Tucson easily broke the 31-year-old record high for the date Tuesday when the thermometer topped off at 112 degrees.

That broke the old record of 109, set in 1987. On Monday, Tucson's high tied for the record.

At 2:42 p.m., the National Weather Service reported Tucson hit 110 degrees. That's the highest temperature ever recorded on this date, July 24. We added a few more degrees to the record for good measure before the afternoon was over, hitting 112.

On Monday, the high was 109 degrees, which tied the record for the date set in 1987, the National Weather Service said.

The weather service has issued a 3-day excessive heat warning for the Tucson area during the first half of this week. Although we've already broken the record, today's expected high could be kicked up a couple more notches to reach 112 degrees.

Tucson had already hit 100 degrees by 9:06 a.m. — seven degrees higher than yesterday's 9 a.m. temperature.

An excessive heat warning is put in place when temperatures are expected to reach 105 degrees or more for at least two hours at a time. The heat warning should be lifted at 8 p.m. Wednesday. 

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Meanwhile, a high temperature of 124 degrees is forecast for California's Death Valley and the temperature could hit 126 degrees Thursday, the weather service said.

The temperature is the highest forecast amid a heat wave that stretched across the U.S. Southwest today.

The temperatures are so high that southeast Arizona could actually break more records. Tucson has only hit temperatures above 110 degrees for more than two consecutive July days four times since 1895. 

It's always important to remember to stay hydrated and protected from the blazing sun — and don't forget about your four-legged friends. 

The weather service recommends rescheduling any outdoor activities to mornings or evenings, though temperatures will still be high. And if you want to walk your pups, keep them in shaded areas to avoid burning their paws on the hot pavement.

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But hey, it might be hot here, but at least we aren't in Phoenix. Their temperatures hit 116, tying the record high for the date. 

And have no fear — the excessive heat shouldn't last for too long. Some temperatures are expected to drop below 100 later this week, with a greater chance of monsoons making a comeback.

Contact reporter Gloria Knott at gknott@tucson.com or 573-4235. On Twitter: @gloriaeknott