five staff photographers have deep roots in Tucson and range in experience from two years to more than 30 years in photojournalism.

Email photo editor Rick Wiley at rwiley@tucson.com

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